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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 11 APRIL 2009

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00jjzml)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00jhfr9)
Sisters of Sinai

Episode 5

By Janet Soskice. The true story of the two sisters who discovered one of the earliest known copies of the Bible on Mount Sinai in 1892. Read by Stella Gonet.

After a long and time-consuming battle, Agnes' discovery is finally published, but this does not put an end to the twins' travels. At the age of 63 they set off for their sixth and final trip to Mount Sinai.

A Pier Productions production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00jjzmn)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00jjzmq)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00jjzms)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00jjzmv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00jjzmx)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Gordon Gray.


SAT 05:45 Lent Talks (b00jj13m)
God Present in Absence?

Six well-known figures explore ideas of the absence of God from their own perspective.

Jewish feminist theologian Melissa Raphael wonders what Jesus' cry of abandonment on the cross says about God's absence and how it connects with the experience of many Jews in the Holocaust.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00jkd19)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00jkd1c)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00jkhk4)
Herefordshire Eco-Community

Living sustainably outside of cities and finding housing without building village suburbs are big problems for those wishing to live in rural landscapes. To buy the cheapest properties in counties such as Herefordshire you would have to borrow 9 or 10 times the average wage and the knock on effect is a far less diverse population.

In these troubled financial times Canon Frome Court hopes to offer a solution first made popular in the 70’s. It’s an organic rural farm community set up in a former school and Georgian Mansion which today houses 45 people young and old. This is the first time that the community have opened their doors to the media but as Helen Mark discovers when she meets the members there are few closed doors once inside.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b00jkhk6)
Farming Today This Week

The tiny midge poses a big threat to Britain's farmers. As summer approaches, any Bluetongue infected insects could be blown from the continent and spread the virus by biting livestock, causing lameness, infertility and death in sheep.

Farmers are being urged to vaccinate their animals against serotype 8, but many just aren't bothering. As we import infected animals and have no protection from the second threat of serotype 1, are there too many chinks in our armour?

Anna Hill investigates.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00jkhk8)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00jkhkb)
Presented by John Humphrys and James Naughtie.

Huw Williams reports on the discovery that the helicopter crash which killed 16 people in the North Sea was caused by what is described as a 'catastrophic gearbox failure'.

Political correspondent Ross Hawkins discusses accusations of a smear campaign against the Tories by the Labour Party.

French marines stormed a yacht captured by Somali pirates, freeing four of the five hostages; the fifth hostage was killed during the operation. Emma Jane Kirby reports.

Kevin Connolly reports on the efforts to help a US captain taken hostage by Somali pirates.

Alex Bushill reports from Cornwall on the calls for more government help for people to find jobs.

Shadow Home Secretary Chris Grayling discusses the speech from radical Imam Anwar al-Awlaki in a pre-recorded video message to an audience in a taxpayer-funded East London community centre.

London is attempting to tackle its pigeon problem with the help of a new birdman. Reporter Nicola Stanbridge meets Gary Railton and his Harris Hawk, George.

Thought for the day with the Reverend Bob Marshall, an Anglican priest.

Jack Izzard reports on the conflict in Sri Lanka between the government and the Tamil Tigers.

Bob Crow, of the union RMT, and Chris Allen, health and safety director of Oil and Gas UK, discuss the helicopter crash in the North Sea crash which killed 16 people.

Journalist Tom Service and the chief executive of Youth Music Christina Coker discuss why more young people should get involved in classical music.

French MP Herve Mariton and Dr Lee Willett discuss the kidnap and death of a French sailor by Somali pirates.

Correspondent Ross Hawkins and Paul Staines, who is better known as blogger Guido Fawkes, discuss what is contained in the controversial emails sent by Damian McBride, an aide of the Prime Minister.

Former Home Office minister Fiona Mactaggart and Liberal Democrat peer Lord Carlile discuss if the police force is no longer properly accountable.

Political writer Peter Oborne and cricket writer David Frith discuss the decision by the MCC to relax regulations on attire at Lord's Cricket Ground during the Twenty20 World Cup to allow fancy dress.

The Crown Prosecution Service is paying a 250 pound bonus to staff who made it in to work in London on the first day of the heavy snow in February. Mark Wallace, of the Taxpayers Alliance, discusses the bonuses.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00jkhkj)
Fi Glover talks to a woman who found herself in Bam when the earthquake struck there.

Her studio guest is basketball player turned presenter turned psychologist John Amaechi.

There is a guerrilla report from a barber shop in Bristol where a line is drawn on the floor and no woman is allowed to cross it.

Plus a man who has streaked at more than 400 public events, the Inheritance Tracks of Daniel O'Donnell and poetry from Matt Harvey.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00jkhkl)
Historian Dr Julian Litten talks about interesting cemeteries to visit around the country and abroad, revealing some of their history and unique characteristics. He is the Chairman of the Friends of Hardwick Road (King's Lynn) Cemetery, Founder of the Friends of Kensal Green Cemetery and a member of the Association of Burial Authorities Executive, and of the English Heritage/Church of England Human Remains Advisory Service.

Undercliffe cemetery in Bradford, West Yorkshire, is a one of Julian's favourites. The cemetery has amazing landscaping on a bluff overlooking the city and contains funerary monuments of profound grandeur.

Christopher Somerville is a writer, broadcaster and a walking enthusiast. He shares his experiences of the pleasures and miseries of this leisure activity and talks about some of his favourite UK walks. Christopher's column 'Walk of the Month' was published for over 15 years in the Daily Telegraph. He is now the Walking Correspondent for The Times, and his latest book contains a selection of 100 walks all over Britain.


SAT 10:30 Motownship (b00jkhkn)
Midge Ure travels to Cape Town to meet a group of young township musicians who are using traditional African instruments to record covers of classic Motown and soul hits.

Abavuki is a group of 10 aspiring young musicians from Langa, Cape Town's oldest, and one of South Africa's toughest, black townships. The project is produced by London-based Barney Rattle, who has been fusing diverse music styles for many years to bring the sounds of Cape Town's townships to the world.

Midge meets the musicians in Langa township and learns about the project and Abavuki's tough backgrounds.


SAT 11:00 Beyond Westminster (b00jq7nd)
Looking at politics beyond and outside the Westminster parliament. Elinor Goodman examines a 'Green New Deal' which has been promised to fight global warming and the recession at the same time. She discovers, however, that tensions between short and long term priorities are making green politics a challenge.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00jkhks)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00jkhkv)
Millions of people face reductions to their weekly social security benefit claims.

Plus the future of pensions after the plunging stock market wiped more than 161 billion pounds from the pension pots of millions of people.

Six months on from the collapse of leisure company XL, some customers fear they will never get their money back.

Benevolent funds see a rise in demand for their help as many more face hardship.


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b00jjtz1)
Series 27

Episode 6

Comedy sketches and satirical comments from Steve Punt, Hugh Dennis and the team including Mitch Benn, Laura Shavin, Jon Holmes and Marcus Brigstocke.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00jkhkx)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00jkhkz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00jjtz3)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate in London. Panellists are the former Mayor of London Ken Livingstone, Conservative parliamentary candidate Priti Patel, political editor of The Spectator Fraser Nelson and Maajid Nawaz of the Quilliam Foundation.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00jkhl1)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00jkv1w)
Alan Ayckbourn - Man of the Moment

A new production of the dark comedy by Sir Alan Ayckbourn, to mark the occasion of the playwright's 70th birthday. A career criminal, who has written an autobiography and is now a television celebrity, agrees to participate in a reality TV show filmed at his Mediterranean villa.

Jill Rillington ...... Lisa Dillon
Trudy Parks ...... Janie Dee
Douglas Beechey ...... Alex Jennings
Vic Parks ...... Tim Pigott-Smith
Kenny Collins ...... Damian O'Hare
Sharon ...... Ella Smith
Ruy ...... Alan Shearman
Floor Manager ...... Michael Simkins
David ...... John Baddeley
Film crew ...... Kenneth Danziger, Matthew Wolf
Children ...... Matilda and Alfie Wickham

Directed by Martin Jarvis.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b00jkv1y)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Highlights of this week's Woman's Hour programmes with Jane Little.

Carole King talks about her extraordinary career, in which she created some of the most memorable pop hits for the stars of the 1960s and 70s, including Will You Love Me Tomorrow and You Make Me Feel Like a Natural Woman. But it was not until she released her solo album Tapestry, one of the biggest-selling albums of all time, that Carole King received international acclaim as a singer in her own right.

Classical pianist Imogen Cooper performs in the studio and talks about her obsession with Schubert's music.

As growing number of couples decide to have just one child, the pros and cons of growing up solo and why one professor thinks we need a global spiritual awakening.

Gail McGarva, one of the few remaining wooden boat builders able to build 'by eye', talks about her specialist craft.

And one of the most important questions: should a man whose hair is receding just accept his baldness; embrace it even? Or does society prefer a man with a full head of hair? Journalist Brian Beacom explains his decision to have a hair transplant and the author Toby Young explains why he is bald and proud.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00jkv20)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b00jkv22)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00jkv24)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00jkv26)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00jkv28)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00jkv2b)
Clive Anderson and guests with an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy.

Armando Iannucci, the man behind The Thick of It, Knowing Me, Knowing You ... with Alan Partridge and The Day Today, chats to Clive talks about writing and directing his new film, In The Loop.

Clive meets actor Clarke Peters, who has appeared Damages and the cult TV hit The Wire and will be playing a young Nelson Mandela in the upcoming Channel 4 drama Endgame.

Hunter Davies offers Clive some tips on coping with the recession from his new book, Cold Meat and How to Disguise It: A History of Advice on How to Survive Bad Times, published by Frances Lincoln.

Arthur Smith talks all things cricket with Scyld Berry, editor of the Wisden Cricketers' Almanack 2009.

Comedy comes from Robin Sebastian and Nigel Harrison, who perform sketches from the Kenneth Williams extravaganza Stop Messing About, playing at the Leicester Square Theatre in London.

With music from folk group Mawkin:Causley, playing The Jolly Broom Man from their new album, The Awkward Recruit.

Plus Sarah Jane Morris performs Promised Land from her 11th album, Where It Hurts.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00jkv2d)
John Sentamu

Mary Ann Sieghart profiles the Archbishop of York, John Sentamu, who has called for St George's Day to be made an official English holiday. It is just the latest cause to be championed by one of the Anglican Church's most outspoken leaders. Sentamu had to flee for his life from Uganda to escape the Idi Amin regime and since then has taken up the cause of justice.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00jkv2g)
Skellig and Death and the King's Horseman at the National Theatre

Tom Sutcliffe is joined by writer Philip Hoare, novelist Aminatta Forna and documentary film-maker Adam Curtis to discuss the cultural highlights of the week. Featuring an arthritic angel, a knackered Viking and a man who can't quite accept he is a Nazi.

David Almond's Whitbread prize-winning novel for teenagers, Skellig, has been adapted for TV by Sky One, in a version starring Tim Roth, Bill Milner, John Simm and Kelly MacDonald. But when the panel accompanied the story's lonely schoolboy hero into the shed at the bottom of the garden, were they as fascinated as he was by what he found?

The exhibition Madness and Modernity: Mental Illness and the Visual Arts in Vienna 1900 anatomises the links between psychiatry and the fin-de-siecle fine arts, from the impact of grotesque medical photographs on Egon Schiele to the artwork of the insane.

The obsession with degeneration and the prospect of creating perfect humans helps to nudge the anti-hero of the film Good towards a moral black hole. Viggo Mortensen plays an absent-minded literature professor in 1930s Germany who finds himself gradually drawn into the Nazi regime. The movie is based on a 1981 play by the Scottish playwright CP Taylor, but does it have anything new to say?

Death and the King's Horseman is Nobel Laureate Wole Soyinka's 1975 dramatisation of a real incident in post-war Nigeria. A tribal leader attempts to commit suicide in order to follow his late master into the afterlife. But a colonial official intervenes, with disastrous results. Rufus Norris directs an all-black cast, who play the white characters in 'white-face'.

Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned is the debut of a young American writer called Wells Tower. This collection of short stories traces the lives of unhappy Americans, thwarted by hamburger-like growths, poisoned moose and dogs that cannot urinate. And for good measure he throws in a story about a Viking rampage, narrated in the voice of a weary manager.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00jkv2j)
Carl Sagan - A Personal Voyage

Physicist and broadcaster Brian Cox presents a tribute to his science hero, the American astronomer Carl Sagan, the man who many people describe as the greatest populariser of science of all time. His landmark television series Cosmos was seen by more than 60 million people worldwide and inspired a generation of young scientists to regard the universe with wonder and awe.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00jh472)
Something Fresh

Episode 2

Second of a two-part dramatisation of PG Wodehouse's 1915 comic novel.

The rivalry between Ashe and Joan to secure the precious scarab is becoming intense. The obsessive Baxter is in hot pursuit and Lord Emsworth keeps a shotgun beside him in case of midnight marauders.

Ashe ...... Ioan Gruffudd
Joan ...... Helen McCrory
Baxter ...... Jared Harris
Earl of Emsworth ...... Martin Jarvis
J Preston Peters ...... Hector Elizondo
The Hon Freddie ...... Matthew Wolf
George Emerson ...... James Frain
Aline Peters ...... Andrea Bowen
Beach ...... Morgan Sheppard
Mr Judson ...... Darren Richardson
Colonel Mant ...... Kenneth Danziger
Wodehouse ...... Ian Ogilvy

Directed by Martin Jarvis.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00jkv2l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Bringing Up Britain (b00jj0sm)
Series 2

Episode 1

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

Mariella and her guests discuss whether shouting at children inflicts long-term damage or is an inevitable part of busy family life. As the focus on children's behaviour and parents' management of it increases, are there effective alternatives to yelling at children to get them to do what you want?

The panellists are psychotherapist Sue Gerhardt, Professor Stephen Scott of the National Association of Parenting Practitioners and journalist and writer Jennie Bristow.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b00jhg36)
Series 23

2009 Heat 5

From Manchester, chairman Paul Gambaccini hosts the music quiz spanning every era.

With Alan Douglas of Worcestershire, Lesley Ford from Newcastle and John Keir from Kirkaldy in Fife.

Producer Paul Bajoria.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2009.


SAT 23:30 Lost Voices (b00jh476)
Series 1

Dom Moraes: The Double Exile

Poet Brian Patten explores the life and work of lesser-known or forgotten poets.

Born in India, educated at Oxford, admirer of Auden and Spender and a youthful resident of low Soho dives, the life of the beautiful Dom Moraes was in itself poetical. Brian finds in Moraes' work the melancholy of a man who never quite belonged either in India or England.



SUNDAY 12 APRIL 2009

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00jlv14)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b0084f7t)
The Big Chill

Conning Mrs Vinterberg

Specially commissioned stories exploring the darker side of life.

Mr Roper arrives in Copenhagen by night to buy a Qing dynasty vase from a certain Mrs Vinterberg. To his cost, he finds that she collects rather more than antiques.

By Heidi Amsinck, read by Tim McInnerny.

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00jlvgh)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00jlvgk)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00jlvgm)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00jlvr2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00jlvr4)
The sound of bells from All Saints, Daresbury in Cheshire.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00jkv2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00jlvr6)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00jlvr8)
This is My Body

With guest Father Timothy Radcliffe, Mark Tully explores the physical, emotional, legal and spiritual meaning of Jesus' words at the Last Supper.


SUN 06:35 Sunrise Service (b00jlvrb)
The Dean of Christ Church the Very Rev Christopher Lewis leads a meditation from the Deanery garden, where Lewis Carroll once gained inspiration for Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. With the Christ Church Singers, directed by Clive Driskill-Smith.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00jlvrd)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 06:59 Easter Sunday Hymn (b00jlvrg)
Jesus Christ is risen today.


SUN 07:01 News and Papers (b00jlwnq)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00jlwnv)
Roger Bolton discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00jlwnz)
St John's Catholic School for the Deaf

Gabby Logan appeals on behalf of St John's Catholic School for the Deaf. Donations to this appeal should be sent to Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal; please mark the back of your envelope St John's School. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144. Or give via the website.

The school will use your money to buy amplification equipment and musical instruments for pupils. If you are a UK taxpayer, please provide St John's School with your full name and address so they can claim the Gift Aid on your donation worth another 25 per cent. The online and phone donation facilities are not currently available to listeners without a UK postcode.

Registered Charity No: 529319.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00jlwp1)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00jlwp5)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00jlwp7)
The joy of Easter is celebrated in a Eucharist from Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, with excerpts from Messiah marking the 250th anniversary of Handel's death, plus Easter hymns.

Preacher: Professor Sarah Foot, Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History.

Director of Music: Stephen Darlington.

Organist: Clive Driskill-Smith.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00jlxjk)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Paddy O'Connell.

In a week that saw resignations from a Prime Ministerial aide and a top policeman, Paddy gets political reaction from a former special adviser and discusses public interest in the middle of a firestorm, with Sir Menzies Campbell and commentator Peter Obourne.

Jon Manel reports on a new drive to spur innovation and protect invention from copycats. His feature includes recordings made in his own shed.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00jlxjm)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b00jlxjp)
Hillsborough

At the end of the week in which the Hillsborough inquest found that the 96 Liverpool football died unlawfully at the FA Cup semi-final in 1989, Sue MacGregor revisits The Reunion from 2009 when, on the 20th anniversary, she brought together a group of people who were involved in the disaster to talk about the events of that day at a time when they were still in the midst of their fight for justice.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b00jhp5b)
Series 3

Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the game show in which panellists are encouraged to tell lies and compete to see how many items of truth they are able to smuggle past their opponents.

With Lucy Porter, Chris Addison, Clive Anderson and Graeme Garden.

A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00jlxjr)
Larchfield Community

Spring is a time of great activity at the Larchfield Community village. Food is at the heart of community life - Larchfield is a biodynamic livestock farm, with on site butchery, bakery and gardens. But Larchfield is also home to a community where adults with special needs, and those without, live in family groups and work on the land to produce the food that helps sustain not only Larchfield but the wider community of Middlesbrough and North Yorkshire beyond.

Sheila Dillon visits the community while lambing is underway and school visits are in full swing to celebrate the return of Spring, and joins in the preparations for their Easter celebrations.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00jlxjt)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00jlxjw)
A look at events around the world with Brian Hanrahan.


SUN 13:30 Fixing the Pedigree Dog (b00htl96)
Sue Broom looks at the genetics and health of pedigree dogs and asks if modern science and an understanding of genetics can produce a solution to make them healthier.

A recent TV documentary highlighted some severe health problems in a number of pedigree dog breeds. The breeds of most concern include Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with syringiomyelia, a neurological disorder thought to be caused by too small a skull squeezing the brain. Also German shepherd dogs and Neapolitan mastiffs have a high incidence of hip dysplasia and Basset and Bloodhounds bred to be too heavy leaving them prone to arthritis and back problems.

However, as Sue discovers, there are changes being made to the way that pedigree dogs are being bred. The Kennel Club has implemented its Fit for Function, Fit for Life campaign. Also, Crufts will be introducing new breed standards, the blueprint for a show dog. They are in the process of training judges to select dogs not only on their looks but also on their health.

These changes are welcomed by the RSPCA, but they do not believe that they go far enough and are concerned that the changes in the breed standards are too vague and open to too much interpretation by judges, many of whom are themselves breeders.

Certain breed groups do not like being dictated to and think that the problems are being overblown. But some dog breeders are actively seeking out DNA tests for disorders that affect their breed and using this information to 'breed out' unhealthy genes from their stock.

Sue finds out what this shake-up of the pedigree dog breeding world will mean for future breeds and whether or not some breeds as we know them will even survive.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00jjt85)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

John Cushnie, Matthew Biggs and Pippa Greenwood answer questions posed by gardeners in Surrey.

To mark the 250th anniversary of the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew, Anne Swithinbank and Matthew Biggs return to the gardens where they trained. The Herbarium there contains seven million plant samples, some priceless exhibits collected by, among others, Charles Darwin.

Including the Gardeners' Question Time gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 Ankle High History (b00jlxjy)
Episode 4

Scotland has a lost archaeological history - the ruins of thousands of townships and buildings which have never been recorded on any map, yet which tell the tale of life in a period of dramatic change. Mark Stephen follows attempts to uncover those stories before the buildings fade from the landscape.

On the island of Mull, he meets two ladies who stumbled across a lost chapel. As he joins the specialist team surveying the site, he learns that not a single written record of it exists - but that it's probably over a thousand years old.

Producer Monise Durrani.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00jlxr0)
Therese Raquin

Episode 1

First of a two-part dramatisation by Diana Griffiths of the novel by Emile Zola, set in mid-19th century Paris.

Therese is forced by her aunt to marry her sickly son, Camille. However, upon moving to Paris, she and her lover Laurent conspire to murder Camille so that they may love freely.

Therese ...... Charlotte Riley
Laurent ...... Andrew Buchan
Camille ...... Toby Hadoke
Mme Raquin ...... Pauline Jefferson
Michaud ...... Rob Pickavance
Suzanne ...... Deborah McAndrew
Manager/Assistant ...... Carl Cieka

Directed by Pauline Harris.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00jlxt0)
A Nature Writing Special including the work of Horatio Clare, John Stewart Collis and Gerald Durrell

Mariella Frostrup presents a celebration of nature writing with guests including Horatio Clare, the author of a new book tracing the annual migration of swallows.


SUN 16:30 Lost Voices (b00jlyyq)
Series 1

WH Davies

Poet Brian Patten explores the life and work of lesser-known or forgotten poets.

WH Davies travelled the world from his native Wales, sleeping rough and jumping trains. His work has a simplicity which is still revered in the form of his well-known lines: 'What is this life if, full of care, We have no time to stand and stare?'

But few people know that it was Davies who wrote them. Brian remembers a poet whose work helped set him on his own way as a writer.


SUN 17:00 The New Scramble for Africa (b00jhxmk)
Mike Wooldridge reports on the quiet economic inroads into Africa being made by India. He asks if we are witnessing a modern-day scramble for Africa as India, along with the world's other most populous country, China, seriously compete with each other to engage resource-rich Africa. If so, what will be the consequences for the continent as a whole and will it benefit or be damaged by this competition?

A Ruth Evans production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00jkv2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00jlyys)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00jlyyv)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00jlyyx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00jlyyz)
Ernie Rae introduces his selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00jlyz1)
Lynda and Neil meet outside church. Lynda tries to persuade Neil that his handbells would work perfectly on the Antony Gormley plinth. Neil isn't keen.

Jolene takes a call from Fallon. She's missed her flight back from Ireland. Sid has to be the Easter Bunny instead. Sid isn't happy - the bunny suit's very hot.

David and Ruth discuss Phil's birthday. Plans are coming together nicely. They tell Pip they'll be sticking to her Lenten diet for good. Pip tries to sound pleased, but is delighted when they get to the Bull for lunch and realises they're joking.

Helen and Annette share a table at the Bull with David and Ruth. Annette offers to help Pip with her French revision. Sid appears in costume and David can't resist pulling his tail! Sid won't let Ben take an Easter egg for Josh. Lynda tries to take one for Molly Button but has a fight with Sid who says Molly's already had one.

Sid goes outside to cool off, and scares George who sees the Easter Bunny with no head on! A furious Jolene finds Sid outside. She's had to apologise to everyone Sid's offended. He'd better hop it inside and save their reputation as a family-friendly pub!

Episode written by Nawal Gadalla.


SUN 19:15 Go4it (b00jlyz3)
Kirsten O'Brien goes shopping with children to find out what's cool and what's not, what makes a craze, what age kids stop playing with toys and if shopping makes them happy. They tell Kirsten what it is like to be a child shopping today and consumer champion Ed Mayo explains the rights of children shoppers.


SUN 19:45 Afternoon Reading (b008nwjx)
Portraits of East Anglia

Time and Tide

Specially commissioned stories by local authors, inspired by paintings of the East Anglian landscape. Recorded in front of an audience in Halesworth, Suffolk, the readings are introduced by Neil Innes.

On a Sunday afternoon in late September, two men make their way home across the quay at Orford. The dreaded weekenders have left and the village is once again quiet. But is everything quite as it seems?

By Anthony Horowitz, read by Gerard McDermott.

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00jjp9j)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00jjt87)
John Wilson presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00jkhkv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00jlwnz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b00jjls6)
All New

Peter Day hears from the business people who, faced with the uncertainties of the global recession, are pinning their hopes for economic recovery on bold new innovation.

He visits a weekly meeting of OpenCoffee club, a busy gathering point for networking entrepreneurs, and speaks to small start-up companies who are launching their products in the current downturn.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00jlzbx)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00jlzbz)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster with Carolyn Quinn. Including The Prime Ministers.


SUN 23:02 The Film Programme (b00jjt89)
Francine Stock talks to poet, publisher, painter, photographer and actor Viggo Mortensen, star of Lord of the Rings, about his new drama, Good. She also hears from the director of award-winning Swedish teen vampire movie, Let the Right One In, who reveals the secrets of his gory sound effects.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00jlvr8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 13 APRIL 2009

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00jlzf1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00jj0f6)
Picturing the Social Order

Laurie Taylor is in Leeds to visit the first exhibition to draw together images of how, historically, artists have represented the social order. He is joined by Alistair Robinson, the curator of Rank: Picturing the Social Order 1615-2009, as well as by political cartoonist Martin Rowson and sociologist Gordon Fyfe.

They discuss evocative images, from The Chain of Being to the Map of World Poverty, and consider the challenges of demonstrating power, class and wealth in a visual way.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00jlvr4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00jlzll)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00jlzqv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00jlzln)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00jlzqx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00jlzs2)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Gordon Gray.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00jlzs4)
Chris Impey investigates allegations that Britain's dairy cows are producing more milk than their bodies are able to cope with. The black and white Holstein is the most popular milking breed, but has been bred to give increasing quantities of milk over recent decades. Chris visits a Holstein farm to find out if the concerns over the cows are justified.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00jlzs6)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00jlzx6)
Presented by Evan Davis and James Naughtie.

Derek Scott, a former economic advisor to the Government, explains the damage that the emails which discussed smearing senior Tories has had on Downing Street.

Reporter Andrew Hosken examines the struggle for survival at one local newspaper: the Biggleswade Chronicle in Bedfordshire.

Glyn Travis, assistant general secretary of the Prison Officers' Association, explains what caused the riot at HMP Ashwell.

Jonathan Head reports on the latest clashes between the army and anti-government protesters in Bangkok, and Sir James Hodge, former British ambassador to Thailand, discusses the genesis of the riots.

Architects Professor Robert Adam and Sunand Prasad discuss Prince Charles's objection to a proposed building in Chelsea.

Thought for the day with the Reverend Dr Giles Fraser.

Commander Chris Davies, from the Nato Shipping Centre in Northwood, discusses what is being done to stop future pirate attacks.

Health Secretary Alan Johnson says he was "shocked and disgusted" by e-mails which discussed smearing senior Tories, but that the prime minister could not be held personally responsible.

Winifred Robinson visited a secure unit for children for a Radio 4 documentary and describes the conditions under which young offenders are being held.

Prisons Minister David Hanson discusses whether measures to alleviate overcrowding and cut costs in the prison system can be blamed for the HMP Ashwell riot.

David Lane, the Economist's Italian business and finance correspondent, explains what the mafia may gain after the earthquake in L'Aquila.

Scientists in China claim that they have created new eggs in mice using stem cells. Professor Robin Lovell-Badge explains the research and its significance to fertility treatment.

Paul Bradshaw of Birmingham City University and Will Hutton, former editor at large of the Observer, discuss the future of local journalism.

Editor of the Spectator Matthew D'Ancona and Guardian columnist Martin Kettle discuss Damian McBride's emails.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00jlzxd)
Michael Portillo examines what drives people to violence and whether any one of us has the potential to become violent. If society tells us violence is good or justified, how does that change us?

According to John Gray, society is not progressing. Although we may be progressing in the arenas of science and knowledge, Gray believes that we cannot use the same model for our progress in ethics, politics and the arts. He thinks that these are essentially cyclical, and our progressions can easily be lost.

Author Amanda Craig thinks that we need to return to the values of the Victorian novel which gave an insight into contemporary social issues. She thinks that authors are now timid of writing works with a large cast driven by a strong plot.

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales incorporated the medieval styles of bawdy anecdote, allegorical fable and courtly romance. Peter Ackroyd has translated these tales of universal human themes into the language of modern day prose.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00jlzzd)
William Fiennes - The Music Room

Episode 1

Dan Stevens reads William Fiennes' memoir of his magical childhood in a moated castle in which he grew up with his severely epileptic older brother.

The five-year-old William is preoccupied with fishing for pike in the castle's moat. Richard's seizures become increasingly worse, and a severe form of epilepsy is diagnosed.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00jpn1f)
Child Protection

A special programme about the future of child protection, including an interview with Sharon Shoesmith, and special reports on social work training and recruitment.


MON 11:00 The Baronet and Tissington's Fight for Survival (b00jm0bq)
Sir Richard FitzHerbert of Tissington Hall talks to fellow historic house owners struggling to balance the books. From April 2009.


MON 11:30 Hazelbeach (b00899mt)
Series 1

Language Teacher

Nick gets a job with a dominatrix and Ronnie buys an extraordinary number of sinks.

Caroline and David Stafford's comedy stars Jamie Forman as Ronnie Hazelbeach.

Ronnie ...... Jamie Foreman
Nick ...... Paul Bazely
Mrs Barlow ...... Tracy Wiles
James ...... John Dougall
Senora ...... Liza Sadovy

Producer: Marc Beeby

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in November 2007.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00jm1ny)
With Julian Worricker

Cricketer Marcus Trescothick has been widely regarded as one of England's finest batsmen. He played a key role in England's 2005 Ashes triumph, but in 2006 he was forced to come home early from England's tour to India after suffering a severe anxiety attack. He now talks frankly about those dark days and how he is coping with the condition.

Will the government's new data collection policy cause problems for sailors? Under the e-borders plan, travellers overseas will have to give information in advance about their itinerary. The Royal Yachting Association says the e-borders plan is not practical for their members.

Should wine producers be required to list all substances used in production on the label? The Food Standards Agency is calling for all wine ingredients to be stated on bottles but wine producers claim that this will be costly and is not necessary.

Poet Ian McMillan celebrates the rise of the village hall as a cultural venue. Actors and writers can be found in the heart of the countryside, performing in village halls up and down the UK, he asserts.

The Office for National Statistics has included rose wine in the basket of items it uses to measure the inflation rate. Meanwhile, research suggests that the number of people regularly drinking rose wine has increased from 37 per cent in 2005 to 61 per cent now. Julian and guests discuss rose wine's growing popularity and taste some examples.

Why are there so few Michelin starred restaurants in city centres outside London? Manchester, Liverpool and Leeds hold their own when it comes to sport, music and popular culture, but when it comes to fine dining, none of them has a Michelin star to its name.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00jm2nk)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00jm2nm)
The latest from the disturbances in the Thai capital, with former Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra and Britain's ambassador to Bangkok giving their views.

A government minister insists that Gordon Brown does not need to apologise for the emails smearing top Conservatives sent by his special advisor. There's a look at the role of special advisors and the programme asks if they are keeping to the official Code of Conduct.

The Merchant Shipping union Nautilus says it is worried that the aggressive strategy used by the French and US navies against Somali pirates could make the seas in the area more dangerous.


MON 13:30 Counterpoint (b00jm2np)
Series 23

2009 Heat 6

From London, chairman Paul Gambaccini hosts the wide-ranging music quiz spanning every era.

With Brian Haynes from London, Alistair Smith from Lymington and Nicholas Tucker from Lewes.

Producer Paul Bajoria.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2009.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00jlyz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00jm2nr)
Shakespeare a la Carte

One of the highlights of the 2008 Brighton Festival was turned into an Afternoon Play for BBC Radio 4. Shakespeare A La Carte took the public by storm when it offered audiences the chance to order up their favourite bits of Shakespeare, together with coffee and croissant.

Pippa Smith, Head of Education at the Brighton Festival had the idea after a disappointing encounter at the Edinburgh Festival. "I saw a flyer advertising Shakespeare for breakfast. But breakfast turned out to be stewed tea in polystyrene cups and the Shakespeare was a lame production of 'Love Labour's Lost.' I came away with an entire show in my head. I knew I could create something much classier than this - the bards best bits performed by leading talent from the RSC and National."

Smith approached Richard Hahlo, Jonathan Cullen and Fiona Dunn, who form the theatre company Hydrocracker. They devised a show where the actors, masquerading as waiters in a Pizza Restaurant, take over the performance when they hear that the real actors have been delayed driving down from Stratford. For the radio adaptation two extra characters played by Sian Webber and Richard Attlee, have been created.

Says Richard Hahlo: "They frame the action for those listening at home. It's good that we will record it live, because what you get are big chunks of Shakespeare interwoven into the to-ing and fro-ing of these waiters trying to get these speeches organised."

Cast:
Peter Quince ..... Richard Hahlo
Nick Bottom ..... Jonathan Cullen
Frances Flute ...... Fiona Dunn
Hermione ..... San Webber
Crispin ......Richard Attlee

Producer: Karen Rose
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00jkv2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Men of Fashion (b00jm2wg)
Beau and Byron - The Romantic Rebellion

Laurence robes up to commune with Lord Byron, unwitting author of Romantic dress and famously painted as an Albanian nobleman.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00jlxjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Click On (b00jm32g)
Series 4

Episode 6

Clare English explores some of the ways in which technology is being used to tackle crime.


MON 17:00 PM (b00jm32j)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00jm32l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b00jm32n)
Series 3

Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the game show in which panellists are encouraged to tell lies and compete to see how many items of truth they are able to smuggle past their opponents.

With Jeremy Hardy, Fred MacAulay, Jack Dee and Will Self.

A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00jm32q)
Helen's finding Annette's untidy habits rather irritating. She suggests they borrow a camping wardrobe from her parents.

Lilian and Jennifer are going shopping, and Lilian's delighted. Not keen on her going out, Matt texts her: be careful. Lilian tells Jennifer about the motorbike incident. She won't ride again. Jennifer thinks this is a shame; she must get back in the saddle. At the car, Lilian notices her riding crop on the seat. It wasn't there before - someone's put it there. Jennifer tries to calm Lilian down but she's panicked and phones Matt. Matt tells Lilian not to call the police, as he hasn't told them he'd met Chalky.

Helen pops in at Bridge Farm for the camping wardrobe, telling her parents Annette's staying until she finds her own place. Annette's been abandoned and Helen wants to help.

Helen and Annette tidy up the flat. Helen tells Annette that Greg was always very tidy. Helen invites Annette to her birthday meal on Thursday.

Tony tells Pat that they should phone Michelle and tell her Annette's with Helen. Pat says no. She doesn't think their arrangement will last. Helen will soon tire of playing surrogate mum.

Episode written by Nawal Gadalla.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00jm364)
Seamus Heaney

To mark his 70th birthday, poet and Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney discusses his inspirations with Mark Lawson and reflects on how a stroke in 2006 affected his work.

Heaney, whose first collection of poetry appeared in 1966, was born in Country Derry in Northern Ireland. He has twice won the Whitbread Book of the Year: for The Spirit Level in 1996 and Beowulf in 1999. Mark Lawson has interviewed Seamus Heaney in front of a live audience at Wyndhams Theatre in London's West End for the publication of Stepping Stones, a new book of interviews conducted with the poet by Dennis O'Driscoll, and again when he was awarded the David Cohen Prize for Literature. In this special edition of Front Row, featuring highlights from both interviews, Heaney discusses the inspiration for his poetry, reflects on the influence of The Troubles on his life and work, and how a stroke in 2006 affected his ability to write.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00jpn1h)
Restless

Episode 6

Dramatisation of William Boyd's thriller.

Sally's courier mission becomes deadly dangerous, while Ruth is sent to interview the enigmatic Romer.

Sally/Eve ...... Eileen Atkins
Ruth ...... Fenella Woolgar
Lucas Romer ...... Adrian Lukis
Morris ...... Philip Fox
Raul ...... Sam Dale
Mexican ...... Stephen Hogan
Porter ...... Malcolm Tierney
Man ...... Benjamin Askew

Directed by Marc Beeby.


MON 20:00 Inside The Child Prisons (b00jm3cj)
Episode 1

Winifred Robinson follows the fortunes of some of the 300-plus violent and damaged youngsters in Britain who are detained in secure children's homes to prevent them harming themselves or others.

She follows interventions ranging from anger management courses to drug and alcohol counselling. The children are aged between 10 and 16 and most have been placed in the units following sentencing by the courts because they are too young to be placed in young offenders institutes. With intensive staffing ratios and heavy security, the cost of each place is high, but if it works the benefits to society can be significant.

At one secure unit, on the outskirts of Bristol, Winifred follows 15-year-old Mitchell, who is admitted after trying to hang himself in a young offenders institute. He was sentenced following a vicious robbery which left a younger boy hospitalised. Mitchell blames cannabis and the wrong friends for the attack, and while locked up he works hard on addressing his behaviour. He plans for a better life on his release but his old friends are waiting for him back home, and both his parents and staff at the secure unit worry about what will happen.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b00jjjps)
Kosovo

Michael Montgomery reports on alleged atrocities in Kosovo which have remained hidden for 10 years. To mark the 10th anniversary of the war in Kosovo, and using documents and interviews he has gathered over more than five years, Michael reveals detailed evidence of another side to the conflict which the world was not meant to see.


MON 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00jm3l3)
A Burning Solution

Sales of wood burning stoves have rocketed over recent months. So much so that producers have struggled to meet demands. But could the latest 'must have' accessory for the style-concious householder be part of the solution in meeting our renewables targets?

Burning woodchip - or biomass - can provide both heat and electricity. It is environmentally friendly since the carbon has already been captured by the tree as it has grown and it is a renewable resource, so has wood's time come?

In this week's Costing The Earth we look at the range of biomass heating schemes in the UK – from small-scale wood-burning stoves that can effectively heat a home, to huge projects that are on the horizon: a massive biomass power station is planned at Port Talbot in South Wales. On the way we meet a bona fide environmental maverick in Barnsley where government renewable targets have been reached decades in advance.

We find out what the government is doing, if it really is green, and whether vast swathes of woodland would be chopped down to make an impact on our renewables target. And with the Port Talbot plant set to import a lot of the biomass from Canada, how sustainable is that project?


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00jlzxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00jm3l5)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00jm3l7)
National and international news and analysis.

Is Thailand on the brink of revolution? Plus reports on the US easing restrictions on travel to Cuba; anti-Christian violence hitting India; political muck-raking - are we becoming more like the US?; and The South African economy is hit by the global recession.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00jm3l9)
Anybody Can Do Anything

Episode 1

Debora Weston reads Betty MacDonald's comic novel about life as a single mother in America during the Great Depression.

Mary is certain that anybody can do anything, especially her sister Betty, who leaves her husband and his chicken ranch and returns to the bosom of her warm and noisy family in Seattle.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b00jhvk8)
Michael Rosen examines spelling. With a revival of interest in spelling bees, the ability to spell 'properly' is again becoming synonymous with having a good education. But do spelling reformers have a point when they say that irregular spelling is responsible for anything from teenage pregnancy to the high prison population?

Michael also considers the politics of spelling and why computer spell-checkers do not seem to help people with dyslexia.


MON 23:30 What a Carve Up! (b0076r0l)
Episode 5

Jonathan Coe's cult novel, adapted by David Nobbs, is a black comedy inspired by the immorality, greed and ambition of 1980s Britain.

Farmer Dorothy squeezes every last pound from her livestock.

Michael ...... Robert Bathurst
Fiona ...... Fiona Allen
Dorothy ...... Geraldine McNulty
Findlay/Mortimer ...... Charlie Higson
George Brunwin/Electrician ...... Gus Brown
Henry/Farmer ...... Jeff Rawle

A Tiger Aspect production for BBC Radio 4.



TUESDAY 14 APRIL 2009

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00jm3m4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00jlzzd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00jm56k)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00jm56m)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00jm56p)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00jm56r)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00jm56t)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Gordon Gray.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00jm56w)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna Hill.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00jm56y)
Presented by Evan Davis and James Naughtie.

Jonathan Baume, general secretary of the FDA (the union representing senior civil servants) says there is no need to tighten the rules on special advisers.

Rajesh Mirchandani reports on the conviction of US music producer Phil Spector for murder.

Michael Voss reports on the lifting of some restrictions placed on Cuba by the US.

Bob Andrews, of Eastside Climate Action, and David Porter, of the Association of Electricity Producers, discuss if coal power can be replaced with renewable energy.

Sir John Holmes, the UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, explains whether the conflict in Sri Lanka is drawing to an end.

Writer and broadcaster Armando Iannucci discusses the coincidence of life imitating his art.

Thought for the day with Dr Indarjit Singh, director of the Network of Sikh Organisations.

Former Thai minister Mechai Viravaidya discusses the repercussions of anti-government protesters surrounding official buildings in Bangkok.

Labour MP Paul Flynn and broadcaster Andrew Neil discuss the media's coverage of the Labour Party slur e-mail affair.

Author Mick Brown discusses the legacy of US music producer Phil Spector, famous for the "Wall of Sound" recording technique.

Passenger Gerald Granston and author Max Morgan-Witts discuss the extraordinary voyage of the SS St Louis.

Religious affairs correspondent Christopher Landau has been following Tony Blair during the first year of his interfaith foundation.

Foreign Office minister Bill Rammell explains why he is urging caution for people wanting to travel to Thailand.

Evan Davis visits his old school - the Ashcombe School in Dorking, Surrey - to talk to the headteacher David Blow about how he is preparing for spending cuts.

Professor Mark Pepys details the research into the cure for Alzheimer's disease.

Is it immoral to send your children to private school? MP Barry Sheerman and headmaster Anthony Seldon discuss if public figures should uphold a "moral duty" to educate their children in state schools.


TUE 09:00 On the Ropes (b00jm66c)
Colin Freeman

John Humphrys talks to successful people who have weathered storms in their careers.

Colin Freeman, chief foreign correspondent of the Sunday Telegraph, was kidnapped in Somalia and held hostage for 40 days in remote caves in the north of the country. It is no longer as rare as it once was to hear of journalists being kidnapped, but Colin's story shows how distorted and unpredictable the rules of engagement for foreign correspondents have become.


TUE 09:30 The Prime Ministers (b00jm66f)
Series 1

Clement Attlee

BBC Political Editor Nick Robinson explores how Britain's prime ministers have used their power, responded to the challenges of their time and made the job what it is today.

Clement Attlee's lack of charisma did not prevent him transforming post war Britain.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00jtxx7)
William Fiennes - The Music Room

Episode 2

Dan Stevens reads William Fiennes' memoir of his magical childhood in a moated castle in which he grew up with his severely epileptic older brother.

Eight-year-old William makes a playground of the castle's attic spaces and is intrigued by a secret door. Richard experiences dark mood swings, but also finds a new pleasure when he takes up pipe smoking.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00jppxm)
Women criticising each other; Sarah Gillespie

Are women becoming more critical of each other? Plus, advice on how to grow tomatoes; and jazz musician Sarah Gillespie plays live.


TUE 11:00 Hitting the Buffers (b00c55vy)
The Human Body

Gareth Mitchell looks at our need for speed in different areas of modern life and asks what is stopping us from getting faster.

Gareth is put through his paces at the Human Performance Laboratory at Bath University to find out whether his body is built for speed. He also talks to sports scientists like Professor Bob Girandola from the University of Southern California, who thinks we've reached the pinnacle of natural human achievement - and any further improvement in speed will depend on tinkering with our genes or taking performance enhancing drugs.


TUE 11:30 Spoon, Jar, Jar, Spoon - The Two Sides of Tommy Cooper (b00jm66h)
Rob Brydon explores two sides to comedian Tommy Cooper - his humour and his love of magic. On stage, Cooper assumed a manic and bumbling persona, but behind this was a man with a genuine talent for magic, as revealed by contributions from magicans Paul Daniels, Alan Alan and Ali Bongo.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00jm1pj)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00jmqq6)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00jmqq8)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.

The Conservatives maintain pressure on Gordon Brown to make a personal apology for the e-mails which were sent by one of his advisers, suggesting ways of smearing Tory MPs.


TUE 13:30 The Music Group (b00jmqqb)
Series 3

Episode 1

Comedian, broadcaster and GP Dr Phil Hammond asks each of three guests to play the track of their choice for the delight or disdain of the others.

His guests include musician and composer Nitin Sawhney; actress, comedienne and Radio 2 DJ Liza Tarbuck; and children's author Terry Deary, creator of the the Horrible Histories series of books.

A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00jm32q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b008gzlm)
Witness: Five Plays from the Gospel of Luke

Beginnings

While the disciples are paralysed by Jesus? death, Mary ponders the mystery of his birth.

Over the Easter season, Nick Warburton's five plays reimagine Jesus' story through the eyes of those who witnessed it.

Jesus.......................Tom Goodman-Hill
Peter.......................Peter Firth
Mary.......................Penelope Wilton
Magdalene.......................Lorraine Ashbourne
Angel.......................Julian Bleach
Simeon.......................David de Keyser
Joanna.......................Rachel Atkins
Joseph of Arimathea.......................Ben Onwukwe
Young Mary.......................Laura Molyneux
Cleopas.......................Sam Pamphilon

Music by David Pickvance.
Director: Jonquil Panting

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2007.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00jmqsc)
Vanessa Collingridge presents the series exploring ordinary people's links with the past.

Listener Bridget Long sets out to confirm a family story - that her late father played oboe in the premiere of a piece of work by Benjamin Britten while being held in a German POW camp.

Archaeologists at the University of Liverpool reveal how they know what Britons ate before the introduction of farming.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00826ct)
Alan Howard Reads

The Tipping Point

The popular veteran actor reads specially commissioned short stories.

A car journey and a CD of Schubert Lieder offer an English academic the opportunity to reflect on the painful conclusion to a love affair with a German environmentalist.

By Helen Simpson.


TUE 15:45 Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Men of Fashion (b00jm2x9)
The Tartan Titan and the Highland Fashion Cult

Romanticism and nationalism in 19th-century Scotland, where King George IV's endorsement meant tartan and the kilt became cult.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b00jmv1l)
Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.

Everyone accepts that it is important for parents to read to their children, but, thanks partly to school literacy targets, many children actually spend more time reading to their parents. Furthermore, some parents suffer from 'performance anxiety' over their inability to 'do the voices' in stories, so, in these cases, what can be done to help keep storytelling alive?


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b00jmv1n)
Series 18

Roy Jenkins

Matthew Parris presents the biographical series in which his guests choose someone who has inspired their lives.

Polly Toynbee, David Steel and Dick Taverne argue that Roy Jenkins, former home secretary, chancellor, president of the European Commission and founder member of the SDP, was one of the greatest politicians of the post-Second World War era.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00jmv1q)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00jmv1s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


TUE 18:30 Heresy (b00jmv1v)
Series 6

Episode 2

Victoria Coren hosts the show that thinks the unthinkable. With Rev Richard Coles, journalist Matthew Norman and comedian Mark Steel. From April 2009.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00jmv1x)
Adam and Brian are in the deer field, talking about Matt. Brian thinks Lilian's losing it. If Matt goes to prison, Adam says they'll have to support her.

Usha tells Alan she needs one more big run before the marathon but she's still nervous. Alan tells her she won't be alone. They set off, Alan in pursuit on an old bicycle. Uphill, he struggles to keep up, but he's delighted when he whizzes downhill - Usha can't catch him! Alan's exhausted when they return. Eddie finds them outside. Bert's told him they want a patio laying. He'll beat any quote.

Eddie's on his way to Will's, and meets Brian. Eddie asks if there's any farm work going. Brian tells him to ask Adam. Eddie doesn't think he'll have any luck. Adam's avoiding Will, who wants to grow some game crops. Annabelle calls Brian. Can she drop by at Home Farm?

Adam finds Brian starting on the game crops. Adam resents the interference, but supposes he might as well finish the work now he's started. Annabelle jogs up. She'd like Brian to go to a meeting with her, instead of Matt. Annabelle tells Brian the board are getting twitchy about Matt. Something needs to change, and soon.

Episode written by Nawal Gadalla.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00jmv1z)
With Mark Lawson.

Twenty-five years after publication, authors Martin Amis and Jay McInerney discuss their novels Money and Bright Lights, Big City and the literary voice they adopted for these works which helped make their literary names.

There is a review of In the Loop, a comedy about politics from Armando Iannucci, whose television credits include Brass Eye, The Thick of It and The Day Today.

Film director Stephen Parsons explains why he asked the British Board of Film Classification to give his film Wishbaby a more restrictive certificate - changing it from a 15 to an 18.

And actress Maureen Lipman explains why she sent a letter and photographs to one of her critics after reviews of her show A Little Night Music.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00jppxp)
Restless

Episode 7

Dramatisation of William Boyd's thriller.

When Morris is found dead, Sally realises that she has been betrayed and now must disappear forever.

Sally/Eve ...... Eileen Atkins
Ruth ...... Fenella Woolgar
Lucas Romer ...... Adrian Lukis
Jochen ...... Gene Goodman
Ludger ...... Matt Addis
Morris ...... Philip Fox
DC Frobisher ...... Benjamin Askew
Ilse ...... Lizzy Watts

Directed by Marc Beeby.


TUE 20:00 Blair's Faith Foundation (b00jmv21)
Christopher Landau, who has followed the setting up of Tony Blair's Faith Foundation to promote religious dialogue and understanding, asks whether it can succeed in promoting religion as a force for progress.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00jmv23)
Peter White wants to know what motivates visually-impaired people to take part in extreme sports and activities. He talks to elephant rider Caroline Casey, marathon runner Mark Pollock and life coach Kirsten Hearn.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00jmv25)
Food Intolerance

Dr Mark Porter reports on food intolerance. Many people think they have an intolerance or an allergy to certain foods. Mark discovers the difference between these conditions and asks what happens when we go to a clinic to be investigated.


TUE 21:30 On the Ropes (b00jm66c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00jmv49)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00jmv4c)
National and international news and analysis with Jane Hill.

Gordon Brown comes under attack from Blairites over the email smear row; US Federal Reserve chief Ben Bernanke sees the green shoots of recovery; and is it time for shipping to protect itself from pirates?


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00jqp6n)
Anybody Can Do Anything

Episode 2

Debora Weston reads Betty MacDonald's comic novel about life as a single mother in America during the Great Depression.

Mary gets Betty a job as a shorthand typist, but she does not know shorthand and cannot type.


TUE 23:00 The Secret World (b01169br)
Series 1

Episode 1 - Pilot

From John Humphrys and Ringo to Alan Carr and Alan Sugar.

Pilot of the comedy impressions series examining the bizarre and private lives of public people.

Starring:

Jon Culshaw
Sarah Hadland
Jess Robinson
Lewis Macleod
Duncan Wisbey

Producer: Bill Dare

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2008.


TUE 23:30 What a Carve Up! (b0076r3x)
Episode 6

Jonathan Coe's cult novel, adapted by David Nobbs, is a black comedy inspired by the immorality, greed and ambition of 1980s Britain.

Biographer Michael Pearce turns his attention to Thomas Winshaw, financier and lifelong voyeur.

Michael ...... Robert Bathurst
Fiona ...... Fiona Allen
Findlay...... Charlie Higson
Thomas Winshaw ...... Geoffrey Palmer
James Gilroy ...... Gus Brown
Hortensia ...... Flaminia Cinque
Michael's Mum ...... Geraldine McNulty
Alice ...... Lucy Punch
Henry/Hanrahan ...... Jeff Rawle
Sid James ...... Arthur Smith

A Tiger Aspect production for BBC Radio 4.



WEDNESDAY 15 APRIL 2009

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00jn0p5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00jlzzd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00jn0p7)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00jn0p9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00jn0pc)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00jn0pf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00jn0ph)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Gordon Gray.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00jn0pk)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna Hill.

Redundancies and slashed bonuses mean city slickers are no longer buying up the British countryside. Land and estate agents are reporting a dramatic drop off in sales to so-called lifestyle buyers.


WED 06:00 Today (b00jn0pm)
Presented by James Naughtie and Sarah Montague.

David Bonser, of Westinghouse Electric, says new nuclear power stations will produce less waste than existing facilities.

Lawyer Debaleena Dasgupta discusses the new regulations on investigating rape.

Professor Simone Buitendijk discusses the results of a study on the safety of home births.

Reporter Sanchia Berg visits former car manufacturer Shaun Fenwick, who is retraining as a fitness instructor.

Schools Secretary Ed Balls considers if, as the Conservatives say, it is too difficult to exclude disruptive pupils permanently and discusses the Damian McBride email slur row.

Professor Ben Leimkuhler and Prof Andrew Cairns discuss some of the numerical challenges presented by modern science.

Thought for the day with the Right Reverend James Jones, Bishop of Liverpool.

The UN special representative for Somalia Ahmedou Ould Abdallah considers whether Somalia's piracy problem can be brought under control.

Commentator Alan Green and former Home Secretary David Blunkett discuss the legacy of the Hillsborough disaster.

Charles Suckling, a ferry passenger stuck in Dunkirk, and Chris Laming, a spokesman for P&O, describe the repercussions of the protests by French fishermen at the three main French Channel ports.

Historians Margaret Macmillan and Dominic Sandbrook discuss if historians spend too much time arguing amongst themselves.

Professor Joseph Nye discusses how North Korea's announcement that it is resuming its nuclear programme will affect the US.

Jerry Aplin, head of design and technology at a large secondary school in Devon, discusses his experience with disruptive pupils.

Duncan Kennedy reports on the cuts in culture budgets in Italy.

Correspondent Quentin Somerville and Dr Yiyi Lu, of the foreign affairs think tank Chatham House, discuss the life of Chinese reformist Hu Yaobang.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00jn0pt)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00jtxx1)
William Fiennes - The Music Room

Episode 3

Dan Stevens reads William Fiennes' memoir of his magical childhood in a moated castle in which he grew up with his severely epileptic older brother.

Richard is captivated by a heron, but is also gripped by a furious black mood. Nine-year-old William and his friends play with antique swords and cannonballs.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00jpq4g)
Raising Teenagers

A special programme on raising teenagers. What is it really like to be a teenager at this time, and what challenges do we face, as parents and carers to the new generation?


WED 11:00 Wrecked (b00jn0pw)
Neil McCarthy explores the history of the illicit activities of the Wirral peninsula's wreckers, who ransacked Liverpool-bound vessels with notorious ferocity. After the end of the wrecking era, huge crowds came to the Victorian seaside resort of New Brighton, but they too have now gone. Neil tries to discover whether the wild spirit of the wreckers lives on in the area today.


WED 11:30 Safety Catch (b017skx3)
Series 2

If a Job's Not Worth Doing

Simon is totally convinced this week that he is in the right job and has a duty not only to stay there, but to do his job sloppily. His reasoning for this is that if he wasn't there doing the job badly then someone else would be doing it well and that would be a much worse scenario.

Then he has the awful, soul shattering realisation, and one which is something every person in Britain would be ashamed to admit, that he actually loves his job. Boris of course is in heaven at the thought of a soul-mate at work, but Simon decides the only way he can go on is to learn to hate again.

Series two of Laurence Howarth's black comedy of modern morality set in the world of arms dealing.

Simon McGrath.............................Darren Boyd
Anna Grieg..................................Joanna Page
Boris Kemal...............................Lewis Macleod
Judith McGrath..............................Sarah Smart
Angela McGrath............................Brigit Forsyth
Madeleine Turnbull........................Rachel Atkins
Richard...........................................Dan Mersh
Julius........................................Nyahsa Hatendi

Producer: Dawn Ellis.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in April 2009.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00jm1pq)
Consumer news and issues with Julian Worricker.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00jn0q0)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00jn0q2)
National and international news with Martha Kearney. Including the government's latest review of bad behaviour in schools. Do headteachers have enough authority to exclude unruly pupils when they need to, or is the solution to be able to keep these pupils on site in special 'containment rooms' as one government adviser is recommending? Plus the latest developments in the Downing Street emails row, with the Cabinet Secretary having toughened-up the rules, and news of Venezuela's young Simon Bolivar orchestra, performing at the Royal Festival Hall.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00jn0q4)
Ed Stourton is joined by two journalists who have been expelled from Fiji as coup leaders clamp down on the press, examines the impact of one of the most archaic aspects of Britain's libel laws and talks to Don Foster, the Liberal Democrat Shadow Culture, Media and Sport Secretary. Ed also discovers what the subscriber TV service Setanta's difficulties mean for football, and, as Tatler marks its tri-centennial, finds out why journalists choose to use pen names.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00jmv1x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00jn0q6)
Listening to the Generals

In 1943, the secret recording of captive German officers, provided invaluable information to the allied war effort, but placed an intolerable burden on the mostly Jewish 'listeners' who transcribed details they often couldn't bear to hear.

Between 1942 and 1945 captured high-ranking German officers were imprisoned in Trent Park, a large mansion with extensive grounds in North London. This was no Colditz. The captives were treated well, given access to films and newspapers, and taken for walks in the capacious grounds. Churchill was horrified to discover that they were even being taken on daytrips to Windsor and Eton. But the aim was to get them to relax - and talk. The newspapers and films were carefully chosen to provoke conversation and they made use of stoolpigeons to get the officers talking. And then through bugs placed in every room and even in the garden, the British Intelligence Service listened as they talked amongst themselves. Everything was recorded and transcribed - for use as evidence at what was to become the trials at Nuremburg.

One of the Jewish 'listeners' tasked with the, at times, infuriating job of recording and transcribing, was Peter Ganz - the author's father.

During World War Two, German generals were imprisoned in Trent Park in North London. Unbeknownst to them their conversations were being recorded and transcribed by German Jews, forced to flee the Nazis.
HELEN: REBECCA SAIRE
PURFLEET: MALCOLM TIERNEY
ANTON: MATT ADDIS
CHARLES: BENJAMIN ASKEW
VON THOMAS: NICK DUNNING
CRUWELL (CREWVELL): SAM DALE
BOES (BURRS): PAUL RIDER
MAYER (MAIER): JONATHAN TAFLER
HARDT: PHILIP FOX
THE SINGER: DAVID REVELS

LISTENING TO THE GENERALS was directed in Belfast by Eoin O'Callaghan.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00jn4f6)
Paul Lewis and guests answer calls on retirement planning.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b0081ck7)
Alan Howard Reads

On Dover Beach

The popular veteran actor reads specially commissioned short stories.

Matthew Arnold engages in animated internal debate with himself about his poem On Dover Beach and its place in history.

By Tom Stoppard.


WED 15:45 Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Men of Fashion (b00jm2xr)
Men in Black - The Funereal Victorians (and Oscar of course)

Why did Victorian men dress ready for a funeral? Black embodied power and serious purpose yet democratised fashion for ever.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00jn4f8)
Biometric Security - Ethnographer's Dilemma

Laurie Taylor explores the latest research into how society works.

There is a revolution happening in security and the human body is at the centre of new ways of monitoring and controlling the way we live. From fingerprinting to retinal scans. Laurie Taylor explores the way that the history of biometrics has changed the relationship between the citizen and the state. What are the new measures that are due to be introduced? How are new technological developments likely to change the way we live? Laurie talks to anthropologist Mark Maguire about changes which mean that the body becomes our passport and asks whether the so-called 'securitization of identity' will change the way we think of ourselves.

Plus, is it possible for a social scientist to always remain uninvolved in the world he is studying? When does it become impossible to keep your mouth shut? Laurie talks to two medical sociologists, Charles Bosk and Clare Williams, about the ethical questions they have had to face.


WED 16:30 Case Notes (b00jmv25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00jn4fb)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00jn4fd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


WED 18:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b00jn4fg)
Series 1

Merthyr Tydfil

Comedian Mark Steel visits towns across the UK and creates a stand-up show for a local audience based on what he finds out about the area.

Mark records a show in Merthyr Tydfil, celebrating the town and its people.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00jn4fj)
Nigel tells Emma they're really pleased to have her back working at Lower Loxley. Emma's pleased to be back too. She likes being busy but isn't sure she'll be as ambitious as before she had George.

Nigel calls at Jaxx. Kenton's feeling sorry for himself, having lost Emma. Nigel rubs it in but points out that he knows Kenton's already found a replacement waitress - Naomi.

Ed's off to meet Oliver and Malcolm, the land agent from the Tenant Farmers Association, to discuss Ed's business plan for Grange Farm. He and Emma agree the future's looking good - and it's thanks to Joe for giving Ed a loan.

Ed wants Mike to know what's going on before Mike sees the agent poking around. Mike's delighted to learn that Oliver's offered Ed the tenancy, and that Ed wants his working arrangement to stay the same. Mike thinks it's great that a Grundy will once more be running Grange Farm.

The meeting with Malcolm goes well. Ed tells Emma this is going to change their lives. Oliver's given them a future they can build on. He just hopes Malcolm gives it the thumbs up so they can go ahead.

Episode written by Nawal Gadalla.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00jn4fl)
Arts news and reviews with Mark Lawson.

After 30 years together, the Essex electronic synth group Depeche Mode have put artistic differences behind them to release a new album. Co-founder and songwriter Martin Gore discusses the background to their new release.

To mark a new radio play about the South African-born cricketer Basil D'Oliveira, his son Damian D'Oliveira and the play's writer Christopher Douglas discuss how Basil, also known as Dolly, became a crucial symbol in the struggle against Apartheid.

The latest offering from the creator of Meet the Fockers and Zoolander is I Love You, Man, starring Paul Rudd as friendless Peter Klaven who goes on a series of man-dates to find a best man for his wedding. Mark Eccleston discusses the new film genre dubbed 'bromance'.

Does theatre sell out to sell out? As Talawa Theatre Company stages a series of discussions at the Young Vic, director David Lan and writer Roy Williams debate this topic.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00jpq4j)
Restless

Episode 8

Dramatisation of William Boyd's thriller.

Ruth makes a fool of herself and Sally returns to wartime London, where she must find a completely new identity.

Sally/Eve ...... Eileen Atkins
Ruth ...... Fenella Woolgar
Hamid ...... Akbar Kurtha
Alfie ...... Matt Addis
Fireman ...... Benjamin Askew
Comeau ...... Sam Dale

Directed by Marc Beeby.


WED 20:00 Bringing Up Britain (b00jn4fn)
Series 2

Episode 2

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

Mariella and her guests ask what parents can do to help children with mental health problems and what constitutes a 'normal' level of unhappiness in childhood and adolescence. She hears from a mother who fears her unhappy 11-year-old-son will go off the rails in adolescence and a mother and daughter on the drawbacks and benefits of having a mental health diagnosis.

With guests the family therapist Jan Parker, Richard Reeves of the thinktank Demos and Roger Catchpole of YoungMinds.


WED 20:45 A Wonderful Way to Make a Living (b00ctl6r)
Series 2

Episode 1

US satirist Joe Queenan meets people with unusual occupations. He meets an emergency shirt delivery man, whose clients include office workers with hangovers, and Miles Warde meets a naked yoga instructress.


WED 21:00 Ludwig Koch and the Music of Nature (b00jn4m2)
Ludwig Koch was once as famous as David Attenborough, as pioneering as 'Blue Planet' and as important as the BBC Natural History Unit. They all owe their existence to this German refugee who first recorded the music of nature. Through his archive and new field recordings the poet Sean Street tells the story of Ludwig Koch.

When Sean Street was recording in a store-room at the Science Museum for a Radio 4 archive programme he came across a grey crate, stencilled, as if it belonged to a band on tour, with KOCH on it. This was the disc-cutting machine which Ludwig Koch used for a decade to make the recordings of birds, mammals and insects that led to a new field of study, of broadcasting and the creation of the BBC's Natural History Unit.

Sean and his producer then began investigating and discovered that Koch made the first ever wildlife recording, of a bird, when he was eight, in 1889 - and that it still exists in the BBC's archives.

Koch was an effusive man and this led to several confrontations with Nazi officials, whom he despised. There is an extraordinary recording of him telling the story of a Berliner whose bullfinch sang 'The Internationale'. He was carted off to prison and the bird 'executed'. "Under dictatorship," Koch observed, "even songbirds suffer". He came to England, worked with Julian Huxley on theories of animal language, and recorded birds from the Scillies to Shetland.

In 1940 he joined the BBC and soon became a household name, beloved of comedians (there's a great sketch by Peter Sellers parodying him at work) because of his resolute pronunciation of English as if it were German.

As well as being wonderful radio in itself his work was of great significance. It inspired producer Desmond Hawkins to start 'The Naturalist', (using Koch's enchanting recording of a curlew as its signature tune). Sean Street uses his recordings and contributions of those who worked with him in what becomes a natural history programme in itself, with Koch the subject and Sean exploring his habits and habitat.

There is also an attempt to record curlews as he did so successfully, to shed light on the achievements of this courageous, influential and loveable genius. Today sound-recordists use tiny digital machines and sophisticated microphones. But there are other problems - traffic, planes, people - and fewer, shyer curlews.

Producer: Julian May

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2009.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00jn0pt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00jn4nt)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00jn4nw)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig. The Metropolitan Police commissioner orders a review of riot policing following the G20 death, Somali pirates threaten a fightback against US ships and corruption issues dog the Indian elections.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00jqp75)
Anybody Can Do Anything

Episode 3

Debora Weston reads Betty MacDonald's comic novel about life as a single mother in America during the Great Depression.

Mary sets up a string of disastrous dates for Betty.


WED 23:00 My Teenage Diary (b00jn5s2)
Series 1

Shappi Khorsandi

Host Rufus Hound is joined each week by a special guest from the world of comedy to read out selected passages from their diaries.

In this episode, Rufus is joined by Iranian comedienne Shappi Khorsandi who reveals herself to be a lonely and awkward teenager, desperate to be part of a group. Listen out for Shappi's embarrassed readings of her hilarious teenage poetry.

Producer: Victoria Payne
A talkbackTHAMES production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Bespoken Word (b00ctl74)
Mister Gee presents the performance poetry series from this year's Latitude Festival in Suffolk. Featured performers include exciting newcomer Dockers MC.


WED 23:30 What a Carve Up! (b0076r78)
Episode 7

Jonathan Coe's cult novel, adapted by David Nobbs, is a black comedy inspired by the immorality, greed and ambition of 1980s Britain.

The spotlight falls on arms dealer Mark Winshaw.

Michael ...... Robert Bathurst
Fiona ...... Fiona Allen
Mark Winshaw ...... Alan Davies
Pemberton-Oates ...... Gus Brown
Joan/Fiona's Nurse ...... Flaminia Cinque
Hilary Winshaw ...... Rebecca Front
Michael's Mum/Doctor Gillam ...... Geraldine McNulty
Thomas Winshaw ...... Geoffrey Palmer
Henry Winshaw/German Industrialist ...... Jeff Rawle

A Tiger Aspect production for BBC Radio 4.



THURSDAY 16 APRIL 2009

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00jn83y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00jtxx1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00jn840)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00jn842)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00jn844)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00jn846)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00jn848)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Gordon Gray.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00jn84b)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.

When it comes to farming, the European Parliament has power - from the Common Agriculture Policy to tagging sheep and pollution controls. What happens on British farms is, to a large extent, dependent on MEPs, which is why leaders from Britain's farming unions are in Brussels to launch a farming manifesto for the upcoming European elections.


THU 06:00 Today (b00jn84d)
Presented by Sarah Montague and Edward Stourton.

Broadcaster and former Liberal MP Sir Clement Freud has died aged 84.

Richard Ashworth MEP says the blockade by French fishermen should be forcibly removed if necessary.

Douglas McWilliams, chief executive at the Centre for Economics and Business Research, explains the UK retail statistics.

Chris Morris reports on the long process of voting in the Indian elections.

Keith Vaz MP says he is confident that no minister was involved in the arrest of Damian Green.

Tom Feilden considers why so many fish are failing to make it back to rivers to spawn.

Thought for the day with the Reverend Angela Tilby, vicar of St Bene't's Church in Cambridge.

Shadow Minister David Willetts and Geoff Mulgan, of the Young Foundation, discuss the Office for National Statistics' annual survey on the state of the nation.

Chris Huhne, the Liberal Democrat home affairs spokesman, says the police should never have been brought in to investigate Damian Green.

Stephen Fry remembers the varied and fascinating life of Sir Clement Freud, who has died aged 84.

Fishermen blockading the Channel ports of Calais and Dunkirk have suspended their action. P&O spokesman Chris Laming describes what is happening to holidaymakers and hauliers who still face disruption.

Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen and veteran Middle East peace negotiator Aaron Miller consider if the US special envoy to the Middle East, George Mitchell, stands any chance of making progress in the peace process.

Lorinda Sheasby, of Co-Operative Funeralcare, and BBC 6 Music presenter Chris Hawkins discuss the most popular choices for funeral songs.

Matt Prodger investigates organised crime in Croatia.

Playwrights Trevor Wood and Ed Waugh discuss what they believe to be the greatest football story ever told, the story of the Sir Thomas Lipton Trophy, held in Turin in 1909.

Carol Reed's film The Third Man celebrates its 60th birthday this year. Journalist Harry Mount and Guardian film critic Peter Bradshaw discuss the film voted the greatest ever British film by the BFI.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00jjgg8)
Suffragism

Melvyn Bragg and guests Krista Cowman, June Purvis and Julia Bush discuss suffragism, a name for the various movements to get the vote for women in the 19th and early-20th century. On the 4th June 1913 the Epsom Derby was underway. King George V was there watching his horse Anmer, ridden by Herbert Jones. Also watching was a young woman called Emily Davison. As the horses thundered towards the finish line, Emily Davison stepped through the barrier and threw herself in front of the King's horse and died of her injuries four days later. Davison was a suffragette, a campaigner for the woman's right to vote and her death is perhaps the most powerful image of that entire movement. Emmeline Pankhurst and her Suffragettes are famous for their militant campaign of suicide, violence and direct action, but Suffragism was a broader movement involving letter writing, reasoned argument, journalism and parliamentary petition - all played out across biology, medicine, law, psychology, politics and the military amidst the rising tide of democratic ideas.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00jtxx3)
William Fiennes - The Music Room

Episode 4

Dan Stevens reads William Fiennes' memoir of his magical childhood in a moated castle in which he grew up with his severely epileptic older brother.

Richard's behaviour becomes increasingly problematic, but his interest in Hilaire Belloc's Cautionary Tales gives him and his family an unexpected moment of pleasure.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00jpq8f)
Phone In: Teenagers

A phone-in on the subject of teenagers. Are teenagers really as bad as they are painted in the media? Is it fair to blame the parents for their children's behaviour?


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b00jn8h1)
Croatia

Matt Prodger examines the effects of organised crime and corruption in Croatia, as the country stands on the brink of EU membership. The execution-style assassination of a young woman, a car bomb explosion killing the country's most famous newspaper editor and journalists and businessmen being beaten in the streets are just some of the events that have rocked Croatia in recent months.


THU 11:30 The Broken Melody (b00jn8h3)
Musician George Kennaway recalls the life of the 19th-century cellist Auguste van Biene, who was discovered while busking on the streets of London and went on to play the lead in over 6,000 performances of just one play, The Broken Melody.

George, himself a cellist and who carries something of an obsession for this forgotten phenomenon, goes in search of his lost hero. It involves a family reunion at Golders Green Sephardic Cemetery, a once-in-a-century run through of this Victorian melodrama by a group of long-suffering friends, and some very dusty archives which reveal a self-publicist who would fit rather well into 21st century showbusiness.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00jm1pv)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00jn8h5)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00jn8h7)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b00jm3l3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Monday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00jn4fj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00jngcx)
Christopher Douglas - Dolly

By Christopher Douglas, based on the real events surrounding the selection of Basil D'Oliveira for the England cricket team in the 1960s.

Having emigrated to England and been called up to the national team, D'Oliveira's one unfulfilled ambition is to be selected to tour against his native South Africa. But the administrators of both South African and English cricket have other ideas.

Directed by Roland Jaquarello.


THU 15:02 Open Country (b00jkhk4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00jlwnz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00826cs)
Alan Howard Reads

Marriage Lines

The popular veteran actor reads specially commissioned short stories.

A return visit to the island of Barra brings back memories of decades past, holidays and young love.

By Julian Barnes.


THU 15:45 Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Men of Fashion (b00jm2y6)
Men in Uniform - Nation and Empire Resplendent

Not always for camouflage, 19th-century uniforms were vibrant and flattering. Fashion's military love affair continues today.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00jlxt0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00jnhf3)
Quentin Cooper talks from the Edinburgh International Science Festival.

The world's first retro-fitted carbon capturing coal-fired power station will soon begin operating in France. Stuart Haszeldine, head of the Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage, talks about the realities of scrubbing, sequestering and and whether Britian might be falling behind.

Barbara Webb of Edinburgh University's School of Informatics talks about her work building and studying robot insects. A robotic cricket can teach us a lot about how to make better robots, but also how insects must actually work.

Quentin also looks at the life of John Maddox, whose unorthodox approach to editing the journal Nature arguably changed the face of modern science.


THU 17:00 PM (b00jnhf5)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00jnhf7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


THU 18:30 4 Stands Up (b00jnhgn)
Series 3

Episode 3

Chris Addison with another trio of comedy movers and shakers, with Josh Howie, Lee Nelson and Alun Cochrane. From April 2009.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00jnhkr)
Brian drops some drinkers off for Tom. As per Peggy's instructions, Brian's showing he's prepared to bury the hatchet. Brian doesn't particularly agree with the wetland system but he chats to Tony about it. He also mentions Annette, who's spent the morning with Alice. Tony reckons Brian's just got too much time on his hands.

Annabelle feels Borchester Land is paralysed while Matt and Chalkman stubbornly cling on. They'll get Matt out, one way or another, and she thinks Brian should consider replacing him as Chair. After plenty of flattery, Brian admits he's not opposed to the idea. Annabelle will sound out the other board members' feelings - discreetly.

It's Helen's birthday. She and Annette have supper with Pat and Tony, who fire questions at Annette. Apart from expressing a keenness for Tom, she gives little away. Out in the kitchen, Helen angrily asks Pat to stop the interrogation. Pat insists they're only thinking of her - Annette can't stay forever on a freebie. Helen tells her it's none of their business. She believes they're still trying to push Greg under the carpet as if he didn't exist. Helen drags Annette off - she's had enough so they're going home.

Episode written by Nawal Gadalla.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00jnhkt)
Arts news and reviews with John Wilson.

Named as Ireland's greatest living musician in RTE's People of the Year Awards 2007, folk singer-songwriter Christy Moore is best known for his political and social commentary. He discusses his latest album, Listen.

Based on the stage play by CP Taylor, Good examines the rise of fascism in 1930s Germany and stars Viggo Mortensen as a bookish professor who finds himself unwillingly and unwittingly swept up in the policies of the Nazi party. Novelist and critic Sarah Dunant reviews the film.

Author Philipp Meyer discusses American Rust, his debut novel, set in a decaying Pennsylvania steel town, and the inspiration he took from his childhood in Baltimore.

As the Tate Britain recreates William Blake's critically panned one-man exhibition from 1809, John Wilson visits the gallery to discover where it went wrong two centuries ago.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00jpq8j)
Restless

Episode 9

Dramatisation of William Boyd's thriller.

Ruth finds the remains of a sawn-off shot gun at her mother's house. What madness is Sally planning?

Sally/Eve ...... Eileen Atkins
Ruth ...... Fenella Woolgar
Jochen ...... Gene Goodman
Sean ...... Stephen Hogan

Directed by Marc Beeby.


THU 20:00 The Report (b00jnj2x)
Failings at Mid Staffordshire Hospital

A government-commissioned inquiry is to deliver its verdict on what led to the catastrophic failures at Mid Staffordshire Hospital. The Health Secretary has said he is confident that Mid Staffordshire is an isolated case.

Simon Cox investigates whether that's true. He asks why the failings at Stafford weren't picked up by a host of organisations and whether other hospitals should also be causing concern.


THU 20:30 In Business (b00jnj2z)
Power Drive

As the world's biggest car companies appeal for government bailouts, fearless newcomers are seeking to revolutionise the global automobile industry with electric cars. Peter Day takes a test drive in a plug-in Chinese newcomer and hears from an Israel start-up company that wants to charge by the mile.


THU 21:00 Remembrance of Smells Past (b00jnj31)
Ian Peacock discovers why certain smells can transport us back to our childhood. Our olfactory perceptions are increasingly being recognised by scientists as the foundation for many of our decisions and actions, from consumer loyalty to weight loss and age perception.

With a growing realisation that a sense of smell has this special ability to arouse particular feelings, researchers are being drawn to explore the connections between smell, memory and emotion. Ian asks if smells could be bypassing the conscious mind and accessing memories on a deeper, more mysterious level.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00jjgg8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00jnj33)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00jnj35)
With Robin Lustig in London and Ritula Shah in Mumbai. Elections start in India, Conservative MP Damian Green will not face police charges over civil service leaks and US Envoy George Mitchell holds first talks in Israel.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00jqpfl)
Anybody Can Do Anything

Episode 4

Debora Weston reads Betty MacDonald's comic novel about life as a single mother in America during the Great Depression.

February 1933 is a terrible time to be out of a job. Even Mary has a hard time lining up interviews for Betty.


THU 23:00 The Personality Test (b007tzff)
Series 3

Toyah Willcox

Pop sensation and actress Toyah Willcox is in the hot seat posing questions all about her.

Tackling the ultra-personal quiz are Sue Perkins, Caroline Quinlan, Robin Ince and Will Smith.

Comedy quiz presented by a new guest host every show. All the questions are about them.

Script by Simon Littlefield and Kieron Quirke.

Devised and produced by Aled Evans.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2007.


THU 23:30 What a Carve Up! (b0076rbl)
Episode 8

Shocking family truths about the Winshaws pile-up, but what's in-store for their biographer, Michael?

But whenever he feels stressed, Pearce turns again and again to view a clip of his favourite film, What A Carve Up!

Robert Bathurst stars in Jonathan Coe's wickedly funny, black comedy, inspired by the immorality, greed, corruption and ambition of 1980s Britain - adapted by David Nobbs (The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin).

Coe's cult 1994 fictional novel was inspired after he watched the old British comedy horror film, What A Carve Up! (1961) starring Sid James, Kenneth Connor and Shirley Eaton. Coe opted to borrow both the film's title and the theme of a family -- as a way of exposing foul play in the British Establishment - and the excesses and evils of all aspects of Thatcherite Britain during the 80s and early 90s.

Michael ...... Robert Bathurst
Fiona ...... Fiona Allen
Hortensia/Tabitha ...... Flaminia Cinque
Mark Winshaw ...... Alan Davies
Hilary Winshaw ...... Rebecca Front
Mortimer Winshaw ...... Charlie Higson
Michael's Mum/Dorothy ...... Geraldine McNulty
Thomas Winshaw ...... Geoffrey Palmer
Phoebe ...... Lucy Punch
Henry Winshaw/Pyles ...... Jeff Rawle

Producer: Lucy Armitage

Made by Tiger Aspect Productions for BBC Radio 4 and first broadcast in 2005.



FRIDAY 17 APRIL 2009

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00jnkd8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00jlzzd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00jnkdb)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00jnkdd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00jnkdg)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00jnkdj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00jnkdl)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Gordon Gray.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00jnkdn)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.

Rustling seems to be on the increase. Farming Today has reported incidents of hundreds of pigs taken from a Staffordshire farm and 100 sheep stolen in south west England. Now a million bees have been stolen from a farm in Shropshire - a risky business for the thief but potentially highly profitable. Charlotte Smith hears that experts believe there are likely to be more such incidents.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00jnkdq)
Presented by Sarah Montague and Edward Stourton.

Home Office minister Vernon Coaker discusses which public authorities - if any - should be able to use surveillance powers in the future.

John Humphrys talks to entrepreneur and minister in Nelson Mandela's government Jay Naidoo, and spokesperson for the ruling ANC party Jessie Duarte, about the current condition of South Africa.

Reporter Sanchia Berg visits the London Traffic Control Centre to discover how is traffic managed in our congested cities.

North America Editor Justin Webb reports on the release of memos detailing techniques the CIA was able to use under the previous administration. Philippe Sands QC discusses the memos and the possibility of prosecution.

Conductor Stephen Rhys and Professor Graham Welch explain the benefits of being in a choir.

Thought for the day with Catherine Pepinster, editor of The Tablet.

Damian Green, the MP arrested in an inquiry into Home Office leaks, says police told him he faced life in jail if convicted. Former Lord Chancellor Lord Falconer discusses if, as Mr Green alleged, the entire affair was 'absurd'.

South Africans go to the polls on 22 April in the fourth national and provincial elections since the end of apartheid in 1994. John Humphrys, who reports from the country for the first time in 15 years, examines how the country has changed.

Liberal Democrat Treasury spokesman Vince Cable says an informant tells him that problems with building societies are widespread.

Archaeologist Professor Jim Crow and classicist Professor Paul Cartledge discuss the possibility of finding the tomb of Cleopatra.

The US sea captain Richard Phillips, held hostage by Somali pirates for five days, arrived in the Kenyan port of Mombasa. Writer Jay Bahadur remembers his meetings with some of the pirates. Shadow International Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell discusses what can be done to halt piracy in the region.

Journalist Conor McNicholas and advisor Mark Mulligan discuss the Swedish-based file-sharing website The Pirate Bay.

Pallab Ghosh reports on the search for a real life equivalent to the character Q from the James Bond films.

Latin America experts Michael Shifter and Otto Reich discuss President Obama's approach to the region.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b00jlxjp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00jtxx5)
William Fiennes - The Music Room

Episode 5

Dan Stevens reads William Fiennes's memoir of his magical childhood in a moated castle in which he grew up with his severely epileptic older brother.

William, now 17, prepares to leave home. Richard enjoys holidays with his parents and his days find a more even keel, but sadness looms.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00jpqbh)
Breastfeeding; Judith Mackay; The legacy of Dusty Springfield

Are women under too much pressure to breastfeed at all costs? Plus, Professor Judith Mackay on her life-time achievement award from the BMJ; and the legacy of Dusty Springfield.


FRI 11:00 What's in Your Head (b00jnkdx)
Under pressure, when we are on our own, many of us hear the words or songs we learnt by heart as a child. This programme features people discussing how these songs have helped them in situations of extreme pressure and danger.

Heidi Vincent is a secondary school teacher in Devon whose son Theo was born prematurely at 23 weeks. She describes her four months of waiting in intensive care as being 'like in some kind of shifted reality'.

Ghias Aljundi was a political prisoner of conscience who was tortured and held in a Syrian prison cell for four years without charge. He was comforted by a poem he had memorised called My Mother.

Peter Shaw from south Wales was kidnapped while working in Georgia and held underground for four months. He found that music and songs which he had learned from his father helped him.

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 O'Kane and Co (b00jnksn)
Improvised comedy featuring Irish comedienne and actress Deirdre O'Kane in conversation with some of her friends about women's subjects. She talks to Jackie Clune and Rowland Rivron about the vagaries of childbirth and hospitals.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00jm1q1)
Consumer news and issues with Peter White.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00jnlmj)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00jnlml)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.

After President Obama publishes the legal advice under which the CIA interrogated terrorist suspects but orders that those who carried it out will not be prosecuted, the head of the International Bar Association gives his thoughts.

Pakistan has been promised five billion dollars of extra aid, but after previous failures to honour commitments made at donor conferences, Shaun asks the vice president of the World Bank whether she can be sure that other countries will actually contribute their share.

As the newspapers publish Jacqui Smith's political obituaries, a former Labour home secretary says that sometimes it is civil servants, not ministers, who should be called to account.


FRI 13:30 More or Less (b00jnlmn)
Tim Harford presents the magazine which looks at numbers everywhere, in the news, in politics and in life.

Tim investigates the numbers behind the drug legalisation debate, tests a former home secretary's maths and finds out why drowning cats can help explain the credit crunch.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00jnhkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00jnlmq)
Old School Ties

By Sue Eckstein. Stand-up comedian Kit Nichols likes to satirise his boarding school experiences, but his past takes on a different light when he reads the obituary of an old school friend. Feeling guilty at having lost touch, Kit decides to confront the man who he believes is responsible for his friend's unexpected death.

Kit Nichols ...... Thomas Arnold
Father Dominic ...... Crawford Logan
Lucy Nichols ...... Noreen Leighton
The Abbott ...... Gareth Thomas
William Hennessy ...... Richard Greenwood
Ted Thomson/Bursar ...... Paul Young

Directed by Bruce Young.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00jnlxd)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

John Cushnie, Chris Beardshaw and Bunny Guinness answer questions posed by gardeners in the Peak District.

The forensic unit at the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, has been key in solving a large number of crimes, including murder. Anne Swithinbank and Matthew Biggs visit and discover the secrets of the Jodrell Laboratory.

Including the Gardeners' Question Time gardening weather forecast.

A Taylor Made production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Men of Fashion (b00jm2yn)
Sporting Gents - The Prince of Wales Plays Golf

The interior designer examines how sportswear has been men's fashion's single biggest influence since the French Revolution.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00jnlxg)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00jnm3f)
To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the French New Wave, Francine Stock talks to Stephen Frears, director of Dangerous Liaisons and My Beautiful Laundrette, and Get Carter creator Mike Hodges about their first time with the films of Jean-Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00jnm3h)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00jnr5p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b00jnr5r)
Series 27

Episode 7

Comedy sketches and satirical comments from Steve Punt, Hugh Dennis and the team including Mitch Benn, Laura Shavin, Jon Holmes and Marcus Brigstocke.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00jnr5t)
Annette's been helping Pip practice her French. Pip's still worrying about her exams but wishes she could stay off school for Phil's birthday reunion. She and Ruth check the lapwing nest and find all four eggs are smashed. Pip wishes she could have protected them.

Helen's off to see Nic, who's delighted to have passed her driving test. Helen invites Annette but points out that Nic lives with Will in Greg's old cottage. This doesn't worry Annette.

Nic's settled in at Casa Nueva but casually mentions the awful décor when Will first moved in. Helen reminds her it was when she lived there - and agrees that the place was depressing, as Greg had a lot to deal with at the time.

Hearing this seems to upset Annette, and she bolts out of the door. She tells Helen she feels really weird. She doesn't have any proper memories of Greg. Helen tries to console her. As Annette pulls herself together, she tells Helen that she heard the argument with Pat last night. Helen assures her it doesn't matter what they or anyone else thinks. Annette can stay, and they can talk about Greg morning, noon and night. It's going to be all right.

Episode written by Nawal Gadalla.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00jnr5w)
Arts news and reviews with Kirsty Lang.

Jarvis Cocker describes his love of indie record-shops; Graham Jones, author of Last Shop Standing, and Nigel House, one of the founders of the original Rough Trade independent music store, talk about International Independent Record Store day.

Award-winning comedian and actor Omid Djalili discusses the return of his TV series, where he talks about what it is to be British, and Credit Crunch: The Opera.

Married dancers Thomas Edur and Agnes Oaks explain why they are retiring from English National Ballet and how their Estonian upbringing affected their technique.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00jpqbk)
Restless

Episode 10

Dramatisation of William Boyd's thriller.

The final confrontation.

Sally/Eve ...... Eileen Atkins
Ruth ...... Fenella Woolgar
Lucas Romer ...... Adrian Lukis

Directed by Marc Beeby.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00jnr5y)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs this week's panel - Conservative party chairman Eric Pickles, Europe Minister Caroline Flint, Times' columnist Giles Coren and Plaid Cymru Assembly Member Helen Mary Jones.

With questions from the audience in Ludlow, Shropshire.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00jnr60)
Reputational Damage

Clive James reflects on what it takes to make – and break – a good reputation in public life. He concludes that the government’s latest euphemism ‘reputational damage’ to describe the fallout concerning Gordon Brown’s special adviser Damian McBride, after he plotted to smear an opposition politician, is fooling no-one.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b00jntf4)
I'm the Boss

By Karen Brown. Successful HR manager Diane's life is turned upside down by a sinister online bullying campaign, and when she finally discovers the culprit, her world begins to disintegrate.

With Lesley Sharp.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00jntbm)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00jntf6)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig. Including reports on Cuba's relations with the US, the UN's concerns about Sri Lanka and President Sarkozy's undiplomatic lunch.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00jqpj9)
Anybody Can Do Anything

Episode 5

Debora Weston reads Betty MacDonald's comic novel about life as a single mother in America during the Great Depression.

Unlike Mary, Betty is hopeless at selling advertising, so she gets work as a photographic tinter, a fur coat model-cum-book-keeper and secretary to a mobster.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b00jmv1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Beardyman and the Mimics (b00d61q9)
Champion beatboxer Beardyman, aka Darren Foreman, is a master of vocal artistry. He can make all manner of noises, including entire percussive music tracks, using only his mouth, throat and tongue.

Inspired by the lyrebird, he ventures on a personal journey to unveil the secrets of animal vocal mimicry. He encounters ornithologist and musician Bill Oddie, birdsong scientific experts and a whole new world of sounds.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00jpn1h)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00jppxp)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00jpq4j)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00jpq8j)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00jpqbk)

4 Stands Up 18:30 THU (b00jnhgn)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00jnr60)

A Wonderful Way to Make a Living 20:45 WED (b00ctl6r)

Afternoon Reading 00:30 SUN (b0084f7t)

Afternoon Reading 19:45 SUN (b008nwjx)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00826ct)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b0081ck7)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00826cs)

Ankle High History 14:45 SUN (b00jlxjy)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00jkhl1)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00jjtz3)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00jnr5y)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00jkv2j)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00jkv2j)

Beardyman and the Mimics 23:30 FRI (b00d61q9)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00jlvr4)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00jlvr4)

Bespoken Word 23:15 WED (b00ctl74)

Beyond Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00jq7nd)

Blair's Faith Foundation 20:00 TUE (b00jmv21)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00jm3l9)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00jqp6n)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00jqp75)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00jqpfl)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00jqpj9)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00jhfr9)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00jlzzd)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00jlzzd)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00jtxx7)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00jlzzd)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00jtxx1)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00jtxx1)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00jtxx3)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00jlzzd)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00jtxx5)

Bringing Up Britain 22:15 SAT (b00jj0sm)

Bringing Up Britain 20:00 WED (b00jn4fn)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00jlxjk)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00jmv25)

Case Notes 16:30 WED (b00jmv25)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00jh472)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00jlxr0)

Click On 16:30 MON (b00jm32g)

Costing the Earth 21:00 MON (b00jm3l3)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b00jm3l3)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b00jhg36)

Counterpoint 13:30 MON (b00jm2np)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b00jjjps)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b00jn8h1)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00jm2nr)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b008gzlm)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00jn0q6)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00jngcx)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00jnlmq)

Easter Sunday Hymn 06:59 SUN (b00jlvrg)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00jkhkl)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b00jkhk6)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00jlzs4)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00jm56w)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00jn0pk)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00jn84b)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00jnkdn)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00jjp9j)

Fixing the Pedigree Dog 13:30 SUN (b00htl96)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b00jntf4)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00jkhks)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00jm364)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00jmv1z)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00jn4fl)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00jnhkt)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00jnr5w)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00jjt85)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00jnlxd)

Go4it 19:15 SUN (b00jlyz3)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b00jmv1n)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b00jmv1n)

Hazelbeach 11:30 MON (b00899mt)

Heresy 18:30 TUE (b00jmv1v)

Hitting the Buffers 11:00 TUE (b00c55vy)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b00jjls6)

In Business 20:30 THU (b00jnj2z)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00jjgg8)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00jjgg8)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00jmv23)

Inside The Child Prisons 20:00 MON (b00jm3cj)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00jjt87)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00jnlxg)

Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Men of Fashion 15:45 MON (b00jm2wg)

Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Men of Fashion 15:45 TUE (b00jm2x9)

Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Men of Fashion 15:45 WED (b00jm2xr)

Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Men of Fashion 15:45 THU (b00jm2y6)

Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen's Men of Fashion 15:45 FRI (b00jm2yn)

Lent Talks 05:45 SAT (b00jj13m)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00jkv2b)

Lost Voices 23:30 SAT (b00jh476)

Lost Voices 16:30 SUN (b00jlyyq)

Ludwig Koch and the Music of Nature 21:00 WED (b00jn4m2)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00jmqsc)

Mark Steel's in Town 18:30 WED (b00jn4fg)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00jnhf3)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00jjzml)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00jlv14)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00jlzf1)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00jm3m4)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00jn0p5)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00jn83y)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00jnkd8)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00jn0pt)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00jn0pt)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00jn4f6)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00jkhkv)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00jkhkv)

More or Less 13:30 FRI (b00jnlmn)

Motownship 10:30 SAT (b00jkhkn)

My Teenage Diary 23:00 WED (b00jn5s2)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00jjzmv)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00jlvr2)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00jlzqx)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00jm56r)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00jn0pf)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00jn846)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00jnkdj)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00jlvr6)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00jkd19)

News and Papers 07:01 SUN (b00jlwnq)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00jlwp5)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00jkv2l)

News 13:00 SAT (b00jkhkz)

O'Kane and Co 11:30 FRI (b00jnksn)

On the Ropes 09:00 TUE (b00jm66c)

On the Ropes 21:30 TUE (b00jm66c)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00jlxt0)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00jlxt0)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00jkhk4)

Open Country 15:02 THU (b00jkhk4)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00jkv20)

PM 17:00 MON (b00jm32j)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00jmv1q)

PM 17:00 WED (b00jn4fb)

PM 17:00 THU (b00jnhf5)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00jnm3h)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00jlyyz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00jjzmx)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00jlzs2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00jm56t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00jn0ph)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00jn848)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00jnkdl)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00jkv2d)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00jkv2d)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00jkv2d)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00jlwnz)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00jlwnz)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00jlwnz)

Remembrance of Smells Past 21:00 THU (b00jnj31)

Safety Catch 11:30 WED (b017skx3)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00jkv1w)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00jkhkj)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00jkv2g)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00jjzmq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00jlvgk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00jlzqv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00jm56m)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00jn0p9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00jn842)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00jnkdd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00jjzmn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00jjzms)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00jkv24)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00jlvgh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00jlvgm)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00jlyys)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00jlzll)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00jlzln)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00jm56k)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00jm56p)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00jn0p7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00jn0pc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00jn840)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00jn844)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00jnkdb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00jnkdg)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00jkv28)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00jlyyx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00jm32l)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00jmv1s)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00jn4fd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00jnhf7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00jnr5p)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00jlvr8)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00jlvr8)

Spoon, Jar, Jar, Spoon - The Two Sides of Tommy Cooper 11:30 TUE (b00jm66h)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00jlzxd)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00jlzxd)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00jlwp7)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00jlwnv)

Sunrise Service 06:35 SUN (b00jlvrb)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00jlxjm)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00jlyz1)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00jlyz1)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00jm32q)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00jm32q)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00jmv1x)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00jmv1x)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00jn4fj)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00jn4fj)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00jnhkr)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00jnhkr)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00jnr5t)

The Baronet and Tissington's Fight for Survival 11:00 MON (b00jm0bq)

The Broken Melody 11:30 THU (b00jn8h3)

The Film Programme 23:02 SUN (b00jjt89)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00jnm3f)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00jlxjr)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00jlxjr)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00jn0q4)

The Music Group 13:30 TUE (b00jmqqb)

The New Scramble for Africa 17:00 SUN (b00jhxmk)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b00jjtz1)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b00jnr5r)

The Personality Test 23:00 THU (b007tzff)

The Prime Ministers 09:30 TUE (b00jm66f)

The Report 20:00 THU (b00jnj2x)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b00jlxjp)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b00jlxjp)

The Secret World 23:00 TUE (b01169br)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:00 SUN (b00jhp5b)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b00jm32n)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00jlxjw)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00jm3l7)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00jmv4c)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00jn4nw)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00jnj35)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00jntf6)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00jj0f6)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00jn4f8)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00jkhkb)

Today 06:00 MON (b00jlzx6)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00jm56y)

Today 06:00 WED (b00jn0pm)

Today 06:00 THU (b00jn84d)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00jnkdq)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00jlzbz)

What a Carve Up! 23:30 MON (b0076r0l)

What a Carve Up! 23:30 TUE (b0076r3x)

What a Carve Up! 23:30 WED (b0076r78)

What a Carve Up! 23:30 THU (b0076rbl)

What's in Your Head 11:00 FRI (b00jnkdx)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00jkv1y)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00jpn1f)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00jppxm)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00jpq4g)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00jpq8f)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00jpqbh)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b00jhvk8)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b00jmv1l)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00jm2nm)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00jmqq8)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00jn0q2)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00jn8h7)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00jnlml)

Wrecked 11:00 WED (b00jn0pw)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00jm1ny)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00jm1pj)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00jm1pq)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00jm1pv)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00jm1q1)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b00jkv22)