Radio-Lists Home Now on R4 Contact

RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 17 JANUARY 2009

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00gm6qz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00h3m9c)
The Rest is Noise - Listening to the 20th Century

Episode 5

Julian Rhind Tutt reads from music critic Alex Ross's history of 20th-century music. John Cage, John Adams and the birth of political opera with Nixon in China.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gm6r1)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gm6r3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gm6r5)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00gm6r7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gm6r9)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


SAT 05:45 Art Made in China (b008th9f)
Episode 3

Roger Law investigates the extraordinary boom in contemporary Chinese art. In Shanghai, he discovers the weird and wonderful world of Chinese installation art.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00gm6rc)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00gntcg)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00gntcj)
Countryside magazine. Matt Baker visits the first wild beaver colony in the UK, at Lower Mill Estate nature reserve in Gloucestershire. Beavers are set to be reintroduced elsewhere in England and in Scotland, and Matt finds out what they might bring with them.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today This Week (b00gntcl)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00gntcp)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00gntcr)
Presented by Sarah Montague and Edward Stourton.

Christian Fraser reports on his findings in Gaza.

John Ransford of the LGA discusses why pay increases in the public sector are 18% higher than in the private sector.

Nick Bryant reports on Lance Armstrong's return to cycle racing.

Jack Izzard examines if the economic climate means that the price of art will fall.

Jeremy Bowen reports on developments in Gaza.

Bill Nighy reads from Sri Lankan editor Lasantha Wickramatunga's final article, in which he predicts his murder.

Former defence minister Peter Kilfoyle and former Navy officer Lewis Page discuss how effective nuclear weapons are as a deterrent.

Thought for the day with the Rev Bob Marshall.

Miles Templeman, of the IoD, and analyst Abigail Herron discuss a vote by shareholders of housebuilding firm Bellway against big bonuses for top bosses.

Chief exec of Channel 4 Andy Duncan and Steve Hewlett, presenter of BBC Radio 4's Media Show, discuss if a merger with BBC Worldwide or Channel 5 are reasonable suggestions for Channel 4 to consider.

Rebecca Jones talks to Sir David Frost and Michael Sheen, who plays Frost in the film adaptation of his interview with Richard Nixon.

Robert Peston explains why shares in Barclays Bank lost 45% of their value in a week.

Royal Navy surgeon Harald Veen discusses his experiences working at a hospital in Gaza during the conflict.

Mercedes Ramirez Johnson, one of only four of 160 passengers to survive a plane crash in 1995, explains what she remembers.

Kevin Connolly remembers the cultural divide throughout US history.

Historian Dr David Starkey and Prof Jim Al-Khalili discuss the impact that Cambridge University has made on the world.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00gntct)
Saturday Live anticipates the inauguration of the first black President of the United States with the historian Andrew Roberts.

As they are about to celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary, presenter Richard Coles talks to George and Dorothy Leigh, one of the first mixed-race couples in Nottingham.

Commander Andrew McKendrick, RN, whose nuclear submarine, HMS Vengeance, contains in its safe the authorisation for launching Trident, talks about life underwater on a submarine.

Stephen Morris, of Joy Division and New Order, shares his secret life - he collects military tanks.

Plus the inheritance tracks of actress Samantha Bond and poetry from Elvis McGonagall.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00gntcw)
Historical Walks in Great Britain - Mosques

HISTORICAL WALKS IN GREAT BRITAIN
John McCarthy is joined by writer and broadcaster Charlie Connelly who’s been following in the footsteps of significant historical figures in a series of major walks around Britain and Ireland.

MOSQUES
The first British mosque was established in Woking in 1889 and now it’s estimated that there are over 1,600 Mosques in Britain, from the grand Regents Park Mosque in London to small community Mosques in many of Britain’s city and town centres. Asian Network presenter Adil Ray shares his knowledge and discusses the travelling pleasures of visiting mosques in Britain and further afield.


SAT 10:30 Winnie the Who? (b00gntcy)
Michael Rosen explores the enduring popularity in Russia of translations of the Winnie the Pooh stories.

In Soviet Russia, Winnie the Pooh became Vinni Pukh, and the original illustrations were replaced by an entirely new animation that became a spectacular hit. From Vladivostock to Tallin there was scarely a Russian-speaking child who couldn't recite large chunks of Vinni Pukh, or garble back the words of Petachok (Piglet) or moan the lines of Oslik (Eeyore). It came as a shock to many of them that an Englishman was able to create such quintessentially Russian characters.

Michael finds out about the Russian translations, why they chose to remove Christopher Robin from the action, why they ignored both the Shepherd and ultimately the Disney cartoon drawings, and why their version was, and still is, such an important part of their cultural history.

And Strictly Come Dancing star Lilia Kopylova, among, others, recalls her love of this very Russo-English Bear.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00gnv9p)
A look behind the scenes at Westminster with Peter Riddell.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00gnv9r)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00gnv9t)
Paul Lewis with the latest news from the world of personal finance.

Anglo Irish bank nationalised and Bank of America bailed out - how far will the banking crisis go? Do UK banks need more support or will the new measures to guarantee loans to small businesses be enough?

Plus the government apologises over Equitable Life, the Children's Tax Credit deadline looms and where is your pension money safe?


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00gm62k)
Series 67

Episode 2

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz, with panellists Francis Wheen, Sue Perkins, Carrie Quinlan and Jeremy Hardy.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00gnv9w)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00gnv9y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00gm683)
On the eve of a new American presidency, Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from The George Washington University in Washington, DC. The panel includes journalist Christopher Hitchens, Republican Renee Amoore, political analyst Thomas E Mann and former chief of staff to Colin Powell, Colonel Larry Wilkerson.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00gnvb0)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00gswn8)
Piper Alpha

By Stephen Phelps.

On 6 July 1988, a North Sea oil rig was destroyed by a series of explosions and a massive fire, resulting in the death of 167 men. Based on Lord Cullen's Public Inquiry, the play chronicles the disaster minute-by-minute as it happened.

With Ewan Bailey, Nigel Betts, Kenny Blyth, Mark Bonnar, Liam Brennan, Stephen Critchlow, Ben Crowe, Nyasha Hatendi, Chris Pavlo, Roshan R Rohatgi, John Rowe, Dan Starkey, John Kay Steel and Joan Walker.

Directed by Toby Swift.


SAT 16:00 Weekend Woman's Hour (b00gnvr1)
Highlights of this week's Woman's Hour programmes with Jane Garvey.

In the week of Barack Obama's inauguration, and following his declaration that he is a feminist, what will his administration do for women?

What help do the children of drug addicts want and what support is available to them? Also, the dangers of explicit images on the net.

Plus 21-year-old inventor Emily Cummins explains how her award-winning solar-powered fridge works, who are the women singer-songwriters to look out for in 2009 and is 'flexibilism' the answer to the issue of work-life balance?


SAT 17:00 PM (b00gnvr3)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Ritula Shah, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b00gnvr5)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00gnvr7)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00gnvr9)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gnvrc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00gnvrf)
Peter Curran presents an eclectic mix of conversation, comedy and music. His guests are Trinny and Susannah, Jessica Hynes and Ed Mitchell, and Gideon Coe talks to musician Jah Wobble. With music from Josephine Oniyama and comedy from Alistair Barrie.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00gnvvc)
Alan Milburn

Chris Bowlby looks at Alan Milburn, the MP for Darlington who has returned to the political front line in a key advisory role to Gordon Brown. He is to head a new Commission on social mobility.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00gnvvf)
Oliver!, Mickey Rourke in The Wrestler, and On Kindness

Guests: Columnist David Aaronovitch
Literary critic Professor John Carey
Comedian Natalie Haynes

Oliver!
Tom, David, John and Natalie consider the new revival of Lionel Bart’s twist on Dickens. It stars Rowan Atkinson as Fagin and the winner of BBC1’s ‘I’d Do Anything’, Jodie Prenger, as Nancy. And its £15 million advance ticket sales reportedly make it the fastest-selling show in history of London’s West End. But does the core story – of hunger, pickpocketing and the threat of the noose – still make sense in ‘The X-Factor’ era? Tom asks the panel if they were left wanting more, or if they’d do anything to avoid going again…

Oliver! is at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in central London.

The Wrestler
Hell-raising Eighties movie star Mickey Rourke eventually lost everything and languished in the wilderness for 15 years. He even spent six as a prize-fighter. Now, in Darren Aronofsky’s new film, he plays hell-raising Eighties wrestler Randy ‘The Ram’ Robinson – another washed-up star who is desperately trying to repair his life.
Rourke is being tipped for major awards for this performance. So has he finally earnt the comeback of which Randy can only dream?

The Wrestler on general release, certificate 15, from Friday 16 January.

The Art of the Presidential Inaugural Speech
On Tuesday night, Barack Obama will become the 44th President of the United States of America, and deliver the 56th inaugural address. Tom and his guests explore this very particular genre, listen to legendary examples from Presidents Roosevelt, Kennedy and Reagan - and discuss what President Obama will need to do to make his version equally memorable.

British news coverage of President Obama’s inaugural on Tuesday 20 January will include an extended edition of PM on BBC Radio 4 from 4.30pm to 6pm.

On Kindness
The psychoanalyst Adam Phillips and the historian Barbara Taylor argue that kindness has become the ‘forbidden pleasure’ of our age. Their new book combines a history of kindness from the Stoics to the NHS with an analysis of the fears that, they contend, stop us enjoying being kind to each other. But how kindly will Tom, John, David and Natalie respond – and what impact can a book like this have?

On Kindness is published by Hamish Hamilton.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00gnvvh)
Nations of the Cross

Arrivals and Departures

Alan Dein hears true stories from those who live around London's King's Cross station.

Millions of us have passed through it but few of know anything about the turbulent lives and the history that is crammed in around London's King's Cross. Today it is being changed beyond recognition by massive redevelopment. For the past three years, Alan Dein and a team of oral historians have been capturing the voices of those who remember a King's Cross already receding before the bulldozers arrived.


SAT 21:00 Anthony Trollope - Orley Farm (b00ghrhb)
3. Secrets

Lady Mason has confessed to her terrible secret and her chance of marriage with Sir Peregrine has been shattered.

Will her secret be exposed at the trial and will her beloved son lose Orley Farm?

Starring Tim Pigott-Smith, Samantha Bond and Ronald Pickup.

The conclusion of Anthony Trollope’s compelling, emotional novel

Dramatised by Martyn Wade.

Anthony Trollope ...... Tim Pigott-Smith
Lady Mason ...... Samantha Bond
Sir Peregrine ...... Ronald Pickup
Peregrine Orme ...... Dan Stevens
Mrs Edith Orme ...... Amanda Root
Lucius Mason ...... Jonathan Christie
Sophia Furnival ...... Lydia Leonard
Mr Furnival ...... Robert Maskell
Mrs Furnival ...... Joanna Monro
Lady Staveley ...... Pamela Miles
Judge Staveley ...... Chris Pavlo
Madeline Staveley ...... Manjeet Mann
Augustus Staveley ...... Robert Lonsdale
Felix Graham ...... Gunnar Cauthery
Mr Dockwrath ...... Sam Dale
Joseph Mason ...... Jonathan Tafler
Mr Moulder ...... Stephen Critchlow
Mrs Moulder ...... Jane Whittenshaw
John Kenneby ...... Inam Mirza
Chaffanbrass ...... Malcolm Tierney
Miss Biggs ...... Jill Cardo
Judge ...... Dan Starkey

Director: Tracey Neale

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2009.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00gnvvk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b00glndk)
Privacy

Clive Anderson presents the series analysing the legal issues of the day.

Max Mosley's successful court action against News of the World for invading his privacy has sent shockwaves through the newspaper world, which fears that this and earlier judgements will inhibit investigative journalism. How can the courts balance the conflicting rights of privacy and freedom of speech?


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b00gl57m)
Robert Robinson chairs the perennial general knowledge contest.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b00ghrld)
Roger McGough introduces listeners' requests.

Actress Lia Williams reads poems from Emily Dickinson, Emily Bronte, Carol Ann Duffy, Brian Patten, William Blake, Matthew Arnold and Harold Pinter. Plus recordings of Michael Williams reading Cecil Day Lewis's The Album and Felix Dennis reads some of his own atmospheric work.

The Ambush by Brian Patten
From: Collected Love Poems
Publ: Harper Perennial

The Effect of Coastal Processes on the Beach at Amroth by Adrian Blamires
From: The Effect of Coastal Processes on the Beach at Amroth
Publ: Two Rivers Press

Verse Found Whilst Reading Between the Lines of a Lonely Hearts Ad by Matt Harvey
From: The Hole in the Sum of My Parts
Publ: The Poetry Trust

Rapunzstiltskin by Liz Lochhead
From: Being Alive (Anthology)
Publ: Bloodaxe

I Cannot Live With You by Emily Dickinson
From: The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Publ: Faber

London by ASJ Tessimond
From: Voices in a Giant City
Publ: William Heinemann

The Album by Cecil Day Lewis
From: The Complete Poems of C Day-Lewis
Publ: Sinclair-Stevenson

Dover Beach by Matthew Arnold
From: The Oxford Book of English Verse

My Three Rivers by Lotte Kramer
From: The Phantom Lane
Publ: Rockingham Press

One Need Not be a Chamber by Emily Dickinson
From: The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Publ: faber and faber

It is Here by Harold Pinter
From: Various Voices : Prose, Poetry, Politics
Publ: Faber

I Know the Place by Harold Pinter
From: Collected Poems and Prose
Publ: Methuen

High Waving Heather by Emily Brontë
From: Brontë - Poems
Publ: Everyman

My Literary Career So Far by Adrian Mitchell
Unpublished



SUNDAY 18 JANUARY 2009

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00gnwd1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SUN 00:30 The Late Story (b007qzxx)
Bottled Air

Death of a Ladles' Man

Short stories by writer and comedian Ian Macpherson, describing life with Florette, a radical, feminist, menopausal poet.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gnwd5)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gnwd7)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gnwd9)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00gnwdc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00gnwdp)
The sound of bells from Winchester Cathedral.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00gnvvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00gp10q)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00gp10s)
Not Cute Enough

Mark Tully considers our responses to beauty: what our attitudes reveal and to what extent such attitudes are culturally conditioned. Can conventional responses to beauty be overridden and how much is beauty really in the eye of the beholder?


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00gq4mc)
Topical farming magazine. Alex James visits a flock of sheep that are famous for their milk rather than their wool, and samples the cheese.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00gq4mf)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00gq4mh)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00gq4mk)
Roger Bolton discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00gq4mm)
Personal Support Unit

Lord Woolf appeals on behalf of Personal Support Unit. Donations: Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00gq4mp)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00gq4mr)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00gq4mt)
From St Mary's Episcopal Cathedral, Glasgow. Morning prayer in the season of Epiphany explores the theme 'O Lord, you searched me out and know me'. With the Very Rev Kelvin Holdsworth and Rev Shona Lillie. Cathedral Choir directed by Frikki Walker.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00gm685)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue from Harold Evans.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00gq4mw)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00gq4mz)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00gq4n2)
Vincent Cable MP

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the Liberal Democrat Treasury Spokesman, Vince Cable. He studied economics at Cambridge and had a rich career before entering parliament in 1997. Now, he's become something of a media darling; seen by many as one of the few people able to understand - and make credible suggestions about - the current financial crisis.

In this personal interview, however, politics is largely set aside and instead Vince describes the home-life that shaped him as he grew up and the rich family life he has enjoyed as an adult. His fiercely ambitious father was an activist for the local Conservative party: he was talented, driven and passionate, but also overbearing and unwilling to hear voices of dissent. Vince dismayed his father by dropping his science degree in favour of economics and later outraged him by marrying his first wife, Olympia, who was from Kenya. Despite his father's view that mixed-race marriages 'didn't work', they were married for more than 13 years and raised their three children together before Olympia's death from cancer. After her death, he says, he envisaged a lonely old-age lay ahead - but an unpromising debate about free trade and agriculture brought him together with his second wife. Now he says he wears both his wedding rings together as a tribute to the two happy marriages he has enjoyed, he continues to go dancing every week with his second wife Rachel, as he did with Olympia and he is, he cheerfully confesses, a romantic.

[Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

Favourite track: La Ci Darem La Mano from Don Giovanni by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Book: A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
Luxury: An Aston Martin car.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b00gl57r)
Series 54

Episode 3

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game with panellists Paul Merton, Charles Collingwood, Graham Norton and Shappi Khorsandi.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00gq4n4)
Egon Ronay

Peter Bazalgette reflects on the life and legacy of the late food critic Egon Ronay. Why was this Hungrian emigre, new to London in the 1940's, so determined to try and change food in Britain?

Chefs, food writers and former colleagues including Raymond Blanc and Simon Hopkinson discuss the influence of the man who spent six decades campaigning to improve the standards of meals in service stations and railway stations, restaurants and cafes.

Producer: Dan Saladino.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00gq4n6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00gq4n8)
A look at events around the world with Brian Hanrahan.


SUN 13:30 Music Feature (b00fzc2y)
Puccini: Touched by the Little Finger of the Almighty

James Naughtie re-evaluates the reputation of composer Giacomo Puccini, who was born 150 years ago.

Despite the enduring popularity of operas such as Tosca, Madama Butterfly and La boheme, Puccini's value to the history of music has been questioned by some academics and opera aficionados, who have criticised the populism of his work. In response to these criticisms, Naughtie hears the opinions of respected Puccini experts including music director of Royal Opera Antonio Pappano, opera director Graham Vick and academics Alexandra Wilson and Emanuele Senici of the University of Rome.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00gm603)
Peter Gibbs chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Pippa Greenwood, Bob Flowerdew and Matthew Biggs answer the questions posed by gardeners in Hertfordshire.

Including the Gardeners' Question Time gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 A View Through a Lens (b00gq4nb)
Series 1

Shadows

Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison offers a personal view of life as he finds himself in isolated and often dangerous locations across the globe filming wildlife.

2/3. SHADOWS: Squat on a tiny platform 30 metres off shore, John waits for young black-footed albatrosses to embark on their first flight from the shore. Below him in the water, shadows are patrolling back and forth, waiting for the birds to land on the waves.

Sound recordist is Chris Watson
Producer Sarah Blunt.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00gq4nd)
Arnold Bennett - The Grand Babylon Hotel

Episode 1

Murder mystery by Arnold Bennett, adapted in two parts by Chris Harrald.

American tycoon Theodore Racksole buys Europe's most exclusive hotel on a whim, but is warned by the seller that he will live to regret it. Soon, a mysterious death occurs and Theodore and his daughter Nella find themselves in danger in their own hotel.

Theodore Racksole ...... John Sessions
Nella Racksole ...... Matti Houghton
Aribert ...... Joe Kloska
Jules ...... Richard Katz
Miss Spencer ...... Fenella Woolgar
Felix Babylon ...... Stephen Greif
Reginald Dimmock ...... Gunnar Cauthery
Miss Ferguson ...... Jill Cardo
Servant ...... Inam Mirza.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00gq530)
Niccolo Ammaniti, and Bram Stoker's Dracula

Mariella Frostrup presents the books magazine. She talks to the Italian writer Niccolo Ammaniti, the author of I'm Not Scared, about his new novel The Crossroads. And the editor of a new edition of Bram Stoker's Dracula discusses some contentious aspects of this Gothic classic.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00gq532)
Roger McGough introduces listeners' requests. Actress Lindsay Duncan reads Keats's erotic and magical poem The Eve of St Agnes.


SUN 17:00 Online Damage: Porn in the 21st Century (b00glc5z)
Penny Marshall examines the effects of the rapid expansion of online pornography on UK society. She talks to those who use online porn, including couples trying to repair the trust and intimacy dented by the persistent and secretive use of porn sites. She also hears from psychologists who are concerned that young people are in danger of having their understanding of sexual relationships permanently damaged by what they see online.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00gnvvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00gq534)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00gq536)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gq538)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00gq53b)
Sheila Dillon introduces her selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00gq53d)
Jenny tackles Brian about Tom again - she thought he was going to step back from the farm, and now he seems to be getting increasingly involved with Tom's business. Brian wants to do a bit more research before he talks to Tom. Meanwhile, Jennifer tells him that Pat and Tony are celebrating. They should complete this week - and they're owner occupiers at last.

Shula has accepted Neil's invitation to a hand bell ringing session in the Vicarage on Tuesday. Shula's clearly feeling uncomfortable at church in spite of Alan's best efforts.

Later, she goes round to Jill and Phil's, where Jill is making marmalade. She has had to reduce the hours for some of the stable girls, and people are taking their livery horses out - she's concerned about it. Phil gets very interested in the marmalade process, and starts to talk technique with a slightly exasperated Jill, who's been making it for years. When she gives a couple of jars to Alan, Phil says they'd better make some more - and he wants a go with more scientific methods. Jill suggests he makes some at home, while she goes and makes a batch at Brookfield in the tried and tested way. Then they can compare results.

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


SUN 19:15 Go4it (b00gq53g)
Children's magazine. In anticipation of his inauguration as president of the United States, Barney Harwood finds out about Barack Obama and the history of the African-American civil rights movement. Plus a report from Uganda on a new initiative supported by Comic Relief, the Awassa Children's Parliament.


SUN 19:45 Opening Lines (b007tdlr)
Series 9

Rising Laughter

Series showcasing cutting-edge contemporary writing.

After she overhears the couple next door sharing a joke, a woman becomes determined to reintroduce laughter to her own home.

By Dave Pescod, read by Susan Brown.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b00gm5zz)
Politics Special

Politics Special
Tim Harford is joined by Vince Cable MP, Charles Clarke MP and the Spectator's political editor Fraser Nelson to discuss the use and abuse of numbers in politics.

Their political qualifications speak for themselves, of course, but what about their knowledge of numbers?

Vince Cable MP, the Chief Treasury Spokesman for the Liberal Democrats, used to teach economics at Glasgow University and later went on to become the Chief Economist at Shell.

Maths runs in the family for former Secretary of State for education and Home Secretary Charles Clarke MP, whose father was a mathematician and grandfather a maths teacher.

Lastly, self-confessed maths geek and political editor of Spectator magazine Fraser Nelson loves picking apart Gordon Brown's figures and had his biggest journalistic scoop in exposing the true figure of life expectancy of Glasgow.

But how does an interest in numbers affect their work and how do they view their use in politics and policy?

To find out, Tim Harford discusses New Labour's rallying cry of "What works", and asks what role research and evidence should have in Government policy making.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00gm62f)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00gnv9t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00gq4mm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b00gm3bh)
Cracked China

Peter Day reports from China's heartland manufacturing cities on the global strains in the world's most vibrant economy, as hundreds of factories close and workers are laid off.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00gq614)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00gq616)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster with Norman Smith. Including The Condensed History of George W Bush.


SUN 23:00 In Living Memory (b00cdsj6)
Series 8

Legionnaire's Disease

Chris Ledgard travels to Philadelphia to meet the survivors and the scientists who struggled to find the cause of the mystery illness that struck down over a hundred ex-servicemen and killed 29 in the weeks following an American Legion convention in July 1976.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00gp10s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 19 JANUARY 2009

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00gq660)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00glnb1)
Moral Relativism

MORAL RELATIVISM
Different cultures have different beliefs, so what gives us the right to judge the behaviour of other people in a world where moralities often conflict? Is there a universal human standard of right and wrong, or does culture explain and excuse behaviour that other peoples might find abhorrent? How should the anthropologist understand cannibalism? Can a cultural context excuse female genital mutilation?

Laurie Taylor is joined by Professor Steven Lukes, author of a book on moral relativism, Henrietta Moore, Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Cambridge and Professor Conor Gearty, Professor of Human Rights Law at the London School of Economics, to discuss relationship of culture and morality in the debate on a universal notion of human rights.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00gnwdp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gq68g)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gq6bb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gq6d6)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00gq6dl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gqdfm)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00gqdfy)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna Hill.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00gqzvt)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00gqgv2)
Presented by John Humphrys and Edward Stourton.

Robert Peston reports on the losses announced by the RBS.

Justin Webb considers whether an approval rating for Barack Obama of over 70% means that he will inevitably disappoint some people.

Chairman of the Equality and Human Rights Commission Trevor Phillips discusses if 'institutional racism' is still a problem.

Robert Peston interviews the head of RBS Stephen Hester to discuss a possible increase in the government stake of the bank.

Shadow chancellor George Osborne discusses Kenneth Clarke's return to the front bench as shadow business secretary and debates whether proposals to help the economy will work.

Tom Burkard discusses the difficulty in marking answers written as essays.

Artist and children's presenter Tony Hart has died, aged 83. Peter Lord, co-founder of Aardman Animations, remembers him.

Thought for the day with religious commentator Clifford Longley.

Christian Fraser and John Ging, of UN relief agency Unrwa, discuss the ceasefire in Gaza and the cost of the conflict.

Chancellor Alistair Darling says government plans will help to increase lending.

Hugh Pym discovers the story of Battle of Britain hero Sir Keith Park.

Nick Robinson discusses if the return of Ken Clarke shows a change in thinking from David Cameron.

Phil Harding and Dorothy Byrne discuss the importance of keeping global events in the news.

Former US ambassador to London Philip Lader and former UK ambassador to the US Sir David Manning discuss the new US administration.

John Wilson reports from Tehran on a cultural exchange between Iran and the UK.

George Magnus and Sir Howard Davies discuss if government measures will see the banking industry return to some sort of normality.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00gqzvw)
Andrew Marr sets the cultural agenda for the week. His guests include writer Daniel Tammet and scientist Graham Farmelo on a new biography of physicist Paul Dirac.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00gqp3b)
Bluebird

The Whole World Seemed to Change

Gemma Arterton reads Vesna Maric's account of coming to Britain as a 16-year-old asylum seeker, after fleeing the conflict in Bosnia in 1992.

As school breaks up in the summer of 1992, the shelling begins in Mostar.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00gqpqs)
Men and diets; The life of Vita Sackville West

Actor Bruce Byron and broadcaster Hardeep Singh Kohli on their experiences of dieting. Plus the fascinating life and scandalous relationships of Vita Sackville West.


MON 11:00 Hot House Kids (b00gqzvy)
Episode 2

Former prima ballerina Deborah Bull investigates the advantages and the pitfalls of being an elite performer in the arts and sport and what young people need to succeed, as well as the psychological advantages and problems of attaining perfection.

To achieve the levels of excellence necessary to compete on the global job market today a performer needs to start young, taking advantage of the brain's early plasticity and the increased potential for muscle flexibility in pre-adolescents. But in some cases the cost can be the stable emotional development of the child.

In certain countries of Eastern Europe and Asia children can enter full-time training as young as three - gymnastics and ballet training are key examples - and undergo challenging physical and mental regimes in order to ensure that they are ready to compete and achieve the highest standards as soon as they reach double figures. For the growing child as it moves into adolescence, interaction with a parent is vital to its emotional development. Yet, as the programme discovers, the intense training regime needed to hothouse gifted children to the supreme levels of performance frequently involves taking the child away for hours of training.

On a journey that takes Deborah to the Ukraine, she visits the National Ballet School in Kiev, the elite football training centre at Dynamo Kiev and the National Gymnastics centre in Kiev, where she discovers why elite athletes are achieving such high levels of achievement in Eastern Europe. Back in Britain she visits the Chelsea Academy, the Yehudi Menuhin School and the Central School of Ballet to find out if our softly, softly approach will work in such a competitive market.

The programme also includes contributions from members of the National Ballet School of Korea, reflecting the growing number of top-class performers today emerging from Asian nations.


MON 11:30 Says on the Tin (b00gqzw0)
Chowder

Comedy by Christopher William Hill.

Eliott, Esther and Hannah compete aggressively to promote American Chowder to the British.

Eliott Thurber ...... Michael Brandon
Esther Finn ...... Samantha Bond
Hannah Walker ...... Pippa Haywood
Zadie ...... Joannah Tincey
Baz ...... Inam Mirza
Sal ...... John Guerrasio

Other parts played by Stephen Critchlow, Jonathan Tafler, Dan Starkey, Gunnar Cauthery and Donnla Hughes.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00gqptt)
Presented by Julian Worricker.

Councils are able to sign up to a government pilot scheme that will allow them to charge households according to how much rubbish they throw out. Giving their views are Steve Lee, chief executive of the Chartered Institute of Waste Management, and the leader of South Norfolk Council, John Fuller.

What is the the future of London Airport now its current owners, BAA, have been forced to sell?

Under new EU legislation due to come in next year, all televisions will need to be energy efficient. Hear the views of Sarah Lambert, spokesperson on energy for the European Commission and industry analyst Bob Raikes.

A second package of measures to support the banking system has been outlined by the Chancellor, Alistair Darling. Does the government need to do more to address the recession? BBC business correspondent Robert Peston tells us more.

For the many commuters who still can't get a seat on rush hour trains, we look at why the supply of new carriages seems to be prone to delays.

Dan Cluderay, the founder of a company that sells food which is past its sell-by date, tells us how the credit crunch has brought him new customers. Dr Andrew Wadge, chief scientist at the Food Standards Authority, also clarifies the difference between 'best before' and 'use by' dates.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00gqxj6)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00gqxjz)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Brain of Britain (b00gqzw3)
Robert Robinson chairs the perennial general knowledge contest.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00gq53d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00gr1fp)
A Prayer for Owen Meany

Episode 1

Adaptation of the John Irving novel, dramatised by Linda Marshall Griffiths.

When Owen accidentally kills Johnny's mother with a baseball, can their friendship survive?

John ...... Henry Goodman
Owen Meany ...... Toby Jones
Tabitha/Mrs Walker ...... Charlotte Emmerson
Johnny ...... Max Baldry
Grandmother ...... Eleanor Bron
Dan Needham ...... Adam Godley
Mr Chickering ...... Stephen Critchlow
Chief Ben Pike ...... Jonathan Tafler.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00gnvvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 America, Empire of Liberty (b00gqxr9)
The Ninety-Day War

David Reynolds tells the story of the American Civil War which began 150 years ago this month. In ten episodes he explores the origins and legacy of the war. This was originallly broadcast as part of the 90 part series, America: Empire of Liberty

Episode 1: The start of the Civil War: a fight for Southern independence and the end of slavery.

Previously broadcast on 19 January, 2009.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00gq4n4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b00grd27)
Ernie Rea explores the place of faith in today's world, teasing out the hidden and often contradictory truths behind the experiences, values and traditions of our lives.


MON 17:00 PM (b00gqxxm)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gqxxy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b00grd29)
Series 54

Episode 4

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game with panellists Paul Merton, Clement Freud, Josie Long and Julian Clary.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00gqwtv)
Things are tense between Matt and Stephen Chalkman. Chalkman doesn't like the way Matt trusts Brenda, but Matt thinks it's good to have a bright young thing about the place. They have a big difference of opinion about the state of their company C3PL. Matt discovers that Chalky awarded himself a director's bonus early last year. So money Matt was hoping to hide away overseas has all gone. Chalkman thinks he's overreacting. They've just got to stand firm and it'll be fine.

Brian finally goes to Tom and tells him he has continued with the negotiations with the supermarket. Tom is furious. A row between them develops, with Tom discovering that Brian has already agreed to consider compromising the quality of the product. Tom thinks it'll be a disaster if he tries to sell two products of different qualities under the same label to different places. By the end of the conversation, it's clear that they are poles apart in their thinking.

Brenda quickly finds out what's been happening and is appalled at Brian going behind Tom's back. Tom thinks the whole thing is a disaster - while Brian, at home with Jennifer, just hopes that Tom will see sense and grab this golden opportunity.

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00gqy39)
Presented by John Wilson.

John talks to Lily Allen ahead of the release of her second album, It's Not Me It's You.

The American TV drama series Generation Kill depicts the true story of the first 40 days of the Iraq war as experienced by marines of the US 1st Reconnaissance Battalion ('First Recon'). John talks to three of those involved: the writer Ed Burns, one of the show's directors, Susanna White, and Sgt Rudy Reyes, who plays himself in the series.

With relations between Iran and the UK remaining very strained, John travels to that country with Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum. Once there, they gain rare and unusually close access to some of Iran's historical treasures from the 17th century as part of the preparations for an exhibition at the British Museum.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00gqpr3)
Vita Sackville-West - All Passion Spent

Episode 1

Adaptation of the 1931 novel by Vita Sackville-West about an old widow who defies her children to embark on an independent life after her husband dies.

Lady Slane ...... Honor Blackman
Mr FitzGeorge ...... Alec McCowen
Herbert Holland ...... John Nicholas
Carrie ...... Phyllida Nash
Kay Holland ...... Patrick Romer
Mr Bucktrout ...... Paul Nicholson
Mr Gosheron ...... Peter Ellis
Genoux ...... Sonia Elliman
Police Inspector ...... Russell Boulter
Deborah Holland ...... Annabel Scholey

Directed by Sara Davies.


MON 20:00 The Bush Legacy (b00grd2c)
As President Bush prepares to leave the White House, the BBC's North America editor Justin Webb examines his legacy.

On the home front, the American economy and judiciary look very different than they did in 2000, as does his Republican Party, but will these changes endure? Abroad, Bush has been nothing if not ambitious: attempting to spread democracy in the Middle East, fight Aids in Africa, expand NATO in eastern Europe and hunt down America's enemies wherever they may hide. The results may have been mixed, but would things have been any different had someone else occupied the White House?

Justin speaks to current and former world leaders, senior White House staffers, diplomats and others who worked with and sometimes against President Bush.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b00fbjlx)
Liberia: Children for Sale

Nadene Ghouri goes undercover to expose the trade in children by some charities registered in the United States and operating as businesses in Liberia.

With the country still reeling from the devastation of a vicious civil war and with unemployment and hunger rampant, she reveals how desperate parents in Liberia are giving their children up to unscrupulous operators who arrange fast-track adoptions with American families. The parents do not realise that they are unlikely ever to see their children again.


MON 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00grd2f)
The Greens Revolution

Tom Heap, who vowed as a teenager, on environmental grounds, that he would never play golf, re-examines his prejudices and investigates whether his view of golf is still a valid one.

Does golf ruin good countryside and threaten wildlife, or have the clubs found ways to work in a more environmentally-friendly way? Tom finds that golf courses can, in many cases, actually represent an ideal of land stewardship: ecologically responsible, rich in biodiversity and sensitive to the environment, they can be crucial to the success of many native species of flora and fauna.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00gqzvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00gqy4c)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00gqy5r)
With Ritula Shah. Will the latest bank bail-out plan be any more effective than the last? Also, why the Greeks won't recognise Macedonia and Gaza two days after the ceasefire.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00gr726)
One Morning Like A Bird

Episode 6

Michael Maloney reads from the novel by Andrew Miller set in Tokyo during World War II.

Life is changing fast for Yuji in wartime Tokyo. His friend Junzo is in the army, his neighbour Saburo returns from the front with incredible stories and Monsieur Feneon's house has been raided by the secret police. But where is Alissa Feneon?


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b00glblw)
Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00gqy62)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Susan Hulme.



TUESDAY 20 JANUARY 2009

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00gq62j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00gqp3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gq662)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gq68j)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gq6bd)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00gq6d8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gqcx5)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00gqdfp)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna HIll.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00gqgt3)
Presented by John Humphrys and James Naughtie.

Caroline Wyatt explains Sir Richard Dannatt's criticism of the hardship faced by British soldiers.

Jim Naughtie reports from Washington on the difficulties Barack Obama will face in rebuilding the US's ailing infrastructure.

Bob Crow, general secretary of the RMT union, discusses his fears over the future of the transport network.

Christian Fraser reports from Gaza on the devastation caused by the Israeli offensive.

Defence Secretary John Hutton debates whether the war in Afghanistan is worth the hardships faced by soldiers there.

Jim Naughtie examines the history of US inaugural speeches.

Thought for the day with Dr Indarjit Singh.

Sir Peter Burt, former deputy chairman of HBOS, debates whether full nationalisation is the solution to the falling value of RBS.

Jim Naughtie reports from Washington as thousands of people make their way to the capital to witness Barack Obama's historic inauguration as US president.

Robert Peston reports on the financial markets.

Sir Alan Budd, a former chief economic advisor at the Treasury, gives his insight into the work going on behind the scenes at the Treasury to try and shore up the financial institutions.

James Rodgers analyses the gas dispute between Russia and Ukraine.

Times columnist Ben Macintyre and novelist Justin Cartwright debate the historical accuracy of the film Valkyrie.

Biologist Sean B Carroll talks to science correspondent Tom Feilden about the evolution revolution.

Former England international Graeme Le Saux explains that footballers do not only care about money.

Ben Bradlee, former editor of The Washington Post, says nobody knows how Barack Obama is going to respond to the challenges of the presidency.


TUE 09:00 Taking a Stand (b00grdby)
Catherine McCartney

Fergal Keane talks to people who have taken risks and made sacrifices to stand up for what they believe in.

Catherine McCartney's brother Robert was allegedly killed by a group of IRA men following a disagreement in a bar in Belfast. When his family felt that they could not get justice for Robert's death in Northern Ireland, they took their campaign to the White House. They received death threats and were ostracised by the nationalist community in which they had grown up. Catherine talks to Fergal about why she feels that, although there is now peace in Northern Ireland, its communities are still as divided as ever.


TUE 09:30 The Fortune Hunters (b00grdc0)
Episode 5

Series in which Max Flint investigates the 15 billion pounds in unclaimed assets in the UK and asks if and how these funds are distributed to their rightful owners.

Max explores issues surrounding claims by former soldiers who had tax wrongly deducted from their service pensions. He meets the man who discovered the problem which resulted in millions of pounds in tax rebates being returned to ex-servicemen, and a 91-year-old retired major who is still fighting for his money.

A Tinderbox Broadcast production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00h6y6b)
Bluebird

Welcome to Britain

Gemma Arterton reads Vesna Maric's account of coming to Britain as a 16-year-old asylum seeker, after fleeing the conflict in Bosnia in 1992.

Vesna and her sister try to forge a new life in the Lake District while their parents remain under fire in Bosnia.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00grd8r)
Author Wendy Holden; Internet dating

Author Wendy Holden on Beautiful People, her satire about the excesses of Hollywood. Plus the potential dangers of internet dating, and the Brook Street Band on Handel.


TUE 11:00 A Voyage on Livingstone's Lake (b00grftd)
Adam Lusekelo tells the story of the MV Ilala, a boat built 60 years ago by Yarrow and Company in Glasgow as a passenger and cargo ship destined for Lake Nyasa, modern-day Lake Malawi. In a remarkable feat of engineering, it was shipped out in pieces via Mozambique and transported overland to be reconstructed on the shores of the inland lake, which has no navigable outlet to the sea. Today, it is still sailing the lake, providing a vital lifeline to remote communities in Malawi and Mozambique.

A Ruth Evans production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:30 Discovering the Sitwells (b00grftg)
Writer and broadcaster William Sitwell, the great nephew of poet Edith Sitwell, discovers more about his family's literary heritage. His great aunt Edith is possibly best known for her poem Facade, which William is asked to perform at the Royal Festival Hall, accompanied by the orchestra of St Paul's Cathedral. In preparing for the performance he travels from Australia to South Africa, via Scarborough, to try to get under the artistic skin of the Sitwells.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00gqpth)
Call You and Yours

Presented by Julian Worricker.

Will the government's response to the economic downturn work?

What difference are the government's initiatives to reduce the effects of the recession making to listeners' experiences of the economic downturn? Will the proposed measures work? Listeners give their views.

With guests Professor Philip Booth, Editorial and Programme Director of the Institute of Economic Affairs; Nigel Meager, director of the Institute for Employment Studies at Sussex University and Anatole Kaletsky, associate editor of The Times.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00gqxgz)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00gqxj8)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Take Two (b00grgkd)
Series 2

Elisabeth Schwarzkopf and Walter Legge

Richard Coles presents a discussion series looking at collaborations between two musicians.

Richard examines the musical and domestic partnership of singer Elisabeth Schwarzkopf and record producer Walter Legge. In conversation with the pianist Graham Johnson and broadcaster Richard Osborne, Richard assesses the extent to which producer Legge acted as a musical Svengali to his singer wife, deciding her repertoire choices and directing her interpretations of operatic roles. He also asks if Schwarzkopf was really as subservient to her husband as has been rumoured.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00gqwtv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00gvm09)
A Prayer for Owen Meany

Episode 2

Adaptation of the John Irving novel, dramatised by Linda Marshall Griffiths.

How will Johnny's wild cousins react to meeting his remarkable best friend Owen?

John ...... Henry Goodman
Owen Meany ...... Toby Jones
Tabitha ...... Charlotte Emmerson
Johnny ...... Max Baldry
Grandmother ...... Eleanor Bron
Dan Needham ...... Adam Godley
Hester ...... Sarah Goldberg
Simon ...... Andrew Hoffmeister
Noah ...... Henry Fay

Vocal Coach for the voice of Owen Meany: Penny Dyer.


TUE 15:00 Home Planet (b00grgkg)
Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the environment and the natural world.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00grgnv)
Wrestling Angels

Once I Was Dead

The subject of one of Jesus's most famous and divisive miracles finds that resurrection is not all that it is cracked up to be. The first of Fraser Grace's three stories which re-tell biblical tales.

Read by James Fleet

Produced by Marilyn Imrie
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:45 America, Empire of Liberty (b00gqxt2)
The Killers Take Command

David Reynolds tells the story of the American Civil War which began 150 years ago this month. In ten episodes he explores the origins and legacy of the war. In this episode, we meet the men on both sides of the battle lines: Robert E Lee and Ulysses S Grant.

Episode 2 - The Killers Take Command

This was originallly broadcast as part of the 90 part series, America: Empire of Liberty
This episode was previously broadcast on 20 January, 2009.


TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b00h42rr)
Non-Human Rights

Clive Coleman discusses the idea that human rights might extend beyond humans, asking whether rights exist for animals, the environment and even robots.

He is joined by the writer Kenan Malik, philosopher Jo Woolf and lawyer Christopher Stone, who discuss propositions put forward by philosopher Peter Singer and environmental lawyer Cormac Cullinan.


TUE 16:30 PM (b00gqxwn)
Carolyn Quinn presents a special edition of the programme to mark the inauguration of Barack Obama. With contributions from James Naughtie in Washington. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gqxxp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


TUE 18:30 Broken Arts (b00grqmj)
Episode 2

David Quantick and company poke fun at the ridiculous in popular culture. Featuring a guest appearance from Gilbert and Sullivan and special correspondents Dan Maier, Richie Webb, Jane Lamacraft and Margaret Cabourn-Smith.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00gqwtl)
Mike shows Hayley and Roy round his new house. He shows them his kitchen plans, and Hayley gets jealous. They wonder if they could afford a new kitchen themselves. Roy says they can look at the finances, but they both know it would stretch them.

Shula goes to the Vicarage, for the hand bell session. Alan provides coffee afterwards in the sitting room, and Shula sees a bronze statue of Shiva in there. She can't disguise her shock, and Alan contrives to keep her back to discuss it. Shula says she can't help it. There's a statue of a Hindu god in the Vicarage! It feels so inappropriate. Alan tries to tell her that it's a work of art to him, something much more to Usha - it has a place in their lives and their home. Shula can't understand how all this doesn't weaken his faith; Alan thinks it strengthens it.

Shula leaves in some distress. She tries explaining her feelings to Alistair - almost cast out of the church because she can't accept the situation. She feels alone. Alistair finds it hard to understand. Maybe she should give it time and hope things will get better. Shula wishes she thought so. But she can't see that anything will change.

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00gqy2b)
Presented by Kirsty Lang.

Political satirist and writer Alastair Beaton reviews Frost/Nixon, a film version starring Frank Langella and Michael Sheen of Peter Morgan's stage play about the series of televised interviews that former US President Richard Nixon gave David Frost in 1977.

Guitar virtuoso Richard Thompson was asked by Playboy magazine in 1999 to come up with a list of the top 10 songs of the Millennium. Inspired by this, he has created a concert which takes the audience from a 16th Century Italian dance to a Britney Spears chart-topper. Kirsty talks to him about his selection and he plays some of his choices live in the studio.

Designer Hussein Chalayan's work includes armchair covers which transform into dresses and chairs which become suitcases. As the first major British exhibition of his work opens, he talks to Kirsty about his approach to clothing-design, and his use of unlikely materials.

How far should actors or directors go to achieve authenticity in a stage performance? Actor and author Michael Simkins joins Kirsty to discuss his own experiences of preparing for roles.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00h438m)
Vita Sackville-West - All Passion Spent

Episode 2

Adaptation of the 1931 novel by Vita Sackville-West.

Lady Slane rejects her children's plans for her old age and begins to make a new life and two eccentric new friends in Hampstead.

Lady Slane ...... Honor Blackman
Mr FitzGeorge ...... Alec McCowen
Herbert Holland ...... John Nicholas
Carrie ...... Phyllida Nash
Kay Holland ...... Patrick Romer
Mr Bucktrout ...... Paul Nicholson
Mr Gosheron ...... Peter Ellis
Genoux ...... Sonia Elliman
Police Inspector ...... Russell Boulter
Deborah Holland ...... Annabel Scholey

Directed by Sara Davies.


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b00grqml)
The UK's Insolvency Laws

Julian O'Halloran examines Britain's insolvency laws and asks whether weaknesses in regulation and enforcement are being exploited by some company directors to unfairly dispose of debts.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00grqmn)
Peter White with news and information for the blind and partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00grqmq)
Insects

Dr Mark Porter finds out about how to avoid and treat diseases caused by insects. Some insects only leave itchy bites on the skin but others transmit serious diseases. Ticks in the UK can cause Lyme disease, with symptoms such as tiredness and pains, mites are responsible for scabies, and tropical areas pose a threat with malaria-transmitting mosquitoes.


TUE 21:30 Taking a Stand (b00grdby)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00gqy3c)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00gqy4f)
On the day of Barack Obama's inauguration as the 44th president of the United States, Robin Lustig presents a special edition from Birmingham, Alabama, where the civil rights movement began in the 1950s. He assesses what the inauguration of the first African-American president means for the United States.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00gr728)
One Morning Like A Bird

Episode 7

Michael Maloney reads from the novel by Andrew Miller set in Tokyo during World War II.

While on night duty looking out for fires in his neighbourhood, an unexpected meeting changes the course of Yuji's life.


TUE 23:00 In Search of Sid (b00grqms)
Musician Jah Wobble discovers the real Sid Vicious, 30 years after the Sex Pistols bassist's death. Jah formed his own opinion of his friend Sid as they grew up together, but has since met other people who knew him that held contrasting impressions of him. Talking to some of these people, Jah reflects on the boy he used to know and re-evaluates the man that he became.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00gqy5t)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Susan Hulme.



WEDNESDAY 21 JANUARY 2009

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00gq62l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00h6y6b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gq664)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gq68l)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gq6bg)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00gq6db)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gqcx7)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00gqdfr)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.


WED 06:00 Today (b00gqgt5)
Presented by Sarah Montague and Evan Davis.

Torin Douglas examines an Ofcom report into public service broadcasting.

Jonathan Beale discovers that closing Guantanamo down, as Barack Obama has pledged, will be easier said than done.

Alison Kentuck, Receiver of Wreck at the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, explains what will happen to the hundreds of tonnes of timber that fell from a cargo ship in the English Channel once it washes ashore.

Tom Feilden explains why a dung beetle has turned carnivore.

Health Secretary Alan Johnson discusses if the constitution for the NHS will change the service.

Researcher David Savage explains why politeness may have led to more British than American casualties in the sinking of the Titanic.

James Naughtie examines Barack Obama's first day as US president.

Thought for the day with the Rt Rev Tom Butler.

Vince Cable and economist Tim Congdon discuss if RBS or Lloyds should be nationalised.

An Ofcom report into public service broadcasting says there will be a shortfall in funding of up to 235 million pounds a year by 2012. Chief exec Ed Richards discusses.

President Obama wants the military trials in Guantanamo Bay to be suspended. Human rights lawyer Clive Stafford Smith welcomes the news.

Alex Bushill reports on the row between wealthy outsiders and local residents in Cornwall.

Tim Franks reports on the situation in Gaza.

Donald Terrence James and lawyer Clive Hyer discuss compensation claims after suffering from nuclear tests.

Zbigniew Brzezinski discusses President Obama's foreign policy.

Matthew Hall explains why coroners have managed to remain independent.

TV executives David Elstein and Andy Duncan discuss the future of public service broadcasting.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00grrzt)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00h6y2z)
Bluebird

Independence

Gemma Arterton reads Vesna Maric's account of coming to Britain as a 16-year-old asylum seeker, after fleeing the conflict in Bosnia in 1992.

Vesna's sister returns to Bosnia and she is left alone in Penrith to cope with dodgy digs and an even dodgier flatmate.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00grd8t)
Feminism Special

A special programme on the state of feminism in Britain today. With Angela McRobbie, Zoe Williams, Rosie Boycott, Vera Baird QC MP, Theresa May MP and Richard Reeves.


WED 11:00 On the Top Deck (b00grrzw)
Travel writer Ian Marchant travels London's buses, talking to drivers and passengers young and old, and to the people trying to keep order in the face of a massive increase in the numbers of teenagers using buses.

He hears the feelings of many older passengers that things have got out of control; that crime, overcrowding and anti-social behaviour have increased; and that some buses have been turned into mobile youth clubs.

Plus teenagers talk about the unwritten rules of the top deck - who may sit where, what you can get away with and the risks of being robbed.


WED 11:30 Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! (b00grrzy)
Series 4

Pub Quiz

Spoof reminiscences of a former variety star. Count Arthur Strong is an expert in everything from the world of entertainment to the origins of the species, all false starts and nervous fumbling, poorly concealed by a delicate sheen of bravado and self-assurance.

Promoting himself to team captain of the Three Musketeers, Arthur enters the Shoulder of Mutton pub quiz. Can he win the 50 pound rollover, or will it all end in tears?

With Steve Delaney, Mel Giedroyc, Dave Mounfield and Alastair Kerr.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00gqptk)
Presented by Winifred Robinson.

An investigation reveals the lavish lifestyles of the people behind an estimated 80 million pound property investment scheme which was supposed to renovate and let homes in North East England.

What does Ofcom's review mean for the future of public service broadcasting? Discussing the issue are: BBC media correspondent Torin Douglas; Rod Liddle, former editor of the Today programme; and Julian Bellamy, head of programming at Channel 4.

Is the customer always right? Assessing the website that lets builders air their complaints against customers.

The U.S has tripled the import tax on Roquefort cheese. The French are up in arms about the impact this will have on the producers, but what impact will it have on the American consumer? Dick Roe, of Atlanta Foods International, gives his opinion.

Live discussion over a claim by the Association of Charity Shops estimating that 20-25% of councils in England are wrongly charging charities for waste disposal.

Seven animal rights activists are sentenced after a campaign of harassment against firms with links to Huntingdon Life Sciences.

The five major banks will have stopped selling single premium payment protection insurance policies against unsecured loans by the end of January 2009. Lucy Widenka,a personal finance campaigner at Which? explains more.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00gqxh1)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00gqxjb)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00grs00)
Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00gqwtl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b00gvlyy)
A Prayer for Owen Meany

Episode 3

Adaptation of the John Irving novel, dramatised by Linda Marshall Griffiths.

Owen's roles as the Christ Child and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come cause a stir in Gravesend, especially when he claims to have had a vision.

John ...... Henry Goodman
Owen Meany ...... Toby Jones
Johnny ...... Max Baldry
Grandmother ...... Eleanor Bron
Dan Needham ...... Adam Godley
Rev Wiggin/Mr Meany ...... Jonathan Tafler
Mrs Meany ...... Jill Cardo
Barbara Wiggin ...... Lorelei King
Rev Merrill ...... Vincent Marzello
Mary Jane ...... Katie Hoffmeister
Harold Crosby ...... Ethan Brooke
Mr Morrison ...... Paul Rider

Vocal Coach for the voice of Owen Meany: Penny Dyer.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00grs02)
Vincent Duggleby and guests answer calls on financial issues.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00grgvl)
Wrestling Angels

The Assassin's Mother-in-Law

A woman recalls one of the Old Testament's more extraordinary acts of seduction, and the friendship forged with the wise old woman who coached her. The second of Fraser Grace's biblical tales.

Read by Numa Dumezweni

Produced by Marilyn Imrie
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:45 America, Empire of Liberty (b00gqxt4)
Forever Free

David Reynolds tells the story of the American Civil War which began 150 years ago this month. In ten episodes he explores the origins and legacy of the war. In this episode, Abraham Lincoln signs the Emancipation Proclamation to free the slaves.

Episode 3: Forever Free

Previously broadcast on 21 January, 2009, as part of David Reynolds 90 part series, America, Empire of Liberty.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00grs04)
Hole in the Wall - Victorian Light

HOLE IN THE WALL
Vikras Swarup, the author of the novel which inspired the movie Slum Dog Millionaire, recently revealed he was inspired by the Hole in the Wall project in Delhi which installed a computer in a Delhi slum. The project leader behind that Hole in the Wall experiment, Sugata Mitra, who is currently Professor of Educational Technology at Newcastle University, reveals how children teach themselves how to use digital technology.

VICTORIAN LIGHT
Imagine the impact of gaslight on the once dark nights of Victorian Britain..“As I walk about the streets by night, endless and always suggestive intercommunings take place between me and the trusty, silent, ever watchful gas. Gas to teach me; gas to counsel me; gas to guide my footsteps, not over London flags, but through the crooked ways of unseen life and death”, that was George Augustus Sala in 1859.

Laurie Taylor is joined by Chris Otter, assistant professor of Modern European History at the Ohio State University, and Lynda Nead, Professor of History of Art at Birkbeck, University of London, to discuss the political history of gas, how did people react? What affect did its yellowy hue have on the ambitions of police and government?


WED 16:30 Case Notes (b00grqmq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00gqxwq)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gqxxr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


WED 18:30 Will Smith's Midlife Crisis Management (b00grsdt)
Episode 6

Comedy series in which comedian Will Smith seeks help and advice - primarily from his godfather Peter - on coping with the onset of middle age.

Will tackles his lack of success with women with the help of Ed, an American love guru.

Will ...... Will Smith
Peter ...... Roger Allam
Ed ...... Simon Greenall
Girlfriend ...... Jill Cardo
First date ...... Janice Acquah
Second date ...... Donnla Hughes
Third date ...... Dan Starkey
Waiter ...... Roger Drew.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00gqwtn)
Nic has another go at driving manoeuvres with Will. She gets a bit better at reversing, but unfortunately wedges the exhaust against the kerb and damages it. She's mortified, but Will takes it to get it replaced. It had rusted through - Will reckons it was better this way than if it had happened when he was driving down a motorway.

Jill takes her oranges and preserving pan round to Brookfield to make her marmalade in traditional style. Ruth watches and learns, but adds the sugar a bit hastily, to Jill's consternation.

Meanwhile David drops in to Glebe Cottage with some crime statistics from the NFU, to find Phil making marmalade too - by his own scientific method, with thermometer and shredder. Unfortunately, the thermometer breaks and his marmalade is useless. Jill returns to find it all congealing in the bin. She is magnanimous - after all, she's learnt today that it doesn't much matter if you add the sugar all in one go. Phil is grumpy at first, but sees the funny side. David suggests he sticks to cakes in future.

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00gqy2d)
Presented by Mark Lawson.

Mark is joined by the Executive Editor of the London Evening Standard, Anne McElvoy, to discuss one-off TV drama A Short Stay In Switzerland, written by award-winning playwright Frank McGuinness.

Film director Bryan Singer's latest film, Valkyrie, depicts the plot to assassinate Hitler and stars Tom Cruise. Bryan discusses German accents, the German response to the film, and casting Hugh Laurie in the US TV series House.

Alex Kapranos and Nick McCarthy of Franz Ferdinand discuss their latest album, 'Tonight: Franz Ferdinand'.

After years of material offered by George W Bush, how will satirists approach American president Barack Obama? Cartoonist Steve Bell and comedian Steve Punt talk to Mark.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00h44b0)
Vita Sackville-West - All Passion Spent

Episode 3

Adaptation of the 1931 novel by Vita Sackville-West.

Lady Slane's retirement in Hampstead is interrupted when she is visited by a figure from her past, whose memories force her to take stock of her own life.

Lady Slane ...... Honor Blackman
Mr FitzGeorge ...... Alec McCowen
Herbert Holland ...... John Nicholas
Carrie ...... Phyllida Nash
Kay Holland ...... Patrick Romer
Mr Bucktrout ...... Paul Nicholson
Mr Gosheron ...... Peter Ellis
Genoux ...... Sonia Elliman
Police Inspector ...... Russell Boulter
Deborah Holland ...... Annabel Scholey

Directed by Sara Davies.


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b00grsdw)
Family Courts

Clive Anderson presents the series analysing the legal issues of the day.

The family courts stand accused by some of operating in a conspiracy of silence and failing to deliver justice. Will the government's decision to open the courts to the media improve the situation or simply lead to the sensitive personal details in divorce and child custody cases being exposed in the tabloids?


WED 20:45 The Condensed History of George W Bush (b00grshj)
Adam Long, co-founder of the Reduced Shakespeare Company, joins two friends with a few guitars to take a wry look back at the two-term rollercoaster that was the presidency of George W Bush.


WED 21:00 State of Mind (b00grshl)
Community Care?

Claudia Hammond tells the story of mental health care in the UK from the 1950s to the present day and explores, with the help of listeners' testimonies, how treatment and understanding of mental illness has changed over the past 50 years.

When Enoch Powell launched his 1962 Hospital Plan he believed all the asylums would be closed by 1975. However, it was not until the 1980s that the closures really got under way, with thousands of former inmates beginning new lives in the community. For many this was a new beginning: with genuine care, life in the community was infinitely preferable to the total institutions from which they had emerged. But for those who lacked support and could not cope, homelessness and even prison were the alternative to what had been, for some, genuine asylum.

At the Surrey History Centre, where Woking Mind work with the archivists to examine the history of the local asylums, Claudia meets a former patient of Brookwood asylum for whom squatting in the derelict building was preferable to life in a community that didn't care. She also meets service users in Reigate who, frustrated by the lack of formal support, have set up their own, the Stepping Stones drop-in centre.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00grrzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00gqy3f)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00gqy4h)
National and international news and analysis with Jane Hill. Including reports on Obama's first day in office, whether the EU should end the suspension of a deal with Israel and what it is like growing up in the White House.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00gr72b)
One Morning Like A Bird

Episode 8

Michael Maloney reads from the novel by Andrew Miller set in Tokyo during World War II.

Having learned that Alissa is pregnant, Yuji must now face her father.


WED 23:00 Nick Mohammed in Quarters (b00grtmv)
Episode 1

Energetic sketch comedy by Nick Mohammed. With guests Anna Crilly and Colin Hoult.


WED 23:15 The Correspondent (b00h781m)
Series 2

Tom Feels Trapped

Series of bitterwsweet comic monologues, starring Tom Allen.

With a job appraisal on the horizon, Tom despairs of his domestic situation. But there is a welcome distraction with the discovery of a new mystery friend in the workplace.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00gqy5w)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



THURSDAY 22 JANUARY 2009

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00gq62n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00h6y2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gq666)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gq68n)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gq6bj)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00gq6dd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gqcx9)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00gqdft)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.


THU 06:00 Today (b00gqgt9)
Presented by Edward Stourton and Sarah Montague.

Gillian Tett of the Financial Times discusses comments by the head of the FSA, Lord Turner, about banking regulations.

Professors David Webb and Peter Rubin discuss if medical students are taught too little about medicines.

James Munro reports on the strict restrictions on athletes to stop drug use in Belgium.

Average temperatures in the Antarctic have been rising for the last 50 years, scientists have discovered. Science correspondent Tom Feilden explains.

Criminologist Dr Marian FitzGerald and Chief Constable Ian Johnston discuss flaws in crime statistics.

Simon Schama discusses why Barack Obama took the presidential oath for a second time.

Thought for the day with the Rev Angela Tilby.

Lord Patten warns that if President Obama is as multilateral as promised, life could become less comfortable for Europe.

Head of the FSA Lord Turner discusses whether parts of the regulatory system are 'seriously deficient'.

Prince Charles reads a poem to mark the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns.

James Reynolds joins Chinese migrants as they return for the Chinese New Year.

Rodney Bickerstaffe, formerly of public sector workers' union the NUPE, and Will Hutton, chief exec of the Work Foundation, remember the 'Winter of Discontent'.

Quentin Sommerville reports on death penalties given to those involved in China's milk scandal.

Lorna Gordon reports from the Highlands on a dramatic increase in the illegal harvesting of freshwater pearls.

Angus Stickler reports on accusations that millions of government records contain errors.

Scotland's wild red deer may be lost if they continue to breed with a foreign species, scientists warn. Helen Senn of the University of Edinburgh reports.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00gryrx)
History of History

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss how the writing of history has changed over time, from ancient epics to medieval hagiographies and modern deconstructions. In the 6th century AD, the bishop of Tours began his history of the world with a simple observation that “A great many things keep happening, some of them good, some of them bad”. For a phrase that captures the whole of history it’s among the best, but in writing about the past we are rarely so economical. From ancient epics – Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War - to medieval hagiographies and modern deconstructions, historians have endlessly chronicled, surveyed and analysed the great many things that keep happening, declaring some of them good and some of them bad. But the writing of history always illuminates two periods – the one history is written about and the one it is written in. And to look at how the writing of history has changed is to examine the way successive ages have understood their world. In short, there is a history to history.With Paul Cartledge, AG Leventis Professor of Greek Culture and Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge; John Burrow, Emeritus Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford and Miri Rubin, Professor of Medieval and Early Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00h6y31)
Bluebird

A Place by the Sea

Gemma Arterton reads Vesna Maric's account of coming to Britain as a 16-year-old asylum seeker, after fleeing the conflict in Bosnia in 1992.

Vesna makes plans to move to Hull. She knows it is by the sea, and so looks forward to sandy beaches, palm trees and promenades.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00grd8w)
Phone-in: the relevence of feminism

With Jenni Murray. Listeners share their views on feminism, including those who have managed work and family and how it relates to young women today.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00gryrz)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.


THU 11:30 Five Meet to Make Up Myths (b00xchg6)
Gyles Brandreth explores the creative connections between five Victorian authors. Oscar Wilde, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Robert Louis Stevenson, JM Barrie and Bram Stoker all knew each other and used to frequent many of the same venues in London in the 1880s and 90s. Gyles Brandreth enlists the help of Freudian psychotherapist Brett Kahr and others to find out why their fictional creations remain compelling to this day.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00gqptm)
Presented by Winifred Robinson.

Doctors say they are sometimes having to pretend their existing rheumatoid arthritis patients are new sufferers when they need to get them seen by a specialist. Consultant rheumatologist Professor David Scott discusses.

Some employees are using social networking sites to complain about their customers. We speak to employment lawyer Clare Dawson and Matt Rhodes, who works for media consultancy Fresh Networks, to find out the legal implications this might have on a business.

With the downturn biting, will train operators be able to honour franchise deals struck in happier times? Tony Miles, of Modern Railways Magazine, and Ashwin Kumar, passenger director at Passenger Focus, give the inside story.

As part of an incentive scheme that covers all four and a half thousand Northern Rock workers, the majority of staff will get bonuses. Robert Peston, the BBC's business editor, explains why.

Melanie Abbott takes a look at a smaller version of the 'mosquito device', which gives off a high-pitched noise designed to put young people off hanging around where they are not wanted.

Phone Pay Plus has come up with some ideas for giving mobile phone customers a better service. Paul Whiteing, its chief executive, explains.

British Gas has announced it will cut the cost of its standard tariff by 10%. But given that gas prices rose by more than a third in July 2008, how good a deal is it, and what else is on offer? We ask Ed Mayo, head of consumer focus.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00gqxh3)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00gqxjd)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b00grd2f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Monday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00gqwtn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00gvlz0)
A Prayer for Owen Meany

Episode 4

Adaptation of the John Irving novel, dramatised by Linda Marshall Griffiths.

Owen gets into serious trouble at Gravesend Academy when he challenges authority. Is it just teenage rebellion or is he driven by something more profound?

John ...... Henry Goodman
Owen Meany ...... Toby Jones
Johnny ...... Simon Lee Phillips
Dan Needham ...... Adam Godley
Dr Dolder/Randolph White ...... Kerry Shale
Rev Merrill ...... Vincent Marzello
Larry Lish ...... Robert Lonsdale
Mrs Lish ...... Janice Acquah
McSwiney ...... Vincent Marzello.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b00gntcj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00gq4mm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00grgvn)
Wrestling Angels

The Jeweller's Wife

The pain of a woman's infertility is nothing compared to the trouble caused by her miraculous healing. The third of Fraser Grace's biblical tales.

Read by Deborah Findlay

Produced by Marilyn Imrie
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 15:45 America, Empire of Liberty (b00gqxt6)
A New Nation

David Reynolds tells the story of the American Civil War which began 150 years ago this month. In ten episodes he explores the origins and legacy of the war. The Battle of Gettysburg.

Episode 4: A New Nation
Previously broadcast on 22 January, 2009, as part of David Reynolds 90 part series, America, Empire of Liberty.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00gq530)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00grz23)
Neutrons Probe Spider Silk Secrets - Concrete Canvas & Emergency Shelters

Neutrons Probe Spider Silk Secrets
Just outside Oxford there’s a state-of the-art particle accelerator. It’s not searching for the secrets of the cosmos but probing materials in greater detail than is possible with any microscope. It’s the ISIS neutron source and has just had a major upgrade.

The intense beams of neutrons it sends out are being used by more than 2,000 scientists ranging from chemists to geologists. They can reveal the chemicals of life in molecular detail and the structure of materials used in electronics and nanotechnology. The newly completed upgrade will provide a second experimental hall, primarily for biological sciences. Quentin Cooper hears about the latest applications for the vast instrument.

For example, ISIS is being used to identify the molecular recipe for spider silk. Spider-silk is five times the strength of steel and more flexible than the material used in bullet proof vests. That’s leading to many potential new applications.

Far from catching flies, silk is forming the basis of bio-compatible materials for surgical sutures, bone, cartilage and tendon replacements and even guide tubes to regenerate damaged nerves. But the scientists at the Oxford Silk Group don’t want to start a spider farm!

They hope to reproduce in lab and ultimately factory what spiders do in nature. And for that they need to understand how the silk molecules behave, dry out and strengthen as the spider draws them from its spinarette. And that means looking at them with pulses of neutrons.

Neutrons are also helping aerospace companies tackle the challenge of cosmic radiation and its damaging effect on microchips in airplanes. They can identify materials that can store hydrogen safely, efficiently and cost-effectively for hydrogen cars of the future. And, looking to the past, the technology is helping scientists discover the true origins of historical artefacts. These have included ornate pistols owned by a former US President and Japanese swords that date back over a thousand years.

Concrete Canvas and Emergency Shelters

Engineers find solutions, and there’s no greater need for such ingenuity than in the wake of a disaster. Whether it be earthquakes or war, there are people around the world in desperate need of shelter and basic infrastructure.

Arup engineer Jo da Silva joins Quentin Cooper to talk about her work co-ordinating the building of shelters after the 2004 tsunami. She also discusses the key engineering problems in disaster zones, and how a mixture of materials and local expertise can ensure the re-building lasts in the long-term. A post-disaster solution suggested by Peter Brewin and his colleague is concrete canvas. This flexible cloth is impregnated with concrete powder and only needs water and oxygen to set hard.

It’s so tough that the MoD is already using it to strengthen defences on the frontline in Afghanistan. Although it’s currently too expensive to be suitable for shelters, the material has potential for making secure buildings and emergency field hospitals when and where they’re needed.


THU 17:00 PM (b00gqxws)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gqxxt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


THU 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b00dz8ls)
Series 5

Anger Management

Comedy series by Christopher Douglas and Andrew Nickolds.

After a run-in with the Head of Stakeholder Communications Engagement at a local council meeting, Ed finds himself in anger management classes. Could he turn over a new leaf and become a gentler person?

Ed Reardon ...... Christopher Douglas
Sue Fishpool ...... Rachel Atkins
Olive ...... Stephanie Cole
Felix ...... John Fortune
Pearl ...... Rita May
Ping ...... Barunka O'Shaughnessy
Steve Williams ...... Tom Price
Stan ...... Geoffrey Whitehead.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00gqwtq)
Shula's still feeling stressed. Alistair asks if she'd like him to look over the books with her. Shula admits that it's not just the business, and Alistair realises she's still worrying about the church. He finds it hard to understand, as he thought Shula had done something about that by agreeing to run some services in Loxley Barrett. But Shula is missing all her involvement in St Stephen's. She knows it sounds dull to Alistair, but it wasn't to her. Alistair is sorry for her and decides to skip Gamblers Anonymous tonight. He'll cook, and they can enjoy an evening together.

Things are tense at Grange Farm too, as Alistair goes over to assess the results of yet another TB test. Everyone tries to chat as the cows go through. Mike tells them that Roy and Hayley can't afford a new kitchen and are going to have to make do with a lick of paint and a new cooker. But everyone is really concentrating on the animals and Alistair's results.

No-one relaxes until the glorious moment when the last cow goes through and is clear. Oliver tells them all that he's going to celebrate with a party, and there is general relief and rejoicing.

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00gqy2g)
Presented by Mark Lawson.

Front Row looks at the Oscar nominations for 2009, including interviews with directors David Fincher and Stephen Daldry, writers Mike Leigh and David Hare, actresses Amy Adams, Kate Winslet and Angelina Jolie and the director of the documentary Man on Wire, James Marsh.

Critics Chris Tookey and Laruska Ivan-Zadeh join Mark to discuss the Academy's choices and to review the film Milk, starring Sean Penn as the US politician and gay activist Harvey Milk.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00h44sj)
Vita Sackville-West - All Passion Spent

Episode 4

Adaptation of the 1931 novel by Vita Sackville-West.

Lady Slane's new-found friendship with Mr FitzGeorge is ended when he dies suddenly, leaving a legacy that comes as a shock to her children.

Lady Slane ...... Honor Blackman
Mr FitzGeorge ...... Alec McCowen
Herbert Holland ...... John Nicholas
Carrie ...... Phyllida Nash
Kay Holland ...... Patrick Romer
Mr Bucktrout ...... Paul Nicholson
Mr Gosheron ...... Peter Ellis
Genoux ...... Sonia Elliman
Police Inspector ...... Russell Boulter
Deborah Holland ...... Annabel Scholey

Directed by Sara Davies.


THU 20:00 Investigation (b00gs0km)
Series 6

Episode 2

Simon Cox investigates how local authorities react when people ask to have their children taken away. While attention might normally focus on social services failing to protect children from abusive parents, he talks to some parents who, conversely, say that they cannot cope or do not want the responsibility.


THU 20:30 In Business (b00gs0kp)
Now That the Party's Over

As the dust begins to settle on the catastrophic business events of 2008, Peter Day looks at what has changed and finds out how to cope with the future.


THU 21:00 Leading Edge (b00gs0n4)
Darwin’s Sacred Cause

Darwin’s Sacred Cause
2009 is the bicentenary of the greatest biologist of all time, Charles Darwin. To celebrate, Jim Moore, professor of the history of science at the Open University, and Adrian Desmond of University College, London, have written a new book, Darwin’s Sacred Cause. It challenges the conventional view of the man, saying that the motivation for his theory of evolution was his strong anti-slavery beliefs.
Darwin's Sacred Cause is published on the 29th of January by Penguin

A Guide to Darwinalia
Science writer and broadcaster Adam Rutherford, is slightly bemused about the current glut of Darwinalia – but he also has some sound advice!

Mobile Diagnosis
That familiar cry of the mobile phone user - “I’m on the train!” - might one day be replaced by another: “I’ve got the sample”. Scientists in California are developing a phone to help with the diagnosis of disease. It would be faster and cheaper than sending a test tube off to a lab. Leading Edge reporter Jon Stewart went to the University of California to meet Professor Aydogan Ozcan.

Medicine at the Gallop
The University of Glasgow Equine Hospital is the first in the UK to look inside a horse as it gallops at full speed. Many horses suffer from breathing problems and a new diagnostic technique allows vets to see inside the horses as they are exercising, leading to better diagnosis and treatment.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00gryrx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00gqy3h)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00gqy4k)
With Jane Hill. Including reports on the announcement of President Obama's new Middle East envoy, and the gloomy prospects for the class of 2009.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00gr72d)
One Morning Like A Bird

Episode 9

Michael Maloney reads from the novel by Andrew Miller set in Tokyo during World War II.

Yuji, Alissa and their new baby son return to Tokyo. But the family life they cherish cannot go on indefinitely.


THU 23:00 Recorded for Training Purposes (b00gs0n6)
Series 3

Episode 3

Sketch show about modern communication and contemporary obsessions. With Ben Willbond and Rachel Atkins.

First heard on BBC Radio 4 in January 2009.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00gqy5y)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



FRIDAY 23 JANUARY 2009

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00gq62q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00h6y31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gq668)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gq68q)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gq6bl)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00gq6dg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gqcxc)
Daily prayer and reflection with Rev Dr Stephen Wigley.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00gqdfw)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00gqgv4)
Presented by Edward Stourton and Evan Davis.

Economics professor Nouriel Roubini discusses fears about the fate of the economy.

Could there be an end in sight to the civil war in Sri Lanka? Zubeida Malik reports.

Feargal Sharkey, chief executive of UK Music, says that the Met Police are abusing live event legislation.

Historian David Barlow reflects on first use of wireless technology in a sea rescue 100 years ago.

Sanchia Berg talks to three family members who were all made redundant on the same day in 1980.

Professor Richard Parish, of the Royal Society of Public Health, discusses if a financial incentive will provide the stimulation to give up smoking.

Thought for the day with the Right Reverend Lord Harries of Pentregarth.

UN official Sir John Holmes discusses the nature and extent of the destruction in Gaza.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown discusses what the government is doing to alleviate pressure on small businesses and families.

Mike Thomson reports on General Nkunda's detention in Rwanda.

Did Israel engage in the illegal use of munitions, including white phosphorus shells, against the civilian population in Gaza?

Evan Davis goes birdwatching at Brent Reservoir in North London.

Christopher Parish and Professor Richard Aldous discuss the 200th birthday of former Prime Minister William Gladstone.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00gq4n2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00h6y33)
Bluebird

Coming Home

Gemma Arterton reads Vesna Maric's account of coming to Britain as a 16-year-old asylum seeker, after fleeing the conflict in Bosnia in 1992.

Vesna receives a letter from the Home Office that will decide her fate.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00grd8y)
Stressed midwives; The Belle Star Band

The emotional impact of childbirth on the midwife discussed. Plus the merits of northern parents, and one of Scotland's top all-women dance bands, The Belle Star Band, play live.


FRI 11:00 The Lake (b00gs3ks)
An evocative sound portrait of Britain's largest lake, Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland. With a shoreline measuring over 70 miles long, this vast stretch of water is more like a sea than a lake. Recordings made above and below the waves reveal a moody, stormy, wild and even dangerous place where legends of a buried town, a horse god and three sisters emerge from the shallows, while smoke-like plumes and huge flocks of birds rise from the surface as the seasons unfold.


FRI 11:30 The Castle (b00gs3kv)
Series 2

Pool Party of Doom

Hie ye to "The Castle", a rollicking sitcom set way back then, starring James Fleet ("The Vicar Of Dibley", "Four Weddings & A Funeral") and Neil Dudgeon ("Life Of Riley")

In this episode, a heatwave and an archaeological excavation leads to an unexpected swimming pool...

Cast:
Sir John Woodstock ..... James Fleet
Sir William De Warenne ...... Neil Dudgeon
Lady Anne Woodstock ..... Montserrat Lombard
Cardinal Duncan ...... Jonathan Kydd
Lady Charlotte ....... Ingrid Oliver
Master Henry Woodstock ...... Steven Kynman
Merlin ...... Lewis Macleod

Written by Kim Fuller with additional material by Paul Alexander
Music by Guy Jackson

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00gqptp)
Presented by Peter White.

The Food Standards Agency is trying to persuade restaurants to include the calorie information of meals on its menus. Tim Smith, chief executive of the FSA, explains.

You and Yours reveals the identity of nine ticket websites which are being targeted by police over allegations of fraud and failing to provide tickets paid for by music fans. Shari Vahl reports.

Peter White and wheelchair user Flash travel from Heathrow to Stratford to find out how accommodating it is for the disabled.

A review is underway of the so-called 'Crown Jewel' events and those which must be shown on terrestrial television. We hear from the former FA executive director David Davies, who is heading up the independent review.

With EastEnders and Hollyoaks introducing new characters with physical disabilities, comedian Liz Carr ponders what lies in store for them.

Why Sean Connery is willing Scots around the world to return home in 2009.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00gqxh5)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00gqxjg)
National and international news with Brian Hanrahan.


FRI 13:30 More or Less (b00gs3kx)
Fertility Figures - Credit Crunch Maths - Statistical Significance - Recession

Fertility Figures
The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority has the world's largest database on artificial insemination. But how does the HFEA make all this information useful to anxious couples considering having IVF treatment?

To find out Tim Harford speaks to Lisa Jardine, chair of the HFEA and Helen Joyce the education correspondent for the Economist and mathematician, who has had IVF treatment herself.

Credit Crunch Maths
How did the derivatives market grow to the value of $150 trillion?

Continuing with our credit crunch series , Paul Wilmott returns to explain how the value of the global derivatives market could possibly be three times that of the world economy - a figure amounting to $150 trillion.

Statistical Significance
Professor Steve Ziliak, economist and co-author of 'The Cult of Statistical Significance' discusses the mathematical tool for separating random from real effects.

He explains to us why the misunderstanding of statistical significance has lead to bad government policy making and how one particularly famous brewery employed the technique to improve the pints we enjoy today.

Recession
How exactly is a recession defined?
Its official - the UK is in recession, defined by the second consecutive quarter of negative growth that was announced today.

But why do we define recession this way and how is negative growth calculated? To find out we speak to Martin Weale, director of the National Institute for Economic and Social Research.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00gqwtq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00gvlz2)
A Prayer for Owen Meany

Episode 5

Adaptation of the John Irving novel, dramatised by Linda Marshall Griffiths.

As the draft cards for the Vietnam War arrive, Johnny cannot understand why Owen is desperate to join the combat branch. But following his prophetic vision, Owen believes that there are higher forces at work.

John ...... Henry Goodman
Owen Meany ...... Toby Jones
Johnny ...... Max Baldry
Rev Merrill ...... Vincent Marzello
Hester ...... Sarah Goldberg
Major Rawls ...... William Hope
Mr Meany ...... Jonathan Tafler
Mrs Meany ...... Jill Cardo
Dick Jarvits ...... Harry Mcentire
Mother/Nun ...... Janice Acquah
Father ...... Jonathan Tafler
Girl ...... Donnla Hughes

Vocal coach for the voice of Owen Meany: Penny Dyer.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00gs3kz)
Peter Gibbs chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Bob Flowerdew, Bunny Guinness and Matthew Biggs answer the questions posed by gardeners in Norfolk.

Including the Gardeners' Question Time gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 America, Empire of Liberty (b00gqxt8)
The War Behind the Battle Lines

David Reynolds tells the story of the American Civil War which began 150 years ago this month. In ten episodes he explores the origins and legacy of the war.

Episode 5: 'The War Behind the Battle Lines': The burning of Atlanta.

Previously broadcast on 23 January, 2009, as part of David Reynolds 90 part series America, Empire of Liberty.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00gs3x3)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00gs3x5)
Francine Stock talks to Gus Van Sant, the director of Milk, which stars Sean Penn as Harvey Milk, California's first openly gay elected official. Francine also talks to Peter Morgan, writer of The Deal, The Queen and Frost/Nixon.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00gqxwv)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gqxxw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00gs3x7)
Series 67

Episode 3

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz, with panellists Andy Hamilton, Jeremy Hardy, Danielle Ward and Fred MacAulay.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00gqwts)
After some serious thinking, Shula calls Alan and tells him she can't do the services at Loxley Barrett after all. She just so busy now at the weekends. She wouldn't want to do the work of a reader badly. When Usha finds out she's uncompromising in her criticism of Shula. It's all got to be about her, she thinks. Alan is very sad.

Brian and Jennifer go round to Pat and Tony's to celebrate their successful purchase of Bridge Farm. Brian's not really keen to go and spends his time avoiding Pat's homemade food. But at least it gives him a chance to talk to Tom about the supermarket deal.

Tom is clear that he hasn't changed his mind - he wants nothing to do with it. A pity, says Brian, because I've told them we'll go ahead. They have a full scale row, with Brian giving Tom some hard facts and Tom standing up for himself and his business ethos. Brian is not going to win this one. He can go ahead and deal with the supermarket, but he'll be on his own. He'll get no support from Tom.

Episode written by Joanna Toye.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00gqy2j)
Presented by Kirsty Lang.

Cape Town-born actor, director and writer Antony Sher talks to Kirsty about the resonance of The Tempest in his birthplace and how African ritual releases the magic of Shakespeare's last play.

Writer and former Time Out editor Laura Lee Davies joins Kirsty to discuss Bruce Springsteen's new album, Working On A Dream.

Novelist Andrew Martin and the director of the Warwick Prize, Prof David Morley, consider the merits of literary prizes and prize-giving.

Kirsty talks to author Lawrence Hill about his historical novel, The Book of Negroes, which won the 2008 Commonwealth Writers' Prize. They discuss the significance of the novel's title, which was changed for an American audience, and the research involved in writing a slave narrative.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00h45n1)
Vita Sackville-West - All Passion Spent

Episode 5

Adaptation of the 1931 novel by Vita Sackville-West.

Lady Slane's decision about what to do with the vast fortune left to her by her friend Mr FitzGeorge outrages her family, but a visit from her great-granddaughter brings hope for the future.

Lady Slane ...... Honor Blackman
Mr FitzGeorge ...... Alec McCowen
Herbert Holland ...... John Nicholas
Carrie ...... Phyllida Nash
Kay Holland ...... Patrick Romer
Mr Bucktrout ...... Paul Nicholson
Mr Gosheron ...... Peter Ellis
Genoux ...... Sonia Elliman
Police Inspector ...... Russell Boulter
Deborah Holland ...... Annabel Scholey

Directed by Sara Davies.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00gs3x9)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate in Chudleigh, Devon. The panel are the health minister Ben Bradshaw, shadow health secretary Andrew Lansley, Liberal Democrat spokesman on culture, media and sport Don Foster and the chair of the Charity Commission, Dame Suzi Leather.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00gs3xc)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue from Harold Evans.


FRI 21:00 America, Empire of Liberty Omnibus (b00gs3xf)
North and South

Omnibus edition of the series charting the history of America, written and presented by David Reynolds.

The years of Civil War: a fight for Southern independence and the end of slavery. The North won but the price paid in human lives was immense, and the political and cultural impact is still evident today.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00gqy3k)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00gqy4m)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig. With reports on the UK recession, the new US attitude to Hamid Karzai and prosecuting 'war cimes' in Gaza.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00gr72g)
One Morning Like A Bird

Episode 10

Michael Maloney reads from the novel by Andrew Miller set in Tokyo during World War II.

With Alissa and Emile on their way to Singapore and Ishihara's group drawing him closer to them, Yuji makes some life-changing decisions.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b00gs3xh)
Series 17

Alfred Russel Wallace

Series of biographical discussions with Matthew Parris. Travel writer Redmond O'Hanlon champions the life of naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace. Dr Sandy Knapp joins the discussion.


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00gqy60)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Mark D'Arcy.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00gqpr3)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00h438m)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00h44b0)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00h44sj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00h45n1)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00gm685)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00gs3xc)

A View Through a Lens 14:45 SUN (b00gq4nb)

A Voyage on Livingstone's Lake 11:00 TUE (b00grftd)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00grgnv)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00grgvl)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00grgvn)

America, Empire of Liberty Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b00gs3xf)

America, Empire of Liberty 15:45 MON (b00gqxr9)

America, Empire of Liberty 15:45 TUE (b00gqxt2)

America, Empire of Liberty 15:45 WED (b00gqxt4)

America, Empire of Liberty 15:45 THU (b00gqxt6)

America, Empire of Liberty 15:45 FRI (b00gqxt8)

Anthony Trollope - Orley Farm 21:00 SAT (b00ghrhb)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00gnvb0)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00gm683)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00gs3x9)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00gnvvh)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00gnvvh)

Art Made in China 05:45 SAT (b008th9f)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00gnwdp)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00gnwdp)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b00grd27)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00gr726)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00gr728)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00gr72b)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00gr72d)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00gr72g)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00h3m9c)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00gqp3b)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00gqp3b)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00h6y6b)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00h6y6b)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00h6y2z)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00h6y2z)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00h6y31)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00h6y31)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00h6y33)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b00gl57m)

Brain of Britain 13:30 MON (b00gqzw3)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00gq4mw)

Broken Arts 18:30 TUE (b00grqmj)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00grqmq)

Case Notes 16:30 WED (b00grqmq)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00gq4nd)

Costing the Earth 21:00 MON (b00grd2f)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b00grd2f)

Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! 11:30 WED (b00grrzy)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b00fbjlx)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00gq4n2)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00gq4n2)

Discovering the Sitwells 11:30 TUE (b00grftg)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00gr1fp)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00gvm09)

Drama 14:15 WED (b00gvlyy)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00gvlz0)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00gvlz2)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 THU (b00dz8ls)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00gntcw)

Farming Today This Week 06:30 SAT (b00gntcl)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00gqdfy)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00gqdfp)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00gqdfr)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00gqdft)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00gqdfw)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b00grqml)

Five Meet to Make Up Myths 11:30 THU (b00xchg6)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00gnv9r)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00gryrz)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00gqy39)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00gqy2b)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00gqy2d)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00gqy2g)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00gqy2j)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00gm603)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00gs3kz)

Go4it 19:15 SUN (b00gq53g)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b00gs3xh)

Home Planet 15:00 TUE (b00grgkg)

Hot House Kids 11:00 MON (b00gqzvy)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b00gm3bh)

In Business 20:30 THU (b00gs0kp)

In Living Memory 23:00 SUN (b00cdsj6)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00gryrx)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00gryrx)

In Search of Sid 23:00 TUE (b00grqms)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00grqmn)

Investigation 20:00 THU (b00gs0km)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b00gl57r)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b00grd29)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00gm62f)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00gs3x3)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b00h42rr)

Leading Edge 21:00 THU (b00gs0n4)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00gnvrf)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00grz23)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00gm6qz)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00gnwd1)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00gq660)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00gq62j)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00gq62l)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00gq62n)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00gq62q)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00grrzt)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00grrzt)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00grs02)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00gnv9t)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00gnv9t)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b00gm5zz)

More or Less 13:30 FRI (b00gs3kx)

Music Feature 13:30 SUN (b00fzc2y)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00gm6r7)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00gnwdc)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00gq6dl)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00gq6d8)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00gq6db)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00gq6dd)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00gq6dg)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00gp10q)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00gm6rc)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00gq4mh)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00gq4mr)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00gnvvk)

News 13:00 SAT (b00gnv9y)

Nick Mohammed in Quarters 23:00 WED (b00grtmv)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00gq4mc)

On the Top Deck 11:00 WED (b00grrzw)

Online Damage: Porn in the 21st Century 17:00 SUN (b00glc5z)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00gq530)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00gq530)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00gntcj)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b00gntcj)

Opening Lines 19:45 SUN (b007tdlr)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00gnvr3)

PM 17:00 MON (b00gqxxm)

PM 16:30 TUE (b00gqxwn)

PM 17:00 WED (b00gqxwq)

PM 17:00 THU (b00gqxws)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00gqxwv)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00gq53b)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b00ghrld)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00gq532)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00gm6r9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00gqdfm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00gqcx5)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00gqcx7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00gqcx9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00gqcxc)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00gnvvc)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00gnvvc)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00gnvvc)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00gq4mm)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00gq4mm)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00gq4mm)

Recorded for Training Purposes 23:00 THU (b00gs0n6)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00gswn8)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00gntct)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00gnvvf)

Says on the Tin 11:30 MON (b00gqzw0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00gm6r3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00gnwd7)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00gq6bb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00gq68j)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00gq68l)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00gq68n)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00gq68q)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00gm6r1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00gm6r5)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00gnvr7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00gnwd5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00gnwd9)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00gq534)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00gq68g)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00gq6d6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00gq662)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00gq6bd)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00gq664)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00gq6bg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00gq666)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00gq6bj)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00gq668)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00gq6bl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00gnvrc)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00gq538)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00gqxxy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00gqxxp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00gqxxr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00gqxxt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00gqxxw)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00gp10s)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00gp10s)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00gqzvw)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00gqzvw)

State of Mind 21:00 WED (b00grshl)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00gq4mt)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00gq4mk)

Take Two 13:30 TUE (b00grgkd)

Taking a Stand 09:00 TUE (b00grdby)

Taking a Stand 21:30 TUE (b00grdby)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00gq4mz)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00gq53d)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00gq53d)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00gqwtv)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00gqwtv)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00gqwtl)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00gqwtl)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00gqwtn)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00gqwtn)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00gqwtq)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00gqwtq)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00gqwts)

The Bush Legacy 20:00 MON (b00grd2c)

The Castle 11:30 FRI (b00gs3kv)

The Condensed History of George W Bush 20:45 WED (b00grshj)

The Correspondent 23:15 WED (b00h781m)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00gs3x5)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00gq4n4)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00gq4n4)

The Fortune Hunters 09:30 TUE (b00grdc0)

The Lake 11:00 FRI (b00gs3ks)

The Late Story 00:30 SUN (b007qzxx)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00grs00)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b00gm62k)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00gs3x7)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00gnv9p)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00gq4n8)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00gqy5r)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00gqy4f)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00gqy4h)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00gqy4k)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00gqy4m)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00glnb1)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00grs04)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b00gqy62)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00gqy5t)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b00gqy5w)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b00gqy5y)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b00gqy60)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00gntcr)

Today 06:00 MON (b00gqgv2)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00gqgt3)

Today 06:00 WED (b00gqgt5)

Today 06:00 THU (b00gqgt9)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00gqgv4)

Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b00glndk)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b00grsdw)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00gntcg)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00gntcp)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00gnv9w)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00gnvr9)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00gq4mf)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00gq4mp)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00gq4n6)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00gq536)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00gq614)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00gqzvt)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00gqxj6)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00gqy4c)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b00gqxgz)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b00gqy3c)

Weather 12:57 WED (b00gqxh1)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00gqy3f)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00gqxh3)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00gqy3h)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00gqxh5)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00gqy3k)

Weekend Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00gnvr1)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00gq616)

Will Smith's Midlife Crisis Management 18:30 WED (b00grsdt)

Winnie the Who? 10:30 SAT (b00gntcy)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00gqpqs)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00grd8r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00grd8t)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00grd8w)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00grd8y)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b00glblw)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00gqxjz)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00gqxj8)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00gqxjb)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00gqxjd)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00gqxjg)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00gqptt)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00gqpth)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00gqptk)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00gqptm)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00gqptp)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b00gnvr5)