Radio-Lists Home Now on R4 Contact

RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 13 JUNE 2009

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00kwbkd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00kvp9p)
The Locust and the Bird

Episode 5

Lebanese novelist Hanan al-Shaykh's memoir of the life of her mother. Kamila is haunted by her decision to abandon her young daughters, and she seeks a reconciliation with Hanan.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00kwbkg)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00kwbkj)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00kwbkl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00kwbkn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00kwbkq)
Daily prayer and reflection with Gopinder Kaur.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b00kwbks)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00kwbkv)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00kwcnt)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b00kwcnw)
Series 12

Dorset - Isle of Purbeck

Clare Balding explores walks that are good for the mind, body and soul.

Clare meets Garth Gunn and his son Craig on the Isle of Purbeck in Dorset, as they embark on the training route that got Garth back on his feet as he recovered from ME.

Garth had been a keen long distance walker since the late 1960s, trekking across the Isle of Wight east to west in a day. In the early 1990s, however, he suffered a series of traumas and was diagnosed with the energy-depleting condition ME, leaving him unable to even sweep the leaves up in his garden.

Walking played a huge role in his recovery. His son Craig, who is a postman, would finish work at lunchtime and walk Garth down to Poole harbour, a little bit further each day to try and build up his confidence. Garth would look across at the Purbeck Hills and think that he would never feel them under his feet again, but with a little help he did. He now regularly walks what he calls his 'training circuit', even conquering the 210 hillside steps of Jacob's Ladder to enjoy the stunning views across Dorset's Jurassic coast.

Clare joins father, son and friends as they all complete the seven-mile circuit.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00kwcny)
Farming Today This Week

There are calls for consumers and retailers to start paying more for milk to save the UK's dairy industry. Farming news has been dominated by the continuing fallout from the collapse of Dairy Farmers of Britain. It went into administration owing £140 million, much of it to members. There have also been warnings that we are 'milking cows to starvation'.

Charlotte Smith visits a Gloucestershire farm which is selling up its dairy operation after 60 years in business to ask if consumers and retailers are paying enough for the price of milk.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00kwcp0)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00kwcp2)
Presented by James Naughtie and Edward Stourton.

Jon Leyne reports on complaints of a number of voting irregularities in the Iranian presidential elections.

Political correspondent Tim Iredale investigates claims that there is a group of Labour MPs who will not be reconciled to the prime minister's leadership.

Are aid agencies still finding it difficult to operate in Zimbabwe? Jasmine Whitbread, of Save the Children UK, discusses what more can be done to help their work.

Yesterday in Parliament with Mark D'Arcy.

Richard Hurley, of the UK fraud prevention service Cifas, discusses why cases of 'takeover fraud' in the UK have increased by 75 per cent in the last year.

Michael Clarke, of the Royal United Services Institute, and Mohammed Ayub, a spokesman for Muslim youth magazine The Revival, discuss if the UK faces a new generation of more sophisticated terrorists.

Psychologist Alexandra Horowitz discusses if the sheepish look a dog pulls when it's in the dog house really is a look of guilt.

Thought for the day with Reverend Joel Edwards, international director of Micah Challenge.

Correspondent Mike Thomson presents an undercover report from Zimbabwe in which he looks at the collapse of the country's health system. The BBC is not allowed to operate legally in Zimbabwe so many of the names of people Mike interviewed have been changed and some locations omitted in order to protect those he spoke to.

Professor Ali Ansar and former US national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski discuss the election results in Iran.

WH Smith has done a deal with BAA to give it an exclusive presence as a bookseller. Melissa Shales, of the British Guild of Travel Writers, discusses if this deal if fair.

The first ever performance by a Saudi female comic in Saudi Arabia has taken place. Reporter Zubeida Malik speaks to Noufie, the groundbreaking comic.

Sunand Prasad, of the Royal Institute of British Architects, and former Housing and Planning Minister Nick Raynsford discuss plans for Chelsea Barracks.

What is life really like in Zimbabwe? Foreign Office Minister for Africa Mark Malloch-Brown discusses how problems with life expectancy, the health service and the education system can be addressed.

Middle East Editor Jeremy Bowen considers if things are really beginning to change in the region.

Why is it that centre right parties will dominate the new European Parliament? Labour MP Denis MacShane and Neal Lawson, of Compass, discuss the future of the left.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00kwf9t)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them. Fi Glover is joined by journalist and author Sathnam Sanghera. With poetry from Lemn Sissay.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00kwf9w)
John McCarthy hears from beer writer Pete Brown about how India Pale Ale was developed for export to the subcontinent, what it tells us about the British Empire and how he retraced its journey from Burton-on-Trent to Delhi, via Brazil.

Journalist and Delhi resident Sam Miller gives an insider's view of the city, what it's like to explore it on foot and the jostling of the historic and the modern, while songwriter Richard Stilgoe talks about the contrast between rich and poor and the efforts being made to improve sanitation.


SAT 10:30 Punt PI (b00kwf9y)
Series 2

Episode 2

Steve Punt turns private investigator, examining little mysteries that perplex, amuse and beguile.

Steve goes on the trail of TV detector vans, investigating rumours that the vehicles are little more than a myth. Some people are utterly convinced that the vans are empty and that it is simply not possible to detect a television set.

Faced with a wall of official silence, Steve travels hundreds of miles to track down one of the vehicles for himself. He searches out those who were once involved in the TV licensing business and wades through the post office archives to get the lowdown on the history of this very British phenomenon.

And he turns to the scientific boffins to establish once and for all whether the technology really does exist, mounting a controlled experiment to find out if it is possible to see into the living rooms of TV licence evaders.

But just when Steve thinks that the case is closed, a witness comes forward who throws the entire investigation into confusion.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00kwfb0)
What makes some coups against political leaders succeed and others fail? Lord Fowler Lord Donoughue and Lord McNally recall their experiences of past attempts to oust political leaders, some of which succeeded.

For the moment Gordon Brown is staying put but the Labour party is still well behind in the polls. There is now much debate about which direction the party should take to regain popularity.
Matthew Taylor of the Royal Society for the Arts, a former Downing St adviser to Tony Blair discusses Labour’s future with Neal Lawson of the left wing group Compass.

On Wednesday Gordon Brown outlined plans for constitutional change and the strengthening of democracy. How radical are the plans and is he serious about them? Sir George Young chair of the Standards and Privileges committee and Graham Allen a long time advocate of constitutional change discuss the Prime Minister’s blueprint.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00kwfb2)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00kwfb4)
What sort of deal will West Bromwich customers get now the building society has to pay shareholders? Paul Lewis talks to to chief executive Robert Sharpe.

What you can you do if a debt collection agency wrongly identifies you as someone who owes their client money? And should you fix your mortgage now, before lenders raise their interest rates?


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00kvt89)
Series 68

Episode 7

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. Panellists include Jeremy Hardy, Andy Hamilton and Sue Perkins.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00kwfb6)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00kwfb8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00kvt8c)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate in Knutsford, Cheshire. Panellists include Labour MP Frank Field.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00kwfbb)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00kwfbd)
Hattie Naylor - J'Accuse

By Hattie Naylor. Dramatisation inspired by a newspaper article written by Emile Zola in response to the Dreyfus Affair of the 1890s, when a Jewish army officer was persecuted and wrongly imprisoned by the French military and judicial establishment. Louis Gregori gives a right-wing and nationalistic perspective on the events that led him to believe that the murder of the guiltless Dreyfus was the correct and only action.

Louis ...... Mark Heap
Dominique ...... Kathryn Hunt
Arnaud ...... Graeme Hawley
Zola ...... Conrad Nelson
Eugene/Dreyfus ...... Paul Mundell
Gustav ...... Jonathan Keeble

Directed by Pauline Harris.


SAT 15:30 Performing to the Red Light (b00kt8r5)
Episode 2

Terence Curran goes behind the scenes to experience the recording process as different classical performers prepare for the studio. Among them is pianist Kathryn Stott. There are also interviews with notable performers including Emma Johnson and Stephen Hough, producers and record company executives who discuss the little-known psychological aspects behind making a classical recording.

Terence explores how more seasoned performers approach recording and also looks at how decisions are reached in chamber groups. Which member of a quartet decides the best 'take', and what happens if no one can agree?


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00kwfbg)
Weekend Woman's Hour

With Jane Garvey. Including: Caroline Flint in her first radio interview since resigning from the government; Maria Friedman on starring in The King And I; sun exposure and vitamin D; the new Children's Laureate Anthony Browne; heroines for today; allowing fat back into cooking; and tall women and shorter men - does height matter?


SAT 17:00 PM (b00kwfbj)
Saturday PM

Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Ritula Shah, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b00kvr9j)
Evan Davis tests his three guests on the tricky business of succession: is there an ideal time to choose who is going to take over from you, or is it better to hang on until you're pushed? Following recent events in Downing Street, Evan finds out whether businesses can manage handovers any better than politicians.

He also asks the chief executive of Pizza Hut UK whether size matters. Can big ever be too big? In this recession, should companies become leaner and meaner to survive the bad times?

Evan's guests are Jens Hofma, chief executive of Pizza Hut UK, Chris Hyman, chief executive of Serco and Harriet Green, chief executive of Premier Farnel.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00kwfbl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00kwfbn)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00kwfbq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00kwfbs)
Clive Anderson is joined by Ray Davies, David McCallum and Carol Thatcher.

Natalie Haynes talks about music festivals with DJ and festival organiser Rob Da Bank

With comedy from Terry Alderton and music from The Mummers and Smoke Fairies.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b00kwfbv)
Series 6

The Underdog

Offbeat Poet Tim Key attempts to tackle the burning issues of the day, but gets distracted by England's World Cup qualifier with Andorra. With Tom Basden.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00kwfbx)
BBC2's Psychoville, Helen Mirren in Racine's Phedre, and D-Day: The Battle for Normandy by Anthony Beevor

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by writers Paul Morley and Miranda Sawyer and poet Paul Farley to discuss the cultural highlights of the week.

Eric Cantona and Ken Loach may not seem like the most likely bedfellows, but in Loach's new film, Looking for Eric, 'Le Roi' appears as a proverb-spouting life-coach to a depressed Mancunian postman. Inner city violence makes an appearance, but so do some remarkable goals and a surprising piece of trumpet playing.

At the National Theatre in Racine's Phedre, Helen Mirren is the queen whose lust for her stepson Hippolytus sets in train a succession of disastrous events for the royal household. Nicholas Hytner directs and the translation is by Ted Hughes.

With book sales in excess of four million, Antony Beevor is indisputably a popular historian. In D-Day: The Battle for Normandy he brings the same exhaustive research and eye for telling detail, that distinguished his previous works, to bear on the events of 1944 which culminated in the liberation of Paris.

The Futurist movement began in 1909 with a highly provocative manifesto written by the Italian poet Marinetti which included the phrase 'We want no part of it, the past'. This suggests that they may not have had much truck with retrospective exhibitions, but this hasn't stopped Tate Modern from staging Futurism - an exhibition which shows how the shockwaves of that manifesto reverberated around pre-war Europe.

Steve Pemberton and Reece Shearsmith are one half of the League of Gentlemen team and their latest offering, Psychoville on BBC2, demonstrates a certain kinship with Royston Vasey. Meet Mr Jelly, the highly unsuitable children's entertainer, David Sowerbutts with his exhaustive knowledge of serial killers and Mr Lomax's room of unusual commodities.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00krhhl)
The First A and R Man

Paul Gambaccini delves into EMI's Hayes archive to uncover the remarkable story of Fred Gaisberg, the music collector, technician and entrepreneur who brought recording to Britain over 100 years ago.

Fred became the first man to record Caruso and the first to record the court music of the Chinese and Japanese Emperors. In a series of adventures in the early years of the 1900s, transporting his bulky apparatus - including an acid bath - across continents, he amassed hundreds of discs of indigenous music. Nearer home, he recorded the last ever castrato and made precious recordings of the great music hall and operatic stars.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00krtw3)
Wilkie Collins - Armadale

Episode 1

Dramatisation by Robin Brooks of the 1866 mystery novel by Wilkie Collins. The machinations of the flame-haired temptress Lydia Gwilt are derailed by the workings of fate and her own lusts and longings.

By unexpectedly inheriting a substantial estate in Norfolk, callow Allan Armadale comes to the attention of the beautiful and dangerous fortune hunter Lydia Gwilt. She plans to seduce and marry him, but there are obstacles in her way in the shape of Allan's pretty young neighbour and his mysterious friend Midwinter.

Lydia ...... Lucy Robinson
Allan Armadale ...... Alex Robertson
Midwinter ...... Ray Fearon
Neelie ...... Perdita Avery
Maria ...... Carol Macready
Susan ...... Rebecca Saire
Major ...... Sean Baker
Bashwood ...... Richard Durden
Pedgift Jnr ...... Grant Gillespie

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00kwfc1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (b00kt7sh)
Michael Sandel: A New Citizenship: 2009

Markets and Morals

Michael Sandel, Harvard Professor of Government, delivers four lectures about the prospects of a new politics of the common good. The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley.

Sandel considers the expansion of markets and how we determine their moral limits. Should immigrants, for example, pay for citizenship? Should we pay schoolchildren for good test results, or even to read a book? He calls for a more robust public debate about such questions, as part of a 'new citizenship'.


SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b00kslks)
Nigel Rees chairs the popular quiz involving the exchange of quotations and anecdotes. With guests Dame Beryl Bainbridge, Ekow Eshun, Anthony Howard and Francesca Simon.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b00kryft)
Roger McGough presents a programme dedicated to the poetry of the Old Testament Book of Psalms, in old translations and new, read by Kenneth Cranham and Henry Goodman.



SUNDAY 14 JUNE 2009

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00kwfs9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b007s363)
Murder She Thought - Series 1

Three is a Lucky Number

Compelling crime stories by women writers.

Margery Allingham's electrifying 'bride in the bath' story is as highly charged today as when first published in the 1930s.

Read by Martin Jarvis.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00kwfsc)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00kwfsf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00kwfsh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00kwfsk)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00kwfsm)
The sound of bells from Christ Church, Radyr near Cardiff.


SUN 05:45 I Was Put on Trial by Al Qaeda (b009y492)
Episode 1

Allan Little describes his own terrifying interaction in November 1993 with a group of mujahideen volunteers who were fighting on behalf of Bosnian Muslims during the war there. He explores the role that Bosnia played as a recruiting arena for Islamist extremists and their effect on the local population.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00kwfsp)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00kwfsr)
Charm

Mark Tully investigates the danger and usefulness of charm, with guest Tony Benn.

One such example was when film director Michael Korda was cornered by furious investors, wanting to know what had happened to their money. He would stare at their feet, riveted. 'What simply marvellous shoes,' he would remark - thus defusing the confrontation, and escaping unscathed.

With music from Handel, Gluck and Gerard Souzay and readings from Milton, Plutarch and The Last King of Scotland.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b00kwfst)
Ancient Orchards

Lionel Kelleway is guided by two National Trust experts around a 100-year-old orchard in search of creatures that can only be found among the old fruit trees. Species include beetles that look like fleas and moth caterpillars that can bore holes in a tree as wide as your finger. And look out for the queen hornet and beasts that live only in mistletoe on old apple trees.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00kwfsw)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00kwfsy)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00kwft0)
Roger Bolton discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00kwft2)
Survivors Fund (SURF)

Lindsey Hilsum appeals on behalf of the Survivors Fund (SURF).

Survivors Fund (SURF) strives to ensure that the voices of survivors of the genocide in Rwanda are heard and acted on, and that the genocide and its victims are never forgotten.

Donations to Survivors Fund (SURF), should be sent to FREEPOST BBC Radio 4 Appeal, please mark the back of your envelope Survivors Fund. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144 If you are a UK tax payer, please provide Survivors Fund with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation worth another 25 per cent. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity No: 1065705.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00kwft4)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00kwft6)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00kwft8)
Annelies

Marking the 80th anniversary of Anne Frank's birth, a meditation from Blackburn Cathedral featuring the music of James Whitbourn's oratorio which sets words from Anne's diary.

With Canon Chris Chivers and the Renaissance Singers.

Music director: Richard Tanner.


SUN 08:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b00kvt8f)
Series 1

Monstrous Flowers

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Deep in the steamy forests of Sumatra, the largest flowers in the world bloom, albeit for under a week. But why are they so big?


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00kwftb)
With the hustings for the new Speaker of the House of Commons imminent, what sort of person does it take to keep MPs in check?

John Simpson reports from Tehran on the results of Iran's presidential elections.

Following Madonna's successful court battle to adopt a Malawian child, a woman who was herself adopted from another country offers her thoughts on the story.

Kevin Connelly hunts for extraterrestrials at the Roswell air base in the US.

Elaine C Smith, John Micklethwait and Fiona Neill review the papers.

Richard Jenkinson from London was the winner of the quiz, with the correct answer being the rise in the popularity of camping holidays.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00kwftd)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00kwftg)
Lord Healey

Kirsty Young's castaway is the Labour peer and former Chancellor of the Exchequer, Denis Healey. As a politician, he was known for his sharp intellect and biting oratory and now, as he approaches his 92nd birthday, those skills are still very much in evidence. He talks of his regret that his lack of ambition meant that he did not push himself further in politics but, he says, it is better for people to wonder why he wasn't Prime Minister than to wonder why he was.

[Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

Favourite track: The Cavatina from String Quartet No.13 in B flat Major by Ludwig van Beethoven
Book: The Faber book of English verse
by John Hayward
Luxury: Very big box of chocolates including nougat.


SUN 12:00 The Museum of Curiosity (b00ksvt5)
Series 2

Episode 6

John Lloyd and Sean Lock invite guests Tim Minchin, Philip Pullman and Clive James to add to the collection. From June 2009.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00kwftj)
Diet and Prostate Cancer

Sheila Dillon discusses the latest research linking diet and prostate cancer.

A man dies every hour from prostate cancer in the UK, but it is a slow growing cancer. This programme explores the findings that show a link between diet and this form of cancer.

Food campaigner Geoff Tansey, diagnosed with prostate cancer a year ago, has kept an audio diary relating his experience of the disease, the removal of his prostate, and his quest to discover the effects of diet.

Nutritional scientist Professor Margaret Rayman joins Sheila Dillon to discuss her findings, which show that the health of the prostate can be helped by eating a diet rich in certain foods and avoiding the harmful effects of others

Professor Rayman is joined in the studio by Professor Colin Cooper, of the Department of Molecular Biology at the Institute of Cancer Research.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00kwftl)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00kwfv3)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.

In the wake of protests over the re-election of President Mahmoud Ahmadnejad, how should the West deal with Iran? Ambassador William Luers, Reza Pahlavi and the son of the late Shah of Iran give their views.

As the Labour Party seeks to recover from its poor local and European election results, we hear from leading party members who are hoping to shape policies for the future: Andy Love MP, NEC member Ann Black, Jon Cruddas MP and Paul Kenny, General Secretary of the GMB Union.

Two councillors elected in the recent county council elections - Victor Agarwal of Surrey and Julie Young of Essex - discuss how they will try to operate now that they are the only Labour representatives on their authorities.


SUN 13:30 Hallelujah (b00jhpp8)
Composer Jocelyn Pook celebrates the music and meaning of the word Hallelujah through history and creates a new composition inspired by the word. This exuberant exclamation of joy and gratitude has survived the passage of centuries, transcending the barriers of language, religion and culture, and has inspired composers and songwriters from the Psalms through Monteverdi, Handel, Vivaldi, Nick Cave and Leonard Cohen.

Featuring contributions from composer Julian Anderson and singer-songwriter kd lang.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00kvt83)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Bob Flowerdew, Anne Swithinbank and Chris Beardshaw are guests of Sparsholt College in Hampshire.

Featuring the first in a series of visits to the garden of Roy Lancaster to hear the stories behind some of his favourite plants.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 A Guide to Water Birds (b00kwh7d)
Warblers

Brett Westwood presents a series of entertaining and practical guides to identifying many of the birds found on or near freshwater, aided by sound recordist Chris Watson.

Brett is joined by keen bird watcher Stephen Moss on the Somerset Levels to look and listen out for some of our reed bed songsters, including the reed warbler, sedge warbler and the loudest of them all, Cetti's warbler.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00kwh7g)
Wilkie Collins - Armadale

Episode 2

Dramatisation by Robin Brooks of the 1866 mystery novel by Wilkie Collins. The machinations of the flame-haired temptress Lydia Gwilt are derailed by the workings of fate and her own lusts and longings.

Lydia Gwilt's plan to marry Allan Armadale and secure his fortune has run into difficulties and her own passions, as well as those around her, are starting to interfere with her schemes. She is increasingly attracted to Allan's companion Midwinter, and he to her.

Lydia ...... Lucy Robinson
Allan ...... Alex Robertson
Midwinter ...... Ray Fearon
Neelie ...... Perdita Avery
Pedgift Snr ...... GeoffreyWhitehead
Bashwood ...... Richard Durden
Mrs Benson ...... Rebeccea Saire
John ...... Robin Brooks

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00kwh7j)
George Pelecanos, the Palestinian Festival of Literature, and Liz Jenson

Mariella Frostrup speaks to the American crime writer George Pelecanos about his new novel, The Way Home, an exploration of shifting loyalties between a father and his drop-out son against the backdrop of the worlds of crime and punishment in his native Washington. He also talks about how his role as screenwriter on the hit American television drama The Wire has influenced his fiction.

Mariella looks back at the highs and lows of the Palestinian Festival of Literature with Egyptian novelist and chair of Palfest, Adhaf Soueif. The Festival brought literary figures including Michael Palin and Deborah Moggach to the West Bank.

Mariella also speaks to author Liz Jenson about her new novel, The Rapture, set in the near future, in which a therapist attempts to treat a young female psychiatric patient who appears to be predicting the cataclysmic global disasters which the world is experiencing.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00kwh7l)
Carol Ann Duffy and others pay tribute to the poet UA Fanthorpe, who died recently. Describing herself as a 'middle-aged dropout', Fanthorpe only began writing at 50.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b00ktc9y)
Causes of the Swine Flu Virus

Julian O'Halloran investigates claims that industrial-scale pig farms in America played a key role in exposing us to the swine flu virus.

Local people near the first known case in Mexico questioned the role of an American-owned industrial scale pig farm not far away. Any link was strenuously denied, however, and the US pork industry soon helped persuade medical authorities to drop the term 'swine flu'.

But for years American virologists have been studying the links between new and potentially risky flu viruses and farm animals. Whatever the role of pig farms in Mexico, experts say that parts of the current flu virus can be traced back to outbreaks of swine flu, then affecting only pigs, in several American states in 1998.

As Julian reports from the USA, the move to highly intensive pig farming methods by some companies has long been denounced by green groups and the animal welfare lobby, who allege massive damage to the environment, intolerable smells, and health risks to farm workers and their families. Now they are asking if factory farming conditions could have increased the dangers of a global flu pandemic.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b00kwfbv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00kwh7n)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00kwh7q)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00kwh7s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00kwh7v)
Clive Coleman introduces his selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00kwh7x)
Jazzer arrives to check the pigs, and asks about Neil's business worries. Christopher mentions a non-paying customer, Paul Clifford. Jazzer's heard that he might be going under. Christopher's bemused when Susan keeps quizzing him about her missing fruit bowl, and tells her that Jazzer's news is more important.

Lynda can see Christopher on the Ambridge plinth as a youthful icon - the village farrier. Christopher's not interested. Jazzer reckons he ought to be able to stand on the plinth selling. It's what would have happened in the Middle Ages.

Matt wants a bit of peace but Lilian wants some straight answers. Getting nowhere, Lilian tries a change of tack by suggesting they go to a nice country pub. Matt would rather drive to Skegness to see an old pal about a business deal. Lilian reminds him they've got to stay solid and Matt eventually agrees to lunch - as long as there's no more interrogation.

To Lilian's annoyance, Matt becomes engrossed in the pub's television. At least when he gets his car back he can slink off and do what he has to. Matt doesn't think she understands but she does. She's just not sure that she wants to any more.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


SUN 19:15 Americana (b00kwh7z)
Hosted by Matt Frei from the BBC studio in Washington, DC.

Featuring the contrasting tales of two states: why the California Dream has turned into a nightmare and why Iowa is at the cutting edge of social debate.

Plus the enduring appeal of Nancy Drew, the fictional girl detective who has inspired senators, First Ladies and at least one would-be Supreme Court Justice.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b0082b40)
The Closed Door

The Handbag

Series of stories by Dorothy Whipple. A councillor's neglected wife lays a trap for her vainglorious husband. Read by Patience Tomlinson.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00kwh81)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00kvt85)
Featuring the life of the controversial trade union leader Eric Hammond, who did a secret deal to help Rupert Murdoch move his newspapers to Wapping.

One of the founders of Google, Sergey Brin, pays tribute to the computer scientist Professor Rajeev Motwani, who helped them develop their search engine.

Matthew Bannister also discusses the Scottish poet Maurice Lindsay, a passionate advocate for Scottish literature, art and architecture, the 'ton up vicar' of the 1960s, Father Bill Shergold, who encouraged hundreds of bikers to join his church youth club in the East End of London, and the record producer Ron Richards, who worked with the Hollies, Gerry and the Pacemakers as well as on some of the Beatles' first recording sessions.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00kwfb4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00kwft2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b00l0xxl)
Martin Wolf: Economy on the Edge

In 2008 one of the world's most respected economic observers, Martin Wolf, the chief economic commentator of the Financial Times, forecast that the global downturn could be even worse than most experts realised. A year on, he returns to examine the current state of the global financial markets and talks to a range of financial experts to analyse what the future may hold.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00kwh96)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00kwh98)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including Learning to Love the Microphone.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b00kvt87)
Francine Stock talks to Ken Loach about working with Eric Cantona on his new film, Looking for Eric.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00kwfsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 15 JUNE 2009

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00kwhst)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00ktdbb)
Human Zoos - Girl Racers

Laurie Taylor discusses 'human zoos', the practice of putting colonial subjects on display to western audiences. He is joined by Charles Forsdick, co-editor of Human Zoos: Science and Spectacle in the Age of Colonial Empires, and the cultural commentator Kate Berridge.

There were 20-25,000 on display, in special villages, in circuses and in bars. Millions of spectators from New York to London, Tokyo to Warsaw visited at their feeding times, watched as they gave birth and came to ogle at their extraordinary physicality as they stood nude behind bars. These were the people of Africa, Aboriginals from Australia, Fijians, Zulus and even Laplanders, brought to the cradle of imperialism to tell a story of savagery and civilisation.

Also Girl Racers, an ethnographic study of car modifiers in Aberdeen, and how the women involved in the youth cult intergrate themselves in a traditionally male pass time. Karen Lumsden from Aberdeen University tells Laurie about her research.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00kwfsm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00kwhts)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00kwhwv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00kwhvy)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00kwhx5)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00kwhzh)
Daily prayer and reflection with Gopinder Kaur.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00kwj0z)
Following the collapse of a major dairy co-operative, rock-bottom prices could force hundreds of farmers out of business.

Plus, with the United Nations pushing for a larger global fish farming industry, Charlotte Smith finds out why Europe is lagging behind the rest of the world.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00kwqyp)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00kwj1c)
Presented by James Naughtie and Sarah Montague.

Tim Franks reports from Jerusalem on Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu's landmark speech.

Jon Leyne reports from Tehran on how thousands of protestors are expected on the streets of Iran.

Professors Alan White and Professor Mike Richards discuss whether men face a greater risk of cancer than women.

Michael Roberts, Chief Executive of the Association of Train Operators, discusses if lines axed in the 1960s could be reopened.

George and Deborah Kinsella discuss what should be done to halt the knife crime that they say is 'embedded in the very heart of Great Britain'.

Thought for the day with Rev Dr Colin Morris, a Methodist Minister.

Nicholas Witchell reports from Baghdad on one of the last US foot patrols with the fifth cavalry.

The swine flu virus has claimed its first victim in the UK, after a female patient died in a Scottish hospital. James Cook reports on the scale of the problem in Scotland and Professor John Oxford, virologist at Queen Mary University, London, debates the implications of the death.

Middle East correspondent Jeremy Bowen, Aaron David Miller, who served six US secretaries of state as an advisor on Arab-Israeli negotiations, and Ron Prosor, Israeli Ambassador in London, discuss Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's endorsement of a two-state solution.

New owner of Erotic Review Kate Copstick and novelist Kathy Lette discuss whether men are better at writing about sex than women.

Sir Kenneth Calman discusses what should be done to improve devolution in Scotland.

Hugh Pym reports on how the recession has affected the government's Private Finance Initiative (PFI) plans.

Home affairs correspondent Danny Shaw reports on how probation staff monitor violent and high-risk offenders.

Two veterans of the Siege of Tobruk, one German and one British, remember the pivotal battle in World War II.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00kwr5d)
Andrew Marr sets the cultural agenda for the week.

His guests include the philosopher AC Grayling on why he thinks the 'war on terror' has led to a war on our civil rights, and the documentary maker Adam Wishart on how the NHS body NICE makes its decisions on expensive new drugs.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00kwj2g)
Venus of Empire - The Life of Pauline Bonaparte

Episode 1

Diana Quick reads from Flora Fraser's biography of Pauline Bonaparte, Napoleon's favourite sister.

As Napoleon's position grew ever stronger, he was determined to find Pauline the husband of his choosing and even to name her first and only child.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00kwkjh)
Lynn Barber on An Education; Bingo wings

Columnist Lynn Barber on her memoir An Education. Plus, are there key differences between male and female sexual offending? And what can be done to tone up the under-arm dangle?


MON 11:00 The Job Clinic (b00l0vc8)
Episode 1

Liz Barclay meets some job seekers whose search for employment is aided by three mentors - business guru Charles Handy, founder of Coffee Republic Sahar Hashemi and management coach Jenny Rogers.

Whether a college graduate or a middle-aged businessman, they reveal how unemployment affects their daily lives and family relationships.

Jenny Rogers has been an executive coach for 18 years. She trains other coaches as well as continuing to work with her own clients. She is a founder-director of the UK consultancy Management Futures Ltd and runs her own consultancy.

Sahar Hashemi founded Coffee Republic with her brother, Bobby Hashemi, in 1995 and is the author of Anyone Can Do It.

Charles Handy is a social theorist who has written extensively on management and education. His books include The Elephant and the Flea and The New Philanthropists.


MON 11:30 Newfangle (b00l0vl7)
Grows on Trees

Sitcom by Adam Rosenthal and Viv Ambrose, set 100,000 years BC among a tribe of proto-humans.

It's boiling hot down in the swamp and the tribe suffer while Alf and Lucy enjoy the cool breezes in their treetop home. Newfangle, aided by Crag, discovers that piles of mud can be shaped into shelters from the heat. These mudturtles, as Crag calls them, prove very popular with the other hominids - so popular that Newfangle devises a complicated payment system based on future harvests to cope with demand. But then the whole pyramid scheme comes crashing down when Crag intervenes with a big idea of his own.

Newfangle ...... Russell Tovey
Snaggle ...... Pippa Evans
Crag ...... Gabriel Vick
Coco ...... Maureen Lipman
Alf ...... Hugh Bonneville
Lucy ...... Amy Shindler.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00kwn5l)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.

Including:

Edinburgh Fringe: Will things run smoothly at the festival this year?

Dealing with the aftermath of prostate cancer.

How restaurant suppliers are feeling the pinch in the economic recession.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00kwn89)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00kwn9l)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.

Schools Secretary Ed Balls and his Conservative counterpart Michael Gove discuss spending on schools; who has a credible plan that takes into account the need for public spending cuts?

Plus the couple whose IVF embryo was mistakenly implanted into another woman.


MON 13:30 Quote... Unquote (b00l0vl9)
Nigel Rees chairs the popular quiz involving the exchange of quotations and anecdotes.

With guests Adele Geras, Conn Iggulden, Christopher Luscombe and Simon Pearsall.

The reader is Peter Jefferson.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00kwh7x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00l0xxb)
A Bit of Explaining to Do

By Graham White. Mark realises that he has made a potentially embarrassing mistake - there is a difficult-to-explain entry on his wife's credit card statement. He turns on the charm with a young woman, Jo, who works in a call centre, to see if she can make it disappear.

But this is not just a domestic embarrassment for Mark - his wife Eve is a senior policewoman, very much in the public eye.

Mark ...... Shaun Dingwall
Jo ...... Lizzy Watts
Eve ...... Jaye Griffiths
Jeff ...... Ewan Bailey
Trainee ...... Benjamin Askew
Phone ....... Philip Fox

Directed by Mary Peate.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00krhhl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 America, Empire of Liberty (b00kwnwn)
Cuba - That Four Letter Word

Series charting the history of America, written and presented by David Reynolds.

An American-backed invasion of Cuba fails but President Kennedy saves face when he stops the Soviet Union from placing missiles on the Caribbean island.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00kwftj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b00l54ws)
Ernie Rea and guests discuss the theological issues raised by Alzheimer's disease. What insights do faith communities offer into what makes us human when we lose our cognitive abilities, and what is left of the self once Alzheimer's has done its worst?


MON 17:00 PM (b00kwnz3)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00kwnzh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b00l0xxg)
Series 51

Episode 1

The perennial antidote to panel games comes from Her Majesty's Theatre, Haymarket in London, with Stephen Fry the first to take on the chairman's role from the late Humphrey Lyttelton. Regulars Barry Cryer, Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined by Victoria Wood. With Colin Sell at the piano.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00kwnb3)
Debbie's e-mailed her plans for Thursday's Borchester Land board meeting. Adam's impressed. Jennifer knows that putting the set-aside land back into cultivation will upset William but Adam insists that the birds come second to producing food.

Jennifer's impressed by Lilian's idea of a strawberry tea party in the summerhouse for Jack's birthday and is pleased that they seem to have healed their rift. Peggy's just saddened to hear things aren't good between Lilian and Matt.

Susan's concerned for Neil's business. Clarrie's equally concerned that Eddie has no work but at least she's got her flower arranging to distract her. She thanks Susan for the loan of the bowl.

Neil returns from his reunion in good spirits but Susan's got a bone to pick with him - fancy not telling her he's lent her lovely fruit bowl to Clarrie. When she tells him that Paul Clifford is about to go under, Neil gets hold of him and he confirms the rumours. Things are bad but Neil remains optimistic.

Clarrie apologises for the misunderstanding over the bowl but it's no longer important to Susan. She's worried how they're going to keep Neil's business going - just when things ought to be getting easier.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00kwp26)
Arts news and reviews.

Comedian Sue Perkins and food critic Giles Coren are returning for a new series of Supersizers, the programme which sees the twosome trying out the culinary offerings of the past. John Wilson talks to them about everything from 1980s pop tarts to the Roman delicacy of pig's uterus.

New scientific research has proven, for the first time, that the statues and friezes of the Parthenon were painted in a variety of colours, rather than left as pristine white marble. John Wilson is shown how infrared light has helped reveal tiny traces of pigment on the British Museum's Parthenon Marbles, which were controversially removed by the Earl of Elgin two centuries ago.

Telstar is Nick Moran's feature film directorial debut and tells the story of maverick 1960s record producer Joe Meek, who enjoyed huge success with Telstar (the biggest selling record of its time) and whose life later descended into tragedy through drug addiction and mental illness. Music journalist David Hepworth reviews the film.

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow has been nominated for the 'Museum of the Year' award by the Art Fund Prize for the second time. John Wilson reports from The Centre Of New Enlightenment (TCONE), an interactive programme in which children are sent on a series of missions around the museum, collecting data and responding to artefacts.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00kwq0d)
Diary of an On-Call Girl

Targets

Yvonne Antrobus' dramatisation of the blogs and book by 'WPC Ellie Bloggs', the pseudonymous blogger who is also a serving police officer.

Bloggsy gets one arrest closer to her monthly target - despite her misgivings.

WPC Ellie Bloggs ...... Nadine Marshall
Bongo/Max/Driver ...... Matt Addis
Wayne Perril/Mr Grahams ...... Paul Rider
Lisa Perril/Meryl ...... Rachel Atkins
Will/TD ...... Stephen Hogan
Becks ...... Annabelle Dowler
Sgt Woodcock/Skipper ...... Philip Fox
Minnie/Frances/Saira ...... Janice Acquah
Luke/Boy ...... Benjamin Askew
Colleen ...... Lizzy Watts
Adam ...... Gene Goodman.


MON 20:00 The Ian Blair Years (b00l0xxj)
Episode 2

BBC home affairs correspondent Danny Shaw tells the inside story of Sir Ian Blair's tenure as commissioner of the Metropolitan Police.

This liberal Oxford-educated 'Blairite' was once seen as the ideal candidate to modernise British policing and, in particular, to eliminate the taint of 'institutional racism' from the Met. But his tenure became increasingly controversial and he was forced to step aside, dogged by the police shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, accused of racial discrimination by one of his most senior officers and facing allegations of cronyism.

Shaw talks to those who have known Sir Ian throughout his career and examines how Britain's highest-flying officer came to be embroiled in a bitter dispute at the top of Britain's biggest police force. Was Blair a victim of politicisation or could he simply not do the job as he had promised?


MON 20:30 Analysis (b00ksztl)
A New Iraq?

As British forces complete their withdrawal from Iraq and the government declares the mission a success, Bronwen Maddox considers the prospects of lasting peace for the Iraqi people. Have lessons been learnt that will change the way in which similar missions are tackled in the future?


MON 21:00 Frontiers (b00l0xxn)
Bioprecipitation

Richard Hollingham investigates if bacteria in the atmosphere can influence the weather and meets some of the scientists who are working in what has been called 'bioprecipitation'.

He talks to David Sands from Montana University, who coined the term, and visits labs in Avignon and London where researchers are trying to understand more about the impact of bacterial particles on our weather. If the complexities of bioprecipitation can be unravelled, it might be possible to turn the process to our advantage and use these extraordinary bacteria to encourage rainfall in drought-affected regions of the world.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00kwr5d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00kwqmm)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00kwqqg)
News from a global perspective with Robin Lustig.

As thousands rally in Tehran in support of the defeated presidential candidate, Mir Hossein Mousavi, what now for Iran?

How is the recession shaping the world of work in the UK?

The government announces an inquiry into the Iraq war.

President Obama's plans to reform healthcare in the United States.

Millions of unexploded bombs are still killing people in Laos.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00kwqtr)
David Nicholls - One Day

Episode 6

Julian Rhind-Tutt reads from the bittersweet novel by David Nicholls.

It is now 1996 and the two friends have not spoken to each other since a painfully acrimonious evening the previous summer when Emma found herself admitting that she no longer liked Dexter very much. In the meantime her teaching career is surging ahead while Dexter is being edged into the graveyard slots of TV presenting.

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Off the Page (b00ktprr)
Stripping Off

Dominic Arkwright, Zoe Simon, Catherine Blyth and Phil Hilton discuss whether being revealing is art or obscenity? From 2009.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00kwqv2)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with David Wilby.



TUESDAY 16 JUNE 2009

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00kwhc0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00kwj2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00kwhsw)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00kwhw0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00kwhtv)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00kwhwx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00kwhyj)
Daily prayer and reflection with Gopinder Kaur.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00kwhzk)
Hundreds of farmers are still struggling to find a new milk contract after the collapse of the co-operative Dairy Farmers of Britain. Caz Graham hears from some of those with small farms who live in remote areas, who milk companies are more reluctant to collect from.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00kwj11)
Presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis.

Jon Leyne reacts to reports of further violence during protests in Iran.

Nicholas Lansman, of the ISP Association (ISPA), and Stephen Garrett, of programme makers Kudos Productions discuss who should be responsible for policing the web.

Correspondent Angus Crawford talks to a former soldier who had to leave the army after being injured by the cold.

Economist John Appleby discusses how the NHS can be made more efficient.

Reporter Sanchia Berg talks to architect Lord Rogers who said he believes Prince Charles has broken the 'constitutional understanding' governing the role of the monarchy.

Thought for the Day with The Right Reverend Tom Butler, Bishop of Southwark.

Andrew Hosken reports on the expenses row that has now moved into the House of Lords.

How will Britain respond to the elections in Iran? Foreign affairs editor John Simpson details the aftermath of recent protests. Foreign Secretary David Miliband gives his reaction to the post-election violence.

Dr Michael Dixon, of the Natural History Museum, and columnist Simon Jenkins, discuss if museum entry should be free.

The BBC could be made to share part of the television licence fee with commercial rivals under government plans. Peter Bazalgette, formerly of media company Endemol, and Sir Christopher Bland, former chairman of the BBC, discuss the future of public broadcasting.

Stephen Chittenden reports on the fixture between Spanish football giant Real Madrid and Irish part-timers Shamrock Rovers.

After the Chief Probation Officer resigned over the botched handling of double killer Dano Sonnex, the probation service has come under increased scrutiny. Home affairs correspondent Danny Shaw discovers what this means for the daily routine of probation officers in Kent.

All over the world people are monitoring unfolding events in Iran via the internet, where an apparently decisive election victory by the incumbent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is being challenged on the streets. Correspondent Jon Leyne reports from Tehran on the ongoing protests. Turi Munthe, of the website Demotix, explains how content is still being generated despite the restrictions on media.


TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (b00l0y01)
Michael Sandel: A New Citizenship: 2009

Morality in Politics

Professor Michael Sandel delivers four lectures about the prospects of a new politics of the common good. The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley.

Sandel considers the role of moral argument in politics. He believes that it is often not possible for government to be neutral on moral questions and calls for a more engaged civic debate about issues such as commercial surrogacy and same-sex marriage.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00l6c82)
Venus of Empire - The Life of Pauline Bonaparte

Episode 2

Diana Quick reads from Flora Fraser's biography of Pauline Bonaparte, Napoleon's favourite sister.

At Napoleon's request, Pauline and her young son accompany her husband Leclerc on the military campaign to the sugar colony of Saint-Domingue. It is here that rumours of her infidelity begin and tragedy is not far away.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00kwkj5)
Jo Whiley; District nursing; Women's wages

Jo Whiley on her years as a Radio One DJ. Plus, the history of district nursing; and why, despite outperforming boys, are girls still earning less?


TUE 11:00 The Job Clinic (b00l0ykx)
Episode 2

Liz Barclay meets some job seekers whose search for employment is aided by three mentors: business guru Charles Handy, founder of Coffee Republic Sahar Hashemi and management coach Jenny Rogers.

The job seekers negotiate homework set by their personal mentors and apply for yet another job, against the backdrop of the severest recession for decades.

Jenny Rogers has been an executive coach for 18 years. She trains other coaches as well as continuing to work with her own clients. She is a founder-director of the UK consultancy Management Futures Ltd and runs her own consultancy.

Sahar Hashemi founded Coffee Republic with her brother, Bobby Hashemi, in 1995 and is the author of Anyone Can Do It.

Charles Handy is a social theorist who has written extensively on management and education. His books include The Elephant and the Flea and The New Philanthropists.


TUE 11:30 Waldemar at the Venice Biennale (b00l0ykz)
Art critic Waldemar Januszczak visits the world's oldest and most prestigious international contemporary art festival.

In the century that has passed since the Venice Biennale was established in 1895, this festival of art, founded to showcase the work of artists, has come to attract the attention of politicians. Governments realising the propaganda value of the event have taken an increasing interest in the presence of their artists. Waldemar Januszczak, who attended the opening of the 2009 Biennale, considers how this 19th-century creation is coping with the numerous demands of a 21st-century world, and asks what the future holds for the festival.

The programme features contributions from:

Steve McQueen, the artist officially representing Britain at the Venice Biennale
Andrea Rose, the Commissioner for the British Pavilion
Daniel Birnbaum, the artistic director of the 2009 Biennale
Artists Shezad Dawood, Khosrow Hassanzadeh and Zolaykha Sherzad from the East-West Divan exhibition
Art critic William Feaver
Cuauhtémoc Medina from the Mexican Pavilion
Kristina Norman from the Estonian Pavilion.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00kwn47)
Call You and Yours

Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.

Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg takes your calls on the economy, parliamentary reform, Europe, the MPs’ expenses issue, and his choice for the new Speaker of the House of Commons.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00kwn5n)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00kwn8c)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Oh My What a Rotten Song! (b00l0yl1)
Michael Rosen revels in songwriting duo RP Weston and Bert Lee's uncanny knack for coming up with the catchy tune and the witty chorus that everyone loved to sing.

The pair were among the foremost popular songwriters of the 1910s and 1920s, writing separately or together some 3,000 songs in their 21-year collaboration, many of which have passed into the nation's collective musical psyche, including Hello, Hello Who's Your Lady Friend?, I'm Henery the Eighth I Am and, apparently, Knees Up Mother Brown.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00kwnb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00l0yl3)
The Granny Killers

Black comedy by David Hodgson. Twins Chris and Liddy want to kill their granny, the shoulder-padded, high-heeled, money-crazed head of a property empire. But granny has other plans - she wants to kill her new husband on their wedding night.

Granny ...... Lesley Joseph
Alfonso ...... David Fleeshman
Chris ...... John Caterall
Liddy ...... Sara Sadeghi
Mrs Fothergill ...... Maggie Fox.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00l0yl5)
Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00l0ymd)
Empath Man

The Optiagra Effect

Series of three stories written and read by poet Matt Harvey featuring Empath Man, the 21st-century answer to Superman who fights crime with advanced listening skills and has the uncanny ability to stay open and vulnerable in a tight situation.

Compassionately foiling muggers and armed robbers is all in a day's walk for the Skinless Wonder.


TUE 15:45 America, Empire of Liberty (b00kwnwb)
Vietnam - The Battleground of Freedom

Series charting the history of America, written and presented by David Reynolds.

The threat of communism causes successive American leaders to become embroiled in a disastrous foreign conflict.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b00l0z36)
Exploring the Age of Criminal Responsibility

Clive Coleman explores the age of criminal responsibility. In most European countries this ranges from 12 to 18 years old, but in England, Wales and Northern Ireland 10-year-old children can be prosecuted. Clive asks if criminalising young people at such an early age is the best response to child crime.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b00l0z38)
Victoria Hislop and Martin Newell

Kate Mosse and her guests - bestselling writer, Victoria Hislop and poet and musician, Martin Newell - discus a short novel, an autobiography and a satirical rant.

On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan
Publisher: Vintage

The Angry Island: Hunting the English by AA Gill
Publisher: Phoenix

The Three of Us by Julia Blackburn
Publisher: Vintage

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2009.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00kwnxw)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00kwnz5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


TUE 18:30 The Secret World (b011dkny)
Series 1

Episode 2

From Lord Alan Sugar to Bruce Forsyth - Jon Culshaw explores the bizarre private lives of famous folk.

The comedy impressions series examining the bizarre and private lives of public people.

Starring:

Jon Culshaw
Margaret Cabourn Smith
Julian Dutton
Jess Robinson
Lewis Macleod
Duncan Wisbey

Written by Bill Dare, Julian Dutton, Tom Jameson & Nev Fountain, Rufus Jones and Dan Skinner.

Producer: Bill Dare

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2009.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00kwn9n)
It's been quiet in the shop lately so Helen doesn't see the point in Pat advertising for a replacement for Colin at Bridge Farm. She could help cover, and Clarrie would certainly appreciate some extra hours. Pat thinks it's great to have the family so involved.

Helen's concerned that Annette is getting too attached to Jazzer. Tom thinks Jazzer's getting more serious as he's mentioned taking Annette out on his day off.

Tom's getting romantic himself. He's planned a champagne picnic for Brenda to celebrate the end of her student life. First they have to listen to Kenton's plans to turn Jaxx into a café-bar. Brenda thinks it sounds great, especially his ideas for cocktails.

Tom finally gets Brenda away. She thinks they're going for a pizza, so Tom's real plans are a lovely surprise. As they drift down the Am in a rowing boat, Brenda praises his romantic nature. But it all goes a bit wobbly when he opens the champagne and loses an oar in the water. As he struggles to row with one oar, Brenda shrieks at him to be careful. They both laugh. Brenda can see where he, or maybe both of them, are likely to end up.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00kwp0x)
Arts news and reviews.

Nina Bawden's novel, Carrie's War, was based on her own experiences of being evacuated to a Welsh mining village during WWII. Now, as a stage production of Carrie's War starring Prunella Scales opens in London's West End, Nina Bawden shares her memories and explains how evacuation politicised her forever.

The Take is the latest big-budget Sky 1 TV drama, an adaptation of a novel by bestselling author Martina Cole. Set in the criminal underworld of London's East End, The Take follows the fortunes of the Jackson family across a decade that takes in the height of Thatcherism through to the birth of New Labour. Crime novelist Dreda Say Mitchell reviews the drama.

Mark Lawson reports from The Wedgwood Museum near Stoke-on-Trent, one of four shortlisted contenders for the 2009 Art Fund Prize. Director Gaye Blake Roberts explains the long struggle to re-house the collection and archives of Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, and local MP Mark Fisher discusses the importance of the museum to Stoke's history.

The premiere is taking place of a new piece by composer Michael Berkeley, inspired by the sounds of humpback whales. As Berkeley started composing the piece, his family friend Gabriel Bailey died, at the age of 21; shortly after that, the conductor Richard Hickox, a long time friend and collaborator of Berkeley, also died. The composition is dedicated to the memory of both men. Michael Berkeley talks to Mark about the sad chain of events which led to this piece.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00l0vzx)
Diary of an On-Call Girl

Tuesday is Nothing Day

Yvonne Antrobus' dramatisation of the blogs and book by 'WPC Ellie Bloggs', the pseudonymous blogger who is also a serving police officer.

WPC Ellie Bloggs ...... Nadine Marshall
Bongo/Max/Driver ...... Matt Addis
Wayne Perril/Mr Grahams ...... Paul Rider
Lisa Perril/Meryl ...... Rachel Atkins
Will/TD ...... Stephen Hogan
Becks ...... Annabelle Dowler
Sgt. Woodcock/Skipper ...... Philip Fox
Minnie/Frances/Saira ...... Janice Acquah
Luke/Boy ...... Benjamin Askew
Colleen ...... Lizzy Watts
Adam ...... Gene Goodman.


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00l0z3b)
Incompetence within the Learning and Skills Council

Gerry Northam investigates allegations of incompetence and neglect in England's biggest quango, the Learning and Skills Council. As the recession leads to rocketing unemployment, apprentices and local college students have been hit by a dramatic cash crisis in this government agency, which oversees their training.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00l0z3d)
Including the camera which connects to electrodes on the tongue that can help blind people get around; but is the technology all it's cracked up to be?

News on a new set of awards from the Macular Disease Society.

Fed-up with your job? Why not take up boat building?


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b00l0z3g)
Decrimalising Drugs

Claudia Hammond travels to Portugal to find out how decrimalising drugs could help addicts.

In 2001, Portugal became the only European country to decriminalise all drugs, from cannabis to heroin. Claudia reports from Lisbon to find out how the policy has affected drug use in the intervening years.

Drug use is still illegal but users are not considered criminals. If caught with drugs, they are most likely to be offered treatment and, if they accept, it is most likely that sanctions will be waived. Claudia visits a drug treatment centre to find out how addicts are helped to kick the habit. She also talks to psychologists at one of Portugal's Dissuasion Commissions to find out how first-time users are discouraged from continuing drug use.

Claudia asks if the Portuguese experiment could ever transfer to the UK.


TUE 21:30 Unseen Britain (b00j67ml)
Episode 2

Peter White goes in search of those who monitor how we spend our money, where we travel and the state of our health, while remaining unseen themselves.

Peter meets the unseen bank staff who spend their days watching our spending habits and alerting us to possible fraud when our usual spending patterns are broken.

He then uses his bonus points card at a supermarket, which prompts him to question who knows what about his buying habits and how this information helps analysts to persuade him to spend more, by targetting him with tailor-made and tempting offers.


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00kwql2)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00kwqmp)
Who is really in control in Iran?

Do older people get a raw deal from employers?

As hostages are killed in Yemen, how dangerous is the country becoming?


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00kwqqj)
David Nicholls - One Day

Episode 7

Julian Rhind-Tutt reads from the bittersweet novel by David Nicholls.

Dexter has fallen in love, a fact which he feels compensates for his almost negligible career in television. Meanwhile his old friend Emma has quit her teaching job and secured a small advance to write her first book. Their friendship has deteriorated to a functional acquaintanceship.

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Mark Watson Makes the World Substantially Better (b00d75nw)
Series 2

Honesty

The comedian finds out if telling the truth pays off. With poetry and songs from Tim Key and Tom Basden. From September 2008.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00kwqtt)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



WEDNESDAY 17 JUNE 2009

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00kwhc2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00l6c82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00kwhsy)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00kwhw2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00kwhtx)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00kwhwz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00kwhyl)
Daily prayer and reflection with Gopinder Kaur.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00kwhzm)
A farming charity says calls to its helpline have tripled following the collapse of Dairy Farmers of Britain. Hundreds of farmers are facing financial crisis after the milk co-operative went into receivership two weeks ago. Many are now struggling to buy the feed for their animals. Anna Hill reports.


WED 06:00 Today (b00kwj13)
Presented by James Naughtie and Sarah Montague.

The head of the International Atomic Energy agency, Mohammed ElBaradei, has encouraged international engagement with Tehran so that it has less incentive to create a nuclear bomb. Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen discusses his interview with Mr ElBaradei.

Shadow Home Secretary Chris Grayling discusses the Tory policy on ID cards.

Four years after Hurricane Katrina hit, thousands of New Orleans residents are still living in temporary accommodation despite having been assured they would be re-homed. Correspondent James Coomarasamy speaks to some of those affected.

Race Relations Co-ordinator in South Belfast Denise Wright and Malcolm Morgan, pastor at Belfast City Church, discuss attacks on Romanians in Belfast.

Professor Terence Stephenson discusses his argument that smoking should be banned in cars when children are passengers.

Danny Shaw examines why dealing with drink-dependent offenders is a growing part of probation work.

Thought for the Day with Professor Mona Siddiqui, of the University of Glasgow.

Chancellor Alistair Darling discusses the analysis of financial regulation in his Mansion House speech and debates the future of public sector spending.

Mass protests are continuing in Iran over the nation's disputed election poll. Reporter Jack Izzard attempts to gauge the public's opinion in Iran.

Matthew Richardson of Press TV (one of Iran's state broadcasters) and Dr Reza Molavi, director of the Centre of Iranian studies at Durham University, discuss if a recount of some votes could change the outcome of the Iranian election.

For most of 1941, the siege of the Libyan port Tobruk frustrated Field Marshall Rommel and his Afrika Korps and turned the tide of World War II in North Africa. Rommel's driver Rudolph Schneider discusses his experiences with the historian Rob Lyman and British veteran John Riggs.

Former Chancellor Lord Lawson and Howard Davies, director of the LSE, discuss whether the regulatory system is to blame for the credit crunch.

The anti-cancer properties of carrots are more potent if the vegetable is not cut up before cooking, research shows. Chef Phil Vickery considers if the whole carrot is better than the sum of its parts.

The UK Film Council has commissioned a wide-ranging study into the cultural impact of film. John Woodward, CEO of the UK Film Council and British TV and film director Tom Hooper discuss what UK films reveal about Britishness and cultural identity.

Does psychotherapy do more harm than good? An Intelligence Squared debate at the Royal Geographical Society is addressing the issue. Former psychotherapist Jeffrey Masson and government adviser Lord Layard put forward their sides of the argument.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00l13mw)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests including Kevin Wood, Ian Mulholland, Hannah Waddingham, Paddy Ashdown and Patrick Hennessey.

A production of Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story recently took place in the unlikely surroundings of Wandsworth Prison. It was a rare collaboration between prisoners and prison officers. Ex-Wandsworth inmate Kevin Wood played the part of Action, a feisty member of the Jets, and Ian Mulholland is the Governor of Wandsworth Prison.

Hannah Waddingham plays Desiree Armfeldt in Trevor Nunn's production of Sondheim's A Little Night Music. Her theatre credits include the critically acclaimed The Lady of the Lake in Monty Python's Spamalot both in the West End and on Broadway, as well as Lautrec, The Beautiful Game, Tonight's The Night, A Chorus of Disapproval and Bad Girls the Musical.

In his autobiography A Fortunate Life, Lord Ashdown tells of the 17 years he spent as an officer in the Royal Marine Commandos, a member of the Special Boat Service, and as he reveals for the first time, an employee of the 'shadowy side' of the Foreign Office. From 2002 to 2006 he served as the High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Patrick Hennessey is a former officer in the British Army. In his book The Junior Officers' Reading Club, he tells the story of how one soldier was made, through the testosterone-heavy breeding ground of Sandhurst, into the war zones of the Balkans, Iraq and Afghanistan's Helmand Province.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00l6c7p)
Venus of Empire - The Life of Pauline Bonaparte

Episode 3

Diana Quick reads from Flora Fraser's biography of Pauline Bonaparte, Napoleon's favourite sister.

Pauline returns to Paris a widow. However, it is not long before she finds herself another suitable husband and journeys with him to Rome. It is here that she suffers an unbearable loss that will turn her life around.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00kwkj7)
Names for female genitalia; The influence of female fashion editors

The difficulties for parents of choosing the right words for their children's genitalia. Plus, the power of female magazine editors; and the art of growing olive trees.


WED 11:00 The Job Clinic (b00l13my)
Episode 3

Last in a series of three programmes in which Liz Barclay follows the fortunes of job seekers.

Realistic expectations are set against hopes for better times to come. Liz hears the Job Clinic contributors' experiences of financial hardship and tough job interviews over the last few months.

Jenny Rogers has been an executive coach for 18 years. She trains other coaches as well as continuing to work with her own clients. She is a founder-director of the UK consultancy Management Futures Ltd and runs her own consultancy.

Sahar Hashemi founded Coffee Republic with her brother, Bobby Hashemi, in 1995 and is the author of Anyone Can Do It.

Charles Handy is a social theorist who has written extensively on management and education. His books include The Elephant and the Flea and The New Philanthropists.


WED 11:30 Spread a Little Happiness (b00l13n0)
Series 1

Episode 4

Comedy by John Godber and Jane Thornton, set in a Yorkshire sandwich bar.

Jodie and Dave try to get a little quality time with a rare night out, but there is no hiding place - not even in a small kebab.

Hope ...... Suranne Jones
Jodie ...... Susan Cookson
Dave ...... Neil Dudgeon
Gavin ...... Ralph Brown
Eve ...... Joanne Froggatt

Directed by Chris Wallis.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00kwn4b)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00kwn5q)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00kwn8f)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00l14p2)
Lord Carter has published his Digital Britain report. Among its proposals are using part of the BBC's licence fee to fund regional news, a tax on phone bills to pay for universal access to broadband and switching to digital radio only from 2015. Joining Steve Hewlett to discuss the implications are Emily Bell, Tim Suter and Bill Thompson.

Journalists in Iran are banned from covering the demonstrations there, and in many cases are confined to their hotels. Channel 4's International Editor, Lindsay Hilsum, describes what it is like working within the restrictions and Professor Annabelle Sreberny explains the rise of citizen journalism there and the long-term impact that social networks might have.

Police blogger Richard Horton has lost his case in the High Court in which he sought to protect his anonymity. Media lawyer Isabel Hudson explains the implications of this landmark case.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00kwn9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b0090s0n)
Gandhi's Goat

By Matthew Coombes. Gandhi and Chaplin meet in London's East End in 1931. But the real cultural exchange is taking place between Anil and Emily, members of their respective entourages.

Emily ...... Teresa Gallagher
Anil ...... Zubin Varla
Newsreader/Receptionist ...... Sam Dale

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00l14p4)
Paul Lewis and a panel of guests answer calls on long-term care.

Paul's guests are Pauline Thompson of Age Concern and Help the Aged, Philip Spiers of First Stop and Caroline Bielanska of Solicitors for the Elderly.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00l162z)
Empath Man

From Court to Cult

Series of three stories written and read by poet Matt Harvey featuring Empath Man, the 21st-century answer to Superman who fights crime with advanced listening skills and has the uncanny ability to stay open and vulnerable in a tight situation.

The Skinless Wonder finds that springing the police chief's daughter from a dodgy organisation is not without its trials.


WED 15:45 America, Empire of Liberty (b00kwnwd)
1968 - Paralysis of a President

Series charting the history of America, written and presented by David Reynolds.

Domestic tensions and the war in Vietnam throw the Johnson administration into a tailspin, opening the door for radical movements and a conservative backlash.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00l14p6)
Potatoes - Leisure Pleasure

The potato, with just a little bit of milk, can provide all of the nutrients necessary to sustain human life. Its wonderful productivity and the fact that it can be grown in small family plots in urban and rural areas means that, according to Professor Nancy Ries, it provides subsistence when local economies fail and other sources of food disappear.

This fact more than any other explains why Russia, the home of the vast collective wheat farm, increasingly relies on the potato. Nearly half of all agricultural production in the country is potatoes and 90 per cent of that is in small family plots. Is the potato a tool of oppression? Does it perpetuate poverty? Laurie Taylor is joined by Professor Ries and by John Reader, author of The Untold History of the Potato.

Also, Allison Hui from Lancaster University talks about her research into the role of travel in people's hobbies, and how leisure pursuits play an increasing part in global tourism.


WED 16:30 All in the Mind (b00l0z3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00kwnxy)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00kwnz7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


WED 18:30 I Was... (b00fpy6b)
Series 1

Dudley Moore's First Bandleader

Andrew McGibbon presents a series of interviews analysing great artists from the perspective of someone who knew them.

John Bassett met Dudley Moore, then a talented organ scholar, at Oxford in the late 1950s, and asked him to become the pianist in his jazz band, The Basset Hounds. The success of Moore's musical comedy skits led to Bassett introducing him to three other up-and-coming talents who would go on, with Moore, to find fame in Beyond the Fringe.

Including contributions from Bassett Hound members Duncan Lamont and Pete Shade and Dudley's Beyond the Fringe colleague Jonathan Miller.

A Curtains for Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00kwn9q)
Annette's looking forward to spending the day with Jazzer but his plan is that they spend the day selling strawberries on the by-pass.

Worried that Neil's business is going under, Christopher doesn't want them to splash out on a new watch for his 21st birthday. Susan insists they want to mark the occasion. Christopher relents but makes sure that Susan doesn't buy the expensive model she had in mind. On their way back, they spot Jazzer and Annette selling strawberries, and stop to say hello. Jazzer tries the hard sell but Annette steps in and offers them a special price for four punnets. She's pleased with her success but Jazzer's not - he insists they'd have paid more if she hadn't interfered.

David measures the sward in the paddocks to confirm that he and Ruth are running the system correctly. The results look good and they congratulate themselves.

Ruth's impressed by Clarrie's floral display at St Stephens and thinks it deserves to win. Clarrie thinks Susan's beautiful bowl is perfect. She knows how special it is to Susan, so she'll be taking great care of it, even though nothing much could hurt it in the church. It's just fingers crossed for the big day.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00kwp0z)
Singer Bobby McFerrin, visiting the UK to take part in Ornette Colman's Meltdown festival at the Royal Festival Hall in London, meets Mark Lawson to discuss audience participation and his new wordless and improvised opera, Bobble.

Mark Lawson visits the Ruthin Craft Centre in Denbighshire to hear from artist Andrew Logan and the centre's director, Philip Hughes, about why the gallery has been shortlisted for this year's Art Fund Prize for Best Museum and Gallery in the UK.

Following the High Court's ruling that anonymous bloggers have no right to keep their identities secret, lawyer Duncan Lamont considers the implications of individuals no longer able to hide behind fabricated identities, online, in literature and in the art gallery.

Plus, Front Row's resident crime reviewer Jeff Park makes his selection of US and UK thrillers.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00l0vzq)
Diary of an On-Call Girl

Bloggs By Night

Yvonne Antrobus' dramatisation of the blogs and book by 'WPC Ellie Bloggs', the pseudonymous blogger who is also a serving police officer.

WPC Ellie Bloggs ...... Nadine Marshall
Bongo/Max/Driver ...... Matt Addis
Wayne Perril/Mr Grahams ...... Paul Rider
Lisa Perril/Meryl ...... Rachel Atkins
Will/TD ...... Stephen Hogan
Becks ...... Annabelle Dowler
Sgt. Woodcock/Skipper ...... Philip Fox
Minnie/Frances/Saira ...... Janice Acquah
Luke/Boy ...... Benjamin Askew
Colleen ...... Lizzy Watts
Adam ...... Gene Goodman.


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b00l14p8)
Ralph Tabberer, who until last year was Director-General of schools, says that comprehensive schools are sacrificing academic standards because of an obsession with fairness. He believes that the comprehensive system is not working and an inverted snobbery in Britain has led to 30 years of near-apartheid between state and independent schools. He describes a culture that is indifferent to academic success and blames a combination of old-fashioned notions of elitism in elements of the teaching profession and the apathy of parents. But can you ever have a system of education that is egalitarian and fair, but at the same time pursues excellence?

Grammar schools undoubtedly produced many successful students, but at the price of largely cementing your position in society at the age of 11. Comprehensives were introduced as a way to tackle this class divide, but is it the job of schools and teachers to be social engineers with a missionary zeal to tackle inequality, or to provide students with the best education? Or is the problem that our comprehensives are not comprehensive enough and that middle-class parents can still afford to get their children in to the best state schools, leaving the rest to flounder? 25 years ago, O-levels and CSEs were scrapped in favour of the one-size-fits-all GCSE. Is it time to accept that, in education, one size does not fit all and that the comprehensive system has failed?

Witnesses:

Robert McCartney QC: Chairman National Grammar Schools Association

Dr Chris Howard: National President NAHT (National Association of Head Teachers) and the Head of Lewis High School in Pegan, Wales

Prof Richard Pring: Lead director of the Nuffield Review of 14-19 education and training

James Park: Director of Antidote, a research organisation focusing on emotional literacy.


WED 20:45 Learning to Love the Microphone (b00l14pb)
Episode 1

Anne Perkins explores how politicians at the dawn of mass democracy utilised the new media of radio and newsreel.

How politicians adapt to using new media is highly relevant today, as the internet, social networking and 24-hour TV news transform the political landscape. Yet it was equally relevant in the 1920s and 1930s, when politicians grappled with the new media of radio and newsreels. What lessons can our generation learn from theirs?

Anne examines how two Prime Ministers - Stanley Baldwin and Neville Chamberlain - gradually mastered the new media of their day. She reveals how the first spin doctor used his wartime experience spying on the Germans to attack Labour and carefully craft the Conservative leaders' images to appeal to a new mass electorate. She also explains why the other parties were so slow by comparison.


WED 21:00 James and the Giant Tree (b00l14wp)
Professional tree climber James Aldred climbs one of Britain's tallest trees, a giant redwood affectionately called Goliath, and sleeps in its branches.

James has always loved climbing trees. The first time he used ropes to climb Goliath, he was 16 years old; he was absolutely terrified and didn't get further than the first branch. In this programme he returns to climb the tree, even spending the night in a hammock two thirds of the way up.

Also, one of Britain's leading tree experts, Tony Russell, offers an insight into the history and natural history of the giant redwood, or Wellingtonia as it is also known. The largest of them grow in the United States, but they have become icons in the British countryside since their introduction in the 18th century.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00l13mw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00kwql4)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00kwqmr)
News and analysis with Ritula Shah.

Regulating the banks: Obama treads where Darling fears to go.

The Iranian authorities crack down on blogging websites.

Bringing back manned space flight.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00kwqql)
David Nicholls - One Day

Episode 8

Julian Rhind-Tutt reads from the bittersweet novel by David Nicholls.

Dexter and Sylvie have got married and embarked on their new life together, and Emma is quietly becoming a success in the world of children's fiction. They are back in touch but their worlds are miles apart.

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Self-Storage (b01hn1q8)
Series 1

Dating

Judy fixes Dave up on his first date since his marriage broke up. Unfortunately, Sarah needs a favour and Geoff needs Judy.

Stars Reece Shearsmith and Mark Heap.

Sitcom written by Tom Collinson and Barnaby Power.

Dave ...... Reece Shearsmith
Geoff ...... Mark Heap
Ron ...... Tom Goodman-Hill
Judy ...... Rosie Cavaliero
Sarah ...... Susan Earl
Liz ...... Nadia Kamil.

Producer: Ed Morrish

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in October 2007.


WED 23:15 Strangers on Trains (b00d75p2)
Episode 2

Heated views on climate as travellers reveal their faith and beliefs. Stars Nat Segnit and Stewart Wright. From September 2008.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00kwqtw)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Robert Orchard.



THURSDAY 18 JUNE 2009

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00kwhc4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00l6c7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00kwht0)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00kwhw4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00kwhtz)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00kwhx1)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00kwhyn)
Daily prayer and reflection with Gopinder Kaur.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00kwhzp)
Hundreds of dairy farmers may have to throw milk away if they fail to find a buyer. Charlotte Smith investigates the long term impact of the collapse of a large milk co-operative and hears from the receiver who is trying to find a future for the farmers in isolated parts of the UK.


THU 06:00 Today (b00kwj15)
Presented by James Naughtie and Edward Stourton.

Business Editor Robert Peston and Lib Dem Treasury spokesman Vince Cable consider how the Bank of England will be able to discharge its new statutory responsibility.

Vince Cable also considers the effects of the publication of MPs' expenses.

Author Mark Lynas says the potential threat of climate change is often exaggerated.

Angela Merkel is the most popular politician in Germany, according to opinion polls, and the Chancellor even has a Barbie doll in her honour. Steven Rosenberg examines her appeal.

Dick Roche, Ireland's Europe minister, and Deaglan de Breadun of the Irish Times consider if Irish voters are likely to change their mind on Europe.

Woolly mammoths became extinct 6,000 years later than previously thought, research has shown. Professor Adrian Lister, of the Natural History Museum, explains.

Thought for the day with Dr David Wilkinson, principal of St John's College, Durham.

Iran analyst Mohammed Shakeel looks at Iran's history of protest.

Expenses claims of every MP over the last four years have been published online. Environment Secretary Hilary Benn discusses if this will be the end of the row.

Environment Secretary Hilary Benn discusses what can be done to stop climate change.

Should the inquiry into the Iraq war be held in public? Political Editor Nick Robinson and Major General Tim Cross consider the growing pressure from the military for evidence to be given in public.

John McFall, chairman of the Treasury Select Committee, and David Green, a former Bank of England official, discuss the call for greater powers for the Bank of England.

The book and WWII film The Man Who Never Was is being retold in a play called Mincemeat by a theatre company of homeless people. Journalist Roger Morgan and director Adrian Jackson discuss the story.

Reporter Nicola Stanbridge goes fishing to find out why the pastime is gradually gaining cult status.

The British Library has digitised a large part of its 19th century newspaper collection. Ed King, head of the collection, and Professor Catherine Hall discuss why this has been done.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00l16vp)
Elizabethan Revenge

Melvyn Bragg and guests Jonathan Bate, Julie Sanders and Janet Clare discuss Elizabethan and Jacobean revenge tragedy. From Thomas Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy to Shakespeare's Hamlet, the Elizabethan stage was awash with the bloody business of revenge. Revenge was dramatic, theatrical and hugely popular. It also possessed a fresh psychological depth in the way vengeful minds were portrayed through a new dramatic device: the soliloquy. But these tales of troubled individuals, of family wrongs and the iniquities of power also spoke to an audience for whom the vengeful codes of medieval England were being replaced by Tudor legal systems, by bureaucracy and the demands of the state above those of the individual. Therefore, the heady brew of hatred, madness, violence, evil deeds and righteous anger found on stage reflected the passing of something off stage.Jonathan Bate is Professor of Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature at the University of Warwick; Julie Sanders is Professor of English Literature and Drama at the University of Nottingham; Janet Clare is Professor of Renaissance Literature at the University of Hull.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00l6c7r)
Venus of Empire - The Life of Pauline Bonaparte

Episode 4

Diana Quick reads from Flora Fraser's biography of Pauline Bonaparte, Napoleon's favourite sister.

Now separated from her husband, Pauline's lifestyle and the loss of her son begin to take their toll on her health and her need for restorative waters are ever greater. However, it is her turn to support her brother who, following hard times, is forced to abdicate and accept in lieu the Kingdom of Elba.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00kwkj9)
Access to IVF treatment; Male friendship

How can provision for IVF treatment become truly fair? Plus, the fine art of male friendship; and journalist and human rights activist Rana Husseini on so-called 'honour killings'.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00l16vr)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.


THU 11:30 Bill Mitchell: The Man Who Wrestled Pumas... Probably (b00l1q7h)
Miriam Margolyes presents a documentary charting the life and career of her late colleague and friend Bill Mitchell, the voice-over artist who informed us the latest blockbusters would be 'at cinemas near you from Sunday', told us 'Carlsberg was probably the best lager in the world', and that Denim was 'for men who didn't have to try too hard'.

Born in Canada, he admitted that heavy drinking and smoking from his teens helped preserve the voice, and indeed drove his excessive lifestyle. He 'had to' abuse his body to maintain the voice and he 'had to' be in a Soho pub because it was handy for the recording studios.

Bill's career spanned acting, voice-over work, plus a brief spell as 1970s pop outfit Yin and Yan with friend Chris Sandford. His remains ranked as one of the greats within the advertising industry.

Featuring contributions from Bill's daughter Amanda McAllister, musicians and friends Zoot Money and Kenny Clayton, and industry moguls Nick Angell and Rob Townsend.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00kwn4f)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00kwn5s)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00kwn8h)
The Government are signalling a U-turn over their controversial decision to hold the Iraq War inquiry behind closed doors. World at One hears from Lord Scott, who chaired the 'Arms to Iraq' public inquiry; he claims that public confidence is best restored by holding hearings in public. Gen Sir Mike Jackson, head of the Army at the time of the invasion, also joins the programme. Plus, a look at the latest climate modelling, that shows in greater detail than ever before how global warming will effect parts of the UK.


THU 13:30 Off the Page (b00l1qvz)
Trivia

What turns a fact into knowledge, and did you know that Pete Conrad was the first man to dance on the moon?

Dominic Arkwright debates elitism in education with Kathryn Hughes, Francis Gilbert and Mark Mason, author of The Importance of Being Trivial.

Produced by Miles Warde.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00kwn9q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00l1qw1)
Desperate Measures

By David Ian Neville. In an old warehouse by the River Clyde, Paul and Mhairi Blaze have built a successful design company. But as the economic downturn bites, they need more than grand designs to save their business and their relationship.

Mhairi ...... Gabriel Quigley
Paul ...... Neil McKinven
Clara ...... Daniela Nardini
Helen ...... Molly Innes
Charli ...... Nicola Jo Cully
Harry ...... Phil McKee

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


THU 15:02 Ramblings (b00kwcnw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00kwft2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00l162s)
Empath Man

Hot Air Rises

Series of three stories written and read by poet Matt Harvey featuring Empath Man, the 21st-century answer to Superman who fights crime with advanced listening skills and has the uncanny ability to stay open and vulnerable in a tight situation.

Having excelled as a cult-buster, what becomes of the reconstructed male known as Empath Man when he falls into the clutches of his nemesis, the dangerously charming Scorpio Rising?


THU 15:45 America, Empire of Liberty (b00kwnwg)
Vietnam - 'Peace With Honour'?

Series charting the history of America, written and presented by David Reynolds.

America wakes up to its involvement in south east Asia and Nixon pulls out the troops as public sentiment turns against the war.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00kwh7j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00l1rg6)
Quentin Cooper looks at the science of the ancient microbes being discovered in frozen ice cores from Greenland. Maybe 120,000 years old, the new species, named Herminimonas Glaciei, is 50 times smaller than E. coli, and seemingly needs minimal nutrients to survive, perhaps living in the narrow capillaries of liquid water between ice crystals 3km below the surface. What does it, and other microbes being discovered in extreme environments mean for the search for life in the seemingly hostile stretches of space?

Fans have greeted the publication of the new season's football fixture list. Quentin hears from the man who draws up the calendar for the Premiership, Championship, English leagues 1 and 2, and the Scottish league. The mathematical system he uses, established in 1982, uses surprisingly sophisticated algorithm to meet all the teams' differing needs.

The printworks fire in Leominster recently sent a plume of smoke into the sky, reminiscent of the Buncefield storage depot fire of December 2005. It was after Buncefield that procedures for emergency air-quality monitoring were put in place to help inform the authorities of when and where evacuations might be necessary.


THU 17:00 PM (b00kwny0)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00kwnz9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


THU 18:30 Hut 33 (b00wlldq)
Series 2

Yankee Diddle

The Bletchley Park cipher-busting team decide that a wealthy American visitor is a ripe target for fleecing...

James Cary's sitcom set at Bletchley Park - the top-secret home of the Second World War codebreakers.

Professor Charles Gardner …. Robert Bathurst
Archie …. Tom Goodman-Hill
Fergus Craig (Gordon)
3rd Lieutenant Joshua Fanshawe-Marshall …. Alex MacQueen
Minka …. Olivia Coleman
Mrs Best …. Lill Roughley
Freddie G. Roosevelt …. Arnab Chanda

Producer: Adam Bromley

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2008.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00kwn9s)
It's the Borchester Land board meeting. Brian knows the cropping plans are good but if things go well he's not looking forward to telling William what that means.

Adam gives a great presentation, emphasising how they can optimise returns while building a measure of sustainability. The board agrees the proposal. Now all Brian needs is a suitable story for William.

Matt doesn't appreciate Lilian's interrogation and storms off. Sick of being treated like a doormat, Lilian chases after him. If Matt won't tell her what he's up to, she'll find out for herself. She refuses to get out of the car, so Matt races off, angrily telling her that he never knows where he'll end up. There have never been any business meetings. All he knows is that speeding clears the fog. The faster he goes, the better he feels. He pushes the accelerator and heads for the motorway. Terrified Lilian screams at him to pull over. He does, skidding to a half, and insists she gets out.

Adam receives a hysterical call from Lilian, stranded on the hard shoulder, and needs to rush to her side. Jennifer wants to go with him but Adam promises to call as soon as he knows anything.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00kwp11)
The 2009 winner of The Art Fund Prize

Lord Puttnam announces that The Wedgwood Museum in Stoke-on-Trent is this year's winner of the 100, 000 pound Art Fund Prize for museums and galleries.

The Proclaimers

Craig and Charlie Reid, better known as The Proclaimers, enjoyed huge success in the late '80s with hits including I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles), Letter From America and King of the Road. This week sees the release of their new studio album Notes & Rhymes, so they brought their guitar to the Front Row studio to give us a flavour of their new work.

Radical Nature at the Barbican and Richard Long at Tate Britain

At the Barbican Art Gallery in London, an exhibition, Radical Nature: Art and Architecture for a Changing Planet 1969-2009, involves a number of installations that include foliage, grass and mud. At Tate Britain, Richard Long's exhibition Heaven and Earth features his familiar large flint circles, his mud paintings and photos of the British landscape. Janet Street Porter, Vice-Chair of the Ramblers Association, gives her response to both exhibitions.

Katyn

The Polish film director Andrzej Wajda's father was killed with the 20,000 Polish officers murdered by the Russian secret police in the Katyn forest during the Second World War. His Oscar-nominated feature film Katyn, which includes documentary archive, is being released in the UK. Critic Sarah Crompton gives her response to the film.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00l0vzs)
Diary of an On-Call Girl

The Unfair Sex

Yvonne Antrobus' dramatisation of the blogs and book by 'WPC Ellie Bloggs', the pseudonymous blogger who is also a serving police officer.

WPC Ellie Bloggs ...... Nadine Marshall
Bongo/Max/Driver ...... Matt Addis
Wayne Perril/Mr Grahams ...... Paul Rider
Lisa Perril/Meryl ...... Rachel Atkins
Will/TD ...... Stephen Hogan
Becks ...... Annabelle Dowler
Sgt. Woodcock/Skipper ...... Philip Fox
Minnie/Frances/Saira ...... Janice Acquah
Luke/Boy ...... Benjamin Askew
Colleen ...... Lizzy Watts
Adam ...... Gene Goodman.


THU 20:00 Law in Action (b00l0z36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b00l1rxv)
Guest presenter Stephanie Flanders discusses the future of the airline industry with Stelios Haji-Ioannou, chairman of Easygroup Ltd and founder of Easyjet, Lord Digby Jones, business entrepreneur and former director of the CBI, and Steve Ridgway, chief executive of Virgin Atlantic Airways.

They discuss the cost conundrum of trying to predict the economic future when buying new aircraft, and reveal whether they have cut back on their personal air travel as environmental concerns get stronger.

The panel also ask if machines are taking over the industry; from computer check-ins and check-outs to automated phone services, it is becoming harder to deal with real people. It might be cheaper for companies, but Stephanie asks if the benefits really get passed onto the consumer.


THU 21:00 Leading Edge (b00l1rxx)
The Science of Seasonality

As midsummer in the Northern Hemisphere approaches, Geoff Watts looks into the science of seasonality in animals and ourselves. Winter blues and summer celebrations - from hibernation to sex - the seasons affect the living world, including humans.

On the other side of the world, in Antarctica, it is midwinter and those creatures that can't migrate are employing intriguing adaptations to slow their body processes, virtually stopping respiration and even heartbeat as they enter hibernation. Scientists have even discovered something akin to hibernation in cold-blooded fish.

Geoff hears what it's like to dive beneath Antarctic ice from Lloyd Peck of the British Antarctic Survey, and he meets some of the strange creatures that live in freezing waters.

He also hears about an unlikely alliance between scientists of different backgrounds, drawn together by an interest in hibernation, the chemicals that control it and how they might help to protect the brains of premature babies and battlefield casualties.

And there's a new book, Seasons of Life, by Oxford biologist Russell Foster, who shows how the seasons affect human as well as animal life, even in our 24/7 society.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00l16vp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00kwql6)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00kwqmt)
Mass demonstrations in Tehran keep the pressure up. We have an eye-witness account.

Why the public wants a public inquiry on the Iraq war.

Hazel Blears pleas with her constituency party to stay on.

With Ritula Shah.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00kwqqn)
David Nicholls - One Day

Episode 9

Julian Rhind-Tutt reads from the bittersweet novel by David Nicholls.

Emma and Dexter have surrendered to their desire to be together, and while ostensibly maintaining separate flats they are living at Dexter's old bachelor pad, trying for a baby and house hunting. The pressure is on.

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 The Stanley Baxter Playhouse (b00j8djx)
Series 3

Astonishing Archie

Series of three comic plays starring Stanley Baxter.

When two brothers get together to plan the funeral of an old friend, the choice of music is a bone of contention - will it be Sinatra or Presley? A generation and a whole philosophy of popular music separate the brothers, and the choice they finally make is a heartwarming musical compromise. By Bill Paterson.

Ronnie Purgavey ...... Stanley Baxter
Alan Purgavey ...... Bill Paterson
Rev Margot Turnbull ...... Maureen Beattie

Directed by Marilyn Imrie.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00kwqty)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with David Wilby.



FRIDAY 19 JUNE 2009

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00kwhc6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00l6c7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00kwht2)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00kwhw6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00kwhv1)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00kwhx3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00kwhyq)
Daily prayer and reflection with Gopinder Kaur.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00kwhzr)
Farmers have lost tens of thousands of pounds each following the collapse of the co-operative Dairy Farmers of Britain, and the government has refused to offer financial support. Charlotte Smith reports on the exchanges in the House of Commons.

Also, salmon farmers reject accusations their industry causes pollution, and the latest on the Farming Today beehive as an inspector calls.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00kwj17)
Presented by John Humphrys and Evan Davis.

Nearly 900 workers at a Lincolnshire oil refinery have been sacked following unofficial strike action at the plant. Reporter Paul Murphy reports from the Lindsey oil refinery on how the former workers have reacted.General Secretary of the union GMB Paul Kenny says Total, which owns the plant, has sought to escalate the problem by victimising workers and refusing to meet unions.

At least 2.5 million people were forced from their homes when the army of Pakistan began their military assault in the Swat valley. John Humphrys talks to Pakistani journalist and writer Ahmed Rashid about whether the refugees can soon start returning to their homes.

Iran's supreme leader is to address the nation for the first time since disputed election results sparked huge protests in the capital, Tehran. Sadeq Saba, the BBC's Iranian affairs analyst, considers what the speech might contain.

The southern Chinese city of Guangzhou - formerly known as Canton - is to introduce a one-dog policy. Correspondent Chris Hogg reports on why it is joining a long list of Chinese cities - including Beijing - which have chosen to introduce the policy.

John Humphrys examines whether the education system in Pakistan is underfunded and, if so, what this would mean for a country under threat from extremists.

Thought for the Day with the Chief Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks.

Justice Secretary Jack Straw and Harry Fletcher, of the National Association of Probation Officers (NAPO), consider new evidence which suggests probation services were actively encouraged to underspend.

How can the government of Pakistan deal with terrorists living within the country? John Humphrys reports on whether internal problems facing leaders are affecting the fight against terrorism.

Sacked worker John McEwan and Bob Emmerson, of Total UK, discuss the sacking of 900 contract workers in Lincolnshire.

Correspondent Jon Leyne and Abdel Bari Atwan, editor of the Al-Quds newspaper based in London, discuss how the media in the Middle East is reporting the situation in Iran.

A journalist does not have to hand over her notes to the police, the High Court in Belfast has ruled. The PSNI was trying to force Suzanne Breen to hand over material linked to articles she had written on the Real IRA. She discusses how important this judgement is to the protection of sources.

The song Lili Marleen was a wartime hit among both German and British troops. Now, the song is being used to help raise money for veterans, with a play being staged in Porthcawl in Wales based on the life of five women who recorded the song. Writer of the musical, Oscar Fovarge, explains why this is such a fascinating story.

Environment correspondent Sarah Mukherjee reports on the work in Weston-Super-Mare in Somerset to protect the town from flooding.

It is nearly 30 years since the military ruler of Pakistan, General Zia ul Haq, decreed that the country should be an Islamic state. Writer and journalist Mohammed Hanif considers the effect on a country whose founder, Mohammed Ali Jinnah, dreamed of turning into a liberal democracy.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00kwftg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00l6c7t)
Venus of Empire - The Life of Pauline Bonaparte

Episode 5

Diana Quick reads from Flora Fraser's biography of Pauline Bonaparte, Napoleon's favourite sister.

While Napoleon's great reign comes to an end, Pauline re-establishes herself as a 'little queen' in Roman society. But it is not long before she realises that her brother's health is poor and that she must do all in her power to help him.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00kwkjc)
British surrogacy law; Winifred Nicholson; Moving house

The state of British surrogacy law examined. Plus, the life and work of painter Winifred Nicholson; and the pleasures and trauma of moving into a new home.


FRI 11:00 The Horses of Spindles Farm (b00l1w91)
In January 2008 the RSPCA raided a farm in Buckinghamshire and in a glare of publicity, removed more than 100 horses, ponies and donkeys, as well as the carcasses of others. Mike Embley follows the ensuing court case and finds out what it reveals about the horse trade in Britain.

A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Electric Ink (b011kvmn)
Series 1

Episode 3

Editor Oliver wants Terry from Tottenham, as 'street boy' Freddy inadvertently breaks a top story in the Treasury.

Old hacks meet new media in Alistair Beaton’s satire set in the changing world of the newspaper industry.

Maddox ...... Robert Lindsay
Oliver ...... Alex Jennings
Amelia ...... Elizabeth Berrington
Tasneem ...... Zita Sattar
Masha ...... Debbie Chazen
Freddy ...... Ben Willbond
Announcer ...... Matt Addis

With additional material by Tom Mitchelson.

Director: Sally Avens

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2009.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00kwn4h)
Consumer news and issues with Winifred Robinson.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00kwn5v)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00kwn8k)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 Feedback (b00l20td)
Roger Bolton speaks to the World News Editor of the BBC about coverage of the events in Iran.

Listeners express their outrage regarding the potential radio digital switchover in 2015, announced in Lord Carter's Digital Britain Report.

We have the initial response to Stephen Fry's first show as the host of I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Plus we celebrate the 40th anniversary of a Radio 2 institution, The Organist Entertains.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00kwn9s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00l20tg)
Series 2

Old Boggie

Series of four plays by Nick Warburton, set in an idiosyncratic restaurant in the Fens.

Chef Warwick Hedges is invited to lunch in a remote part of the Fens and he discovers treasure guarded by a ghost-dog.

Warwick ...... Trevor Peacock
Jack ...... Sam Dale
Codlett ...... Malcolm Tierney
Samuel ...... John Rowe
Zofia ...... Helen Longworth
Imogen ...... Lizzy Watts

Directed by Claire Grove.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00l20tj)
Peter Gibbs chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Pippa Greenwood, Bob Flowerdew and Matthew Biggs answer questions posed by gardeners in Kent.

Including Gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 America, Empire of Liberty (b00kwnwj)
Watergate and the Imperial Presidency

Series charting the history of America, written and presented by David Reynolds.

Paranoia and arrogance in the White House lead to the downfall of President Nixon.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00l213l)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00l213n)
Francine Stock talks to Nic Roeg and Quadrophenia director Franc Roddam about opera, cinema and Aria, a portmanteau of short films orchestrated by producer Don Boyd.

Poet Clive Wilmer and Professor Jeffrey Richards cross swords over their favourite Errol Flynn swashbuckler.

Derek Malcolm surveys the career of legendary Polish director Andrzej Wajda.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00kwny2)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.
The PM Speaker vote closed at noon on 22 June 2009, please do not call as your vote will not count and you may be charged.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00kwnzc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00l213q)
Series 68

Episode 8

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. Panellists include Jeremy Hardy, Andy Hamilton and Francis Wheen.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00kwn9v)
Clarrie's over the moon at winning first prize for most imaginative interpretation at the flower festival.

Lilian's feeling wretched. She's let Matt down when he most needed her support. After spending the night at Adam's, the Dower House now feels unbearably quiet to her. Worried that Matt may have reached breaking point, she's inconsolable and spends the day leaving messages, begging him to come home.

Fallon's set everything up for Tom and Brenda's engagement party. All goes well but Brenda gets upset when she learns it was Vicky's idea for an announcement in the Echo with photos of Brenda and Tom as children. Brenda's annoyed when she sees Vicky with her hands all over Mike on the dance floor. But she and Tom couldn't be happier.

Mike and Vicky leave early and Mike impulsively proposes to her under the stars. She replies with a convincing yes, yes, yes.

Lilian seeks out Adam at the party. She wants to spend another night at his. She's convinced that either something's happened to Matt, or he doesn't want to see her again, so either way she's lost him. She doesn't know how she can live without him and doesn't know what she's going to do.

Episode written by Graham Harvey.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00kwp13)
Arts news and reviews.

At the age of seventy, many singer-songwriters would be putting together Greatest Hits albums, but Neil Sedaka is celebrating 57 years in the business with a UK tour as well as a CD release that includes eleven new songs. He discusses his creative versatility with Kirsty Lang and describes the highlights of his prolific career, from his early training as a classical pianist to his time in the Brill Building hit-factory and, later, how Elton John rescued him from being out-of-favour with the young public. He also reveals that preparations are afoot for a stage musical about his life, with a reality TV series to find the performer who will play the role of Neil himself.

Alfred Hitchcock's romantic thriller North by Northwest, starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint, is returning to the big screen. It contains many memorable virtuoso set pieces, including some sizzling scenes of sexual banter between Grant and Saint on a train; when the couple finally get together the camera cuts away to a famous shot of the train entering a tunnel. Film historian Ian Christie discusses examples of cinematic sexual imagery from the days when censorship forbade anything too explicit.

Eight hundred saxophonists are taking to the streets of London to perform an epic musical endeavour: The Leviathan, composed by saxophonist John Harle. Harle's varied career has seen him turn his hand to everything from Harrison Birtwistle premieres to composing the theme tune for thriller series Silent Witness. He talks to Kirsty Lang about the practicalities of pulling off such a large scale musical project.

Is British dance too insular and biased against women choreographers? Choreographer Siobhan Davies discusses the state of British contemporary dance with John Ashford, who is stepping down after running The Place for over twenty years.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00l0vzv)
Diary of an On-Call Girl

The Long Dark Tea-time of the Cells

Yvonne Antrobus' dramatisation of the blogs and book by 'WPC Ellie Bloggs', the pseudonymous blogger who is also a serving police officer.

WPC Ellie Bloggs ...... Nadine Marshall
Bongo/Max/Driver ...... Matt Addis
Wayne Perril/Mr Grahams ...... Paul Rider
Lisa Perril/Meryl ...... Rachel Atkins
Will/TD ...... Stephen Hogan
Becks ...... Annabelle Dowler
Sgt. Woodcock/Skipper ...... Philip Fox
Minnie/Frances/Saira ...... Janice Acquah
Luke/Boy ...... Benjamin Askew
Colleen ...... Lizzy Watts
Adam ...... Gene Goodman.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00l2gv4)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate at the London College of Fashion. Panellists are Tessa Jowell, Minister for the Olympics, the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General, Shadow Leader of the House Alan Duncan, Liberal Democrat peer Julia Neuberger, media entrepreneur Kelvin Mackenzie.


FRI 20:50 David Attenborough's Life Stories (b00l2h9p)
Series 1

Platypus

Along the soft, muddy river banks of New South Wales, the female duck-billed platypus makes a burrow to raise her family.

Not only is this the strangest of creatures, it is also one of the most tricky to film.

Series of talks by Sir David Attenborough on the natural histories of creatures and plants from around the world.

Producer: Julian Hector

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in June 2009.


FRI 21:00 America, Empire of Liberty Omnibus (b00l2h9r)
The Impotence of Omnipotence

Omnibus edition of the series charting the history of America, written and presented by David Reynolds.

Fractious politics at home and the war in Vietnam expose America's weaknesses throughout the tumultuous 1960s.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00kwql8)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00kwqmw)
With Ritula Shah.

Scotland Yard launches an investigation into the alleged misuse of expenses by some MPs and peers.

Iran's supreme leader tells Iranians to stop their protests to avoid bloodshed.

EU leaders reach an agreement to encourage Irish voters to accept the Lisbon treaty.

Recession and unemployment - who will pay the biggest price, the young or the old?


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00kwqqq)
David Nicholls - One Day

Episode 10

Julian Rhind-Tutt reads from the bittersweet novel by David Nicholls.

Seventeen years after the one night they spent together in 1988, memories of that fateful day are still strong - perhaps even stronger, given the events that have shaped and changed their lives for ever.

A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b00l0z38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00kwqv0)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Mark D'Arcy.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00kwq0d)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00l0vzx)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00l0vzq)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00l0vzs)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00l0vzv)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b00l0z38)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b00l0z38)

A Guide to Water Birds 14:45 SUN (b00kwh7d)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b007s363)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b0082b40)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00l0ymd)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00l162z)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00l162s)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b00l0z3g)

All in the Mind 16:30 WED (b00l0z3g)

America, Empire of Liberty Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b00l2h9r)

America, Empire of Liberty 15:45 MON (b00kwnwn)

America, Empire of Liberty 15:45 TUE (b00kwnwb)

America, Empire of Liberty 15:45 WED (b00kwnwd)

America, Empire of Liberty 15:45 THU (b00kwnwg)

America, Empire of Liberty 15:45 FRI (b00kwnwj)

Americana 19:15 SUN (b00kwh7z)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b00l0xxl)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b00ksztl)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00kwfbb)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00kvt8c)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00l2gv4)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00krhhl)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00krhhl)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00kwfsm)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00kwfsm)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b00l54ws)

Bill Mitchell: The Man Who Wrestled Pumas... Probably 11:30 THU (b00l1q7h)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00kwqtr)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00kwqqj)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00kwqql)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00kwqqn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00kwqqq)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00kvp9p)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00kwj2g)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00kwj2g)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00l6c82)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00l6c82)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00l6c7p)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00l6c7p)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00l6c7r)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00l6c7r)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00l6c7t)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00kwftb)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00krtw3)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00kwh7g)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 08:50 SUN (b00kvt8f)

David Attenborough's Life Stories 20:50 FRI (b00l2h9p)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00kwftg)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00kwftg)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00l0xxb)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00l0yl3)

Drama 14:15 WED (b0090s0n)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00l1qw1)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00l20tg)

Electric Ink 11:30 FRI (b011kvmn)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00kwf9w)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00kwcny)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00kwj0z)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00kwhzk)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00kwhzm)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00kwhzp)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00kwhzr)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00kwh81)

Feedback 13:30 FRI (b00l20td)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b00ktc9y)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00l0z3b)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b00kwfbv)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b00kwfbv)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00kwfb2)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00l16vr)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00kwp26)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00kwp0x)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00kwp0z)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00kwp11)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00kwp13)

Frontiers 21:00 MON (b00l0xxn)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00kvt83)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00l20tj)

Hallelujah 13:30 SUN (b00jhpp8)

Hut 33 18:30 THU (b00wlldq)

I Was Put on Trial by Al Qaeda 05:45 SUN (b009y492)

I Was... 18:30 WED (b00fpy6b)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b00l0xxg)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00l16vp)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00l16vp)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00l0z3d)

James and the Giant Tree 21:00 WED (b00l14wp)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00kvt85)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00l213l)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b00l0z36)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b00l0z36)

Leading Edge 21:00 THU (b00l1rxx)

Learning to Love the Microphone 20:45 WED (b00l14pb)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b00kwfst)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00kwfbs)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00l0yl5)

Mark Watson Makes the World Substantially Better 23:00 TUE (b00d75nw)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00l1rg6)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00kwbkd)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00kwfs9)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00kwhst)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00kwhc0)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00kwhc2)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00kwhc4)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00kwhc6)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00l13mw)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00l13mw)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00l14p4)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00kwfb4)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00kwfb4)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b00l14p8)

Newfangle 11:30 MON (b00l0vl7)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00kwbkn)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00kwfsk)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00kwhx5)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00kwhwx)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00kwhwz)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00kwhx1)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00kwhx3)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00kwfsp)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00kwbkv)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00kwfsy)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00kwft6)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00kwfc1)

News 13:00 SAT (b00kwfb8)

Off the Page 23:00 MON (b00ktprr)

Off the Page 13:30 THU (b00l1qvz)

Oh My What a Rotten Song! 13:30 TUE (b00l0yl1)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00kwh7j)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00kwh7j)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00kwfbj)

PM 17:00 MON (b00kwnz3)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00kwnxw)

PM 17:00 WED (b00kwnxy)

PM 17:00 THU (b00kwny0)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00kwny2)

Performing to the Red Light 15:30 SAT (b00kt8r5)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00kwh7v)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b00kryft)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00kwh7l)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00kwbkq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00kwhzh)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00kwhyj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00kwhyl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00kwhyn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00kwhyq)

Punt PI 10:30 SAT (b00kwf9y)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b00kslks)

Quote... Unquote 13:30 MON (b00l0vl9)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00kwft2)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00kwft2)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00kwft2)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b00kwcnw)

Ramblings 15:02 THU (b00kwcnw)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00kwfbd)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00kwf9t)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00kwfbx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00kwbkj)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00kwfsf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00kwhwv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00kwhw0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00kwhw2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00kwhw4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00kwhw6)

Self-Storage 23:00 WED (b01hn1q8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00kwbkg)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00kwbkl)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00kwfbl)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00kwfsc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00kwfsh)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00kwh7n)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00kwhts)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00kwhvy)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00kwhsw)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00kwhtv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00kwhsy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00kwhtx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00kwht0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00kwhtz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00kwht2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00kwhv1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00kwfbq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00kwh7s)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00kwnzh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00kwnz5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00kwnz7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00kwnz9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00kwnzc)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00kwfsr)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00kwfsr)

Spread a Little Happiness 11:30 WED (b00l13n0)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00kwr5d)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00kwr5d)

Strangers on Trains 23:15 WED (b00d75p2)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00kwft8)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00kwft0)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00kwftd)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00kwh7x)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00kwh7x)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00kwnb3)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00kwnb3)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00kwn9n)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00kwn9n)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00kwn9q)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00kwn9q)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00kwn9s)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00kwn9s)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00kwn9v)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b00kvr9j)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b00l1rxv)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b00kvt87)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00l213n)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00kwftj)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00kwftj)

The Horses of Spindles Farm 11:00 FRI (b00l1w91)

The Ian Blair Years 20:00 MON (b00l0xxj)

The Job Clinic 11:00 MON (b00l0vc8)

The Job Clinic 11:00 TUE (b00l0ykx)

The Job Clinic 11:00 WED (b00l13my)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00l14p2)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:00 SUN (b00ksvt5)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b00kvt89)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00l213q)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (b00kt7sh)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (b00l0y01)

The Secret World 18:30 TUE (b011dkny)

The Stanley Baxter Playhouse 23:00 THU (b00j8djx)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00kwfb0)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00kwfv3)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00kwqqg)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00kwqmp)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00kwqmr)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00kwqmt)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00kwqmw)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00ktdbb)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00l14p6)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b00kwqv2)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00kwqtt)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b00kwqtw)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b00kwqty)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b00kwqv0)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00kwcp2)

Today 06:00 MON (b00kwj1c)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00kwj11)

Today 06:00 WED (b00kwj13)

Today 06:00 THU (b00kwj15)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00kwj17)

Unseen Britain 21:30 TUE (b00j67ml)

Waldemar at the Venice Biennale 11:30 TUE (b00l0ykz)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00kwcnt)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00kwcp0)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00kwfb6)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00kwfbn)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00kwfsw)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00kwft4)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00kwftl)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00kwh7q)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00kwh96)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00kwqyp)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00kwn89)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00kwqmm)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b00kwn5n)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b00kwql2)

Weather 12:57 WED (b00kwn5q)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00kwql4)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00kwn5s)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00kwql6)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00kwn5v)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00kwql8)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00kwh98)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00kwfbg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00kwkjh)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00kwkj5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00kwkj7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00kwkj9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00kwkjc)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00kwn9l)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00kwn8c)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00kwn8f)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00kwn8h)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00kwn8k)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00kwn5l)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00kwn47)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00kwn4b)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00kwn4f)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00kwn4h)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b00kwbks)