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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 29 NOVEMBER 2008

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b00fmbrw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b00fpypf)
Arthur Miller

Episode 5

Henry Goodman reads from Christopher Bigsby's biography of the prominent American playwright.

The newly-married Miller and Marilyn Monroe are tested by a miscarriage and Monroe's emotional vulnerability. Miller attempts to halt the disintegration of their marriage by writing a screenplay for Monroe, The Misfits, but the filming of the movie has unintended consequences.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00fmbry)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00fmbs0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00fmbs2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b00fmbs4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00fmbs6)
Daily prayer and reflection with Alison Elliot.


SAT 05:45 A Voyage to Lundy (b008v8zf)
Episode 1

Writer and poet Gwyneth Lewis visits a remote island in the Bristol Channel as she contemplates a change in direction in her life.

She travels a long way close to home.

Producer: Penny Arnold

First heard on BBC Radio 4 in January 2008.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b00fn2gf)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b00fn2gh)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b00fn2tr)
Countryside magazine. Helen Mark visits Mourne in Northern Ireland, a place fabled in song and literature and mooted as the country's first national park.


SAT 06:35 Farming Today This Week (b00fn2tt)
News and issues in rural Britain, presented by Charlotte Smith.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b00fn2tx)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b00fn2tz)
Presented by Edward Stourton and James Naughtie.

Chris Morris gives the latest developments on the terror attacks in Mumbai.

Jonathan Head reports on the state of emergency in Thailand.

Stephanie Power reports from Croxteth Comprehensive, the only mixed comprehensive school in that area of Liverpool, which is facing closure following dwindling pupil numbers.

Chair of the Green party James Humphreys says the arrest of MP Damian Green looks like a terrible error.

Climate change experts Tom Delay and David Boomer discuss whether the green agenda can survive a recession.

Lynne Cadenhead, the Scottish entrepreneur who founded the board game Quest, discusses if the new Welsh, English and Irish versions will be as successful as the original.

Thought for the Day with Brian Draper, associate lecturer at the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity.

Alissa Johannsen Rubin, of the New York times, and Sir Jeremy Greenstock, former special envoy to Iraq, discuss the vote by Iraq to back a US pullout.

Chris Morris and Lt General Asad Durrani discuss who could be responsible for attacks in Mumbai.

Robert Pigott runs down the official list of the top 50 Christmas carols

Joint General Secretary of Unite Derek Simpson and Cabinet Office Minister Liam Byrne discuss what is next for New Labour

Chief executive of the RSC Dr Richard Pike says a competition about The Italian Job promotes the relevance of science.

Adam Brimelow reports on the new NHS service set up for gambling addicts.

Jonathan Head says the police are still not ready to move into airports taken over by Thai protestors.

Vincent Dowd looks at what went wrong with Woolworths.

Photojournalist David White discusses how Robert Howlett produced images of Brunel's great works.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b00fn2v1)
Real life stories in which listeners talk about the issues that matter to them. Presenter Peter Curran is joined by Pam Ayres. With poetry from Mat Harvey.


SAT 10:00 Excess Baggage (b00fn3fm)
Old Man on a Bike - The Snow Tourist

OLD MAN ON A BIKE – THE SNOW TOURIST
Sandi Toksvig meets Simon Gandolfi, who at the age of seventy three rode the length of South America on a motorbike. She also talks to Charlie English, Associate Editor at The Guardian, who’s fascination for snow transformed him into an enthusiastic ‘snow tourist’.


SAT 10:30 That's No Job for an Asian (b00fn3fp)
Yasmeen Khan explores the current state of British Asian comedy and asks whether the job of being a comedian has become an acceptable alternative to the more traditional professions of doctor, lawyer and accountant. She hears the views of both new and veteran comedians, including Sanjeev Bhaskar, Paul Sinha, Sajeela Kershi and Ahir Shah.


SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (b00fn3hq)
A look behind the scenes at Westminster with Jackie Ashley.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b00fn3jk)
BBC foreign correspondents with the stories behind the world's headlines. Introduced by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b00fn5ny)
Paul Lewis with the latest news from the world of personal finance. Why has Lord David Lipsey quit as chairman of the Financial Services Consumer Panel?


SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b00fm9tp)
Series 25

Episode 1

Comedy sketches and satirical comments from Steve Punt, Hugh Dennis and the team including Mitch Benn, Marcus Brigstocke, Laura Shavin and Jon Holmes.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b00fn5p0)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News Briefing (b00fn5p2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b00fm9wh)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate in Nottingham. The panel includes transport secretary Geoff Hoon MP, shadow Cabinet member David Willetts MP, deputy leader of the Liberal Democrats Vince Cable MP and leader of the Green Party Caroline Lucas MEP.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b00fn5p4)
Jonathan Dimbleby takes listeners' calls and emails in response to this week's edition of Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b00fn5p6)
Boscobel

A tense and thrilling dramatisation of a real-life escape story from Ian Curteis, starring Simon Woods (Cranford, Rome) as King Charles II.

Defeated in battle following the execution of his father, the future Charles II must flee England or die.

Over a thrilling 40-day journey, young Charles has much to learn - how to live rough, how to evade capture and how to earn the kindness of strangers.

Ian Curteis is a prolific writer for radio and television. His most well known play is The Falklands Play, the story of how Margaret Thatcher's government went to war with Argentina, which was first broadcast on both Radio 4 and BBC 4 to mark the 20th anniversary of the Falklands War.

Cast:
Charles II ..... Simon Woods
Derby/John Penderel ..... Kevin Eldon
Wilmot ..... Chris Larkin
George Penderel/Whitgreave ..... Simon Treves
Gifford/Woolf ..... Malcolm Brown
Carlis/Colonel ..... Stephen Carlile
Betty/Jane ..... Kate Sachs
Mrs Woolf/Cook ..... Jill Shilling

Director: Dirk Maggs
Writer: Ian Curteis

Producer: Rebecca Pinfield
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 15:30 Music Feature (b00fl05l)
Paying the Piper: The Coal-Man and the Hosier

John Florance investigates two unsung heroes of British cultural history: the hosiery manufacturer William Gardiner, who introduced the unknown Beethoven to England, and the coal merchant Thomas Britton, whose musical gatherings above his coal store in Clerkenwell attracted some of the greatest musicians of the late 17th and early 18th century and an audience that bridged the social divide.


SAT 16:00 Weekend Woman's Hour (b00fn5q7)
Highlights of this week's Woman's Hour programmes with Jane Garvey.

Including discussions on why more Down's syndrome babies are being born, the alternatives to women serving prison sentences and does being a working mother affect a child's subsequent life choices?

Plus news of the appointment to the Pakistani cabinet of two politicians accused of brutal attitudes toward women, the music of Sandy Denny and Fairport Convention 30 years on and new ways to cook with mince.


SAT 17:00 PM (b00fn5q9)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Carolyn Quinn, plus the sports headlines.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b00fmbsw)
The weekly interactive current affairs magazine featuring online conversation and debate.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00fn753)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b00fn755)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00fn757)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b00fn759)
Clive Anderson presents an eclectic mix of conversation, comedy and music. He is joined by Samuel West, Michael Cockerell and Professor Brian Cox, and Rachael Stirling talks to Danielle McCormick about car maintenance for girls. Plus music from Keane and Oleta Adams and comedy from Doc Brown.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b00fn75c)
Series 5

Pins and Needles

Series in which writers create a fictional response to the week's news.

As Afghan farmers and tribal elders try to beat the opium trade by exporting pomegranates rather than poppies, writer Jeff Young and musician Pete Wylie explore the impact on the streets of Liverpool.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b00fn77k)
Clint Eastwood’s new movie, TS Eliot onstage, and Paul McCartney experiments

This week Tom is joined by three novelists: AS Byatt, Patrick Gale and Catherine O’Flynn.

Changeling

Clint Eastwood’s new movie Changeling stars Angelina Jolie as Christine Collins, a single mother whose only son is kidnapped in 1920s Los Angeles. When she is told her boy has been found, she is overjoyed – until the child turns out to be an impostor. The LA police insist she is wrong, and her campaign to find her son leads her into all-out conflict with the corrupt force, which doesn’t hold back from having her incarcerated in a psychopathic ward.

The film is based on historical but largely forgotten events; Collins’ campaign was instrumental in driving through reform of the LAPD.

Changeling is on release nationwide, certificate 15.

The Family Reunion

The poems which became the musical Cats may be the poet TS Eliot’s best known contribution to drama in verse, but The Family Reunion (1939) was one of his most ambitious purpose-built forays into this territory. There have been several new, high-profile verse dramas staged recently, by the likes of Michael Frayn and Tony Harrison. So are we witnessing a resurgence of this once-discredited form? And if so, will this revival of Eliot’s atmospheric story - of a man haunted by the Furies after the death of his wife – help blow the dust off this theatrical strategy?

The Family Reunion is at the Donmar Warehouse in central London until 10 January, as part of the theatre’s TS Eliot Festival, which also includes readings of Eliot’s verse and of his two best-known verse dramas, Murder in the Cathedral and The Cocktail Party.

The Fireman (Paul McCartney and Martin Glover)

The album Electric Arguments is the third collaboration between Paul McCartney and producer Youth, aka Martin Glover. Each track was improvised from scratch in a day.

The Fireman album, Electric Arguments, is out now on the MPL label.

After Rome: Holy War and Conquest

Before he became Mayor of London, Boris Johnson wrote and presented this exploration of the clashes between Christian and Muslim civilisations in the centuries after the fracturing of the Roman Empire. He explores the legacy of the Crusades, pinpoints key moments of harmony between the two faiths, and finds out why many Spaniards remain anxious to deny that Muslim Andalusia has any real role in their country’s history.

The first edition of After Rome: Holy War and Conquest is on BBC2 at 8.05pm on Saturday 29 November. The second and final part follows a week later.

The Secret Life of Words

Henry Hitchings’ exploration of ‘How English Became English’ won him the John Llewllyn Rhys Prize this week. He argues that the roots of our current vocabulary – traceable to more than 350 other languages – cast intriguing sidelights on our national history.

The Secret Life of Words is published in hardback by John Murray.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b00fr75c)
Studs Terkel - Back in the Wax Museum

Alan Dein looks back at the life of the American oral historian Studs Terkel, who died earlier this month. Includes unique archive material from Terkel's own collection of recordings covering almost 50 years of interviews and broadcasts.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b00fkgnj)
Jaroslav Hasek - The Good Soldier Svejk

Episode 2

Dramatisation by Christopher Reason of the satirical Czech novel by Jaroslav Hasek that charts the exploits of a WWI soldier.

Svejk and Lukas are sent to the front in disgrace, but Svejk gets waylaid by a gallery of grotesques.

Svejk ...... Sam Kelly
Lukas ...... Adrian Lukis
Dub ...... Nicholas Blane
Choudounski ...... Malcolm Raeburn
Marek ...... Howard Chadwick
Police Sergeant ...... James Quinn
Von Schwarzberg ...... Stuart Richman
Baloun ...... Eric Potts
Lance Corporal ...... Mark Chatterton
The Maid ...... Szilvi Naray Davey
Vodicka ...... Bernard Wrigley

Other parts played by members of the cast.

Directed by Gary Brown.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b00fn77m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b00fl5w5)
Michael Buerk chairs a debate on the moral questions behind the week's news. Clifford Longley, Kenan Malik, Michael Portillo and Melanie Phillips cross-examine witnesses.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b00fkwv6)
Robert Robinson introduces the ninth heat of the perennial general knowledge quiz.


SAT 23:30 Adventures in Poetry (b00fkgnn)
Series 9

The Listeners

Peggy Reynolds explores the background, effect and lasting appeal of some well-loved poems.

Published in 1912, Walter de la Mare's poem has been popular with adults and children alike for its elusiveness. Peggy examines its enduring appeal and finds out why gardeners, spiritualists and teachers are still intrigued and inspired by it.

Featuring contributions from the novelist Russell Hoban, de la Mare's grandson, Giles, and Professor of Radio at Bournemouth University, Sean Street.



SUNDAY 30 NOVEMBER 2008

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b00fn7bw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SUN 00:30 The Late Story (b007nlbm)
Back Chat

Since I've Been Away

Series of specially commissioned stories exploring the traumatic and occasionally comical subject of back pain.

By Nicci Gerard, read by Rachel Atkins.

A bored patient in a body-brace imagines a scenario on the ward that lands her in trouble. Is there a way out?


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00fn7by)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00fn7c0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00fn7c2)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b00fn7c4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b00fn7c6)
The sound of bells from St Anne's Limehouse, in London.


SUN 05:45 Received Wisdom (b00fhmcl)
Episode 1

MPs and peers from across the political spectrum share their stories and top tips for surviving life in Westminster with Guardian political sketchwriter Simon Hoggart.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b00fn88p)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b00fn88r)
Perchance to Dream

The writer and broadcaster Irma Kurtz considers the complexity of dreams and dreaming.


SUN 06:35 Living World (b00fn88t)
Too Good to Tread On

Lionel Kelleway travels to Portland Island in Dorset to see one of Britain's rarest and smallest plants, a bryophyte.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b00fn88w)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b00fn88y)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b00fn890)
Edward Stourton with the religious and ethical news of the week. Moral arguments and perspectives on stories, both familiar and unfamiliar.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b00fn892)
Pump Aid

Corrine Bailey Rae appeals on behalf of Pump Aid.


SUN 07:58 Weather (b00fn894)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b00fn896)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b00fn898)
Good Tidings to Zion

A service for Advent from Greenbank Parish Church, Edinburgh, led by the Rev Alison Swindells. Preacher: David Fergusson, Prof of Divinity, New College, University of Edinburgh. With the choirs of Greenbank and New College conducted by Alan Irvine. Organist: Damien Mason. Reading: Isiah 64, vv1-9.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b00fm9wk)
Glamourising Terror

Clive James discusses the glamorisation of terror in the movie industry. As a new film on the notorious Baader Meinhof gang is released, Clive argues that the movie version of history is often now in danger of replacing the real historical event.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b00fn89b)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b00fn89d)
The week's events in Ambridge.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b00fn89g)
Michael Eavis

Kirsty Young's castaway on Desert Island Discs this week is Michael Eavis. It's more than 30 years since he launched the Glastonbury Festival at his dairy farm in Somerset. Back in 1970, the headline act was Marc Bolan. His fee for appearing was just £500 and party-goers were given all the milk that the farm's herd of Friesians produced.

Over the years Michael risked losing his farm in order to fund the festival, faced years when the event was mired in mud and was criticised for booking a hip-hop act to top this year's bill. But, he says, he always felt compelled to keep the Glastonbury Festival going and now it attracts 180,000 people each year and brings millions of pounds into the local economy.

[Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

Favourite track: How Great Thou Art by Elvis Presley
Book: Blake by Peter Ackroyd
Luxury: A mouth organ with instruction book.


SUN 12:00 Another Case of Milton Jones (b00fkwx4)
Series 3

Antiques Expert

Milton Jones bestrides the globe as an expert in his field, with no ability whatsoever.

Milton is an antiques expert whose passion for Faberge Eggs leads him to bankruptcy, a Russian sleigh ride and a mysterious Swiss schloss.

With Tom Goodman-Hill, Ingrid Oliver, Ben Willbond.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b00fn89j)
Food and Farming Awards 2008

Sheila Dillon hosts the ninth Food and Farming Awards, held at the NEC in Birmingham. Angela Hartnett and Jamie Oliver are among the guests announcing the winners of categories including Best Food Producer and Best Dinner Lady.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b00fn89l)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b00fn89n)
A look at events around the world with Shaun Ley.


SUN 13:30 Women in Uniform (b00dy4b3)
Episode 1

Former BBC correspondent Martin Bell travels to Afghanistan to investigate the growing numbers of women in the British military and how their jobs are increasingly taking them into the front line.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00fn89q)
Eric Robson chairs the popular horticultural forum.

Bob Flowerdew, Chris Beardshaw and Bunny Guinness answer questions posed by an audience of gardeners in Lancashire.

Peter Seabrook, the Sun's Gardening Editor, Tim Rumball, editor of Amateur Gardening magazine, and Juliet Roberts, editor of Gardens Illustrated, discuss the pros and cons of genetically modified plants.

Including the Gardeners' Question Time gardening weather forecast.


SUN 14:45 Wars of The Roses (b00fn89s)
Episode 3

Wesley Kerr follows the Somerset town of Taunton in its bid to win the RHS Britain in Bloom competition.

It is judgment day in Taunton, as the town makes last-minute preparations before the final tour. Will Taunton have done enough to impress the judges and win the gold medal?


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b00fnbf3)
The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Episode 1

Adaptation of Victor Hugo's classic tale set in 15th-century Paris, dramatised in a collaboration between the BBC and Graeae, the disabled-led theatre company. Starring deaf actor David Bower, artistic director of Signdance Collective.

Quasimodo, the deformed bell ringer, hides away in the bell tower of Notre Dame Cathedral, friendless and ashamed of his appearance. When the bewitching gypsy Esmeralda arrives in Paris, Quasimodo falls in love with her from afar.

Quasimodo ...... David Bower
Esmeralda ...... Candis Nergaard
Frollo ...... Kevin Doyle
Madame Poutine ...... Susan Twist
Madame La Fayette ...... Rita May
Phoebus ...... Joseph Kloska
Mikael Leduc ...... Roger Morlidge
George ...... Garry Robson
Guillaume ...... Terence Mann

Written by Alex Bulmer
Directed by Polly Thomas


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b00fnbl9)
Ian Buruma, and Christmas Books

Ian Buruma
Mariella talks to the writer Ian Buruma, best known as an essayist and commentator on the Far East. His second novel, The China Lover, fictionalises the life of a Japanese actress and singer who for propaganda reasons was passed off as Chinese. He explains the allure of this fascinating figure.

Christmas Books
A selection of special guests, including Strictly Come Dancing star John Sergeant and Poet Laureate Andrew Motion, choose the books they'd most like to give at Christmas - and Peter Kemp adds a few thoughts of his own.

A book is for life, not just for Christmas
As a major publisher unveils a new range of luxury leather bound volumes made in collaboration with the leather designer Bill Amberg, Mariella talks to the book dealer Rick Gekoski and Liz Thomson, editor of Bookbrunch, to find out whether today's volumes are likely to last long enough for us to leave them to our children.


SUN 16:30 Adventures in Poetry (b00fnbqh)
Series 9

Ithaka

Peggy Reynolds explores the background, effect and lasting appeal of some well-loved poems.

By CP Cavafy. Peggy talks to people who have found inspiration in the poem's treatment of the journey of life, including the poet Ruth Padel, and Professor Edith Hall discusses its Homeric associations.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b00fl0jg)
Michael Robinson investigates whether the Prime Minister's instruction to banks to keep funds flowing will halt the rise in evictions and unemployment as repossession rates rocket due to the credit crunch.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b00fn75c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b00fnbqk)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b00fnbqm)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00fnbqp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b00fnbqr)
Clive Coleman introduces his selection of highlights from the past week on BBC radio.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b00fnbqt)
Peggy and Jennifer are off to look at summerhouses. Lilian decides to join them, as Matt's with Chalky again. Peggy sees one that she likes, and Jennifer and Lilian decide they should buy it today to have it in time for Christmas. Peggy's delighted. Jennifer buys plants to decorate Home Farm, for Christmas Day. But Peggy and Lilian don't remember agreeing to go - and Lilian wants everyone to come to the Dower House.

Joe's looking forward to plucking and dressing the turkeys as a family. Clarrie says that may not happen this year - Ed's too busy, and she hasn't asked William yet. Joe's upset, but Clarrie can't stop. She and Eddie should be at the panto rehearsal. Joe tells her Eddie's delivering compost so he'll be late.

At the rehearsal, Joe's still upset that the family won't be together to do the turkeys. Clarrie tells him she'll speak to William. Lynda's phone rings - it's Sabrina. Her husband's booked a surprise Christmas holiday so she's dropping out of the panto. It's the last straw for Lynda. Clarrie reassures her. Fallon's very talented and they'll find someone to play Jack. It could be a blessing in disguise.

Episode written by Simon Frith.


SUN 19:15 Go4it (b00fnbqw)
Children's magazine. Kirsten O'Brien and the team learn how to crack a joke with lessons from a stand-up comedy teacher and a successful 13-year-old comedian. They also find out what makes a book funny with a trip to the Roald Dahl Funny Prize awards ceremony.


SUN 19:45 Defining Moments (b007rhkp)
Series 1

Phoenix Rising

Series of stories about life-changing events from five emerging Irish writers.

By Maggie Cronin.

Ralph's return home after battling with illness is a cause for celebration, but his party is crashed by the most unwelcome of uninvited guests.

Read by Richard Dormer.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b00fm9j3)
Roger Bolton airs listeners' views on BBC radio programmes and policy.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b00fm9tk)
Matthew Bannister presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b00fn5ny)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b00fn892)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b00fm5s4)
Paying The Piper

Frances Cairncross examines what lessons must be learned from the events of the credit crunch and the effects it has had on the capitalist system.


SUN 21:58 Weather (b00fnlbr)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b00fnlbt)
Reports from behind the scenes at Westminster. Including Received Wisdom: MPs and peers share their stories and top tips for surviving life in Westminster.


SUN 23:00 Mind Changers (b00b7lrb)
Case Study: The Wild Boy of Aveyron

In 1800, 12-year-old Victor emerged from the woods of the Aveyron District, naked and behaving like an animal. It was estimated that he had been living wild since the age of about four.

Doctor Jean-Marc-Gaspard Itard devised a revolutionary programme of training for the boy, which met with partial success. The story is repeatedly quoted in the nature-nurture controversy, but it provides no conclusive proof either way. As with all case studies, it can be used to defend different theories. Nevertheless, many still benefit from Victor's legacy, as children with learning difficulties and others, especially those in Montessori nurseries, are taught by the method of hands-on play devised by Itard.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b00fn88r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 01 DECEMBER 2008

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b00fnljf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b00fl5w3)
Organisation/Disorganisation

ORGANISATION/DISORGANISATION
According to Michael Thompson, former mountaineer, professional soldier, sociologist and advisor to governments around the world, there are five ways to organise everything, and the best organisations use all five methods.

Laurie Taylor is joined by Michael Thompson author of Organising and Disorganising, and philosopher John Gray to discuss the hierarchical, the individualistic, the egalitarian, the fatalistic and the autonomous – ways in which things can be organised, and forces that disorganise the other ways.

What is the best way for things to run? Is John Gray’s contention just a theory too far and can there really be a way to describe everything from a tea party to the United Nations?


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b00fn7c6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00fnm1f)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00fnm2v)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00fnm48)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b00fnm4v)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00fnn7t)
Daily prayer and reflection with Alison Elliot.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b00fnnxq)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna Hill.


MON 05:57 Weather (b00fnp92)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b00fnpb7)
Presented by Edward Stourton and James Naughtie.

Harry Fletcher, of the National Association of Probation Officers, discusses the plan for criminals to wear orange bibs to identify them as offenders.

National Clinical Director for Cancer Mike Richards discusses the first annual report for the Cancer Reform Strategy with Prof Karol Sikora, medical director of Cancer Partners UK.

Former MP Denis MacShane is concerned that MPs must be able to do their jobs.

Deputy children's commissioner for England Sue Berelowitz discusses a proposed central database for children.

Duncan Kennedy reports on the starlings covering Rome in bird muck.

The Today programme Advent calendar begins with Evan's confusion over musical veg.

Thought for the day with Canon Dr Alan Billings.

British lawyer Mark Abell describes his recent ordeal at the Oberoi Trident Hotel in Mumbai.

Robert Peston discusses how RBS is the first to follow government guidelines created to help struggling homeowners.

Justice Secretary Jack Straw gives his views on the arrest of MP Damian Green.

Chris Morris reports on how people in Mumbai are returning to normal life.

Jonathan Head reports on the British travellers stranded in Thailand.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission say a man was shot dead by police in Guildford following reports of an armed man. Jack Izzard reports.

Angus Crawford reports on a new project to combat gun and knife crime.

Cllr Steve Morphew of Norwich City Council explains why hairdressers there are banned from serving mulled wine.

Retail expert and TV presenter Mary Portas discusses what is likely to happen to Woolworths.

Writers Kanishk Tharoor and Amir Taheri discuss whether the attacks in Mumbai were aimed at India or the West.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b00fpx7g)
CHRIS BISHOP, Chief Research Scientist at Microsoft Research in Cambridge, is giving this year’s Royal Institution Christmas Lectures. He predicts some of the most exciting breakthroughs in computer science, including storing our data on DNA, and demonstrates that the concepts behind computers are quite simple; he argues that there are many areas in which a three-year-old can outperform a supercomputer, such as solving a jigsaw puzzle. The Royal Institution Christmas Lectures will be televised on Five at 7.15pm on 29, 30, 31 December 2008 and 1 and 2 January 2009.

In this period of financial difficulty, can we afford lawyers? RICHARD SUSSKIND thinks that the legal services have not previously had enough pressure on them to keep up with technology and have become worryingly inefficient. He argues that by harnessing Web 2.0 technologies lawyers will become cheaper, thereby enabling justice to be available to more people. The End of Lawyers? Rethinking the Nature of Legal Services is published by Oxford University Press and Richard Susskind will be giving a lecture on 2 December at 4.00pm, Gulbenkian Lecture Theatre, Faculty of Law, University of Oxford.

JOHN DUPRÉ, Director of Egenis, believes that most people don’t really understand what genomes are, preferring to think of them as a mystical ‘blueprint to life’ containing the essence of our being. He thinks that this over-simplification is dangerous when it comes to debates about biological determinism, GM crops and stem cell research. Genomes and What to Make of Them by Barry Barnes and John Dupré is published by The University of Chicago Press.

The Amazonian rainforest and its role in climate change is much discussed, yet what are the attitudes of the people who live there? PAUL HERITAGE is directing a production at the Young Vic theatre in London which combines Brazilian and British cultural forms to tell the stories from the Amazon, in particular that of the assassinated environmental activist Chico Mendes. Heritage argues that the theatre is a strong vehicle for community change both in this country and Brazil.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b00fnpnk)
Medical London - City of Diseases, City of Cures

Episode 1

For centuries, London was the world's largest city, and a frontline in mankind's battle against disease. Dr Richard Barnett explores how city life has been shaped by sickness and health.

Roman advertising and the legacy of leprosy.

Read by Tony Gardner.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00fnpnm)
Forced marriages; Snobbery; Community spirit

The impact of the Forced Marriage Act evaluated. Plus snobbery in British society, and what has happened to our sense of community?


MON 11:00 Lives in a Landscape (b00fpx7j)
Series 4

Gone East

Documentary series telling original stories about real lives in Britain today.

In the dead of night, presenter Alan Dein once listened to the troubles of young teenager Hannah, pouring out her woes from a phone box during a turbulent night in the centre of the Kent resort town of Margate.

Alan went on to make a Radio 4 feature programme about Hannah's story; now, he finally encounters Hannah and her family.


MON 11:30 Spending My Inheritance (b00fpx7l)
Where There's a Will

Sitcom by Clive Coleman, starring Kris Marshall as cash-strapped forty-something Harry, who has to watch from the sidelines as his newly retired parents start spending their hard-earned cash on themselves.

Harry tries to find out if his mum and dad have made a will.

Harry ...... Kris Marshall
Jo ...... Raquel Cassidy
Brian ...... Kenneth Cranham
Liz ...... Judy Parfitt
Jess ...... Antonia Thomas
Paul ...... Stephen Critchlow
Nick ...... Jonathan Tafler
Ed/Simon ...... Gunnar Cauthery
Radio Correspondent ...... Clive Coleman
Fran ...... Jill Cardo

Directed by Sam Hoyle.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b00fnpv2)
Presented by Julian Worricker.

Newquay Aiport in Cornwall will be closed for three weeks because Cornwall County Council is not ready to take over control of it from the RAF. What does this mean for the thousands of passengers who have had their travel plans thrown into chaos?

Companies operating on the UK's ports are facing business rate demands for millions of pounds due to changes in the way the charges are calculated. The demands are said to be threatening to put many port operators out of business and could lead to thousands of jobs losses.

A decision to allow some of the best-known buildings in Venice to be draped with huge adverts has caused outrage with locals. Duncan Kennedy, the BBC's Rome correspondent, tells us more and gives us the latest on the recent floods in Venice.

Could faster trains be a realistic alternative to expansion at Heathrow airport?

Consumers International, the body that represents consumer organisations around the world, has announced the winners of what it calls the 'Bad Company Awards'. Its spokesperson, Luke Upchurch, joins us to speak about the irresponsible behaviour by the world's leading brands.

Essex County Council has begun drawing up plans to establish its own bank. It wants to provide a credit lifeline to small businesses who say they're struggling to get loans from the private sector. We speak to Lord Hanningfield, leader of Essex County Council, to find out more.


MON 12:57 Weather (b00fnpx6)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b00fnpyy)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


MON 13:30 Brain of Britain (b00fpx7n)
Robert Robinson introduces the tenth heat of the perennial general knowledge quiz.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b00fnbqt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00fpx7q)
Prayer Mask

Prayer Mask
By David Pownall

JOSEPH FIENNES stars as the young Lieutenant Richard Burton who in 1853 disguised himself as an Afghani pilgrim and undertook an expedition to Mecca. His aim was to explore the Holy of Holies. He chronicles this journey fraught with dangers and misadventure. But can he hide his identity from his two young guides?

Lieutenant Richard Burton .... Joseph Fiennes
Mohammed............... Akbar Kurtha
Nur.......................... Rasmus Hardiker
Wali..................... Paul Rider
Larking.................... Roger Hammond
Kaaba official............ Inam Mirza
Surgeon.................... Jonathan Tafler
Mohammed's mother ... Natasha Pyne

Director..... Peter Kavanagh.


MON 15:00 Money Box Live (b00fpx7s)
Vincent Duggleby and guests answer calls on financial issues.


MON 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00fnqcx)
John B Keane Readings

Protocol

Five readings from the work of the late Irish novelist and essayist John B Keane.

It is obvious from Timmy Binn's demeanour that this evening's visit is different from all the others: tonight he is on a special mission. Read by Dermot Crowley.


MON 15:45 Street Science (b00fnqt9)
Cloning

Five eminent scientists discuss controversial areas of science with members of the public. Cloning expert Prof Stephen Minger joins the congregation at St Mary's Church in Elham, Kent, to discuss the creation of embryos that are part cow, part human.


MON 16:00 The Food Programme (b00d8gvl)
Parmesan

Chef Angela Hartnett celebrates the core ingredient on the menu of her new restaurant, parmigiano reggiano, or parmesan cheese.


MON 16:30 Traveller's Tree (b00fpx7v)
Series 4

Dubai, Montenegro and Hangzhou

Katie Derham presents the holiday magazine with insider tips from listeners and travel experts. Katie examines the way that tourism is developing in the world's emerging economies.


MON 17:00 PM (b00fnx6t)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00fnxb3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


MON 18:30 Another Case of Milton Jones (b00fpx7x)
Series 3

Magician

Milton Jones bestrides the globe as an expert in his field, with no ability whatsoever.

Milton is a famous magician and illusionist who gets tangled up in a devilish plot to make the Bank of England disappear.

With Tom Goodman-Hill, Ingrid Oliver, Dan Tetsell.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b00fnpzq)
Hayley's feeling guilty that she and Roy are moving out of Willow Farm on Mike's birthday, but they'll be back later for his birthday dinner. Brenda calls to wish her dad a happy birthday. She's shocked at the dust. He can't have his birthday dinner there. They can all come to hers.

Roy and Hayley instantly feel at home at Lower Loxley. It's so peaceful.

Lynda seeks out Fallon and speaks encouragingly about her acting. But as Lynda explains how she's desperate for a new lead, Fallon catches on quickly, and isn't keen. Lynda's not expecting an answer now, but wants Fallon to promise she'll think about it.

Fallon bumps into Brenda - they haven't seen each other for ages, so must have a proper night out soon. Lynda appears, and starts to see a solution to her problems. When Brenda agrees that Fallon's very talented, Lynda thoughtfully suggests that maybe she could play Jill. Why didn't she think of Brenda before? Brenda reluctantly agrees - it could be a laugh! Fallon's fate is sealed.

At Brenda and Tom's, Mike's convinced his glass is dusty! All that dust at home, no wonder he's paranoid. But Mike insists they're not to worry, he's absolutely fine there.

Episode written by Simon Frith.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b00fnxbf)
Presented by Mark Lawson.

The writer and comedian Alexei Sayle talks about his new novel Mister Roberts, a coming-of-age story set in a small village in Spain, where Sayle now lives.

This year Tilda Swinton won the Oscar for best supporting actress for her role in Michael Clayton. Now she takes the lead in a new film, Julia, as a flamboyant alcoholic whose desperation lures her into kidnap and extortion. The critic Gaylene Gould gives her reaction to the film.

The American composer Elliott Carter will be celebrating his 100th birthday on December 11th and there will be a series of events in the UK to mark the occasion, including a performance of Carter's horn concerto by the CBSO in Birmingham. In a rare interview, the 99-year-old reflects on his long career and the influence of jazz, poetry and horses hooves on his music.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00fnxcb)
Julian Fellowes - Snobs

Episode 1

Satire on English snobbery, adapted from his own novel by Julian Fellowes.

On a visit to the local stately home, middle-class estate agent Edith meets Charles, the extremely eligible Earl.

Narrator ...... Nicholas Farrell
Edith ...... Sophie Roberts
Charles ...... Hugh Bonneville
Lady Uckfield ...... Celia Imrie
Lord Uckfield ...... Richard Mitchley
Isabel ...... Sophie Thompson
David/Eric ...... Rupert Vansittart
Caroline ...... Caroline Harker
Simon ...... Julian Rhind-Tutt
Bella ...... Bernice Stegers
Singer ...... David Benson.


MON 20:00 Things We Forgot to Remember (b00fpx7z)
Series 4

The Jarrow March

Michael Portillo with the series revisiting the great moments of history to discover that they often conceal other events of equal, but forgotten, importance.

The Jarrow March.
'Marshal Riley's Army', the 'Jarrow Crusade' has become a symbol of the reaction of British society to the mass unemployment of the 1930s. In the month of October 1936, two hundred out-of-work Jarrow men came south to draw London's attention to their plight. They did not make political demands, but merely asked that something ought to be done to help them. They were polite, respectful, and orderly, and as they passed, all sections of society, rich and poor, came out to greet them. The Jarrow Marchers were treated to a heroes' welcome when they got to London. They showed how much the British cared about the unemployed, so now their place in history is secure.
But, Michael discovers that here had been a variety of "Hunger Marches" going back to the 1920s, the biggest of which was in 1932 organised by the Comunist backed National Unemployed Workers Movement or NUWM, after the level of unemployment was cut, with thousands of men and women marching to London. When the march arrived in Hyde Park on October 27th 1932, 100,000 supporters were greeted by over 3,000 police who launched a series of mounted charges into the crowds, and the arrival ended in chaos. But this event lead to the formation of the movement for civil liberties which resulted in the pressure group Liberty being formed.

So - why do we remember Jarrow? Maybe because it is pleasant to think of the past as an era of social peace, a time when there was a dignity in poverty and working men would ask for, rather than take, social and political recognition

Producer - Neil George

(repeat).


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b00fm02z)
Sri Lanka

Roland Buerk investigates the lengths to which the Sri Lankan army and its proxies have gone to ensure victory in their war against the Tamil Tigers. With victory now in sight, Roland uncovers a trail of civilian massacres and abductions.


MON 21:00 Wiring the NHS (b00fpxd2)
Sue Nelson examines the progress of the NHS National IT Programme over the past year. She reports from the British Medical Association's annual general meeting in Edinburgh and hears from Gordon Hextall, the chief operating officer for NHS Connecting for Health.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b00fpx7g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b00fnycr)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b00fnyv1)
With Ritula Shah. Including reports on Barack Obama's announcement of his new foreign policy team and the release of a damning report on Haringey Council and Baby P.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00fnywb)
Black Orchids

Episode 6

Amanda Root reads from Gillian Slovo's love story, set in 1950s Ceylon and London.

As Milton struggles to fit in at boarding school and Evelyn and Emil clash over how best to integrate into English society, a seemingly chance encounter threatens to tear the family apart.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b00fl0bm)
Michael Rosen takes another journey into the world of words, language and the way we speak. He is joined by Leonard, an African Grey parrot, to talk about animal communication.


MON 23:30 Textbook Diplomacy (b00d8t8k)
Last year, final year pupils in French and German schools started using an identical history text book, an example of a trend across Europe towards using the teaching of history to overcome mistrust and conflict between nations. Mark Whitaker reports.



TUESDAY 02 DECEMBER 2008

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b00fnlg5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b00fnpnk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00fnljh)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00fnm1h)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00fnm2x)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b00fnm4b)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00fnn79)
Daily prayer and reflection with Alison Elliot.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b00fnnx7)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna Hill.


TUE 06:00 Today (b00fnp94)
Presented by James Naughtie and Sarah Montague.

Former Conservative leader Iain Duncan Smith says social housing can act as a huge disincentive to going back to work.

Peter Biles reports from the border between South Africa and Zimbabwe on an outbreak of cholera.

Jonathan Head reports on the decision by the Thai courts to dissolve the governing People Power Party.

The pound has fallen sharply against the dollar amid more bad economic data, which suggests a prolonged recession and further interest rate cuts. Economist Neil MacKinnon discusses the largest one day fall in percentage terms since 1992.

Nick Robinson reports on the ongoing row surrounding the arrest of Tory frontbencher Damian Green.

Rebecca Jones reports on the display of the original manuscripts of Jack Kerouac's On The Road.

Thought for the day with the Reverend Dr David Wilkinson, principal of St John's College Durham.

Justin Webb and author Carl Bernstein discuss Barack Obama's nomination of Hillary Clinton as his Secretary of State.

Shadow Children's Secretary Michael Gove says Haringey's child protection department is dysfunctional.

Historian Professor Peter Hennessy explains how Britain's nuclear system works and if it is failsafe.

David Loyn discusses the recent deterioration in relations between Pakistan and India.

Sir Kenneth Calman says devolution in Scotland has been a great success.

Karen Abuzayd, commissioner general of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), discusses how Britain could help with the humanitarian situation in Gaza.

Writer Rick Thomas and scholar Stanley Wells discuss the theories behind Shakespeare's departure from London.


TUE 09:00 The Long View (b00fpxkd)
Airport Expansion/Railway Expansion

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present. He explores the parallels and differences between current attitudes to airport expansion and the controversy and debate that surrounded railway expansion in the mid-19th century.

Image: Detail of 'The Railway Station' (1862) by William Powell Frith (1819-1909).


TUE 09:30 Bad Habits (b00fpxkg)
Perfectionism

Comedian and writer Richard Herring explores some of the bad habits and personal failings which directly or indirectly affect all of us in our daily working lives.

Richard examines the impact of perfectionism and goes inside a double Michelin-starred restaurant to see how chef Marcus Wareing strives for food utopia.

Douglas Broadley, CEO of global design agency Imagination, talks frankly about how his perfectionism affects the company and an ex-employee gives his perspective on working for a perfectionist boss.

Also featuring psychologist and perfectionism expert Cary Cooper.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b00fv6k5)
Medical London - City of Diseases, City of Cures

Episode 2

For centuries, London was the world's largest city, and a frontline in mankind's battle against disease. Dr Richard Barnett explores how city life has been shaped by sickness and health.

The commercial aspect of treatment and the medical marketplace.

Read by Tony Gardner.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00fnpqq)
Tilda Swinton; Slimming clubs; Women war photographers

Acclaimed actor Tilda Swinton on her career and choice of roles. Plus women's influence on war photography, and how important are slimming clubs in the quest to lose weight?


TUE 11:00 World On The Move: Great Animal Migrations (b00fpy68)
Philippa Forrester and Brett Westwood present the series following the movement and migration of animals across the planet, from the European eel to the African white-eared kob antelope. A team of wildlife specialists are joined by zoologists and conservationists around the world to present regular reports.


TUE 11:30 I Was... (b00fpy6b)
Series 1

Dudley Moore's First Bandleader

Andrew McGibbon presents a series of interviews analysing great artists from the perspective of someone who knew them.

John Bassett met Dudley Moore, then a talented organ scholar, at Oxford in the late 1950s, and asked him to become the pianist in his jazz band, The Basset Hounds. The success of Moore's musical comedy skits led to Bassett introducing him to three other up-and-coming talents who would go on, with Moore, to find fame in Beyond the Fringe.

Including contributions from Bassett Hound members Duncan Lamont and Pete Shade and Dudley's Beyond the Fringe colleague Jonathan Miller.

A Curtains for Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b00fnpsd)
Call You and Yours

Presented by Julian Worricker.

Air vs Rail.

The Conservative party says it would scrap plans for a new runway at Heathrow to invest in a better north-south rail link instead. But would you rather see a third runway at Heathrow, a high-speed rail network, neither or both?

With guests:
Dr Alice Bows - University of Manchester.
Roger Kemp - Professor of Engineering at Lancaster University.
Baroness Jo Valentine - chief executive of London First.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b00fnpv4)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b00fnpx8)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


TUE 13:30 Music Feature (b00fr51y)
Soul II Soul

Trevor Nelson tells the story of the influential band Soul II Soul, which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary in 2008. With its origins in the social unrest of 1980s Thatcherite Britain, the band grew to become a voice for young black people.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b00fnpzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00fq1br)
Michael Butt - The Babington Plot

Documentary-style drama by Michael Butt that tells the story of the 1586 plot to assassinate Elizabeth I and return England to Catholic rule under Mary, Queen of Scots. The story is told from the perspective of several of the conspirators - some genuine, some government spies that had infiltrated the group.

Presenter ...... Stephen Greif
Robert Poley ...... Burn Gorman
Thomas Salisbury ...... Sam Barnett
Aloysius Skeres ...... Chris Pavlo
Thomas Phelippes ...... Jonathan Tafler
Robert Bull ...... Stephen Critchlow
Gilbert Gifford ...... Inam Mirza
Don Mendoza ...... Malcolm Tierney
Mistress Bellamy ...... Marlene Sidaway
Jane Tichbourne ...... Janice Acquah
Agnes Lauren ...... Jill Cardo
Shepherd ...... Dan Starkey
Casey ...... Paul Rider

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


TUE 15:00 Making History (b00fq2sp)
Carved Stone Balls of Aberdeenshire

Carved Stone Balls of Aberdeenshire
Glass artist and Making History listener Louise Tait has been inspired by carved stone balls which have been found in significant numbers in Aberdeenshire and may well date back to the Neolithic. Louise is fascinated about their origins – ‘what on earth were they for’, she asks?

Making History turned to one of Britain’s finest archaeologists, Dr Alison Sheridan who is Head of Early Prehistory at the National Museums of Scotland. Alison took Vanessa to a field near Aberdeen.


TUE 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00fnqbk)
John B Keane Readings

The Voice of an Angel

Five readings from the work of the late Irish novelist and essayist John B Keane.

When Tom Winter agrees to play the role of Santa Claus, he has no idea that he may be the one to receive the perfect Christmas gift. Read by Dermot Crowley.


TUE 15:45 Street Science (b00fnqt7)
Nuclear Power

Five eminent scientists discuss controversial areas of science with members of the public. Nuclear scientist Dr Sue Ion visits the Alternative Technology Centre in Hebden Bridge to discuss nuclear power.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b00fq2sr)
Michael Rosen investigates what happens when our ability to communicate breaks down.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b00fq2st)
Diana Rigg and Rachel de Thame

Sue MacGregor and her guests - actress, Dame Diana Rigg and, gardening expert, Rachel de Thame - discuss favourite books by Anton Chekhov, Gillian Tindall and Oswald Wynd.

The Duel and Other Stories by Anton Chekhov
Publisher: Dover Thrift

The House by the Thames by Gillian Tindall
Publisher: Pimlico

The Ginger Tree by Oswald Wynd
Publisher: Eland

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2008.


TUE 17:00 PM (b00fnx3s)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00fnx6w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


TUE 18:30 Listen Against (b00fq2sw)
Series 2

Episode 3

Radio 4's new drama 'Peston', 'Thought for the Day' for Satanists and why is Jeremy Vine so charming in person but so tetchy on Radio 2?

The show that look backs in amplitude at rearranged and downright fictional snippets from BBC radio.

Written by and starring Jon Holmes,

With Alice Arnold.

Producer: Sam Bryant

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2008.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b00fnpz0)
David and Ruth are chatting about their beef. They need to start phoning round their Christmas customers. Ruth's heard that The Elms homeless shelter is in financial trouble. Ruth later asks Susan if she knows anything about it. Susan says that the treasurer's stood down. There's no money left. Ruth returns, having missed a call from Usha. David passes on the news. Alan's thanked them for their kind offer. What kind offer?! Ruth's agreed to donate some of their beef for The Elms' Christmas lunches.

Neil and Susan are poring over a bathroom brochure, looking for things for the flat. Christopher's agreed to meet Neil at the suppliers. They're pleased he's showing an interest, but worried it might be to take his mind off problems with Alice.

In the bathroom supplies department, Neil wants budget, Chris wants no expense spared. Mrs Woolley wouldn't want anything cheap! They come to a compromise.

Back at Ambridge View, Susan and Neil are still worried that Chris's relationship with Alice has stalled. But they soon realise they needn't have worried: Chris appears, to get changed. He's off to Southampton to see Alice, and will be back tomorrow.

Episode written by Simon Frith.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b00fnxb5)
Presented by Mark Lawson.

Writer and academic Diane Roberts reviews the film Lakeview Terrace, a provocative thriller about a LAPD cop, played by Samuel L Jackson, who terrorizes a newlywed interracial couple who move next door to him.

Jack Kerouac's scroll of On The Road is on display at the Barber Institute in Birmingham. Playwright David Edgar is there for the unfurling and shares the experience with Mark.

Sue Townsend, the creator of Adrian Mole, talks to Mark about the seventh collection of diaries by her most famous comic creation. This finds Adrian at the age of 32 as an unemployed single parent of two sons who has had to move back in with his mother.

Birkenhead-born artist Mark Leckey talks to Mark about winning this year's Turner Prize at a ceremony at Tate Britain.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00fnxj1)
Julian Fellowes - Snobs

Episode 2

Satire on English snobbery, adapted from his own novel by Julian Fellowes.

News of Edith and Charles's romance hits the gossip columns but Lady Uckfield and the rest of Edith's aristocratic soon-to-be in-laws are not impressed.

Narrator ...... Nicholas Farrell
Edith ...... Sophie Roberts
Charles ...... Hugh Bonneville
Lady Uckfield ...... Celia Imrie
Lord Uckfield ...... Richard Mitchley
Isabel ...... Sophie Thompson
David/Eric ...... Rupert Vansittart
Caroline ...... Caroline Harker
Simon ...... Julian Rhind-Tutt
Bella ...... Bernice Stegers
Singer ...... David Benson.


TUE 20:00 The Human Button (b00fq2sy)
Historian Prof Peter Hennessy speaks to the people who have operated Britain's nuclear deterrent over the years and today, including military commanders, politicians and former Vulcan bomber crew members. He visits Northwood, the headquarters from which the order to fire would come today, and Corsham, the secret nuclear bunker which, in the 1960s, would have been the location for an alternative government in the event of all-out war.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b00fq2t0)
Peter White with news and information for the blind and partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b00fq2t2)
Blogging - Science of Persuasion - Sexual Abuse by Clergy - Videoing Psychotic Episodes

MENTAL HEALTH BLOGGING
The number of blogs written by people with mental health problems has grown significantly in the past couple of years. One of the best-known blogs is The Secret Life of a Manic Depressive, written by Seaneen Molloy.

Another prominent blogger, Mandy Lawrence, even continued writing her blog when she was an in-patient on a psychiatric unit. Both Seaneen and Mandy join Claudia Hammond to discuss why blogs about mental health have become so popular.

THE SCIENCE OF PERSUASION
Managing to persuade someone to do something has always been seen as an art. Now, however, policy makers are getting interested in the psychology, or science, of persuasion. One of the leaders in the field of influence and persuasion is Dr Robert Cialdini, Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University. He tells Claudia what common mistakes we make when we’re trying to get make people do what we want.

SEXUAL ABUSE BY THE CLERGY
During the last twenty years the scale of sexual abuse by priests and clergy in churches of all denominations has come out into the open.

Now, a new study of those who have been sexually abused by Roman Catholic priests, nuns and monks raises questions over the way that their trauma has been identified and treated. Victims of such abuse are usually diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, but Dr Derek Farrell, who conducted the research, believes that abuse by a priest, as God’s representative on earth, creates a unique set of circumstances, affecting the survivor’s whole view of this world, and, for them, also the next. Dr Farrell lectures in mental health at the University of Birmingham and as a counselling psychologist he specialises in working with survivors of religious abuse. He describes his findings.

VIDEOING PSYCHOTIC EPISODES
When somebody has a psychotic episode they might hallucinate, hear voices and have delusions. Despite the serious nature of these symptoms, however, once people begin to recover they often have no idea just how unwell they were, which often means they're reluctant to continue their treatment. St Bernard’s Hospital in West London has tried out a remarkably simple way of helping people to gain that crucial insight into their condition, by videoing them when they’re having an episode and then playing it back to them later. Consultant Psychiatrist Dr Michael Maier, who ran the pilot, explains how the practice has helped his patients.


TUE 21:30 The Long View (b00fpxkd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b00fnybj)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b00fnyct)
National and international news and analysis with Ritula Shah. Including reports on the spread of cholera in Zimbabwe, the resumption of talks between Europe and Russia and whether the digital generation needs to learn facts.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00fnyv3)
Black Orchids

Episode 7

Amanda Root reads from Gillian Slovo's love story, set in 1950s Ceylon and London.

When Evelyn's doomed affair with Charles is exposed, a distraught Emil demands that she leave the family home.


TUE 23:00 Danny Robins Music Therapy (b00fq2t4)
Episode 3

Danny Robins harnesses the power of music to improve the world and solve listeners' problems.

Danny helps the worst five-a-side football team in the country and boosts the confidence of a listener who, at under five feet tall, feels that the world is heightist.

With Isy Suttie.

Special musical guest Connie Fisher.

Written by Danny Robins with Isy Suttie, James Sherwood and Danielle Ward.

Producer: Ben Walker

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2008.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00fnywd)
Ahead of the State Opening of Parliament, Mark D'Arcy asks how Parliament and the country copes with the volume of legislation now being created.



WEDNESDAY 03 DECEMBER 2008

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b00fnlg7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b00fv6k5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00fnljl)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00fnm1l)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00fnm2z)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b00fnm4d)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00fnn7c)
Daily prayer and reflection with Alison Elliot.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b00fnnxc)
News and issues in rural Britain with Anna Hill.


WED 06:00 Today (b00fnp96)
Presented by James Naughtie and Sarah Montague.

Garry Richardson considers whether England will return to India for the Test series.

Chief exec of the King's Fund Niall Dixon discusses whether negative stories from patients contradict the positive impression given by many hospitals' annual reports.

Angela Knight, of the British Bankers Association, says it is vital that small businesses receive assistance.

Hamish Laing, of The British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons, discusses the risks of having surgery overseas.

Dr Sylvia Cremer discusses the risks to wildlife from an invasion of ants.

Lord Foulkes and MP David Davis debate the House of Commons Speaker's role in the arrest of Damian Green.

Nicola Stanbridge listens to the unusual sound effects used in the music of Matthew Herbert.

Thought for the day with the Right Rev Lord Harries of Pentregarth.

Robotics experts Prof Colin Allen and Prof Noel Sharkey discuss the idea of replacing human soldiers with robots.

Prof Jane Barlow says the UK welfare system is too legalistic in the face of widespread abuse.

Lord Mandelson and Nick Robinson discuss the Queen's speech.

Surgeon David Nott describes how he performed a life-saving operation in the Congo by using text message instructions from a colleague in London.

French philosopher Bernard Henri Levy says the free market was corrupted by the decline in moral values.

Zubeida Malik reports on the initiative by The British Film Industry to crack down on illegal DVD sellers.

Barack Obama is said to highly recommend the book Team of Rivals - the Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, by Doris Kearns Goodwin. She discusses how much she is looking forward to a president who enjoys reading about the past.


WED 09:00 Midweek (b00fq2x9)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b00fv6jx)
Medical London - City of Diseases, City of Cures

Episode 3

For centuries, London was the world's largest city, and the frontline in mankind's battle against disease. Dr Richard Barnett explores how city life has been shaped by sickness and health.

London has long been associated with conspicuous consumption, but indulgence has its perils. An exploration of the close-knit relationship between the flesh and its pains and pleasures.

Read by Tony Gardner.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00fnpqs)
Children of alcoholics; Stripping

Do the children of alcoholic parents get enough support? Plus the life of motorcyclist Beryl Swain, and do we have double standards about male and female strippers?


WED 11:00 In Living Memory (b00fq2xc)
Series 9

The New Volunteers

Contemporary history series.

Chris Ledgard tells the story of the Voluntary Service Overseas organisation and its controversial founder Alec Dickson. The scheme was born out of the ending of National Service in 1957, in order to give young men something else to do with the two years they had allocated to it.

Chris speaks to some of the first volunteers, who made trips to West Africa and Borneo, and to colleagues and friends of Dickson.


WED 11:30 The Art of Conversation (b00fq2xf)
The first broadcast of a newly discovered piece by Dylan Thomas, written during WWII when he was employed by the BBC to write radio talks and features.

A short piece of Allied propaganda, it is a witty talk on the decline of conversation, with 'contributions' from, among others, Oscar Wilde, Aubrey Beardsley and Dr Johnson, which frequently reminds listeners that 'careless talk costs lives'.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b00fnpsg)
Presented by Julian Worricker.

Managing director of British Gas Phil Bentley responds to customer criticisms.

We have been getting more and more complaints about the government's Warmfront scheme. Melanie Abbott is here to tell us more. We also speak to Joan Ruddock MP.

Former building societies carpetbagger Richard Yendal explains why he has no regrets.

New proposals for the rights of carers were announced in the Queen's Speech earlier today. We hear from Imelda Redmond, Chief Executive of campaign group Carers UK.

Mark Ruby is chief executive of Kro, which runs six bars in Manchester city centre, talks about measures to clamp down on binge drinking.

Piaggio, the company that makes Vespa, made the last one with a gearbox. Following new EU rules on emissions they now only make automatics. Stephanie Power went to a scooter rally in Bridlington Spa to find out whether this really is the death of an icon.


WED 12:57 Weather (b00fnpv6)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b00fnpxb)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


WED 13:30 The Media Show (b00fq2xh)
Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b00fnpz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz (b00fq2xk)
Series 1

Then Fancies Flee Away

By Sebastian Baczkiewicz.

Paul Hilton stars as the reluctant and unthanked hero protecting mankind from an enemy they resist believing in.

Travelling through Yorkshire, Pilgrim meets Noreen, whose son has been in a strange coma for the past seven years. He lies in his bed, surrounded by a huge growth of thorns. How can this enchantment be broken? As Pilgrim investigates, he is drawn inexorably towards the darkness beneath the mysterious Round Barrow of Willy Howe.

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b00fn89q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:00 on Sunday]


WED 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00fnqbm)
John B Keane Readings

A Tale of Two Furs

Five readings from the work of the late Irish novelist and essayist John B Keane.

Jack Murphy learns that a woman's affection cannot be bought. Or can it? Read by Dermot Crowley.


WED 15:45 Street Science (b00fnqtc)
GM Agriculture

Five eminent scientists discuss controversial areas of science with members of the public. Former chief scientific officer to the government Sir David King visits the Magic Cafe in Oxford to discuss GM agriculture.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b00fq2yx)
The Sociology of Smell - Getting a Confession

SOCIOLOGY OF SMELL
In their new book The Guide to Perfumes Luca Turin and Tania Sanchez examine the sociology of smell from its aesthetic complexity, to its class, status associations, racial overtones and its gender implication. Laurie Taylor is joined by the fragrance expert Luca Turin, who describes perfume as an art, and Rod Watson, a sociologist of smell, to explore the hidden resonances of perfume. Why do we wear perfume, what do our choice of fragrance say about us?

GETTING A CONFESSION
Dr Elisabeth Carter, Research Associate of the University of Essex has studied the fine detail of police interrogation. She discusses the findings of her doctoral thesis called ‘An Investigation into the structure of the police interview’.


WED 16:30 All in the Mind (b00fq2t2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 17:00 PM (b00fnx3v)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00fnx6y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


WED 18:30 Clare in the Community (b008xg02)
Series 4

My Funny Valentine

Brian is amazed that Clare’s remembered Valentine's Day and booked a restaurant.

The only trouble is... she hasn't.

Comedy by Harry Venning and David Ramsden. Clare Barker is a social worker with all the politically correct jargon but none of the practical solutions.

Clare ...... Sally Phillips
Brian ...... Alex Lowe
Ray ...... Richard Lumsden
Helen ...... Gemma Craven
Irene ...... Ellen Thomas
Megan ...... Nina Conti
Simon ...... Andrew Wincott

With Ben Onwukwe and Sam Pamphilon.

Producer: Katie Tyrrell

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in February 2008.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b00fnpz2)
Lilian's taking Peggy Christmas shopping in Borchester. Jennifer feels guilty leaving Ian with Jack, but Peggy says Ian enjoys it. Jennifer tells Lilian she's got a contact who might help find a carer. She'll call this afternoon. But they still haven't decided about Christmas! Lilian suggests they share the cooking and bring it to the Dower House.

Back at Home Farm, Brian tells Jennifer that Alice has called. Christopher's been down, and will help her move back at the end of term. They expect he'll be around a lot at Christmas. Brian samples Tom's bacon and is delighted with it. However, Tom reveals a snag. They're left with big legs of pork, which they can't sell. They could cook them for ham? Brian thinks this is a fantastic idea.

Lilian tells Peggy she wants everyone at the Dower House for Christmas because otherwise she has to go to the Chalkmans! They return to the Lodge, and Jennifer arrives. Peggy explains she's made a decision. They'll go to Grey Gables for Christmas. No arguments. Jennifer tells Lilian she's had no luck finding a carer. How can she go to Hungary tomorrow? Lilian tells her to go - she wants a full report on Debbie's boyfriend.

Episode written by Simon Frith.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b00fnxb7)
Mark Lawson talks to Maria Friedman, star of musical shows like Chicago and Ragtime, who specializes in performing the songs of Stephen Sondheim. During the Broadway production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's Woman in White in 2005, Maria Friedman was diagnosed with breast cancer. Post treatment, earlier this year she released a new album and is now re-opening her one woman show, Maria Friedman: Re-arranged, at the Trafalgar Studios in London. Maria talks about working through her illness, the ups and down of schooldays in Germany and the importance of interpretation in her singing , particularly when working with the meticulous Stephen Sondheim.

Elizabeth Bishop was first introduced to Robert Lowell in 1947 and letters between these two American poets, which span three decades, discuss everything from their literary heroes and their arguments about each other's work to Lowell's mental illness and Bishop's struggles with alcohol. Poet Tom Paulin has been reading them.

The recent DVD release of Stephen King's The Mist offers an unusual extra: a version of the film in black and white. Film critic Adam Smith takes a look at this, and turns down the colour on a selection of other recent DVD releases to see how going black and white changes our viewing experience.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00fnxk0)
Julian Fellowes - Snobs

Episode 3

Satire on English snobbery, adapted from his own novel by Julian Fellowes.

3/5. Edith's privileged yet dull new existence is shaken up when a film crew arrives at Broughton Hall, among which is the handsome Simon Russell.

Narrator ...... Nicholas Farrell
Edith ...... Sophie Roberts
Charles ...... Hugh Bonneville
Lady Uckfield ...... Celia Imrie
Lord Uckfield ...... Richard Mitchley
Isabel ...... Sophie Thompson
David/Eric ...... Rupert Vansittart
Caroline ...... Caroline Harker
Simon ...... Julian Rhind-Tutt
Bella ...... Bernice Stegers
Singer ...... David Benson.


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b00fq311)
Michael Buerk chairs a debate on the moral questions behind the week's news. Clifford Longley, Kenan Malik, Michael Portillo and Claire Fox cross-examine witnesses.


WED 20:45 Received Wisdom (b00fq32g)
Episode 2

Series in which MPs and peers from across the political spectrum share some pearls of wisdom with Guardian political sketchwriter Simon Hoggart.

Current and former MPs reveal their tips for keeping voters on-side and impressing the party bigwigs.


WED 21:00 World On The Move: Great Animal Migrations (b00fpy68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Midweek (b00fq2x9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b00fnybl)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b00fnycw)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.

Including reports on Gordon Brown's mortgage rescue plan and what the US can do to defuse regional tensions after the Mumbai attacks.

Plus the signing in Oslo of a convention banning cluster bombs and the first Chinese chef to be awarded three Michelin stars.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00fnyv5)
Black Orchids

Episode 8

Amanda Root reads from Gillian Slovo's love story, set in 1950s Ceylon and London.

Life at his public school is improved when Milton embarks on a business venture with some friends.


WED 23:00 15 Minute Musical (b00fq37t)
Series 5

Pappa Pia

Series of brief musical comedies by Dave Cohen, David Quantick and Richie Webb.

Piers Morgan discovers that his father is one of three reality show judges - but which one?

With Richie Webb, Dave Lamb and Vicki Pepperdine.


WED 23:15 Self-Storage (b00fq37w)
Series 2

Episode 5

Sitcom by Tom Collinson about a man living in a storage unit.

Dave's dad makes a surprise visit.

Dave ...... Reece Shearsmith
Geoff ...... Mark Heap
Dave's dad ...... Philip Jackson.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00fnywg)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Robert Orchard.



THURSDAY 04 DECEMBER 2008

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b00fnlg9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b00fv6jx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00fnljn)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00fnm1p)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00fnm31)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b00fnm4g)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00fnn7f)
Daily prayer and reflection with Alison Elliot.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b00fnnxg)
News and issues in rural Britain with Melanie Abbott.


THU 06:00 Today (b00fnp98)
Presented by John Humphrys and Sarah Montague.

Labour backbencher Stephen Pound discusses why leader of the House of Commons Harriet Harman has refused to say whether she has confidence in the Speaker of the House, Michael Martin.

Stephen Noakes, of Cheltenham & Gloucester, discusses the government's mortgage help plan for homeowners.

Roger Harrabin reports on the threat from Italy, Poland and other East European nations to veto the global climate package because, they say, it would cost too much.

Lisa Harker, of the Institute for Public Policy Research, and shadow work and pensions secretary Chris Grayling discuss if an end to child poverty can be achieved by 2020.

Director of the LSE Sir Howard Davies discusses cutting rates with David B Smith, chairman of the 'shadow' Monetary Policy Committee.

Rupert Uloth says people should eat more venison to curb the rising deer population.

Thought for the day with Prof Mona Siddiqui.

Prof Jon Silverman and Lord Mackenzie discuss if police followed protocol in the arrest of Damian Green.

Housing Minister Margaret Beckett discusses the government plan to underwrite mortgage interest payments of people facing repossession.

Chas Bayfield and Frankie Hipwell-Larkin consider whether the Christmas story can be told in thirty seconds.

Tony Lake, former chairman of the national DNA database, discusses the case of two British men who want their DNA profiles removed.

Neil Doncaster, of Norwich City FC, and Peter Ridsdale, of Cardiff City FC, discuss a proposed salary cap on football clubs.

Australia's minister for defence, Warren Snowdon, explains why their navy has begun a two-month stand-down.

Former Lib Dem leader Charles Kennedy and Labour MP David Winnick discuss the row over MP Damian Green.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b00fq3d4)
Heat

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the history of scientific ideas about heat. As anyone who’s ever burnt their hand will testify – heat is a pretty commonplace concept. Cups of coffee cool down, microwaves reheat them, water boils at 100 degrees and freezes on cold winter nights.Behind the everyday experience of hot things lies a complex story of ideas spread across Paris, Manchester and particularly Glasgow. It’s a story of brewing vats and steam engines, of fridges, thermometers and the heat death of the universe. But most importantly, it was the understanding and harnessing of heat that helped make the modern world of industry, engineering and technology.With Simon Schaffer, Professor of History of Science at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Darwin College; Hasok Chang, Professor of Philosophy of Science at University College London and Joanna Haigh, Professor of Atmospheric Physics at Imperial College London


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b00fv6jz)
Medical London - City of Diseases, City of Cures

Episode 4

For centuries, London was the world's largest city, and a frontline in mankind's battle against disease. Dr Richard Barnett explores how city life has been shaped by sickness and health.

Is distraction of the mind an urban condition? A look at the sick city's attitude to madness.

Read by Tony Gardner.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00fns7x)
Contact orders; Poet Annie Freud

Will new measures to prevent parents from flouting their contact orders, deter them from doing so? Plus, poet Annie Freud on the relationship between literature and visual arts.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b00fq3qz)
Spain

The BBC's Madrid correspondent Steve Kingstone examines the growing antagonism between Spain's Socialist government and the Roman Catholic Church, who have clashed over changes to religious and social education in schools. Many fear that this conflict could further dilute the Catholic values that some people feel define Spain's national identity.


THU 11:30 The Three Stooges: Movie Maniacs (b00fq3r1)
Comedy writer and historian Glenn Mitchell tells the story of American vaudeville and comedy act The Three Stooges, from their debut in the 1920s to their later films and shorts.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b00fnpsj)
Presented by Julian Worricker.

How do we solve a problem like the ticket tout? We hear from John Whittingdale, the chairman of the Commons Select Committee on Media, Culture and Sport.

Increasing numbers of people are having their IP addresses stolen. We hear from the assistant editor of Which? Computing, Jaclyn Clarabut.

The changing face of the pub. Pub regular Gerry Anderson explains why he has reached the sad conclusion that going to the pub isn't quite the experience it once was.

Reporter Luke Walton finds out how to put empty properties to good use and hears the story of a property guardian in Gateshead.

The Scottish Government is considering leasing more than a quarter of its forests to private companies, possibly some from abroad. Critics say public recreational areas and the protection of wildlife will be at risk if the plans go ahead. Environment Minister Michael Russell discusses the proposals along with Edward Shepherd, secretary of the Forestry Commission's Trade Union Group.

Carers from across the UK are travelling to Parliament to lobby MPs for a better deal from Government and on 5th December events are held across the country to mark Carers Rights Day. We hear from one carer who is joining those lobbying MPs and how she is coping.

Does the world of retailing need a suppliers' ombudsman? The recommendation comes from the Competition Commission, who argue that such a figure could smooth relations between suppliers and supermarkets. But the supermarkets themselves say no, arguing that the post is unnecessary and that it would cost the consumer.


THU 12:57 Weather (b00fnpv8)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b00fnpxd)
National and international news with Martha Kearney.


THU 13:30 Open Country (b00fn2tr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:07 on Saturday]


THU 14:00 The Archers (b00fnpz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b007rgmm)
A Shropshire Lad

A new setting of AE Housman's famous poem, exploring the fleetingness of love and decay of youth, adapted for radio by Steven Canny.

With interviews and contributions from people across Shropshire.

Poems performed by Simon Russell Beal.


THU 15:00 Journey of a Lifetime (b00801p6)
2007: The Nandi People

Runner David Waldman won the BBC/Royal Geographical Society's 2007 competition for travellers who want to fulfil their dream journey.

This programme follows him as he fulfils his ambition to meet the Nandi people of Kenya's Rift Valley and discover just what makes them the greatest endurance runners on the plane.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b00fn892)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00fnqbp)
John B Keane Readings

The Curriculum Vitae

Five readings from the work of the late Irish novelist and essayist John B Keane.

When young Dolly Hallon sees an advertisement for a postman, she knows that there is only one possible candidate for the job. Read by Dermot Crowley.


THU 15:45 Street Science (b00fnqtf)
MMR

Five eminent scientists discuss controversial areas of science with members of the public. Immunisation coordinator Dr David Elliman joins parents at a primary school in Lambeth, south London, to discuss the MMR vaccine.


THU 16:00 Open Book (b00fnbl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:30 Material World (b00fq6nh)
Wetlands and the Carbon Cycle - Hot Rocks

Wetlands and the Carbon Cycle
Quentin Cooper joins scientists from the Open University who are measuring the exchange of methane between plants, soil microogranisms and the atmosphere.

Wetlands such as bogs and swamps are home to some special microorganisms which are important producers of methane, a greenhouse gas 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide. Biogeochemists are trying to better understand the impact of human activities and industrial processes on biological, chemical and geographic systems in the hope that they can find ways to reduce the production of greenhouse gases.

Hot Rocks
When oil prices rise, there are queues at the petrol station and the whole world goes into panic. But could the cheap energy we’re looking for be right beneath our feet? 99.9% of the Earth is hotter than 100 degrees Centigrade, meaning that tapping into geothermal sources could be the ideal solution.

And we won’t even have to move to Iceland. Geologists working in the wake of the 1979 oil crisis found that 3km-deep boreholes in Cornwall could provide both electricity and heat energy for towns nearby. Unfortunately, the availability of cheap North Sea gas in the 80s meant that the idea never really took off. It’s only with climate change, rising fuel prices and better drilling technology that ‘hot dry rocks’ are back.

Geophysicist Ryan Law from Ove Arup and Partners joins Quentin Cooper to discuss how pumping water deep into the Earth’s surface to heat it and then turn it into energy is an idea worth investing in. Jon Busby from the British Geological Survey explains how we can tell what’s under the ground and which areas of the UK can benefit most from geothermal power.


THU 17:00 PM (b00fnx3x)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00fnx70)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


THU 18:30 Act Your Age (b00fr1tp)
Series 1

Episode 2

Simon Mayo discovers which generation is the funniest. With Jon Richardson, Lucy Porter and Roy Walker. From December 2008.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b00fnpz4)
Clarrie's taken George to visit William. She mentions the turkeys. William can't get any time off, it's so busy. Later, Nic phones William. She wonders if William could take them skating in Felpersham? He'd love to. He tells her about the turkeys. She's sure he could get the time off if he asked nicely.

Hayley's really grateful to Elizabeth for letting them stay at Lower Loxley. She offers to take the twins to the Christmas lights switch on.

Mike and Jill put the lights up on the village hall. Jill donates some from the decorations swap - they're rather old but Phil's tested them. Hayley appears with the twins and her two. She's got to collect some things from Willow Farm, so Mike goes with her. Hayley's horrified! There's dust everywhere, piles of washing up and it's freezing. Mike tells her it's fine, no need for fuss.

The countdown for the lights begins. Jill starts to tell Mike she's not so sure about the lights she brought. Mike throws the switch and the circuit blows. Eventually they try again, this time with success. In the middle of it all, Clarrie's phone rings. It's William. To her delight, he'll be there for the turkeys.

Episode written by Simon Frith.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b00fnxb9)
Presented by Kirsty Lang.

David Benedict reviews two musical openings in London this week: a new production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Carousel, and Trevor Nunn's production of the Sondheim musical, A Little Night Music.

British actress Sophie Okonedo talks about her latest role in The Secret Life of Bees, a coming-of-age story set in South Carolina against the turbulence of the civil rights movement.

Banksy is the most famous street artist to emerge from Bristol, a city which has been at the centre of graffiti art in the UK since the early 1980s. As a new book launches chronicling 25 years of the street art story in Bristol, Front Row visits the city to meet the people who made it happen.

The shortlist for the Record of the Year at the Grammys, announced last night, had an overwhelmingly British flavour. Music critic Alexis Petridis assesses whether this has any significance.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00fny8b)
Julian Fellowes - Snobs

Episode 4

Satire on English snobbery, adapted from his own novel by Julian Fellowes.

Simon is on sparkling form when David and Isabel Easton invite the Broughtons and some of the film crew out for dinner, not realising that they are making a dreadful faux pas. But the evening takes an embarrassing turn and Charles is forced to make an early departure.

Narrator ...... Nicholas Farrell
Edith ...... Sophie Roberts
Charles ...... Hugh Bonneville
Lady Uckfield ...... Celia Imrie
Lord Uckfield ...... Richard Mitchley
Isabel ...... Sophie Thompson
David/Eric ...... Rupert Vansittart
Caroline ...... Caroline Harker
Simon ...... Julian Rhind-Tutt
Bella ...... Bernice Stegers
Singer ...... David Benson.


THU 20:00 The Partisan Coffee House (b00fq6nm)
Historian Mike Berlin tells the story of a short-lived but influential left-wing coffee house set up in London's Soho in 1958 and considers what happened to the political and cultural optimism that flourished after it closed in 1961.

Founded by Raphael Samuel, a young radical historian, the Partisan aimed to recreate a European-style meeting place for politically engaged young people in the wake of such events as the Suez Crisis and the Hungarian Revolution.

Featuring interviews with surviving Partisan participants including historian Eric Hobsbawm and sociologist Stuart Hall.


THU 20:30 Analysis (b00fq6rl)
Blow-Back from Edinburgh?

David Runciman asks if political forces are pushing Edinburgh and London onto increasingly divergent paths, with radical implications for how the next Westminster general election will be fought and British government formed.


THU 21:00 Leading Edge (b00fq6rn)
Student Astronauts

Student Astronauts
As Britain reviews its role in human spaceflight, reporter Anna Lacey auditions for Leicester University's astronaut course.

Street Science
What happens when scientists undertaking controversial research meet the public? That is the theme of BBC Radio 4’s series Street Science. But should scientists engage with the public and is controversy only a result of media hype? Geoff debates the issues with Fiona Fox of the Science Media Centre and nanotechnology expert Professor Tony Ryan.

The Silent Epidemic
Thoracic surgeon Mr John Edwards warns that we still don’t know enough about the dangers of low level exposure to asbestos.

Medical Futures
It can take up to thirty years for a medical invention to be developed. Medical Innovations is a scheme to accelerate the process.


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b00fq3d4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b00fnybn)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b00fnycy)
With Robin Lustig. Winners and losers after the latest interest rate cut; is the French bid to kick-start their economy a good model?; and an African leader's call for Mugabe to go.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00fnyv7)
Black Orchids

Episode 9

Amanda Root reads from Gillian Slovo's love story, set in 1950s Ceylon and London.

It is now 1972 and Britain has changed since the fifties. But even though Emil's eccentricities now seem to fit with the times, his son is still ill at ease in his own skin.


THU 23:00 Cowards (b00fq6rq)
Series 2

Episode 4

Step inside the strange and happy world of the Cowards.

Series 2 of sketch comedy with a comic slant on human frailties

Starring Tom Basden, Stefan Golaszewski, Tim Key and Lloyd Woolf.

Producer: Victoria Lloyd

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in December 2008.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00fnywj)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with David Wilby.



FRIDAY 05 DECEMBER 2008

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b00fnlgc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b00fv6jz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b00fnljq)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b00fnm1r)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b00fnm33)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b00fnm4j)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b00fnn7h)
Daily prayer and reflection with Alison Elliot.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b00fnnxj)
News and issues in rural Britain with Charlotte Smith.


FRI 06:00 Today (b00fnp9b)
Presented by John Humphrys and Evan Davis.

Justin Webb reports on sceptisism as to whether $34bn in aid will help GM, Ford and Chrysler.

Public Accounts Committee Chairman Edward Leigh says managers at CDC Group are not doing everything they should to help the poorest of the poor.

Martin Patience reports on his week with the US 101st Airborne regiment in Khost.

Mark Simpson reports on relations between the Conservatives and the Ulster Unionists.

Former adviser to Tony Blair Ros Altman and chief economist Jim O'Neill discuss the Bank of England's decision to cut interest rates to the lowest level in 57 years.

Microbiology expert Mark Wheelis discusses whether a truth serum is still science fiction.

Thought for the day with the Chief Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks.

International Development Secretary Douglas Alexander says that the cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe is Robert Mugabe's fault.

Publicist Max Clifford and managing editor of The Sun Graham Dudman discuss newspapers' use of rewards to help solve criminal cases.

Telephone engineer Bryan Fox, who was at the recording of the first trunk call, discusses the technological advances of the last half-century.

Pallab Ghosh discusses why the Large Hadron Collider at Cern broke down so quickly.

Sanchia Berg reports on calls for the government to help buy-to-let landlords.

Gemma Dixon discusses why she is refusing to send her daughter to school because it will not let her wear earrings with the headmaster John Hardy.

Barbara Plett visits an Islamic charity caught up in the crisis between Pakistan and India.

Former chief constable Paul Whitehouse and Rob Brown, former president of the London Courts Solicitors Association, discuss if the DNA of innocent people will still be admitted in court.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b00fn89g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b00fv6k1)
Medical London - City of Diseases, City of Cures

Episode 5

For centuries, London was the world's largest city, and a frontline in mankind's battle against disease. Dr Richard Barnett explores how city life has been shaped by sickness and health.

London's geographical location has been both its blessing and its curse. The river has at different times offered the health hazards of both malarial swamp and open sewer, but it has also been a global trading route bringing exotic commodities and foreign cures.

Read by Tony Gardner.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b00fnpqx)
Deprivation and cancer; Explicit music videos; Fringes

What can be done about the 'deprivation gap' in cancer screening? Plus Trevor Sorbie on the perfect fringe, and are music videos pushing the boundaries of sexual imagery too far?


FRI 11:00 A Dream of Eleanor (b00fq8w2)
Former president of Ireland Mary Robinson examines the role that Eleanor Roosevelt had in producing the UN Declaration of Human Rights, which was 60 years old in 2008.

Appointed to the UN General Assembly by her husband's successor as US president, Harry Truman, she was subsequently elected chairperson of the Commission on Human Rights by her fellow delegates. It was from this position that she helped to draft the Declaration that still holds firm today. Featuring contributions from Geoffrey Robertson QC, Shami Chakrabarti and Eleanor's grandson Curtis Roosevelt.


FRI 11:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b00fq91f)
Series 2

All the Best

Comedy set in a Scottish corner shop. Lenzie turns feral after Ramesh inadvertantly sells locals cards with abusive messages.

Written by and starring Sanjeev Kohli and Donald McLeary.

Ramesh ... Sanjeev Kohli
Dave ... Donald McLeary
Alok ... Susheel Kumar
Sanjay ... Omar Raza
Father Henderson ... Gerard Kelly
Michael the Copper ... Jordan Young
Ted ... Gavin Mitchell
Janet ... Maureen Carr
Gillian ... Michele Gallagher

Director: Iain Davidson
Producer: Gus Beattie

A Comedy Unit Production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b00fnpsl)
Presented by Peter White.

Five months before the government announced it was bidding for the 2012 games a report was published saying the economic and sports participation benefits of the games would be limited. We look at what the report says.

A Food Standards Agency investigation has found that you have a one in ten chance of getting a different type of fish to the one you ordered when you eat out. Melanie Abbott reports.

In Scotland, one of the country's leading environmental organisations has just given its backing for a golf course to be built on a site of special scientific interest. We speak to Andrew Campbell, operations manager at the government advisory body Scottish Natural Heritage.

When does noise in restaurants count as a 'healthy buzz' and when is it off-putting? Henrietta Harrison compares acoustics at top-end restaurants to those at a noodle bar chain to find out how table linen or tiled floors can make a big difference.

The soprano Lesley Garrett tells us about her ideal weekend.

Members of the only gymnastics club in the country to produce an Olympic medallist in the last eighty years say it is at breaking point and are critical of the funding system. We speak to Liz Nicholl from UK Sport which handles the big budgets for the Olympics and Paralympics.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b00fnpvb)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b00fnpxg)
National and international news with Shaun Ley.


FRI 13:30 More or Less (b00fq91h)
Sexual or Statistical Abuse - Credit Crunch Maths - VAT Cut

Sexual or Statistical Abuse?
Between 5 and 10% of girls suffer the most serious forms of sexual abuse, according to reports based on a paper published this week in The Lancet. These are shocking figures, but are they true? We investigate whether the statistics really support the claims of a hidden epidemic.

Maths and the Credit Crunch
Banks and hedge funds rely on highly paid mathematicians and economists known as "quants" to evaluate risk. Why didn't they see the credit crunch coming?

Paul Wilmott is a lecturer in financial mathematics and runs the profession's most popular website. He is a fan of quantitative finance - but he thinks that its misuse has played a part in creating the current banking crisis. It is all to do with a tendency for some mathematicians to get fixated on the numbers, whilst failing to think about the big picture.

VAT Cut
Many people have dismissed the recent reduction in the VAT rate from 17.5% to 15% as derisory. "A difference of £2.50 in a £100 is hardly light at the end of the tunnel," was the typical complaint. We explain why the news is worse than that.

Britain's Most Admired Companies
This week Management Today magazine announced that the drinks manufacturer Diageo is Britain's Most Admired Company.

The organisers claim the awards "offer a unique insight into the components of corporate reputation, by recognising key factors critical to business success."

All round brilliance or the halo effect? But is the survey based on flawed data?

Phil Rosenzweig, a professor at leading business school IMD in Geneva, claims the academics who spend months each year compiling the 'Most Admired' league tables are failing to take into account "the halo effect".

This is our tendency to perceive that a company which is doing wellfinancially is performing well in pretty much every field - from product quality and innovation through to the ability to attract and retain top talent.

According to Prof Rosenzweig, it is a phenomenon that is rife in the world of popular management science and in many of the leading business success books.

Is Fishing More Dangerous Than Boxing?
Boxers often defend their sport against those who would like to ban it by stating that it is less dangerous than fishing. Listener Su Heggerty asked us to investigate whether the boxers' claim is really true.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b00fnpz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b007mhzr)
Looking for Dad

By Michael Butt.

Charlie's attempts at reconciliation with his estranged father are threatened by his wife's fierce but unexplained hostility to a man whom she has only ever met once in her life.

Charlie ...... Henry Goodman
Ray ...... Rob Jarvis
Juliet ...... Lesley Sharp
Matron ...... Richenda Carey
Young Ray ...... Jarvis.


FRI 15:00 Ramblings (b00fq91k)
Series 11

Gloucestershire

Clare Balding joins the Bristol Walk and Talk group on a seven-mile hike from the village of Sherston to Westonbirt Arboretum in Gloucestershire.


FRI 15:30 Afternoon Reading (b00fnqbr)
John B Keane Readings

Conscience Money

Five readings from the work of the late Irish novelist and essayist John B Keane.

When Kitty Doody's dad dies, the next door Mickelow twins fear she'll sell up. What could make her stay? Read by Dermot Crowley.


FRI 15:45 Street Science (b00fnqth)
Nanotechnology

Five eminent scientists discuss controversial areas of science with members of the public.

Professor Tony Ryan from Sheffield University spends his lunch hour talking to people in the Winter Gardens in Sheffield about nanotechnology.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b00fq91m)
John Wilson presents the obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died. The programme reflects on people of distinction and interest from many walks of life, some famous and some less well known.


FRI 16:30 The Film Programme (b00fq92q)
Sam Neill, the star of Jurassic Park discusses his latest work, a shaggy dog story about the transmigration of souls.

Buried Treasures Of British Cinema:
Novelist Jonathan Coe and Matthew Sweet nominate two British movies they believe are ripe for rediscovery.

Director Eran Riklis and star Hiam Abbas discuss their award-winning Israeli drama Lemon Tree.

Michael Nyman, the renowned composer of The Piano and The Draughtsman's Contract reveals his favourite score.


FRI 17:00 PM (b00fnx3z)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news with Eddie Mair. Plus Weather.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b00fnx72)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by Weather.


FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b00fqmxv)
Series 25

Episode 2

Comedy sketches and satirical comments from Steve Punt, Hugh Dennis and the team including Mitch Benn, Marcus Brigstocke, Laura Shavin and Jon Holmes.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b00fnpz6)
Tom's annoyed that Brian's keen on his ham idea - he wanted to develop it at Bridge Farm, thinking Brian wouldn't go for it. He can't wait for Hannah to arrive on Sunday. Brenda would love to be there, but realises there's another panto rehearsal then.

Later, Tom visits Peggy. They chat about the summerhouse, and Peggy tries to be positive about how she's doing. Jennifer calls from Hungary. Tom tells Peggy to ask about Marshall but Jennifer hasn't met him yet.

Mike and David are in the Bull before the panto rehearsal. Mike needs to get out of the cold at Willow Farm. Lynda arrives and wants to talk beanstalks. She tells them Kenton's still ill, so she'll be standing in.

At the rehearsal, Lynda has difficulty reading Kenton's notes. David takes full advantage. He tells her she's dropped a page, so she bends down and David manages to hit her with his ladder. Mike congratulates him on his perfect comedy timing, while trying to suppress a cough. They continue, but Mike struggles to deliver his lines between sneezes. It must be the dust at Willow Farm. But Brenda feels his forehead - he's burning up. Lynda refuses to believe it, she can't lose him!

Episode written by Simon Frith.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b00fnxbc)
Presented by Kirsty Lang.

Stand-up comedian, Celebrity Big Brother winner, actor and sitcom star Jack Dee talks to Kirsty about the inspiration behind the deadpan sitcom Lead Balloon.

Writer, broadcaster and critic Norman Lebrecht debates the new trends in choral performance with Suzi Digby, a choral director and judge on the BBC's Last Choir Standing and Choir of the Year competitions.

The new German film North Face tells the remarkable story of a 1936 expedition to scale the notorious face of the Eiger in the Swiss Alps. We speak to the German director Philipp Stoelzl and to Louise Osmond, who told the same story of the assault on the Eiger in the Emmy Award-winning documentary The Beckoning Silence.

When Genesis drummer and singer Phil Collins suggested that he might retire from performing earlier this year, some online music message-boards greeted the news with delight. But as classic Genesis albums from the early 1970s are re-released on vinyl, Ben Wardle argues that it's time to show Phil some respect.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b00fny8v)
Julian Fellowes - Snobs

Episode 5

Satire on English snobbery, adapted from his own novel by Julian Fellowes.

Edith and Simon move in together, leaving Charles devastated. But life with an actor is not as glamorous as Edith had hoped and, when she makes an unfortunate discovery, she is forced to make a choice.

Narrator ...... Nicholas Farrell
Edith ...... Sophie Roberts
Charles ...... Hugh Bonneville
Lady Uckfield ...... Celia Imrie
Lord Uckfield ...... Richard Mitchley
Isabel ...... Sophie Thompson
David/Eric ...... Rupert Vansittart
Caroline ...... Caroline Harker
Simon ...... Julian Rhind-Tutt
Bella ...... Bernice Stegers
Singer ...... David Benson.


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b00fqmxx)
Jonathan Dimbleby chairs the topical debate in Woking. The panel are Labour MP Bob Marshall-Andrews, shadow secretary of state for energy and climate change Greg Clark, Liberal Democrat spokesperson Lynne Featherstone MP and the editor of the Financial Times, Lionel Barber.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b00fqmxz)
Writers Room

Are we naturally able to think clearly when surrounded by mess, asks Clive James, because chaos is inherent in all our minds - even those of the great writers and thinkers. He reveals why he is glad the chaos of his own office is not featured in a new exhibition called ‘Writers’ Rooms’.


FRI 21:00 Friday Drama (b00fqmy1)
Binge Drunk Britain: The Musical

Comedy by Paul Dodgson about three blokes from Newport - Oddie, Tank and Shave It - who wake up at Severn Bridge Services face down in bowls of salad. Gradually, the excesses of the night before come back to them - a night in Bristol that had started so well.

Oddie ...... Ian Puleston Davies
Tank ...... Richard Elfyn
Shave It/Nigel ...... Richard Nichols
Manager/Policewoman ...... Eiry Thomas
Psycho ...... Dick Bradnum
Driver ...... Huw Davies

Music composed by Paul Dodsgon; arranged and performed by Sarah Moody, Luke Carver Goss and Oliver Wilson Dickson.

Directed by Kate McAll.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b00fnybq)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b00fnyd0)
National and international news and analysis with Robin Lustig.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b00fnyv9)
Black Orchids

Episode 10

Amanda Root reads from Gillian Slovo's love story, set in 1950s Ceylon and London.

After the shocking discovery that his mother is still alive, Milton sets out for Sri Lanka to unravel the truth about his parents.


FRI 23:00 On the Ropes (b00ghrrb)
Peter Hain

John Humphrys talks to successful people who have weathered storms in their careers. His guest is former cabinet minister Peter Hain, who talks to John about the ten-month police investigation into his financial affairs and his political future now that he has cleared his name.


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b00fnywl)
News, views and features on today's stories in Parliament with Mark D'Arcy.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b00fnxcb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b00fnxj1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b00fnxk0)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b00fny8b)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b00fny8v)

15 Minute Musical 23:00 WED (b00fq37t)

A Dream of Eleanor 11:00 FRI (b00fq8w2)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b00fq2st)

A Point of View 08:50 SUN (b00fm9wk)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b00fqmxz)

A Voyage to Lundy 05:45 SAT (b008v8zf)

Act Your Age 18:30 THU (b00fr1tp)

Adventures in Poetry 23:30 SAT (b00fkgnn)

Adventures in Poetry 16:30 SUN (b00fnbqh)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 MON (b00fnqcx)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 TUE (b00fnqbk)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 WED (b00fnqbm)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 THU (b00fnqbp)

Afternoon Reading 15:30 FRI (b00fnqbr)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b00fq2t2)

All in the Mind 16:30 WED (b00fq2t2)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b00fm5s4)

Analysis 20:30 THU (b00fq6rl)

Another Case of Milton Jones 12:00 SUN (b00fkwx4)

Another Case of Milton Jones 18:30 MON (b00fpx7x)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b00fn5p4)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b00fm9wh)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b00fqmxx)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b00fr75c)

Bad Habits 09:30 TUE (b00fpxkg)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b00fn7c6)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b00fn7c6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b00fnywb)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b00fnyv3)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b00fnyv5)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b00fnyv7)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b00fnyv9)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b00fpypf)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b00fnpnk)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b00fnpnk)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b00fv6k5)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b00fv6k5)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b00fv6jx)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b00fv6jx)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b00fv6jz)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b00fv6jz)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b00fv6k1)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b00fkwv6)

Brain of Britain 13:30 MON (b00fpx7n)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b00fn89b)

Clare in the Community 18:30 WED (b008xg02)

Classic Serial 21:00 SAT (b00fkgnj)

Classic Serial 15:00 SUN (b00fnbf3)

Cowards 23:00 THU (b00fq6rq)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b00fm02z)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b00fq3qz)

Danny Robins Music Therapy 23:00 TUE (b00fq2t4)

Defining Moments 19:45 SUN (b007rhkp)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b00fn89g)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b00fn89g)

Drama 14:15 MON (b00fpx7q)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b00fq1br)

Drama 14:15 THU (b007rgmm)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b007mhzr)

Excess Baggage 10:00 SAT (b00fn3fm)

Fags, Mags and Bags 11:30 FRI (b00fq91f)

Farming Today This Week 06:35 SAT (b00fn2tt)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b00fnnxq)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b00fnnx7)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b00fnnxc)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b00fnnxg)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b00fnnxj)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b00fm9j3)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b00fl0jg)

Friday Drama 21:00 FRI (b00fqmy1)

From Fact to Fiction 19:00 SAT (b00fn75c)

From Fact to Fiction 17:40 SUN (b00fn75c)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b00fn3jk)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b00fnxbf)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b00fnxb5)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b00fnxb7)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b00fnxb9)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b00fnxbc)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b00fn89q)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 WED (b00fn89q)

Go4it 19:15 SUN (b00fnbqw)

I Was... 11:30 TUE (b00fpy6b)

In Living Memory 11:00 WED (b00fq2xc)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b00fq3d4)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b00fq3d4)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b00fq2t0)

Journey of a Lifetime 15:00 THU (b00801p6)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b00fm9tk)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b00fq91m)

Leading Edge 21:00 THU (b00fq6rn)

Listen Against 18:30 TUE (b00fq2sw)

Lives in a Landscape 11:00 MON (b00fpx7j)

Living World 06:35 SUN (b00fn88t)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b00fn759)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b00fq2sp)

Material World 16:30 THU (b00fq6nh)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b00fmbrw)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b00fn7bw)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b00fnljf)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b00fnlg5)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b00fnlg7)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b00fnlg9)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b00fnlgc)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b00fq2x9)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b00fq2x9)

Mind Changers 23:00 SUN (b00b7lrb)

Money Box Live 15:00 MON (b00fpx7s)

Money Box 12:00 SAT (b00fn5ny)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b00fn5ny)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b00fl5w5)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b00fq311)

More or Less 13:30 FRI (b00fq91h)

Music Feature 15:30 SAT (b00fl05l)

Music Feature 13:30 TUE (b00fr51y)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b00fmbs4)

News Briefing 13:00 SAT (b00fn5p2)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b00fn7c4)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b00fnm4v)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b00fnm4b)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b00fnm4d)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b00fnm4g)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b00fnm4j)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b00fn88p)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b00fn2gf)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b00fn88y)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b00fn896)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b00fn77m)

On the Ropes 23:00 FRI (b00ghrrb)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b00fnbl9)

Open Book 16:00 THU (b00fnbl9)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b00fn2tr)

Open Country 13:30 THU (b00fn2tr)

PM 17:00 SAT (b00fn5q9)

PM 17:00 MON (b00fnx6t)

PM 17:00 TUE (b00fnx3s)

PM 17:00 WED (b00fnx3v)

PM 17:00 THU (b00fnx3x)

PM 17:00 FRI (b00fnx3z)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b00fnbqr)

Pilgrim by Sebastian Baczkiewicz 14:15 WED (b00fq2xk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b00fmbs6)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b00fnn7t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b00fnn79)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b00fnn7c)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b00fnn7f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b00fnn7h)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:55 SUN (b00fn892)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b00fn892)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b00fn892)

Ramblings 15:00 FRI (b00fq91k)

Received Wisdom 05:45 SUN (b00fhmcl)

Received Wisdom 20:45 WED (b00fq32g)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b00fn5p6)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b00fn2v1)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b00fn77k)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b00fmbs0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b00fn7c0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b00fnm2v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b00fnm1h)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b00fnm1l)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b00fnm1p)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b00fnm1r)

Self-Storage 23:15 WED (b00fq37w)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b00fmbry)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b00fmbs2)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b00fn753)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b00fn7by)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b00fn7c2)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b00fnbqk)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b00fnm1f)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b00fnm48)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b00fnljh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b00fnm2x)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b00fnljl)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b00fnm2z)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b00fnljn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b00fnm31)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b00fnljq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b00fnm33)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b00fn757)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b00fnbqp)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b00fnxb3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b00fnx6w)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b00fnx6y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b00fnx70)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b00fnx72)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b00fn88r)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b00fn88r)

Spending My Inheritance 11:30 MON (b00fpx7l)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b00fpx7g)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b00fpx7g)

Street Science 15:45 MON (b00fnqt9)

Street Science 15:45 TUE (b00fnqt7)

Street Science 15:45 WED (b00fnqtc)

Street Science 15:45 THU (b00fnqtf)

Street Science 15:45 FRI (b00fnqth)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b00fn898)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b00fn890)

Textbook Diplomacy 23:30 MON (b00d8t8k)

That's No Job for an Asian 10:30 SAT (b00fn3fp)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b00fn89d)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b00fnbqt)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b00fnbqt)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b00fnpzq)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b00fnpzq)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b00fnpz0)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b00fnpz0)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b00fnpz2)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b00fnpz2)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b00fnpz4)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b00fnpz4)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b00fnpz6)

The Art of Conversation 11:30 WED (b00fq2xf)

The Film Programme 16:30 FRI (b00fq92q)

The Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b00fn89j)

The Food Programme 16:00 MON (b00d8gvl)

The Human Button 20:00 TUE (b00fq2sy)

The Late Story 00:30 SUN (b007nlbm)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (b00fpxkd)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (b00fpxkd)

The Media Show 13:30 WED (b00fq2xh)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b00fm9tp)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b00fqmxv)

The Partisan Coffee House 20:00 THU (b00fq6nm)

The Three Stooges: Movie Maniacs 11:30 THU (b00fq3r1)

The Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b00fn3hq)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b00fn89n)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b00fnyv1)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b00fnyct)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b00fnycw)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b00fnycy)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b00fnyd0)

Things We Forgot to Remember 20:00 MON (b00fpx7z)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b00fl5w3)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b00fq2yx)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b00fnywd)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b00fnywg)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b00fnywj)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b00fnywl)

Today 07:00 SAT (b00fn2tz)

Today 06:00 MON (b00fnpb7)

Today 06:00 TUE (b00fnp94)

Today 06:00 WED (b00fnp96)

Today 06:00 THU (b00fnp98)

Today 06:00 FRI (b00fnp9b)

Traveller's Tree 16:30 MON (b00fpx7v)

Wars of The Roses 14:45 SUN (b00fn89s)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b00fn2gh)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b00fn2tx)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b00fn5p0)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b00fn755)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b00fn88w)

Weather 07:58 SUN (b00fn894)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b00fn89l)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b00fnbqm)

Weather 21:58 SUN (b00fnlbr)

Weather 05:57 MON (b00fnp92)

Weather 12:57 MON (b00fnpx6)

Weather 21:58 MON (b00fnycr)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b00fnpv4)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b00fnybj)

Weather 12:57 WED (b00fnpv6)

Weather 21:58 WED (b00fnybl)

Weather 12:57 THU (b00fnpv8)

Weather 21:58 THU (b00fnybn)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b00fnpvb)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b00fnybq)

Weekend Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b00fn5q7)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b00fnlbt)

Wiring the NHS 21:00 MON (b00fpxd2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b00fnpnm)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b00fnpqq)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b00fnpqs)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b00fns7x)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b00fnpqx)

Women in Uniform 13:30 SUN (b00dy4b3)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b00fl0bm)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b00fq2sr)

World On The Move: Great Animal Migrations 11:00 TUE (b00fpy68)

World On The Move: Great Animal Migrations 21:00 WED (b00fpy68)

World at One 13:00 MON (b00fnpyy)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b00fnpx8)

World at One 13:00 WED (b00fnpxb)

World at One 13:00 THU (b00fnpxd)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b00fnpxg)

You and Yours 12:00 MON (b00fnpv2)

You and Yours 12:00 TUE (b00fnpsd)

You and Yours 12:00 WED (b00fnpsg)

You and Yours 12:00 THU (b00fnpsj)

You and Yours 12:00 FRI (b00fnpsl)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b00fmbsw)