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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 10 JANUARY 2009

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00gf5rd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00gh4fv)
And Did Those Feet: Walking Through 200 Years of British and Irish History

Episode 5

Martin Freeman reads from Charlie Connelly's travelogue in which he recreates a series of famous historical journeys through the British Isles.

Charlie investigates a calamitous episode in Irish history, the 1849 Doolough famine walk in County Mayo.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gf5rg)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gf5rj)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gf5rl)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00gf5rn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gf5rq)
Daily prayer and reflection with Denis Rice.


SAT 05:45 Art Made in China (b008th9c)
Episode 2

Roger Law investigates the extraordinary boom in contemporary Chinese art. He discovers China's taste for satire.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00gf5rs)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00gh894)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00gh896)
Countryside magazine. Helen Mark visits the Black Mountains to find out how the credit crunch is affecting people living in one of the most sparsely populated areas of the UK.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today This Week (b00gh898)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00gh89b)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00gh89d)
Presented by James Naughtie and Edward Stourton.

Ross Hawkins explains the plans to deal with the recession.

Tim Franks says the UN's relief operations will be resumed in the Gaza Strip.

Russia is still refusing to allow gas supplies to pass through the pipelines that carry gas to several European countries. Nick Thorpe considers how the dispute might be solved.

Andy Gallacher finds out how celebrity autobiographies can be turned into comedy gold.

Foreign Office Minister Bill Rammell discusses how violence between Israeli forces and Hamas militants can end.

Writers Natasha Walter and Allison Pearson discuss the pressures on women to balance home and work.

Thought for the day with editor Catherine Pepinster.

Phil Redmond, Creative Director of Liverpool's year of events as the European Capital of Culture, and Bet Davies, part of the team that tried to win the title for Cardiff, discuss the idea of a regular 'British City of Culture'.

Aleem Maqbool reports from the West Bank and Manuel Hassassian, the Palestinian Authority's representative in London, discusses the possiblilty of a sustainable ceasefire.

Nicola Stanbridge spends a morning with volunteers working with London's homeless.

MPs Geoffrey Robinson and Michael Fallon discuss the economic downturn.

Comedian Arthur Smith and Luisa Dillner, author of the Complete Book of Mothers-in-Law, discuss living with in-laws.

Peter Biles interviews political analyst Steven Friedman about Jacob Zuma's chances of becoming president of South Africa.

David Benedictus, author of a new Winnie the Pooh story, discusses the first sequel to AA Milne's work to have been authorised by the author's estate.

Sir Stephen Wall and Gisela Stuart MP discuss EU involvement in Gaza.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00gh89g)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them. Presenter Clare Balding is joined by novelist Joanna Trollope. With poetry from Luke Wright.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00gh89j)
Travel Industry - 18th & 19th Century Travelogues by Women Adventurers

TRAVEL INDUSTRY
John McCarthy looks back at the past fifteen years of travelling from both the industry and individual perspective with Wanderlust Magazine co founder Lyn Hughes. He also considers what new trends and issues might affect the travelling world in the next year or so.

18th & 19th CENTURY TRAVELOGUES BY WOMEN ADVENTURERS
Margarette Lincoln, Deputy Director of the National Maritime Museum talks about two remarkable travelogues, one written in the 18th century Mary Lacy who disguised herself as a man and joined the Navy and one written in the 19th century by Fanny Loviot, who after emigrating to San Francisco travelled to Hong Kong where she was captured by pirates before being freed by the British Navy.


SAT 10:30 The Shock of the Knee (b00gmdxp)
Fashion writer Colin McDowell recalls the rise of the miniskirt and Yves Saint Laurent's 1959 House of Dior collection, which introduced hemlines above the knee, and the shocked reactions of society.

The press were agog at these developments, and even some Dior staff thought that Saint Laurent's designs had gone too far. At the same time in Britain, short skirts became increasingly popular with young women.

McDowell talks to one of the most important designers of the period, Mary Quant, as well as representatives of today's fashion industry, and wonders if womenswear will ever be as shocking again.

An All Out production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 Beyond Westminster (b00gq5vl)
Series 2

Episode 3

Series looking at politics beyond and outside the Westminster parliament.

As some people claim that large-scale economic migration to Britain will end with the recession, Andrew Rawnsley finds out whether or not the issue will slip down the political agenda.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00gh8f7)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00gh8f9)
As the interest rate hits an all-time low, we ask what quantitative easing is and what the cut means for those with mortgages and savings. Plus shadow chancellor George Osborne tells us about the Conservatives' tax plans to help savers, and how the City watchdog aims to speed compensation if your bank collapses.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b00gf2dr)
Series 67

Episode 1

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz. The panel includes Jeremy Hardy, Fred MacAulay and Phill Jupitus.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00gh8fc)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b00gh8ff)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00gf2g9)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate in Enfield, Middlesex. The panel includes the Liberal Democrats housing spokesperson Sarah Teather, author and columnist AN Wilson, shadow justice secretary Nick Herbert and employment minister Tony McNulty.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00gh9dd)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 David Cook - Walter Now (b00gh9dg)
by David Cook. In 1982 Channel 4 launched with "Walter", directed by Stephen Frears and starring Ian McKellen as a man with learning difficulties. More than 25 years later award-winning writer David Cook brings us up to date with Walter's life and Ian McKellen recreates his extraordinary performance.

Walter.....Ian McKellen
Steph.....Becky Hindley
Mr Herd.....Malcolm Tierney
Mary.....Anna-Marie Heslop
Bernard.....Robert Londsdale
Terry.....Gunnar Cauthery
Tom.....Edmund Davies
Mrs Hall.....Jill Cardo
Boy.....Ceallach Spellman

Director Claire Grove

In November 1982, a Channel 4 launched with "Walter" by David Cook, directed by Stephen Frears and starring Ian McKellen as a man with learning difficulties. It was an outstandingly truthful social commentary, heartbreaking and thought provoking. More than 25 years later award-winning writer David Cook brings us up to date with Walter's life in 'Walter Now' and Sir Ian McKellen recreates his extraordinary performance.

Walter is now a pensioner. Following the death of his mother Walter spent many years living in a psychiatric hospital. When that was closed down he moved to hostel accommodation where he is isolated and lonely. When his support worker hears of a house share with three others he suggests Walter. But Walter is twice the age of the rest. Will they accept him? Will he cope with independent living? Will they integrate with the community around them?

Sir Ian McKellen is best known for Gandalf in The Lord of the Rings. Other recent films include The Da Vinci Code and The X-Men. His portrayal of King Lear for the RSC in 2006-7 was much acclaimed and was released on DVD in January 2009.

David Cook is a stage and television actor who began to write novels in the early 1970s.


SAT 15:30 Music Feature (b00gkz7q)
Playing Castro's Tune

Episode 2

Stephen Evans travels to Cuba to look for the links between the country's music, its revolution and the impact that socio-political and social changes have had on the music and musicians' lives.

Cuba's musicians are one of the few sources for bringing in much-needed foreign currency to the ailing economy, but is the pressure placed on them detrimental to Cuban culture?


SAT 16:00 Weekend Woman's Hour (b00ghmbk)
Highlights of this week's Woman's Hour programmes with Jane Garvey.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00ghmbm)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Ritula Shah, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b00ghmbp)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00ghmbr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00ghmbt)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00ghmbw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00ghmby)
Peter Curran presents an eclectic mix of conversation, comedy and music.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b00ghmdk)
Kevin Pietersen

A profile of Kevin Pietersen, who has left his job as captain of the England cricket team. An aggressive batsman on the pitch and equally high-profile off it, he has made a striking impact on the English game, challenging the traditionalists with his self-assured approach.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00ghmdm)
Slumdog Millionaire, Heliopolis, and Christianity: A History

Guests: Novelist Denise Mina
Historian Tristram Hunt
Television Editor of heat magazine Boyd Hilton

Slumdog Millionaire
Danny Boyle’s new movie about a boy from the slums of Mumbai was almost sunk when his distributor went out of business. But the film’s uplifting story won it new backers, and now it’s hotly tipped to win Oscars. In the film itself, Jamal endures a brutal life until he manages to find his way onto the Indian version of Who Wants to be a Millionaire? – where his experiences allow him to answer question after question, until it looks as though he’ll really win big. But were Denise, Boyd and Tristram won over?

Slumdog Millionaire is on general release now, certificate 15.

Heliopolis
Like Danny Boyle’s film, James Scudamore’s novel ventures into the fast-changing world of the slums – this time in Sao Paolo, Brazil, to explore the ways extremes of wealth and poverty collide. Ludo is a slum-born boy who has been brought up in the house of a supermarket magnate. But he is forced to confront his origins when his adoptive Dad deploys him to advertise his new venture – a supermarket aimed at the favelas...

Heliopolis is published by Harvill Secker.

Hunter
Hugh Bonneville and Janet McTeer reprise their roles as a dysfunctional detective double-act which they created for the ground-breaking series Five Days. In this spin-off, they investigate the abduction of two boys by fanatics determined to win media attention for their cause. But does it match up to its acclaimed parent show?

Hunter is on BBC 1 at nine o’clock in the evening on Sunday 18 and Monday 19 January.

The Last Days of Woolworths
From its arrival from America in 1909, through its place in novelist JB Priestley’s iconic non-fiction travelogue ‘English Journey’, to the childhood memories of millions of contemporary Britons, Woolworths became a symbol of continuity in our national life. Many complain about the phenomenon of ‘clone town’ Britain, but the death of this particular feature of the high street this week has been widely mourned. So how much does its disappearance really matter for British culture? Tristram, Denise, Boyd and Tom each went down to their local branch in its last days to watch the end of a century of British tradition.

Christianity: A History
Channel 4 begins the New Year with a major, eight-part exploration of the history of one of the world’s most powerful religions. Eight public figures each go on a personal journey into a particular aspect of the Christian story. But will this approach help us on the way to enlightenment?

Christianity: A History begins on Channel 4 at 7pm on Sunday 11 January with Howard Jacobson’s Jesus the Jew and continues with films presented by Michael Portillo, Dr Robert Beckford, Rageh Omaar, Ann Widdecombe, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Professor Colin Blakemore and, on 1 March, Cherie Blair.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00ghmdp)
Bremner on Bush - A Final Farewell

Rory Bremner considers the rhetorical evolution of George W Bush, from gaffe-prone candidate to grandiose war president. He considers whether Bush grew to become an effective orator and who was responsible for writing the words he spoke and examines some of his key speeches and phrases. Featuring contributions from political commentators and former Bush speechwriters.


SAT 21:00 Anthony Trollope - Orley Farm (b00g9f9q)
2. Romance

Romance is in the air for the young folk staying at Noningsby, the country home of Judge and Lady Staveley.

Lady Mason accepts Sir Peregrine's invitation to spend Christmas at The Cleeve, and, in the Moulder household, there is business to consider.

Starring Tim Pigott-Smith, Samantha Bond and Ronald Pickup.

Anthony Trollope’s compelling, emotional novel dramatised by Martyn Wade.

Anthony Trollope ...... Tim Pigott-Smith
Lady Mason ...... Samantha Bond
Sir Peregrine ...... Ronald Pickup
Peregrine Orme ...... Dan Stevens
Mrs Edith Orme ...... Amanda Root
Lucius Mason ...... Jonathan Christie
Sophia Furnival ...... Lydia Leonard
Mr Furnival ...... Robert Maskell
Lady Staveley ...... Pamela Miles
Madeline Staveley ...... Manjeet Mann
Augustus Staveley ...... Robert Lonsdale
Felix Graham ...... Gunnar Cauthery
Mr Dockwrath ...... Sam Dale
Miriam Dockwrath ...... Janice Acquah
Joseph Mason ...... Jonathan Tafler
Mr Moulder ...... Stephen Critchlow
Mrs Moulder ...... Jane Whittenshaw
John Kenneby ...... Inam Mirza
Mr Kantwise ...... Paul Rider
Matthew Round ...... Dan Starkey

Director: Tracey Neale.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2009.


SAT 22:00 Weather (b00ghmfb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b00gd5hx)
Murder Law

Clive Anderson presents the series analysing the legal issues of the day.

Proposed reforms to the law relating to murder and manslaughter will remove the defence of 'crime of passion' and make it easier to prosecute gang members who take part in a deadly assault, but do not actually strike the killer blow. But the government's plans fall well short of the radical overhaul demanded by many lawyers.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b00gb0bw)
Robert Robinson chairs the perennial general knowledge contest.


SAT 23:30 Maadai-Kara (b00g9fp9)
Interwoven with a performance of the epic Altai poem from southern Siberia the Maadai-Kara, Benjamin Zephaniah explores the ancient oral tradition of throat singing that conjures spirits and celebrates the legends of these remote and distant lands.



SUNDAY 11 JANUARY 2009

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00ghmz3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SUN 00:30 The Late Story (b007r96w)
Bottled Air

War and the Menopause

Short stories by writer and comedian Ian Macpherson, describing life with Florette, a radical, feminist, menopausal poet.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00ghmz7)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00ghmz9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00ghmzc)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00ghmzf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00ghmzh)
The sound of bells from St John the Baptist in Egham, Surrey.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b00ghmdk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00ghmzk)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00ghmzm)
The Singing Manifesto

Recorded in San Francisco, American public radio producers The Kitchen Sisters, Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva, talk about their distinctive approach to interviewees and why they always ask their guests to sing a favourite song. They explain how they have found that singing achieves an 'accelerated intimacy' that cuts to the heart of a person and results in 'composed radio'.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b00ghmzp)
Topical farming magazine. Alex James visits Orchard Farm in Leicestershire to meet three brothers who have inherited 80 acres of land and are about to enter the world of farming.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00ghmzr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00ghmzt)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00ghq1q)
Roger Bolton discusses the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ghq1s)
RP Fighting Blindness

Jeremy Vine appeals on behalf of RP Fighting Blindness. Donations: Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. Credit cards: Freephone 0800 404 8144.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00ghq1v)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00ghq1x)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00ghq1z)
Mass for the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord from St Thomas More, Coventry. Celebrant: Father Timothy Menezes. Musical directors: Jo Boyce and Mike Stanley.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00gf5df)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue from Harold Evans.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00ghq21)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00ghq23)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00ghq25)
Ruth Padel

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the poet Ruth Padel. She is a highly acclaimed writer who is fascinated with the natural world around her. She's said of her poetry: "wildness, and wild animals lie at the heart of what I feel about writing". And perhaps that's no surprise - she is the great-great-granddaughter of Charles Darwin.

As a child, her hero was Bagheera - the black panther from The Jungle Book. For a time, she confesses, she used to want to be a black panther. Later, she simply wanted to marry one. As an adult she has spent several years travelling across India, Sumatra and parts of Russia tracking tigers and trying to understand their lives. She notes ruefully that while her illustrious ancestor was involved in understanding how different species came into being, her own work was more a matter of documenting their decline.

Her interests have been with her since childhood. Back then, she says, "looking at nature properly, knowing the names of the plants, seeing how the petals worked, observing animal behaviour was just there. That was what you did. That was what being a person was."

[Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

Favourite track: E Voi Ridete? - And you're laughing? by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Book: The Iliad by Homer
Luxury: A lot of paper and pencils.


SUN 12:00 Just a Minute (b00gbc96)
Series 54

Episode 2

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game with panellists Paul Merton, Clement Freud, Helen Lederer and Julian Clary.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00ghqw8)
Quality Meat

Sheila Dillon discovers the lengths the top butchers go to to source and prepare the very best meat.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00ghr96)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00ghr98)
A look at events around the world with Brian Hanrahan.


SUN 13:30 Belsen After Belsen (b00f6q66)
Historian Rainer Schulze tells the story of the former prisoners who had to remain in Belsen after the concentration camp was liberated by the British in April 1945.

For the next five years, a temporary community was contructed there: people who had lost everything married again, started new families and many dreamed of starting a new life in Israel. Emerging from the shadows of its ghastly origins, Belsen became an unlikely centre of Jewish regeneration, resistance and hope for its survivors.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00gdzkc)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Anne Swithinbank, Chris Beardshaw and John Cushnie are guests of Pentyrch Open Gardens near Cardiff, with advice on gardening on a budget.

Including the Gardeners' Question Time gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 A View Through a Lens (b00ghrfd)
Series 1

Seals

Wildlife cameraman John Aitchison often finds himself in isolated and even dangerous locations across the globe filming wildlife, and in this series he reflects on the uniqueness of human experience, the beauty of nature, the fragility of life and the connections which unite society and nature across the globe.

1/3 GREY SEALS: Despite a raging storm John struggles across the rocky shore of Brownsman Island off the coast of Northumberland to film grey seals giving birth at night.

Wildlife sound recordist is Chris Watson
Producer Sarah Blunt.


SUN 15:00 Anthony Trollope - Orley Farm (b00ghrhb)
3. Secrets

Lady Mason has confessed to her terrible secret and her chance of marriage with Sir Peregrine has been shattered.

Will her secret be exposed at the trial and will her beloved son lose Orley Farm?

Starring Tim Pigott-Smith, Samantha Bond and Ronald Pickup.

The conclusion of Anthony Trollope’s compelling, emotional novel

Dramatised by Martyn Wade.

Anthony Trollope ...... Tim Pigott-Smith
Lady Mason ...... Samantha Bond
Sir Peregrine ...... Ronald Pickup
Peregrine Orme ...... Dan Stevens
Mrs Edith Orme ...... Amanda Root
Lucius Mason ...... Jonathan Christie
Sophia Furnival ...... Lydia Leonard
Mr Furnival ...... Robert Maskell
Mrs Furnival ...... Joanna Monro
Lady Staveley ...... Pamela Miles
Judge Staveley ...... Chris Pavlo
Madeline Staveley ...... Manjeet Mann
Augustus Staveley ...... Robert Lonsdale
Felix Graham ...... Gunnar Cauthery
Mr Dockwrath ...... Sam Dale
Joseph Mason ...... Jonathan Tafler
Mr Moulder ...... Stephen Critchlow
Mrs Moulder ...... Jane Whittenshaw
John Kenneby ...... Inam Mirza
Chaffanbrass ...... Malcolm Tierney
Miss Biggs ...... Jill Cardo
Judge ...... Dan Starkey

Director: Tracey Neale

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2009.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00ghrlb)
Jay McInerney, crime writing from Scandinavia

Mariella Frostrup presents the books magazine. She talks to the American novelist Jay McInerney, the author of Bright Lights, Big City, about his new novel The Good Life. Plus a look at a new wave of crime writing from Scandinavia.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b00ghrld)
Roger McGough introduces listeners' requests.

Actress Lia Williams reads poems from Emily Dickinson, Emily Bronte, Carol Ann Duffy, Brian Patten, William Blake, Matthew Arnold and Harold Pinter. Plus recordings of Michael Williams reading Cecil Day Lewis's The Album and Felix Dennis reads some of his own atmospheric work.

The Ambush by Brian Patten
From: Collected Love Poems
Publ: Harper Perennial

The Effect of Coastal Processes on the Beach at Amroth by Adrian Blamires
From: The Effect of Coastal Processes on the Beach at Amroth
Publ: Two Rivers Press

Verse Found Whilst Reading Between the Lines of a Lonely Hearts Ad by Matt Harvey
From: The Hole in the Sum of My Parts
Publ: The Poetry Trust

Rapunzstiltskin by Liz Lochhead
From: Being Alive (Anthology)
Publ: Bloodaxe

I Cannot Live With You by Emily Dickinson
From: The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Publ: Faber

London by ASJ Tessimond
From: Voices in a Giant City
Publ: William Heinemann

The Album by Cecil Day Lewis
From: The Complete Poems of C Day-Lewis
Publ: Sinclair-Stevenson

Dover Beach by Matthew Arnold
From: The Oxford Book of English Verse

My Three Rivers by Lotte Kramer
From: The Phantom Lane
Publ: Rockingham Press

One Need Not be a Chamber by Emily Dickinson
From: The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson
Publ: faber and faber

It is Here by Harold Pinter
From: Various Voices : Prose, Poetry, Politics
Publ: Faber

I Know the Place by Harold Pinter
From: Collected Poems and Prose
Publ: Methuen

High Waving Heather by Emily Brontë
From: Brontë - Poems
Publ: Everyman

My Literary Career So Far by Adrian Mitchell
Unpublished


SUN 17:00 Obama: Professor President (b00gfqbd)
Prof Kwame Anthony Appiah investigates president-elect Obama's academic career before his election to the US Senate in 2004.

He examines the intellectual ideas which influenced him during his time as a student at Harvard and later as a law professor at the University of Chicago, and considers what effect they might have on his policy-making as president.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b00ghmdk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00gj7rr)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00gj7rt)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gj7rw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00gj7ry)
John Waite introduces his selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00gj7s0)
Kenton drops round to see Shula and find out how things are. It's clear that Alistair hasn't mentioned his recent meeting with Kenton outside the bookies, so Kenton drops the subject. Shula has enough on her plate with the stables struggling in the economic downturn, and she's finding the situation with Alan very difficult. But as she says to Kenton - if Mabel can find a way through, then so can she.

Christopher and Neil finish the kitchen in the flat over the shop. Chris is working very hard except for the numerous calls and texts from Alice. Neil wistfully wonders how he's finding Hannah? Such a nice girl - and so good with the pigs.

Will and Nic are very happy in their renewed relationship. Will turns up to take Nic over to Ambridge to see George, and encourages her to drive. Nic's nervous about getting back behind the wheel, but manages the six miles or so to the village without incident. She tells Will that she's ok with the driving along - it's the manoeuvres that she worries about most. Will takes over the wheel, and promptly reverses into a mock staddle stone on the verge. Embarrassed Will hopes Mrs Noakes (the owner) won't notice, and drives away.

Episode written by Simon Frith.


SUN 19:15 Go4it (b00gj7s2)
Children's magazine. Natalie Barrass goes to a re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings and meets people who spend all their spare time pretending to be Vikings or Normans.


SUN 19:45 The Railway Children (b00gj7s4)
Episode 5

Joanna Tope reads from E Nesbit's classic 1906 children's novel which tells the story of the trials and adventures of a middle-class Edwardian family.

A surprising connection to the Old Gentleman promises a happy conclusion.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b00gdz3t)
Sex Workers - Babylonian Numbers - Credit Crunch Maths: Journalism

Sex Workers
"Something like 80% of women in prostitution are controlled by their drug dealer, or their pimp or their trafficker," according to former Home Office minister Fiona MacTaggart MP.

The idea that women who work in prostitution are largely in forced labour situations is one of the justifications behind a government proposal to introduce a strict liability offence of paying for sex with a woman who has been trafficked or is under the control of a pimp or her drug dealer.

It will be no defence for an accused man to say that he didn't realise that the woman had been trafficked or was "controlled for another person's gain". Men accused of this crime will be charged with rape on the basis that the woman can't be deemed to have consented.

Given the underground nature of prostitution, how do researchers know the proportion of women who are controlled by others? Presenter Tim Harford finds out how the research is done and the reliability of the statistics.

Interviewees include Professor Julia O'Connell-Davidson of Nottingham University, Hilary Kinnell of the UK Network of Sex Work Projects and Fiona MacTaggart MP.

Babylonian Numbers
The ancient civilization is famed for the Tower of Babel, the Hanging Gardens and Belshazzar's Feast - but also for the great advances it made in mathematics.

The ability to write large numbers, the way we measure time, the number of degrees in a circle and the 7 day week - we apparently owe much to Babylonian mathematics.

To find out more, Tim Harford visits the British Museum's Babylon exhibition and talks to Eleanor Robson of Cambridge University's Department of History and Philosophy of Science.

Credit Crunch Maths: Journalism
Gillian Tett of the Financial Times explains the moment she realised that nine tenths of financial activity was being largely ignored by journalists, politicians and regulators.

Until recently, media coverage of the financial markets was mainly limited to equities and mergers and acquisitions. But the credit markets, derivative markets and the market in loans repackaged into bonds were worth far more.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00gf2dm)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00gh8f9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ghq1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b00gdyk8)
Free For All

Peter Day hears from two advocates of business models that challenge the conventional wisdom about charging for goods and services.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00gj7s6)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00gj7s8)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster with Norman Smith. Including Schumpeter Rising.


SUN 23:02 In Living Memory (b00cb4ht)
Series 8

Shoreham

Contemporary history series. Jolyon Jenkins tells the story of how the seaside town of Shoreham became convulsed for several months in 1995 when animal welfare hit the headlines and stopped being a minority issue as seasoned protesters were joined by ordinary people to protest against the export of live sheep and veal calves to the Continent.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00ghmzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 12 JANUARY 2009

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00gj832)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00gd5hs)
Popular Music and Violence - The Etymology of 'Hooligan'

POPULAR MUSIC AND VIOLENCE
David Gray, Eminen, ACDC, Bruce Springsteen, Christina Aguilera and Nancy Sinatra are artists whose music - despite their protests - have all been used by states as instruments of war. Laurie Taylor is joined by Dr Martin Cloonan, co-author of the Dark Side of the Tune and Caspar Melville, former lecturer in Popular Music Studies at Goldsmiths, to discuss how music is used in conflicts, and how it is increasingly employed by public utilities and commercial organisations in attempts to control what people do.

THE ETYMOLOGY OF ‘HOOLIGAN’
According to Professor Geoffrey Pearson the word "hooligan" made its official entrance into the English language during the summer of 1898, in the wake of a rowdy, August bank holiday celebration in London when hundreds of people appeared before the courts on charges of assault and drunkenness. Professor Pearson expands on the origins of the word ‘hooligan’.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00ghmzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gj87p)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gj89r)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gj8np)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00gj8p3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gj8sg)
Daily prayer and reflection with Denis Rice.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00gj8vg)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna Hill.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00gkxtj)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00gjbc8)
Presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis.

Ferran Tarradellas, spokesman for EU Energy Commissioner Andris Piebalgs, discusses how the dispute with Russia over gas supply could be settled.

Frank Gardner analyses the death of Somali pirates who hijacked a Saudi oil tanker.

Barnardo's chief executive Martin Narey and former health secretary Alan Milburn, who will head a new commission on social mobility, discuss what the government can do to improve children's chances in life.

Dr Anwar Sheikhalin, Director of Naser Hospital in Gaza explains the dangers posed to children in the ICU.

Keith Vaz MP and former Foreign Office minister Rod Richards discuss Prince Harry's use of the word Paki.

Rajesh Mirchandani reports on the Golden Globe awards.

Thought for the day with Clifford Longley.

Mark Regev, a spokesman for the Israeli Government, explains Israel's goals.

Work and Pensions Secretary James Purnell explains how the government intends to get the unemployed back to work.

Dr Saul David and Nick Fraser debate what happens when history and entertainment meet.

James Coomarasamy visits Detroit to speak to those who were there when Motown began.

Sir Jeremy Greenstock discusses what can be gained from talking directly with Hamas.

Nick Robinson examines the arguments in the politics of the recession.

Jenny Hill reports on 'very serious failings' in children's services in Haringey, Surrey and Doncaster.

Peter Bowes reports from the Golden Globe awards.

Adrian Wilkes of the Environmental Industries Commission and Geoffrey Wood, professor of economics, debate whether 'green collar jobs' offer a solution to the current economic crisis.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00gkz10)
Andrew Marr sets the cultural agenda for the week. His guests include Adam Phillips, author Vikas Swarup and Tom Stoppard.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00gkkw3)
The Rest is Noise - Listening to the 20th Century

Episode 1

Julian Rhind Tutt reads from music critic Alex Ross's history of 20th-century music. The last of the old guard or the first of the new: Strauss, Mahler and Salome.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00gkkw5)
Mary Quant; The work-life balance

The fashion designer Mary Quant on her life and work. Plus, Julia Hobsbawm on the work-life balance, and Professor Wendy Hall on encouraging more young women to become scientists.


MON 11:00 Hot House Kids (b00gkz12)
Episode 1

Former prima ballerina Deborah Bull investigates the advantages and the pitfalls of being an elite performer in the arts and sport and what young people need to succeed. She also looks at the physiological advantages and problems of attaining perfection, discovering the optimum and the safe age to begin meaningful training.

Deborah started ballet training at the age of seven - dangerously close to the age at which, however hard she worked, she would have been too late to consider a career on the international ballet stage today. The ability to excel at complex and extreme physical endeavours in ballet and other performing arts and sport requires a combination of two things: a highly trained body and an expert brain.

To achieve the levels of excellence necessary to compete on the global job market today you have to start young, taking advantage of the brain's early plasticity and the increased potential for muscle flexibility in pre-adolescents. In the UK, most little girls (and some boys) start serious dancing and music training at around the age of seven. A UK child has some degree of choice and control and, after a few years, the ability to decide whether or not to pursue one of the activities as a professional career. However, in some countries in Eastern Europe and Asia children enter full time training as young as three - gymnastics and ballet training are key examples - and endure challenging physical and mental regimes to ensure that they are ready to compete - and achieve the highest standards as soon as they reach double figures.

On a journey that takes Deborah to the Ukraine, she visits the National Ballet School in Kiev, the elite football training centre at Dynamo Kiev and the National Gymnastics centre in Kiev where she discovers why elite athletes are achieving such high levels of achievement in Eastern Europe.

Because of the growing number of top-class performers coming out of Asian countries she also has contributions from members of the national ballet school in Korea.

In this first programme Deborah looks at the physiological development of a young person, what happens to the body and the brain of an elite child and what key things are needed to help nurture and realise its potential. She also discovers that if a child is to avoid some of the short- and long-term injuries which result in top class training he or she may have to compromise on standards.


MON 11:30 Says on the Tin (b00gl50p)
Schokolade

Comedy by Christopher William Hill.

Eliott finds nothing to laugh about while promoting a German chocolate called Laughing.

Eliott Thurber ...... Michael Brandon
Esther Finn ...... Samantha Bond
Hannah Walker ...... Pippa Haywood
Zadie ...... Joannah Tincey
Baz ...... Inam Mirza
Mandelbrot ...... Malcolm Tierney
Interpreter ...... Gunnar Cauthery

Other Parts played by Dan Starkey, Janice Acquah and Jonathan Tafler.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00gkp2z)
Presented by Julian Worricker.

Shari Vahl has been reporting on the problems faced by people buying event tickets online.

The economic crisis and the weak pound are combining to make many of us think twice about booking a holiday. Travel writer Simon Calder gives his views on the situation.

Jane Milne from the British Retail Consortium and Peter Hitchens from the Mail on Sunday discuss the phasing out of traditional light bulbs.

Sir Simon Jenkins, the recently appointed Chairman of the National Trust speaks about his plans for the future.

Rail travellers have reacted angrily to plans to cut the opening hours of manned ticket offices across the South West.

Top hedge funder Lex Van Dam tells us about the BBC2 documentary series, Million Dollar Traders.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00gkpl8)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00gkpln)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Brain of Britain (b00gl57m)
Robert Robinson chairs the perennial general knowledge contest.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00gj7s0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b007rgnn)
Lawn Wars

By Nick Warburton.

Alice is a single middle-aged woman devastated after the recent loss of her mother. To fulfil a promise she made to herself on mother's deathbed, Alice takes on a gardener to improve the lawn that helped bond the two women.

Alice ...... Anna Calder-Marshall
Anthony ...... Richard Johnson
Rob ...... Robert Daws.


MON 15:00 Archive on 4 (b00ghmdp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Saturday]


MON 15:45 The Flight from Tehran: British-Iranians 30 Years On (b00gkqp3)
Death to the Shah

Exiles from the Iranian revolution talk to British-Iranian writer David Mattin about leaving their homeland and family behind to make a new life in Britain.

David talks to some of the first wave of mainly affluent Iranians who came to the UK after the 1979 revolution.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00ghqw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b00gl57p)
Ernie Rea explores the place of faith in today's world, teasing out the hidden and often contradictory truths behind the experiences, values and traditions of our lives.


MON 17:00 PM (b00gkvtv)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gkvwh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b00gl57r)
Series 54

Episode 3

Nicholas Parsons chairs the devious word game with panellists Paul Merton, Charles Collingwood, Graham Norton and Shappi Khorsandi.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00gkqfn)
Hannah tries to chat up Chris, but he's far too besotted with Alice to notice. Jazzer is jealous since he fancies Hannah himself, and he tries to persuade her to go out with him. He's very persistent with her and manages to extract a 'maybe'.

Chris gives Jennifer the latest news on Alice, who is working and playing hard at university.

Brian goes to see Tom to tell him about the approach from the supermarket to stock Tom Archer sausages. It's very simple as far as Tom is concerned. He has no interest at all in working for a supermarket after his previous experiences with one. Brian feels it's a really good opportunity - and they don't come along that often. But Tom won't budge from his position. He's through with supermarkets and he's not going to change his mind.

Brian can't understand it, telling Jenny there are plenty of people who'd kill for such an opportunity. So in spite of what Tom has said, he's made an appointment to go in and speak to the buyer.

Episode written by Simon Frith.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00gkvx4)
Presented by Kirsty Lang.

Novelist Sebastian Faulks reviews A Christmas Tale, the latest film from French director Arnaud Desplechin, a characteristically unpredictable tale about three generations of the dysfunctional Vuillard family.

Novelists Barry Unsworth and Tobias Hill discuss the use of archaeology in their new novels.

Composer Orlando Gough talks to Kirsty about his latest project, ICE, a choral piece which commemorates the centenary of the first expedition to reach the North Pole.

Andrew Collins examines whether, as is often claimed, success at the Golden Globe awards really leads to Oscar glory.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00gkvz6)
Dear Mr Spectator

Episode 1

Dramatised by Elizabeth Kuti from Joseph Addison and Richard Steele's 18th-century 'Spectator' essays.

Middle-aged clockmaker Gilbert increasingly turns to the essays of an anonymous guru of city living, known as Mr Spectator, for guidance on life.

Mr Spectator ...... Benjamin Whitrow
Gilbert ...... Richard Lumsden
Kitty ...... Amy Marston
Jonathan ...... Sam Troughton
Coffee boy ...... Samuel Barnett
Lady ...... Fo Cullan
Gentlemen ...... Miche Doherty, Richard Dormer, Chris McHallem, Mark Lambert

Directed by Heather Larmour.


MON 20:00 Advertising: The Most Fun You Can Have With Your Clothes On! (b00gl57t)
Episode 2

Advertising executive Robin Wight presents a history of the advertising industry.

How clients watched advertising bosses grow rich in the 1990s and so turned to new media, prompting the rise of internet advertising. Robin also examines how the industry creates memorable advertising campaigns that work away from TV screens. Including contributions from Richard Dawkins, John Hegarty and Gemma Calvert, professor of neuro-imaging at Warwick University.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b00gdjvc)
Malaysia: Racial Supremacy No More?

For nearly four decades, ethnic Malays have benefited from positive discrimination over Malaysians of ethnic Chinese and Indian origin - which make up nearly 40 percent of the population.

But in 2008, the country's unique racial compact began to be strongly challenged from within. Mukul Devichand reports on the tensions and meets Malay, Indian and Chinese young people on the front lines of the struggle between ingrained racism and the possibility of a more equal future.


MON 21:00 Costing the Earth (b00gl57w)
Black Monday, Green Tuesday?

Tom Heap considers how the recession is likely to affect attitudes towards the environment. If the current financial and environmental problems are rooted in our taste for consumption, surely an economic slowdown is a painful but necessary step in the right direction towards a greener planet? Fewer cars on the roads, fewer flights in the air and an enforced prudence when it comes to personal spending will mean less energy use and less waste. But as the government advocates spending our way out of recession, some environmentalists fear that there will be a rush to develop a more environmentally-damaging infrastructure in order to keep the economy buoyant. Others say that we are on the threshold of a new green world where workers in traditionally polluting industries such as car manufacturing will be able to switch to new green jobs.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00gkz10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00gkw4m)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00gkw50)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah. Including reports on Egypt's role in a Gaza ceasefire and how the fashion industry is dealing with recession.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00gkwkg)
One Morning Like A Bird

Episode 1

Michael Maloney reads from the novel by Andrew Miller. Tokyo, 1940: With Japan's war with China escalating and the threat of conscription in the air, the Takano family begin to feel the new mood of nationalism close in on them.

On New Year's Eve, Yuji Takano and his family prepare to welcome in 1940, the Year of the Dragon.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b00gd3dy)
Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00gkxmv)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Susan Hulme.



TUESDAY 13 JANUARY 2009

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00gj81v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00gkkw3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gj863)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gj87r)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gj89t)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00gj8nr)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gj8s4)
Daily prayer and reflection with Denis Rice.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00gj8tw)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna HIll.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00gj92v)
Presented by James Naughtie and Evan Davis.

Hugh Pym and Matthew Taylor, the chief exec of JCB, discuss the economic situation.

Conservative MP David Willetts discusses if social mobility has stalled.

Rupert Wingfield-Hayes considers if the causes of the Russian gas supply crisis are resolved.

Justin Webb examines the last days of previous US administrations, which have occasionally been dramatic.

Nick Robinson discusses with MPs George Osborne and Vince Cable how banks can be persuaded to lend to small businesses.

Rebecca Jones talks to Rowan Atkinson about his return to the stage as Fagin in Oliver!

Thought for the day with Dr Indarjit Singh.

Tim Harford wonders if we should look back to the campaign 'Backing Britain' from 1968 for ways to revive the nation's spirits.

MP Liam Byrne discusses how barriers to social advancement can be broken down.

Jeremy Bowen examines reports that areas of Gaza City came under shellfire from Israeli gunboats.

Jen Hadfield, winner of the TS Eliot prize for poetry, reads her work and discusses the prize.

Gavin Lockhart and Tony Thomson discuss if the law must be tougher on gangs.

The last known veteran to have served in both world wars has died. In 2005 Bill Stone talked to reporter Mike Thompson.

Details of the 1911 Census are available for the first time online. Sanchia Berg finds entries for her family and Today presenter Evan Davis, and talks them through with historian Nick Barratt.

Fiona Trott reports on arrests made in connection with a murder in Fairfield.

Emma-Jane Kirby reports on the socio-political consequences of the rising anger against Israel.

Dr Lee Elliot Major and author Dominic Sandbrook discuss whether cultural and educational factors still limit children's chances.


TUE 09:00 Taking a Stand (b00gl58x)
Garry Kasparov

Fergal Keane talks to people who have taken risks and made sacrifices to stand up for what they believe in.

Garry Kasparov was only 22 when he became the youngest ever World Chess Champion. His was a gilded youth, lauded by the Soviet state. Yet he was always known as a bit of a trouble maker, unwilling to tow the party line. His greatest stand, though, would be a very personal one - against Vladimir Putin.

He talks to Fergal Keane about why he decided to stand for the presidency of Russia, a decision that led to his imprisonment. And whether he thinks he will survive as a defiant presence in a country where some critics of the state have met a violent death.


TUE 09:30 The Fortune Hunters (b00gl690)
Episode 4

Series in which Max Flint investigates the 15 billion pounds in unclaimed assets in the UK and asks if and how these funds are distributed to their rightful owners.

Ever wondered what happened to those premium bonds you were given as a baby? It could be one of the 31 million pounds worth of unclaimed premium bond prizes.

Max discovers how the NS&I tracing team tackle the problem of locating lost winners. At least they have an old address to start with. By contrast, Camelot don't even have a name to help locate lost lottery prize-winners.

A Tinderbox Broadcast production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00h3m95)
The Rest is Noise - Listening to the 20th Century

Episode 2

Julian Rhind Tutt reads from music critic Alex Ross's history of 20th-century music. Kurt Weill and the story of Mack the Knife and Gershwin's Porgy and Bess.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00gp2yd)
Domestic abuse in the recession; writer and musician Gemma Weeks

Will the recession see a rise in domestic violence? Plus the demise of the dinner service, and musician Gemma Weekes on her first novel on the transformative power of love.


TUE 11:00 Money Can't Buy You Class? (b00gl692)
Stuart Jeffries visits Solihull in the West Midlands to find out if people from humble origins who become wealthy necessarily become middle class. He finds out what the now well-heeled want to hold onto from the past and what they would prefer to leave behind.


TUE 11:30 A Celestial Star in Piccadilly (b00gl694)
Anna Chen presents a tribute to Hollywood's first Chinese-American movie star, Anna May Wong, star of the classic 1929 silent movie Piccadilly. Filmed in London, it made her a celebrity in Britain in the 1930s. Despite her talent, Wong struggled against racial prejudice throughout her career, and was banned from even kissing her leading men. However, her reputation is now enjoying a revival thanks to the restoration and re-release of Piccadilly.

Producer: Chris Eldon Lee
A Culture Wise Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00gkp2j)
Call You and Yours

Presented by Julian Worricker.

Should Britain seek safety from economic turbulence by adopting the Euro?

For some it helps create a zone of security and stability…for others it’s unlikely to survive to its twentieth birthday…the euro is ten years old this month, and today we’re asking if Britain should consider joining it.

When it arrived – firstly as a virtual currency, and three years later as notes and coins – it received a lukewarm reception. But now as the pound slumps in value while the euro holds firm, some economists are saying it’s time to look again at Britain’s position.

With guests: Paul Mason BBC Business Correspondent, Daily Mail Columnist Peter Oborne and Times Columnist Oliver Kamm.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00gkpgv)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00gkplb)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Take Two (b00gd1t2)
Series 2

Billie Holiday and Lester Young

Richard Coles presents a discussion series looking at collaborations between two musicians.

The recordings that Billie Holiday made with saxophonist Lester Young were lauded for the way in which both artists complemented one another's sound. He called her Lady Day and she nicknamed him Prez because of his presidential mastery of his instrument.

But away from the studio they also shared addictions to alcohol and drugs, which led to their early deaths. Richard is joined by jazz singer Clare Teal and saxophone player and jazz writer Dave Gelly to explore the personalities of Young and Holiday and to investigate their musical legacy.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00gkqfn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b007sq3m)
Excerpt from a Dog's Ear

By Kavyasiddhi.

Dodging impending fatherhood, Dan has escaped to the beach he used to visit as a child in search of answers. What he finds is himself, aged nine.

Dan ...... Michael Begley
Danny ...... Aidan Parsons

With original music by Steve Mead.
Directed by Nadia Molinari.


TUE 15:00 Home Planet (b00glbkf)
Richard Daniel and the team discuss listeners' questions about the environment and the natural world.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00glbkx)
The Other Garden and Collected Stories by Francis Wyndham

The Facts of Life

Francis Wyndam's three subtle stories of desire and yearning during the dark days of the second world war are matchless in tone and nuance. They centre on the young and old, on those upstairs and downstairs, on those living in town and country...

1.The Facts of Life

Young Newton never settled at the school, then he has to see the
headmaster about a rather delicate subject...

Read by Bill Nighy
Producer Duncan Minshull.


TUE 15:45 The Flight from Tehran: British-Iranians 30 Years On (b00gkrtt)
Freedom, Independence, Islamic Republic

Exiles from the Iranian revolution talk to British-Iranian writer David Mattin about leaving their homeland and family behind to make a new life in Britain.

David hears how many of those who participated in the early days of the revolution subsequently faced persecution at the hands of the fundamentalist regime of the Ayatollah Khomeini and had to escape to Britain.

A Wise Buddah Creative production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b00glblw)
Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b00glbyv)
Series 17

Tony Hancock

4 Extra Debut. Poet Pam Ayres chooses the lad himself, Tony Hancock. With Matthew Parris and Tony's biographer John Fisher. From January 2009.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00gkvsv)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gkvtx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


TUE 18:30 Broken Arts (b00glbyx)
Episode 1

David Quantick and company poke fun at the ridiculous in popular culture. Featuring a guest appearance from Gilbert and Sullivan and special correspondents Dan Maier, Richie Webb, Jane Lamacraft and Margaret Cabourn-Smith.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00gkqfd)
Usha and Annabelle are up bright and early for a run. It's freezing cold and the dawn is just breaking. They compete with each other, waxing lyrical about the beauty of the morning and how glad they are to have made the effort. As they run, it's dangerously icy, and Usha is humiliated and cross when she slips and falls. She's not hurt, and gets up and running as fast as she can, gritting her teeth at Annabelle's obvious amusement.

Will and Nic share a warm moment when he presents her with earrings to replace some she's lost. They giggle about Mrs Noakes, who hasn't yet sued Will about the staddle stone he hit with the car.

David and Ruth wake to a frozen milking parlour and spend hours thawing it out and getting the milking done. David is grumpy, so Ruth cooks him a nice breakfast. In return he suggests they go out for the anniversary meal they missed when he was ill.

Episode written by Simon Frith.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00gkvwk)
Presented by Mark Lawson.

In his latest film, The Wrestler, Mickey Rourke plays Randy 'The Ram' Robinson, a professional wrestler who enjoyed success in the 1980s, but twenty years later is struggling to accept that his career is coming to an end. Sports presenter John Inverdale has seen it and gives his verdict.

The actor Hugh Bonneville, who starred in Filth: The Mary Whitehouse Story and Bonekickers, stars as DSI Iain Barclay in Hunter, a two-part TV police thriller. Hugh talks to Mark about acting for the large and small screen.

In 1983, the first volume of compilation album Now That's What I Call Music hit the shelves, featuring the likes of Kajagoogoo, Duran Duran and not one but two tracks from UB40. Mark Ellen, editor of the pop magazine Smash Hits in 1983 and now editor of The Word magazine, looks back at the first album, which has been re-released.

Plus Mrs Beeton's biographer, Kathryn Hughes, considers the potential edibility of recipes in fiction.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00gp30g)
Dear Mr Spectator

Episode 2

Dramatised by Elizabeth Kuti from by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele's 18th century 'Spectator' essays.

Exasperated by her husband's obsession with the writings of Mr Spectator, Gilbert's wife Kitty decides to see what all the fuss is about.

Mr Spectator ...... Benjamin Whitrow
Gilbert ...... Richard Lumsden
Kitty ...... Amy Marston
Jonathan ...... Sam Troughton
Disgruntled man ...... Richard Dormer
Wife ...... Sarah Kants

Directed by Heather Larmour.


TUE 20:00 Online Damage: Porn in the 21st Century (b00glc5z)
Penny Marshall examines the effects of the rapid expansion of online pornography on UK society. She talks to those who use online porn, including couples trying to repair the trust and intimacy dented by the persistent and secretive use of porn sites. She also hears from psychologists who are concerned that young people are in danger of having their understanding of sexual relationships permanently damaged by what they see online.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00glc61)
Peter White with news and information for the blind and partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 Case Notes (b00glj3v)
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

Dr Mark Porter explores the science behind the dramatic cut in the number of cot deaths.

He hears about a study in Bradford which is looking at the differences between how South Asian and European families look after their newborns, as the incidence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome is generally lower in families of South Asian origin. A large study in the south west of England has confirmed risk factors including exposure to tobacco smoke and front-sleeping, though others, like co-sleeping, are less clear-cut.


TUE 21:30 Taking a Stand (b00gl58x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00gkw3j)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00gkw4p)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig. Including reports on Western governments looking for new ways to protect businesses from the credit crunch, Hillary Clinton wanting a 'new approach' to Iran and Wellington School's 'social mobility' experiment.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00gr4p2)
One Morning Like A Bird

Episode 2

Michael Maloney reads from the novel by Andrew Miller set in Tokyo during World War II.

Yuji, an aspiring poet, must find new ways of supporting himself, but the French Club at Monsieur Feneon's house has always been a source of escape.


TUE 23:00 28 Acts in 28 Minutes (b008khpv)
Series 2

Episode 1

The fastest show on-air is back!

28 performers have just 60 seconds in which to entertain the audience in this traditional variety show, featuring established stand-ups, and some newer talent

The whole thing is presided over by John Humphrys, who sits at the side of the stage with a stopwatch, ready to cut the microphone when the time is up.

And hey - if there's an act you don't like, well, there's another one along in 55 seconds or so...

Jeremy Limb
Des Clarke
Penny Broadhurst
Arnab Chanda
John Sessions
Christina Martin
Gavin Osborn
Aaron Counter
G-Force
James Kettle
Paula Wilcox
James Branch
Pegabovine
Dave Cohen
Jarlath Regan
Dutch Elm Conservatoire
Jeff Innocent
Katherine Jakeways
Carl Donnelly
Stephen Grant
Mara Carlyle
Stephen K Amos
Barry Davies
Jeff Green
Shappi Khorsandi
Martin Jarvis
The Puppini Sisters
Stewart Lee

Producers: Rohan Acharya and Ed Morrish

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2007.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00gkxmx)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Sean Curran.



WEDNESDAY 14 JANUARY 2009

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00gj81x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00h3m95)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gj865)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gj87t)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gj89w)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00gj8nt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gj8s6)
Daily prayer and reflection with Denis Rice.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00gj8ty)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.


WED 06:00 Today (b00gj92x)
Presented by James Naughtie and Sarah Montague.

Robert Peston and Paul Mortimer Lee discuss government plans to guarantee loans to small businesses.

CC Peter Neyroud says the fact that police radios can now operate from underground stations will transform their work.

Rockets have allegedly been fired from Lebanon into Israel. Mike Sergeant reports.

Tom Feilden investigates the Angling Trust.

A US entrepreneur is leasing 400,000 hectares from a warlord in Sudan. Mike Thomson reports.

Beverley Cuddy, editor of Dogs Today, and Lilly Shahravesh, owner of a 'canine couture' company, discuss dressing dogs.

Thought for the day with the Rt Rev Tom Butler.

Sanchia Berg speaks to Palestinians in Gaza. Major Jacob Dallal of the Israeli Defence Force discusses accusations that humanitarian targets have been hit.

Lord Mandelson discusses the government's plan to underwrite 20 billion pounds of loans to small businesses.

Chairman of Standard Chartered Bank Mervyn Davies is to be made a life peer and Trade Minister. Nick Robinson reports.

Rebecca Jones talks to writer Armando Iannucci about Skin Deep, a satirical operetta about cosmetic surgery.

Former KGB officer Alexander Lebedev discusses if differences between Russia and Ukraine can be resolved.

Mark Mardell reports on a controversial art installation on display at the European Council building.

Prof Hugh Pennington and author Mark Bostridge discuss whether Florence Nightingale really was a good nurse.

Alistair Crooke discusses the Israeli Prime Minister's comments that the conflict in Gaza may be ending.

Sir Howard Davies gauges reactions to a speech by Federal Reserve chief Ben Bernanke.

Gideon Rachman and Bill Emmott discuss the political implications of the economic climate.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00gllnl)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00h3m97)
The Rest is Noise - Listening to the 20th Century

Episode 3

Julian Rhind Tutt reads from music critic Alex Ross's history of 20th-century music. The Beatles and Stockhausen - and how he ended up on the cover of Sgt Pepper's.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00gp32m)
Alex Clark; 18th century marriage

Granta's first female editor Alex Clark on her first edition. Plus marriage in 18th century Britain, and the discovery of the first gender-linked gene for Alzheimer's.


WED 11:00 Black Students in Red Russia (b00gllnn)
Burt Caesar tells the story of the students who, for three decades from the 1960s, were sent from developing countries to study in the Soviet Union, in the hope that they might become sympathetic to state socialism. He finds out what it was like to for them live and study in the USSR at the height of the Cold War, the long-term impact of the political scholarships and where the former students are now.


WED 11:30 Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! (b00gllnq)
Series 4

An Audience With

Spoof reminiscences of a former variety star. Count Arthur Strong is an expert in everything from the world of entertainment to the origins of the species, all false starts and nervous fumbling, poorly concealed by a delicate sheen of bravado and self-assurance.

A timely visit from the vicar interrupts Arthur's artistic flow as he pens a new novel, and reminds him that he needs to organise entertainment for a fundraiser that night.

The choice of headliner is obvious, but who will he get to support? Surely some auditions in the Shoulder of Mutton will tempt some local talent out of the woodwork.

With Steve Delaney, Mel Giedroyc, Dave Mounfield and Alastair Kerr.

A Komedia Entertainment/Smooth Operations production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00gkp2l)
Presented by Winifred Robinson.

Water companies have called on the government for a change in the law that would allow them to restrict the flow of water to homes of persistent bill evaders.

A consumer trial of domestic wind turbines found that they fell below manufacturers' expectations. We hear from Encraft, a consultancy that advises on environmentally friendly technologies and policy, on whether wind turbines are really any good at powering your home. The wind energy industry believes the research is flawed.

A report claims that 40 councils are planning 7000 redundancies across the UK. We hear from Sir Jeremy Beecham, vice chair of the Local Government Association, and from the BBC's Local Government Correspondent on how the public is likely to be affected.

Last year You and Yours reported on a sort of 'Dragon's Den' for social care at the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufacturers and Commerce, where five finalists pitched their ideas to an expert panel with funding to give. Melanie Abbott goes back to see what happened next.

We examine the predictions made by the retail research company Verdict about the future of high street retailing and hear from the director general of the British Retail Consortium.

The pest control group Rentokil reports that calls to tackle moths were up by a quarter across the UK last year. Aggie MacKenzie from How Clean Is Your House and Julia Dee from Total Wardrobe Care offer their advice on how to protect your home from moth damage.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00gkpgx)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00gkpld)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00gllns)
Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00gkqfd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b007nf3v)
Smoke and Mirrors

Paul B Davies's black comedy is based on real events.

The Great Kalanag, Adolf Hitler's favourite conjuror, is touring America during the 1950s when he is confronted by his dubious past in Nazi Germany. Has he used the skills of a magician, in particular the techniques of misdirection, to create an illusion of his entire career?

Kalanag ...... Geoffrey Durham.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b00gllnv)
Vincent Duggleby and guests answer calls on insurance. He is joined by Hayley Parsons from Gocompare.com, Malcolm Tarling of the Association of British Insurers and Peter Staddon of the British Insurance Brokers' Association.


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00gnfl1)
The Other Garden and Collected Stories by Francis Wyndham

Dear Derek

Stories by short fiction writer Francis Wyndham, recalling England in the 1940s.

Agatha is drawn to her young cousin Phillip when he comes to stay, but should she really be snooping in his bedroom? Read by Emily Woof.


WED 15:45 The Flight from Tehran: British-Iranians 30 Years On (b00gkrtw)
An Ordinary Life

Exiles from the Iranian revolution talk to British-Iranian writer David Mattin about leaving their homeland and family behind to make a new life in Britain.

David meets middle-class Iranians for whom a new life in the UK often meant limited job prospects, financial insecurity, and a sudden loss of social status. One, a successful builder, left his wife and daughter in Tehran and ended up in Manchester. Lonely and with little English, he had to work nights, selling pizza and kebabs.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00glnb1)
Moral Relativism

MORAL RELATIVISM
Different cultures have different beliefs, so what gives us the right to judge the behaviour of other people in a world where moralities often conflict? Is there a universal human standard of right and wrong, or does culture explain and excuse behaviour that other peoples might find abhorrent? How should the anthropologist understand cannibalism? Can a cultural context excuse female genital mutilation?

Laurie Taylor is joined by Professor Steven Lukes, author of a book on moral relativism, Henrietta Moore, Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Cambridge and Professor Conor Gearty, Professor of Human Rights Law at the London School of Economics, to discuss relationship of culture and morality in the debate on a universal notion of human rights.


WED 16:30 Case Notes (b00glj3v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00gkvsx)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gkvv0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


WED 18:30 Will Smith's Midlife Crisis Management (b00glnb3)
Episode 5

Comedy series in which comedian Will Smith seeks help and advice - primarily from his godfather Peter - on coping with the onset of middle age.

To help Will become less cautious, Peter asks rock singer Alex to advise him. Will surprises Alex by revealing that he was once in a band himself.

Will ...... Will Smith
Peter ...... Roger Allam
Alex ...... Dan Tetsell
Dan ...... Roger Drew
Stripper ...... Manjeet Mann
Stag ...... Paul Rider.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00gkqfg)
Ruth and David find the time at last to go out for their anniversary meal. They both enjoy it and look forward to the coming years on the farm together.

Jazzer is despondent because he's getting nowhere with the lovely Hannah. He cries on Kenton's shoulder, and Kenton encourages him to keep trying. Jazzer decides he will.

Ryan is thrilled to have been successful with his job application, and he thanks Alistair for the reference he gave. It made all the difference. Alistair is pleased and feels vindicated, after his dilemma about whether to write it or not.

After the Gamblers Anonymous meeting, they bump into Kenton in the street. Alistair introduces him to Ryan, and Kenton has a feeling he's met Ryan somewhere before. Ryan doesn't remember him though. When Ryan's gone, Kenton asks if he's the young man Alistair has been helping. Alistair admits that it is - but things are going well. He lets slip that he wrote the reference, and Kenton is taken aback. What does Alistair actually know about Ryan? Alistair says he knows as much as he needs to. Why can't Kenton just trust his judgement?

Episode written by Simon Frith.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00gkvwm)
Presented by Mark Lawson.

Writer Martin Amis speaks to Mark about an exhibition of photographs from the private collection of his former fiancee Angela Gorgas.

A new encyclopaedia of British crime writing is published next month. Mark is joined by its editor, Barry Forshaw, and crime writer Martyn Waites takes a look at his own entry.

Nick Hytner, artistic director of the National Theatre in London, has revealed his plans for the theatre for 2009. In a time where cash is scarce and sponsorship drying up, where does that leave this institution?

Director Jonathan Demme talks about returning to fiction for his new film Rachel Getting Married, starring Anne Hathaway, Rosemarie De Witt and Debra Winger.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00gp32p)
Dear Mr Spectator

Episode 3

Dramatised by Elizabeth Kuti from by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele's 18th century 'Spectator' essays.

With financial crisis in the air and his business in peril, Gilbert decides to head for the coffee-house and consult Mr Spectator.

Mr Spectator ...... Benjamin Whitrow
Gilbert ...... Richard Lumsden
Kitty ...... Amy Marston
Jonathan ...... Sam Troughton
Coffee boy ...... Samuel Barnett
Leticia ...... Sarah Kants
Freddie ...... Richard Dormer
Stockjobbers ...... Miche Doherty, Mark Lambert

Directed by Heather Larmour.


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b00glndk)
Privacy

Clive Anderson presents the series analysing the legal issues of the day.

Max Mosley's successful court action against News of the World for invading his privacy has sent shockwaves through the newspaper world, which fears that this and earlier judgements will inhibit investigative journalism. How can the courts balance the conflicting rights of privacy and freedom of speech?


WED 20:45 Schumpeter Rising (b00glndm)
Hedge fund manager Hugh Hendry argues that in the present economic crisis it is the Austrian economist Joseph Schumpeter and not his British rival John Maynard Keynes that we should be heeding. Famous for the term 'creative destruction', the larger-than-life duel fighting, womanising Schumpeter believed that innovators rather than government were essential to economic recovery.


WED 21:00 State of Mind (b00glnj7)
Altered States

Claudia Hammond tells the story of mental health care in the UK from the 1950s to the present day and explores, with the help of listeners' testimonies, how treatment and understanding of mental illness has changed over the past 50 years.

The 1960s saw anti-psychiatrists including RD Laing question the notion of insanity, believing madness to be a special state. Claudia visits one of only two remaining NHS residential therapeutic communities, the Cassel Service in Richmond, Surrey, and goes to Bradford to meet the members of Sharing Voices, a community development approach to mental health services.


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00gllnl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00gkw3l)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00gkw4r)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00gr4cj)
One Morning Like A Bird

Episode 3

Michael Maloney reads from the novel by Andrew Miller set in Tokyo during World War II.

For Alissa Feneon and Yuji, a visit to the theatre is just the start of the evening.


WED 23:02 The Cornwell Estate (b00glqw2)
Series 1

Mike Duggan

The ups and downs of life on a fictional housing estate, told from the perspective of characters played by the comedian Phil Cornwell.

Veteran musician Mike Duggan makes ends meet by giving guitar lessons in a local school. But then a record company boss offers the him chance of a recording contract.


WED 23:15 The Ladies (b00gdhnr)
Series 1

Episode 4

Series of comedy sketches by Emily Watson Howes set in a ladies' public toilet, featuring various female characters as they come and go.

Audrey has personal toilet problems of her own as a neurotic Egyptologist tries to come to terms with her heavy workload.

With Emily Watson Howes, Kate Donmall, Suzanne Hislop, Fran Moulds.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00gkxmz)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Robert Orchard.



THURSDAY 15 JANUARY 2009

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00gj81z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00h3m97)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gj867)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gj87w)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gj89y)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00gj8nx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gj8s8)
Daily prayer and reflection with Denis Rice.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00gj8v0)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.


THU 06:00 Today (b00gj92z)
Presented by John Humphrys and Sarah Montague.

Chief exec of HMV Simon Fox says the company had their 'biggest ever Christmas' despite the recession.

Chief economist at ECU Group Neil Mackinnon discusses the difficulty in setting interest rates for 16 countries.

Israeli spokesman Mark Regev says Hamas is being blamed for orchestrating the Gaza crisis.

Shadow Transport Secretary Theresa Villiers and Baroness Valentine, of business group London First, discuss if the third runway at Heathrow should go ahead.

Dale Vince, founder of wind farm operator Ecotricity, says UFOs have not been ruled out of an inquiry into a damaged wind turbine.

Health minister Lord Darzi says there should be 19 checks on a patient before a surgical incision is made.

Thought for the day with the Rev Angela Tilby.

Former policy holder Anne Berry and pensions advisor Ros Altmann discuss government plans to compensate savers who lost money in Equitable Life.

Richard Lambert of the CBI and economist Ben Broadbent discuss how to stop unemployment rising.

Baroness Vadera has been criticised as 'living in a parallel universe' after she claimed to be seeing a few 'green shoots' of recovery in the economy. Nick Robinson looks at her career.

Rebecca Jones and Mark Kermode discuss the nominations for the BAFTA Film Awards.

Author Deborah Moggach discusses the difficulties she faced in caring for her mother during her dementia.

Peter Sutherland, former chief of the WTO, discusses a campaign for the euro to be adopted.

Mike Thomson discusses developments in Eastern Congo.

Journalist Matthew Parris discusses memorable gaffes made by politicians.

Beijing correspondent James Reynolds and author Mark Leonard discuss China's ability to survive as economic growth slows.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00glr78)
Thoreau and the American Idyll

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the 19th century American writer and philosopher, Henry David Thoreau. Anti-slavery activist and passionate environmentalist, Thoreau was above all a champion of self-reliance and individualism. He was also a champion of the simple life, a lover of nature and an enemy of the modern who lived alone in a log cabin in the woods away from society. In his seminal work, Walden, published in 1854, he wrote: “I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life.” Thoreau has become emblematic of one version of American values and his work has been an inspiration to politicians and writers alike, from Martin Luther King to Gandhi, Yeats and Tolstoy. Yet in many ways Thoreau remains a mystery, a man of contradictions who advocated self-sufficiency but was happy to let his mother do his washing and cook his meals.With Kathleen Burk, Professor of American History at University College London; Tim Morris, Lecturer in American Literature at the University of Dundee; Stephen Fender, Honorary Professor in English Literature at University College London.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00h3m99)
The Rest is Noise - Listening to the 20th Century

Episode 4

Julian Rhind Tutt reads from music critic Alex Ross's history of 20th-century music. The psychological realism of Peter Grimes and Britten's relationship with Peter Pears.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00gp372)
Edna O'Brien on Byron; Women in Obama's government

Author Edna O'Brien on Lord Byron. Plus the women in the Obama administration, and inventor Emily Cummins on why more women don't go into technical professions.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b00glr7b)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.


THU 11:30 Triple Espresso, Marinetti and the Futurists (b00gm2y6)
Art critic Richard Cork tells the story of the Futurist movement and its founder, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti. Featuring recordings of Marinetti himself and the music of composer and fellow Futurist Luigi Russolo.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00gkp2q)
Presented by Winifred Robinson.

If the government gives the go-ahead to Heathrow airport's expansion, the village of Sipson will be demolished. We hear from local people about the impact this would have on their lives.

Southern Cross Healthcare is ordered to pay 80,000 pounds after an 82-year-old woman fell from a first floor window at one of its homes.

Reporting from the last day for bids for outfits owned by the failed Yorkshire stage supplier Homburgs, with each one up for grabs to members of the public.

Gazprom has a sixth of the world's gas reserves. Who is behind it and what are its intentions?

Police in West Lothian branded a pilot project banning weekend off licence sales to the under-21s a success. Now the Scottish government would like to extend the ban to all Scottish off licences at all times.

Plans for a third runway at London's Heathrow airport include a high speed rail line linking Heathrow with London and Birmingham. But would having a new high speed rail service mean that more passengers will choose rail travel over air?


THU 12:57 Weather (b00gkpgz)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00gkplg)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Costing the Earth (b00gl57w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Monday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00gkqfg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b00gm2y8)
Torch No. 1

By David Pownall.

Monologue exploring the mind and motives of the young Czech student, Jan Palach, who set fire to himself in the centre of Prague 40 years ago.

Jan Palach ...... Karl Davies

Directed by Martin Jenkins.


THU 15:02 Open Country (b00gh896)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00ghq1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00gnfl3)
The Other Garden and Collected Stories by Francis Wyndham

Matchlight

Francis Wyndam's three stories of desire and yearning during the dark days of the second world war are matchless in tone and nuance. They centre on the young and old, on those upstairs and downstairs, on those in town and country...

3. Matchlight

After a dull night at the cinema, she is mysteriously
approached by someone on the way home...

Reader Amanda Root.
Producer Duncan Minshull.


THU 15:45 The Flight from Tehran: British-Iranians 30 Years On (b00gkrty)
Sister, Guard Your Veil

Exiles from the Iranian revolution talk to British-Iranian writer David Mattin about leaving their homeland and family behind to make a new life in Britain.

David hears how women's lives changed dramatically under the Ayatollah's regime and why, with modifications to family law and enforced adoption of the hijab in public, some women felt they had to leave. That included a bookish young girl who had been educated abroad and found herself on trial when she applied for a job at the university.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00ghrlb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00gm2yb)
Medical Micro Machines - The Superorganism

Medical Micro Machines
In the 1966 film Fantastic Voyage, a motley crew of medics and glamorous assistants jumped aboard the submarine Proteus before being miniaturised and sent off into the body of Jan Benes.

Their mission was to remove a potentially fatal blood clot from his brain, and the idea of treating people with mini machines has been in our collective psyche ever since. Despite being unable to shrink either people or submarines, researchers are successfully combining biology with mechanics and electronics.

Professor Tony Turner from Cranfield University joins Quentin Cooper to discuss the world of biosensors – where special molecules read the make up of our bodily fluids and pass the information to electronic devices. But to keep all these devices running, we need more power.

So project leader Martin McHugh and researchers from Southampton University have developed a battery that’s powered by the heart. Both guests discuss this new frontier in medicine – including where it’s going, safety issues, and the public response to fusing man and machine.

The Superorganism
Ants are remarkable examples of miniaturisation. In computer terms, they pack a surprising processing power into a small space. But as animals go, they are still quite simple, relying on instinctive, repetitive behaviours.

But an ant colony is very different and can display complex behaviour and what looks like planning and even creativity far beyond the knowledge and capacity of any individual ant. According to biologists E.O.Wilson and Bert Hölldobler, writing in a new book, an ant colony is an example of a ‘superorganism’.

Altruistic cooperation, complex communication and division of labour all contribute to the biological organisation that transforms a colony of individuals into a superorganism. Research into the superorganism provides a deep look into a part of the living world hitherto glimpsed by only a few. Ants, termites, bees all make the transformation to superorganism.Could human society be going the same way?

Quentin is joined by Bert Hölldobler from Arizona State University and Charlotte Sleigh from the University of Kent, author of ‘Ant’ and ‘Six Legs Better’ and an expert on the history of the study of these fascinating creatures.


THU 17:00 PM (b00gkvsz)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gkvv2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


THU 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b00dv2p1)
Series 5

The CV of Dorian Gray

Comedy series by Christopher Douglas and Andrew Nickolds.

Ed Reardon, author, pipe smoker, consummate fare-dodger and master of the abusive email, attempts to survive in a world where the media seems to be run by idiots and lying charlatans.

It's time for Ed to drag out the old jeans, buy a mobile phone and cut ten years off the CV as the new Head of New Media Development is a genuine 12 year old.

Ed Reardon ...... Christopher Douglas
Olive ...... Stephanie Cole
Felix ...... John Fortune
George ...... Simon Greenall
Copper ...... Martin Hyder
Jaz ...... Philip Jackson
Pearl ...... Rita May
Ping ...... Barunka O'Shaughnessy
Market Researcher ...... Nicola Sanderson
Marcus ...... Richard Smith
Stan ...... Geoffrey Whitehead.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00gkqfj)
Brian meets up with the supermarket buyer who has approached him about Tom's sausages. In a robust discussion, Gareth insists on a low selling price, telling Brian that the increased sales will mean that their profits remain secure despite the small margin.

Brian goes back to Home Farm still keen to take up the offer, but Jennifer is extremely worried that he is doing all this behind Tom's back. Brian's going to do a bit more research, but he's sure they can still make a decent profit. Jennifer says it's not her he's got to convince, it's Tom.

Alan and Usha finally let Blossom Hill Cottage to a couple about to marry. Usha goes out for a run and Alan arranges to meet her half way.

Shula has a lot of thinking to do, and goes out for a long ride. She is worried about the stables, and has realised that she is going to have to cut hours for some of the staff. She's not helped when she meets up with Alan and Usha. Usha is polite and civil, but it's still uncomfortable. Later, Alistair tries to console her.

Episode written by Simon Frith.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00gkvwp)
Presented by Mark Lawson.

Authors Tim Lott and Lisa Gee review the revival of the Lionel Bart musical Oliver! starring Rowan Atkinson.

British actor Toby Jones discusses his Hollywood work, his role in an ambitious revival of Tom Stoppard's Every Good Boy Deserves Favour at the National Theatre, and playing the lead in the BBC Radio 4 production of John Irving's A Prayer for Owen Meany.

Will Smith's latest film, Seven Pounds, sees him playing a US tax agent with a dark secret. Jenny McCartney gives her verdict.

Barack Obama will become the 44th President of the United States but only the third President to commission a poet to recite a piece of work during the inauguration ceremony. Former US Poet Laureate Billy Collins discusses the pressure of writing a poem for such an occasion and how the previous inaugural poems have measured up.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00gp374)
Dear Mr Spectator

Episode 4

Dramatised by Elizabeth Kuti from by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele's 18th century 'Spectator' essays.

Encouraged by Mr Spectator and Kitty, Gilbert buys some new-fangled Perspective Glasses, only to discover that they give him a rather shocking viewpoint of his nearest and dearest.

Mr Spectator ...... Benjamin Whitrow
Gilbert ...... Richard Lumsden
Kitty ...... Amy Marston
Jonathan ...... Sam Troughton
Coffee boy ...... Samuel Barnett
Spectacle inventor ...... Chris McHallem
Signior Niccolini ...... Mike Doherty
Lion ...... Richard Dormer

Directed by Heather Larmour.


THU 20:00 Investigation (b00gm35g)
Series 6

Episode 1

Simon Cox investigates the UN's principal human rights body, the Human Rights Council. He examines accusations that it is weak and subject to political manipulation and asks if it is achieving its aim of protecting people from violence and persecution.


THU 20:30 In Business (b00gm3bh)
Cracked China

Peter Day reports from China's heartland manufacturing cities on the global strains in the world's most vibrant economy, as hundreds of factories close and workers are laid off.


THU 21:00 The Line Between Life and Death (b00gm510)
Episode 2

Jonathan Miller explores the complex questions that arise from trying to define death.

He explores some of the difficult questions about exactly when the transition from life to death occurs. Are we dead when our hearts stops or when our brain has died, and what does brain death mean? Jonathan considers how medical technology has changed the process of dying and how controversies around defining death based on the heart or the brain have had an impact on organ donation and transplantion.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00glr78)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00gkw3n)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00gkw4t)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig. Including reports on Gordon Brown's diplomatic intervention into the Central European gas supply row, Israeli forces' attacks on the UN and the Africans who love President Bush.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00gr4cm)
One Morning Like A Bird

Episode 4

Michael Maloney reads from the novel by Andrew Miller set in Tokyo during World War II.

Yuji meets the mysterious novelist Ishihara, as the wars in Europe and China move ever closer to home.


THU 23:00 Recorded for Training Purposes (b00gm512)
Series 3

Episode 2

Sketch show about modern communication and contemporary obsessions. With Ben Willbond and Rachel Atkins.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2009.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00gkxn1)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Robert Orchard.



FRIDAY 16 JANUARY 2009

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00gj834)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00h3m99)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00gj869)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00gj87y)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00gj8b0)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00gj8nz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00gj8sb)
Daily prayer and reflection with Denis Rice.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00gj8v2)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00gj931)
Presented by John Humphrys and Sarah Montague.

Housing minister Margaret Beckett discusses a government scheme aimed at helping homeowners facing repossession.

David Gleave, of Aviation Safety Investigations, says how he thinks the airliner crash in New York, in which all on board survived, was caused.

Vice-President of the EC Guenter Verheugen wants member states to work on a rescue plan for industry.

Karen Allen investigates calls from East Africa for Barack Obama to break with current US policy.

Robert Peston talks to Roger Carr, Chairman of Cadbury's, about the rewards given to company executives despite falls in performance.

Sarah Mukherjee discovers if catchers are making money out of molehills.

Thought for the day with writer Rhidian Brook.

June Kelly reports on the UK residents claiming compensation from Libya after suffering from IRA terrorism.

Rex Baintain says a lack of consumers is harming his business. Buyout expert Jon Moulton discusses whether the government should subsidise the manufacturing industry.

Robert Peston discusses the takeover of Merrill Lynch by the Bank of America.

Nicola Stanbridge considers the legacy of the London Astoria.

Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change Greg Clarke discusses the billion pounds the Tories would invest in improving power distribution.

Michael Portillo and Antony Beevor discuss revisiting a nation's history.

Israeli spokesman Mark Regev says that 'Hamas is going to have a real problem with public opinion'. Palestinian PM Dr Salam Fayyad says that talks for a ceasefire must happen without rocket fire taking place.

Maurice Frankel, director of the Campaign for the Freedom on Information, discusses how much information MPs should disclose about spending.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00ghq25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00h3m9c)
The Rest is Noise - Listening to the 20th Century

Episode 5

Julian Rhind Tutt reads from music critic Alex Ross's history of 20th-century music. John Cage, John Adams and the birth of political opera with Nixon in China.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00gp3bp)
Children of drug abusers; Race jockey Hayley Turner

How much is being done to help the children and families of drug addicts? Plus growing up in the 1950s, and race jockey and sports personality of the year Hayley Turner.


FRI 11:00 Time and Tide: The Severn Barrage (b00gm5zv)
Miriam O'Reilly explores the viability of the Severn barrage project, potentially the biggest, most expensive and most controversial source of sustainable energy in the UK.

It could supply five per cent of our energy needs, but building it has a ten million-ton carbon footprint and a price tag of 15 billion pounds. It could supply clean, renewable energy for the next 100 years, but its construction would wipe out fragile and unique wildlife habitats and unpick European conservation legislation.

Miriam speaks to politicians, environmentalists and engineers to gauge the current mood and the future prospects of the project.


FRI 11:30 The Castle (b00gm5zx)
Series 2

Is This a Turnip That I See Before Me?

Hie ye to "The Castle", a rollicking sitcom set way back then, starring James Fleet ("The Vicar Of Dibley", "Four Weddings & A Funeral") and Neil Dudgeon ("Life Of Riley")

As the old showbiz saying goes, never work with children, animals or a high-speed turnip and a mead spittoon

Cast:
Sir John Woodstock ..... James Fleet
Sir William De Warenne ..... Neil Dudgeon
Lady Anne Woodstock ..... Montserrat Lombard
Cardinal Duncan ...... Jonathan Kydd
Lady Charlotte ..... Ingrid Oliver
Master Henry Woodstock ..... Steven Kynman
Merlin ..... Lewis Macleod

Written by Kim Fuller with additional material by Paul Alexander
Music by Guy Jackson

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00gkp2s)
Presented by Peter White.

Top Gear magazine's Paul Regan reports on the North American International Car Show in Detroit. Are greener models now taking centre stage? Also joining the programme is Professor Karel Williams from Manchester Business School, who specialises in analysing the motor industry.

Should we be booking summer holidays now, or waiting to see how the holiday market, as well as our personal financial situations, develop? Tim Williamson, customer director for Thomsons and First Choice, and Chris Haslam, a Sunday Times travel writer, give their views.

Everton Football Club is hoping to move from its home at Goodison Park to Kirkby, just outside Liverpool. We hear the arguments for and against the relocation.

Jane MacQuitty, wine correspondent for The Times, talks through budget wines for the credit crunch and what we can expect from the industry in 2009.

How can first class travel survive the recession? A look at the ways transport providers are trying out new ways of getting their passengers to upgrade.

Regulations for new charities. Looking at a fundraiser in Manchester.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00gkph1)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00gkplj)
National and international news with Brian Hanrahan.


FRI 13:30 More or Less (b00gm5zz)
Politics Special

Politics Special
Tim Harford is joined by Vince Cable MP, Charles Clarke MP and the Spectator's political editor Fraser Nelson to discuss the use and abuse of numbers in politics.

Their political qualifications speak for themselves, of course, but what about their knowledge of numbers?

Vince Cable MP, the Chief Treasury Spokesman for the Liberal Democrats, used to teach economics at Glasgow University and later went on to become the Chief Economist at Shell.

Maths runs in the family for former Secretary of State for education and Home Secretary Charles Clarke MP, whose father was a mathematician and grandfather a maths teacher.

Lastly, self-confessed maths geek and political editor of Spectator magazine Fraser Nelson loves picking apart Gordon Brown's figures and had his biggest journalistic scoop in exposing the true figure of life expectancy of Glasgow.

But how does an interest in numbers affect their work and how do they view their use in politics and policy?

To find out, Tim Harford discusses New Labour's rallying cry of "What works", and asks what role research and evidence should have in Government policy making.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00gkqfj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b00gm601)
The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

The Ferrers Documents

Series of four new tales of mystery and murder by Bert Coules, inspired by the stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

What is the link between a slum landlord, a missing witness and a break-in at 221B Baker Street? In a case with no leads, the most important clue is that there are no clues at all.

Sherlock Holmes ...... Clive Merrison
Dr John Watson ...... Andrew Sachs
Lestrade ...... Stephen Thorne
Dawkins ...... Thomas Arnold
Ferrers ...... Jonathan Tafler
Alice ...... Donnla Hughes
George ...... Gunnar Cauthery
Mrs Radcliffe ...... Janice Acquah
Johnson ...... Dan Starkey

Directed by Patrick Rayner.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00gm603)
Peter Gibbs chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Pippa Greenwood, Bob Flowerdew and Matthew Biggs answer the questions posed by gardeners in Hertfordshire.

Including the Gardeners' Question Time gardening weather forecast.


FRI 15:45 The Flight from Tehran: British-Iranians 30 Years On (b00gkrv0)
Children of the Revolution

Exiles from the Iranian revolution talk to British-Iranian writer David Mattin about leaving their homeland and family behind to make a new life in Britain.

David discovers how a generation that has grown up both British and Iranian has coped with its dual identity. Including an interview with the son of a political satirist who was unable to return to Iran. He recalls a time when Scotland Yard warned his father that he was a target for assassination and regrets the rifts that the revolution caused among the Iranian community in Britain.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00gm62f)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00gm62h)
Mickey Rourke, the star of Angel Heart and 9 And A Half Weeks discusses his come-back that was crowned with a Golden Globe award this year.

The director and writer of Milk, Gus Van Sant and Dustin Lance Black, reveal what awards will mean to their bio-pic of the first openly gay man to be elected into public office in the United States.

Duane Hopkins, the debut director of the acclaimed drama Better Things discusses the reasons why he works with non-professional actors.

Arnaud Desplechin, one of France's leading directors discusses the concept of high culture, philosophy and The Bourne Ultimatum.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00gkvt1)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00gkvv4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b00gm62k)
Series 67

Episode 2

Sandi Toksvig chairs the topical comedy quiz, with panellists Francis Wheen, Sue Perkins, Carrie Quinlan and Jeremy Hardy.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00gkqfl)
Encouraged by Kenton, Jazzer tries once more with Hannah. He can offer her a night of passion like she's never had before. Amused, Hannah turns him down, using her mother's advice to soften the blow. She was brought up never to mix business with pleasure, she says. Jazzer has to be content with being friends.

Mike shows Jennifer proudly round the extension to Willow Farm, which is now his very own Willow Cottage. It's been cleverly done and she's impressed.

Brian sounds out Hannah to see if she'd be interested in doing a bit of work at odd times round her college course. He also checks with Neil about the availability of good quality pig meat in the local area. Neil thinks he could come up with names for some suppliers. Jennifer is getting more and more worried. Brian is doing all this without telling Tom - she's sure he's just putting it off. But Brian says he's just getting as many facts as he can. When Tom sees what a great opportunity this is, he'll come round.

Episode written by Simon Frith.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00gkvwr)
Presented by Kirsty Lang.

Author Hisham Matar , who spent several years of his childhood in Egypt, takes a look at a new Egyptian gallery at the British Museum.

Joanne Stefani Germanotta, otherwise known as Lady GaGa, talks to Kirsty about her journey to the top. She is currently supporting the Pussycat Dolls on their world tour.

Crime writer Mark Billingham reviews Stockwell, ITV's new docudrama that recreates the tragic chain of events leading up to the shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes on the London Underground in July 2005.

Spring Awakening is the musical adaptation of Frank Wedekind's controversial play from 1891 which has taken Broadway by storm, winning eight Tony Awards. Kirsty meets writer Stephen Sater and director Michael Mayer to discuss how they have successfully brought a 19th Century work to 21st Century audiences.

Dramatist, novelist and barrister Sir John Mortimer has died at the age of 85. Mark Lawson talks to the creator of Rumpole of the Bailey in an excerpt from an interview recorded in 2005.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00gp3br)
Dear Mr Spectator

Episode 5

Dramatised by Elizabeth Kuti from by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele's 18th-century 'Spectator' essays.

As his fortieth birthday arrives, Gilbert's world seems to be in pieces, but perhaps things are not all that they appear.

Mr Spectator ...... Benjamin Whitrow
Gilbert ...... Richard Lumsden
Kitty ...... Amy Marston
Jonathan ...... Sam Troughton
Coffee boy ...... Samuel Barnett
Gravedigger ...... Chris McHallem
Isabel ...... Emma Bolger
Jacob ...... Daniel Walsh
Aggie ...... Laura Conway

Directed by Heather Larmour.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00gm683)
On the eve of a new American presidency, Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate from The George Washington University in Washington, DC. The panel includes journalist Christopher Hitchens, Republican Renee Amoore, political analyst Thomas E Mann and former chief of staff to Colin Powell, Colonel Larry Wilkerson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00gm685)
A weekly reflection on a topical issue from Harold Evans.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b00g45y4)
The Forgotten

Bee has been suffering alarming lapses of memory, losing time and numbers, and is forced to return home to live with her mother May and niece Thea. Desperate to understand Bee and what is happening to her May and Thea begin reading Bee's private notebooks, while Bee becomes increasingly frustrated with her inability to function in the world. There is something important she has forgotten.
And then one day, in the park, she meets a rather odd creature, known only as The Forgotten. A mysterious being, he declares to Bee that he is all the things she has forgotten, the memories and experiences she tries to piece together in understanding what is happening to her.
Taking her on a journey through her disparate memories we travel into Bee's increasingly isolated and solitary world, to explore where the mind might go when enslaved by a dementia that will not let it function meaningfully with the world, and to discover what secret it is that Bee has 'forgotten'.
Writer
Anne Devlin is an award-winning dramatist and screen writer. Her film and TV credits include 'Vigo', 'Titanic Town', 'The Venus de Milo Instead' 'Naming the Names' and dramatisations of 'Wuthering Heights' and 'The Rainbow', while her stage plays include 'After Easter', 'Heartlanders' and 'Ourselves Alone'. Anne adapted some of her screenplays for radio 'After Easter' (1997), 'Naming The Names' (1986) and 'The Long March' (1986).

All other parts were performed by members of the cast.
'The Forgotten' was written by Anne Devlin and directed in Belfast by Heather Larmour.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00gkw3q)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00gkw4w)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00gr4cp)
One Morning Like A Bird

Episode 5

Michael Maloney reads from the novel by Andrew Miller set in Tokyo during World War II.

Yuji's friend Junzo has enlisted in the war, but while one young man prepares to fight in China, another is soon to return from the front.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b00glbyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00gkxn3)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Mark D'Arcy.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00gkvz6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00gp30g)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00gp32p)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00gp374)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00gp3br)

28 Acts in 28 Minutes 23:00 TUE (b008khpv)

A Celestial Star in Piccadilly 11:30 TUE (b00gl694)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00gf5df)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00gm685)

A View Through a Lens 14:45 SUN (b00ghrfd)

Advertising: The Most Fun You Can Have With Your Clothes On! 20:00 MON (b00gl57t)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00glbkx)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00gnfl1)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00gnfl3)

Anthony Trollope - Orley Farm 21:00 SAT (b00g9f9q)

Anthony Trollope - Orley Farm 15:00 SUN (b00ghrhb)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00gh9dd)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00gf2g9)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00gm683)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00ghmdp)

Archive on 4 15:00 MON (b00ghmdp)

Art Made in China 05:45 SAT (b008th9c)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00ghmzh)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00ghmzh)

Belsen After Belsen 13:30 SUN (b00f6q66)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b00gl57p)

Beyond Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00gq5vl)

Black Students in Red Russia 11:00 WED (b00gllnn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00gkwkg)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00gr4p2)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00gr4cj)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00gr4cm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00gr4cp)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00gh4fv)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00gkkw3)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00gkkw3)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00h3m95)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00h3m95)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00h3m97)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00h3m97)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00h3m99)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00h3m99)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00h3m9c)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b00gb0bw)

Brain of Britain 13:30 MON (b00gl57m)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00ghq21)

Broken Arts 18:30 TUE (b00glbyx)

Case Notes 21:00 TUE (b00glj3v)

Case Notes 16:30 WED (b00glj3v)

Costing the Earth 21:00 MON (b00gl57w)

Costing the Earth 13:30 THU (b00gl57w)

Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! 11:30 WED (b00gllnq)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b00gdjvc)

David Cook - Walter Now 14:30 SAT (b00gh9dg)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00ghq25)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00ghq25)

Drama 14:15 MON (b007rgnn)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b007sq3m)

Drama 14:15 WED (b007nf3v)

Drama 14:15 THU (b00gm2y8)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b00gm601)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 THU (b00dv2p1)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00gh89j)

Farming Today This Week 06:30 SAT (b00gh898)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00gj8vg)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00gj8tw)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00gj8ty)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00gj8v0)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00gj8v2)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b00g45y4)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00gh8f7)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b00glr7b)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00gkvx4)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00gkvwk)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00gkvwm)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00gkvwp)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00gkvwr)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00gdzkc)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b00gm603)

Go4it 19:15 SUN (b00gj7s2)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b00glbyv)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b00glbyv)

Home Planet 15:00 TUE (b00glbkf)

Hot House Kids 11:00 MON (b00gkz12)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b00gdyk8)

In Business 20:30 THU (b00gm3bh)

In Living Memory 23:02 SUN (b00cb4ht)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00glr78)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00glr78)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00glc61)

Investigation 20:00 THU (b00gm35g)

Just a Minute 12:00 SUN (b00gbc96)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b00gl57r)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00gf2dm)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00gm62f)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00ghmby)

Maadai-Kara 23:30 SAT (b00g9fp9)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00gm2yb)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00gf5rd)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00ghmz3)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00gj832)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00gj81v)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00gj81x)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00gj81z)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00gj834)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00gllnl)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00gllnl)

Money Box Live 15:00 WED (b00gllnv)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00gh8f9)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00gh8f9)

Money Can't Buy You Class? 11:00 TUE (b00gl692)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b00gdz3t)

More or Less 13:30 FRI (b00gm5zz)

Music Feature 15:30 SAT (b00gkz7q)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00gf5rn)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00ghmzf)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00gj8p3)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00gj8nr)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00gj8nt)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00gj8nx)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00gj8nz)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00ghmzk)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00gf5rs)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00ghmzt)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00ghq1x)

News 13:00 SAT (b00gh8ff)

Obama: Professor President 17:00 SUN (b00gfqbd)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b00ghmzp)

Online Damage: Porn in the 21st Century 20:00 TUE (b00glc5z)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00ghrlb)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00ghrlb)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00gh896)

Open Country 15:02 THU (b00gh896)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00ghmbm)

PM 17:00 MON (b00gkvtv)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00gkvsv)

PM 17:00 WED (b00gkvsx)

PM 17:00 THU (b00gkvsz)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00gkvt1)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00gj7ry)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b00ghrld)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00gf5rq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00gj8sg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00gj8s4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00gj8s6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00gj8s8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00gj8sb)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b00ghmdk)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b00ghmdk)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b00ghmdk)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00ghq1s)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00ghq1s)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00ghq1s)

Recorded for Training Purposes 23:00 THU (b00gm512)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00gh89g)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00ghmdm)

Says on the Tin 11:30 MON (b00gl50p)

Schumpeter Rising 20:45 WED (b00glndm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00gf5rj)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00ghmz9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00gj89r)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00gj87r)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00gj87t)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00gj87w)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00gj87y)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00gf5rg)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00gf5rl)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00ghmbr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00ghmz7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00ghmzc)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00gj7rr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00gj87p)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00gj8np)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00gj863)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00gj89t)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00gj865)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00gj89w)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00gj867)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00gj89y)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00gj869)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00gj8b0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00ghmbw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00gj7rw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00gkvwh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00gkvtx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00gkvv0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00gkvv2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00gkvv4)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00ghmzm)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00ghmzm)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00gkz10)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00gkz10)

State of Mind 21:00 WED (b00glnj7)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00ghq1z)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00ghq1q)

Take Two 13:30 TUE (b00gd1t2)

Taking a Stand 09:00 TUE (b00gl58x)

Taking a Stand 21:30 TUE (b00gl58x)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00ghq23)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00gj7s0)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00gj7s0)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00gkqfn)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00gkqfn)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00gkqfd)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00gkqfd)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00gkqfg)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00gkqfg)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00gkqfj)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00gkqfj)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00gkqfl)

The Castle 11:30 FRI (b00gm5zx)

The Cornwell Estate 23:02 WED (b00glqw2)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00gm62h)

The Flight from Tehran: British-Iranians 30 Years On 15:45 MON (b00gkqp3)

The Flight from Tehran: British-Iranians 30 Years On 15:45 TUE (b00gkrtt)

The Flight from Tehran: British-Iranians 30 Years On 15:45 WED (b00gkrtw)

The Flight from Tehran: British-Iranians 30 Years On 15:45 THU (b00gkrty)

The Flight from Tehran: British-Iranians 30 Years On 15:45 FRI (b00gkrv0)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00ghqw8)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00ghqw8)

The Fortune Hunters 09:30 TUE (b00gl690)

The Ladies 23:15 WED (b00gdhnr)

The Late Story 00:30 SUN (b007r96w)

The Line Between Life and Death 21:00 THU (b00gm510)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00gllns)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b00gf2dr)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b00gm62k)

The Railway Children 19:45 SUN (b00gj7s4)

The Shock of the Knee 10:30 SAT (b00gmdxp)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00ghr98)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00gkw50)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00gkw4p)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00gkw4r)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00gkw4t)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00gkw4w)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00gd5hs)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00glnb1)

Time and Tide: The Severn Barrage 11:00 FRI (b00gm5zv)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b00gkxmv)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00gkxmx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b00gkxmz)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b00gkxn1)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b00gkxn3)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00gh89d)

Today 06:00 MON (b00gjbc8)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00gj92v)

Today 06:00 WED (b00gj92x)

Today 06:00 THU (b00gj92z)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00gj931)

Triple Espresso, Marinetti and the Futurists 11:30 THU (b00gm2y6)

Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b00gd5hx)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b00glndk)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00gh894)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00gh89b)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00gh8fc)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00ghmbt)

Weather 22:00 SAT (b00ghmfb)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00ghmzr)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00ghq1v)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00ghr96)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00gj7rt)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00gj7s6)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00gkxtj)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00gkpl8)

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Weekend Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00ghmbk)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00gj7s8)

Will Smith's Midlife Crisis Management 18:30 WED (b00glnb3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00gkkw5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00gp2yd)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00gp32m)

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Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b00gd3dy)

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World at One 13:00 MON (b00gkpln)

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You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00gkp2z)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00gkp2j)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00gkp2l)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00gkp2q)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00gkp2s)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b00ghmbp)