SATURDAY 05 JANUARY 2013

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b01phf10)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b01pk8fn)
Wild

Episode 5

Cheryl Strayed's redemptive account of hiking 1100 miles alone through America's rugged western landscape. At twenty-six Cheryl Strayed thought she'd lost everything after her mother died, and her marriage crumbled. With no previous experience of backpacking, she made the impulsive decision to rebuild her life by setting out on an incredible journey along America's Pacific Crest Trail. Today, Cheryl anticipates the journey's end.

Read by Kelly Burke
Abridged by Miranda Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01phf12)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01phf14)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.


SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01phf16)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b01phf18)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01phn5t)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church in the United Kingdom.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b01phn5w)
The programme about the winner of the iPM New Year's Honours visits the youth centre he runs on a deprived south London estate to help teenagers who have grown up in a culture of violence. Eddie Mair interviews winner Stu Thomson to find out how and why he tries to help these young people. Your News is read by Torin Douglas MBE.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b01phf1b)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b01phf1d)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b01phkts)
Hastings: The Shingle Fleet

Helen Mark visits the ancient town of Hastings to meet the people involved in the fishing community there. The fishing fleet is made up of small wooden boats which are all under ten metres long. This is important as, unusually, they are launched each day from the beach. This involves pushing them down the shingle bank, by tractor nowadays but traditionally by hand, and winching them back up again out of the sea when they return. Helen meets Paul Joy, a fisherman, who can date his family back as far as the 1000s, all launching their boats from the beach in Hastings as he does today. This is true of lots of the fishing families working there. But even with such a long and thriving history behind them the Hastings fishing industry is now in trouble. Their crews are in their seventies and there's no sign of new blood, and their wages are falling. Before 2006, under ten metre boats weren't subject to any EU fishing quotas as they were deemed exempt, but new legislation brought in six years ago changed all this. Since then the number of cod they're allowed to catch has dramatically reduced, and the fishermen are struggling.

Producer: Beatrice Fenton.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b01pndyr)
Farming Today This Week

From GM to Robots, mega-farms to small co-operatives, Charlotte Smith reports from the Oxford Farming Conference and the Oxford Real Farming Conference on how farming has to change as the world population rises and markets go global.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Rich Ward.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b01phf1g)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b01pndyt)
Morning news and current affairs with Evan Davis and James Naughtie. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b01pnfj9)
Businesswoman and former lawyer Margaret Mountford and the Inheritance Tracks of Madness frontman Suggs

Richard Coles and Sian Williams with businesswoman and lawyer Margaret Mountford, plus an actress who lost lots of weight and then found her work had dried up, the Inheritance Tracks of Madness front man Suggs, a look behind the scenes at 'The Famous' a menswear shop in Cheltenham that's closing its doors after 126 years, a builder whose family company is still around after 422 years, the evocative sound of an Italian coffee machine, Benedict Allen talking to his cousin Charles about their mutual lives in travel and a man who knows a great deal about paper.

Producer: Chris Wilson.


SAT 10:30 Reimagining the City (b01pnfjc)
New Orleans

When the writer Nik Cohn was 10 years old, he visited a bookshop and found a copy of Alan Lomax's book on musician Jelly Roll Morton. It had photographs of Jelly Roll's hometown, New Orleans, "the city of dreams." Nik fell for Jelly Roll Morton's vision of the city "hook line and sinker".

Back home in Northern Ireland, New Orleans became a place of magical possibilities. It would be another decade before Nik finally visited New Orleans but it has become a place he returns to and re-discovers constantly.

Nik muses on what makes New Orleans so different and so special. The beauty, the music and the food are all part of it, but living under sea level also has an impact on anyone who spends proper time in the city.

Producer: Rachel Hooper

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2013.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b01pnfjf)
Disgust

There's quite a lot of agreement between people on just what is disgusting and it usually involves some pretty basic body fluids. In this week's episode of the ideas discussion programme, Bridget Kendall rolls up her sleeves and delves a little deeper into this fundamental human emotion, one which stems from a basic instinct to keep ourselves alive.
We hear from surgeon Iain Hutchison how disgust is a subjective response, from sensory scientist John Prescott how even rats dislike bitter food, and from psychologist David Pizarro how our level of squeamishness can even reveal our politics.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b01pnfjh)
The secrets of eternal youth

Andrew North reflects on whether the recent rape and murder of a woman in Delhi might bring a greater soul searching amongst all sections of Indian society.

Owen Bennett-Jones teeters on the "fiscal cliff" with anti-tax activist Grover Norquist, asking if he's really the most powerful man in America?

Nicholas Shakespeare makes a nostalgic return to Phnom Penh.

Andrew Bomford uncovers the secrets of eternal youth on the Greek island of Ikaria.

Hugh Schofield banishes the January blues by exploring P.G. Wodehouse's love affair with France. And in the process, identifies what may be the master's finest opening paragraph.

Procucer: Jane Beresford.


SAT 12:00 Money Box (b01pnfjm)
Hundreds of thousands not told of child benefit cuts, and how to cash in on cashback

More than a third of families affected by the child benefit cuts which come in on Monday 7 January have not been contacted about the changes. More than 300,000 have not received a letter, as the government said they would. Some people are confused about what to do. Other people may not know that they're affected. Paul Lewis interviews the Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury, David Gauke.

When you take out travel insurance, you would hope that if you had to make a claim for a lost item of low value it would be straightforward. But some insurers are asking for a whole range of financial information from claimants in the hope of sharing the cost of your claim with other insurance companies with which you hold policies. But is this fair, and could this mean your premiums could then rise across all the insurance policies you have? Paul Lewis puts these questions to Malcolm Tarling from the Association of British Insurers.

Cashback websites like Quidco and Topcashback are increasing in popularity. Instead of going directly to a shop, you can access a retailer's online store through a link from a cashback website. You still receive your item directly from the retailer, but you also get some money from the cashback website. It sounds too good to be true, but Money Box hears from listeners who have embraced the trend and made hundreds of pounds - just from shopping. Is it really as simple as it sounds, and what are the drawbacks? Sarah Pennells from savvywoman.co.uk explains.

As we were hearing on the Money Box Live phone-in this week, buying things online or over the phone can be a risky business. What if you don't like what you've bought when it arrives? Or if you buy, say, an insurance policy and then change your mind? Luckily distance-selling regulations offer protection to consumers - they provide a seven-day cooling off period meaning that you can return goods or cancel services within that time. But there are exceptions to the rule, as Money Box hears one listener found to her cost.

Producer: Ruth Alexander.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b01phn12)
Series 79

Episode 3

The News Quiz (Sandi Toksvig & Jeremy Hardy) take on The Now Show (Steve Punt & Hugh Dennis) in the ultimate topical smackdown. Hosted by Rory Bremner.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b01phf1j)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b01phf1l)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:15 Archive on 4 (b00ym8bb)
Freeman's World

"Tighter, tighter!". This, the television producer Hugh Burnett tells Sue MacGregor, was a typical instruction to cameramen on the BBC series Face to Face which ran from 1959 to 1962.

Face to Face was Burnett's idea and it was simple. Each week, a public figure would join the presenter John Freeman for a half hour interview.

Fifty years on the programmes still shine, remarkable for their relentless camera close-ups and Freeman's forensic questioning, bringing celebrities to television screens as never before.

In Freeman's World, Sue MacGregor and Hugh Burnett look back on the series, beginning with its interrogation of Tony Hancock - "There's something troubling you about the world and I should like to know what it is". Critics rounded on Freeman for the tough line he took. In fact, the two men became firm friends.

Perhaps the most enduring Face to Face image is Gilbert Harding in distress as he's asked about seeing someone die (Freeman didn't know Harding's mother had just passed away). But Harding didn't cry, reveals Hugh Burnett. He was sweating under the lights. Moreover, Burnett says, he knew he was in for "a public beating."

Face to Face made John Freeman a celebrity, to his distaste. But his face was almost never seen, only the back of his head. And interviewing was just part of a life in which he has been soldier, MP, magazine editor, TV executive and high-ranking diplomat.

Freeman's World also features Bertrand Russell, Carl Jung, Dame Edith Sitwell and Sir Stirling Moss. And then there's Evelyn Waugh, aloof and ill at ease in the studio. Asked by John Freeman why he's agreed to appear on Face to Face, Waugh replies "Poverty. We've both been hired to talk in this deliriously happy way."

Producer: Chris Ledgard.


SAT 14:00 Ampers-Fan (b01gvlfr)
The dark horse of the keyboard, the ampersand exists to join things together, yet remains set apart. Whilst everyone can read and understand the ampersand, or the & symbol, how many of us know where it came from?

Alistair Sooke traces the history of the funny little character that has quietly given joy to so many, from a bored medieval scribe right the way through to a modern day digital font designer. Delighting type designers throughout the centuries as a chance within a font to create a small piece of art, it is a joyful moment in a functional resource. Speaking to Ampersfans Alastair enters into a world of letterpress, punchcutting and typography and discovers how the ampersand can be found at every step of the way, bringing a joyful flick of a tail to the dullest document.

If you thought the ampersand was a bright young thing in the world of type, you couldn't be more wrong; first credited to Marcus Tiro around 63 BC, combing the letters e and t from the Latin word "et". Fighting off competition from his nemesis, the "Tironian Mark", Alastair then tracks the ampersand to 16th Century Paris where it was modelled in the hands of type designer to the King, Claude Garamond, then back across the sea to William Calson's now famous interpretation, designed with a joyful array of flourishes and swirls. Alastair will discover how the ampersand became a calling card for many typographers, showcasing some of their best and most creative work.

A simple twist of the pen, the ampersand has managed to captivate its audience since print began, in Ampersfan Alistair tries to pin down this slippery character down once and for all.

Producer: : Jo Meek & Gillian Donovan
A Sparklab Production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01pnfjp)
White Snow

Faced with an upstart stepdaughter and lied to by her King about the real object of his affection, his unnaturally perfect daughter, the Queen is forced into decisive and deadly action. In this re-imagining of the Grimm brother's fairy-tale, we find ourselves at one with a fun loving and light hearted Queen, who having been wooed by an emotionally arrested king, soon finds that her main rival is his somewhat spooky and unhealthily translucent daughter, Snow White. It isn't clear what hold this eerily passive child has over the King but the implication is that the trauma of being cuckolded by his first wife, has been transformed into the myth of a flawless child - a child who keenly aware of her power over him, determines that nothing, especially not a mere stepmother is going to come between them. By any reasonable assessment of the situation, Snow White has to die...but will she?

Dramatised by Frances Byrnes
Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan.


SAT 15:30 Jazz Is Dead (b01phg6m)
Jazz was once revolutionary, but is now arguably part of the heritage industry. Paul Morley meets performers, critics and passionate punters to test the contention that jazz is dead - a victim of its own history. Featuring Geoff Dyer, Paul Gilroy, Seb Rochford, Gary Crosby, Laura Jurd, Nick Smart and Chris Hodgkins.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b01pnfsw)
Sinead O'Connor; mothers-in-law; men on diets

Singer song-writer Sinead O'Connor on Ireland, faith, and having bipolar disorder, your experiences of the mother-in-law relationship, power women to watch in 2013, the women organising aid convoys to Syria, men facing up to dieting, Camila Batmanghelidjh on campaigning, and attachment objects - why we just can't let go. With Jane Garvey.
Producer: Dianne McGregor.
Editor: Anne Peacock.


SAT 17:00 PM (b01pnfsy)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b01phn5w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01phf1n)
The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b01phf1q)
The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01phf1s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b01pnft0)
Angus Deayton, Frances Barber, John Lanchester, Roses Gabor and Submotion Orchestra

Clive's got News For You from actor and broadcaster Angus Deayton, whose early work parodied local radio in the series Radio Active. In 1990 he put One Foot In The Grave and was later nicknamed "TV's Mr Sex" for his suave presenting manner. Angus returns as Alan in series two of 'Pramface' which sees the Derbyshire household reeling from their new arrival.

Clive meets journalist and novelist John Lanchester. John has described his new book 'Capital' as a "big, fat, London novel." Set against the backdrop of the financial crash, it's the story of the residents of Pepys Road. The neighbours all receive an anonymous postcard with the message 'We Want What You Have'. Who's behind it and what do they want? As the mystery deepens, the world around Pepys Road is turned upside down and its residents lives change beyond recognition.

Clive also chats to actor Frances Barber who is about to star alongside Kevin Bishop in a darkly comic film, 'May I Kill U?'. Frances plays the mother of cycle cop Baz who turns into a psychopath following a freak accident on a cycle path.

Nikki Bedi interviews singer Roses Gabor who has toured with Gorillaz and performed in a range of venues from Madison Square Gardens to Glastonbury Festival. She has contributed to some of the biggest underground records of recent years and is now taking centre stage with her debut single 'Stars' which she performs in the studio.

More music comes from avant-garde jazz dubstep ensemble Submotion Orchestra who perform 'Thinking' from their album 'Fragments'.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


SAT 19:00 From Fact to Fiction (b01pnft2)
Series 13

Zoo Trips

Award-winning writer A L Kennedy creates a fictional response to the week's news. In the week in which survivors of the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School return to class, she looks at the emotional impact on the children - and their parents.

To complement Radio 4's News and Current Affairs output, our weekly series presents a dramatic response to a major story from the week's news. The form and content are entirely lead by the news topic - so drama can come in many guises, as well as poetry and prose.

Writer: A L Kennedy is the acclaimed author of six novels, two books of non-fiction, and five collections of short stories. Her novel, Day, was the Costa Book of the Year, and her latest novel, The Blue Book, was shortlisted for the Orange Prize. She has twice been selected as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists and has won many prizes including the Lannan Literary Award, the Austrian State Prize for European Literature, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Encore Award and the Saltire Scottish Book of the Year Award. She is also well known for her stand-up comedy.

Produced by Justine Willett
Written and read by A L Kennedy.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b01pnft4)
2012 saw some extraordinary television comedy highs, especially in returning series. Some looked at the state of the nation: The Thick of It, Getting On and Twenty Twelve. Some, like Peep Show and Fresh Meat, simply made people laugh. Saturday Review celebrates the best of the comedy year just gone, highlighting performances by Peter Capaldi, Jessica Hynes and Joanna Scanlan. And what's next for comedy? Is there still room for the family sitcom? New, celebrated comedy from Sky has included Hunderby and Moone Boy - are they leading the way on commissioning? One of the creators and stars of Getting On, Vicki Pepperdine, joins Tom Sutcliffe, along with Peep Show and Fresh Meat co-writer Sam Bain, David Quantick and Natalie Haynes.

Producer: Sarah Johnson.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b01pnft6)
40 Years in Europe: How Was It for You?

January 2013 marks the 40th anniversary of the UK joining the EEC. It was the culmination of a lifetime's ambition for Prime Minister Edward Heath and marked a turning point in the relationship between the British people and our continental neighbours.

In this quirky programme, one-time Europe correspondent John Sergeant asks a variety of people to assess how the subsequent four decades has impacted on their lives. Diplomat Sir Michael Jenkins, one of the first senior civil servants to serve in the new EEC, gives his candid take on what it was like to work in a totally different cultural environment in those early months.

Claire Mooney and her twin brother Danny from Manchester look back through the archives and reflect on why they voted differently in the 1975 EEC Referendum. Bill Newton-Dunn and Michael Welsh talk about their initial bewilderment at being among the first elected Euro MPs in 1979. There's discussion about how closer European involvement impacted on UK culture - people who upped sticks for a life on the Costa Blanca tell us why and Reggie Perrin creator David Nobbs explains how it even inspired him to write a sitcom.

Veteran foreign correspondent Ann Leslie reminisces about changes in our food habits and myths around EU regulations while psychologist Ronete Cohen, who now lives and works in England and Holland, reflects on how the Channel Tunnel changed her life. And as the debate over immigration controls continues, Archive on 4 goes to Lincolnshire to hear how the influx of Polish migrants has impacted on the town of Boston. The final verdict on the UK's role in Europe is left to a Greek, Italian, German and Spaniard over a coffee in Bonn.

Produced by Ashley Byrne
A Made in Manchester production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Classic Serial (b01ph7fc)
The Eustace Diamonds

Episode 2

Rose Tremain's dramatisation of Anthony Trollope's The Eustace Diamonds stars Pippa Nixon as the beautiful Lizzie Eustace, fighting to retain possession of her magnificent diamond necklace, which she claims was left to her as a gift by her late husband Florian.

Her immediate relatives, spurred on by the intransigent family lawyer, Camperdown, argue that the diamonds are an heirloom and on no account can be retained by her. The dispute colours all Lizzie's subsequent relationships - with her cousin Frank, her new lover Lord Fawn, and her admirer Lord George. As gossip and scandal intensify, Lizzie is driven to increasingly desperate behaviour in an attempt to retain her jewels.

Harpist: Cecilia De Maria
Cellist: Alison Baldwin

Original Music: Lucinda Mason Brown
Produced and directed by Gordon House
A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b01phf1v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b01phjb6)
Clive Anderson and top lawyers and judges reveal why the wheels of our legal system turn so slowly and discuss concerns that Government proposals to speed up proceedings in our criminal courts could lead to injustices.

The president of the Law Society, Lucy Scott-Moncrieff, strongly opposes plans for weekend courts and to extend court hours, warning that such measures would be expensive and ineffective.

Deputy chair of the Magistrates Association, Richard Monkhouse says delays in the criminal courts, which often result in defendants spending months in custody, could be addressed by giving magistrates greater sentencing powers.

Retired appeal court judge, Sir Mark Potter, predicts that legal aid cuts will result in major delays in the civil courts. He says a shortage of resources is causing particular problems in the family courts where delays have serious impacts on children's lives.

The programme also considers the arguments for reforming the appeal system, following comments from the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Judge, who expressed "fury" over cases such as that of Abu Hamza which take many years to resolve.

Producer: Brian King
An Above the Title production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b01phf7j)
(6/17)
Which of Ian Fleming's original James Bond novels is narrated by a female character? And which is the largest lake in Italy? The contestant whose general knowledge is good enough to cope with these questions could be taking another step towards the title of Brain of Britain 2013 - with Russell Davies in the chair.

This week's four contenders come from the West Country and the Home Counties. They're bidding for a semi-final place in this, the sixtieth series of the ever-popular general knowledge contest. As usual, the questions cover every imaginable subject, from literature and music to geography, medicine and science.

There'll also be the customary chance for a Brain of Britain listener to outwit the contestants with some cunning questions of his or her own devising.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b01ph7fh)
Roger McGough presents a diverse selection of listeners' poetry requests on the theme of time. The readers are Ian McElhinney and John Mackay.

Pianos, mountains, train stations and even coffee provide the inspiration for poems on the theme of time. There's a dystopian vision of earth in the future in a poem by Sheenagh Pugh. Thomas Hardy wonders what people may say of him when he's gone in 'Afterwards', whilst Cecil Day Lewis's meditation on New Year's Eve urges us to cherish the 'dying, but never dead' state of now.

There's a rarely heard piece of archive of the poet Tony Harrison reading his poem Old Soldiers which was inspired by his childhood memory of a repeating image on a coffee label that seemed to stretch to infinity. Jackie Kay also reads her own work in a moving dialect poem about an old friendship.

Other poets reading their own work include two winners of the recent Gardeners' World Magazine's Poetry Competition.

There are also a few significant pauses at train stations with poems by John Montague and Tomas Tranströmer. John Dryden's speech 'When I Consider Life' is a glorious rant, and Tennyson roars to the world in this poem 'I Stood on a Tower in the Wet.'

Producer: Sarah Langan.



SUNDAY 06 JANUARY 2013

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b01plf6x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Afternoon Reading (b011jv89)
Sylvia Townsend Warner - Winter in the Air and Other Stories

Shadwell

Shadwell is selected from Sylvia Townsend Warner's collection, Winter in the Air. In this story, the death of Mrs Probus threatens a precarious future for her long time servant, Shadwell.

The stories in Winter in the Air were written between 1938 and 1950. They capture the mood and atmosphere of the times, and the lot of women in mid twentieth century England. Sylvia Townsend Warner is less well known today, but in her time was a prolific writer of novels, short stories and poetry. She also wrote a biography of T.H. White. These stories remind us that she was a sharp, insightful, and vivid storyteller.

The reader is Susannah Harker
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01plf6z)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01plf71)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01plf73)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b01plf75)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b01pngpx)
The bells of St Lawrence's Church in Towcester.


SUN 05:45 Four Thought (b01phjb8)
Series 3

Sally Kettle: Does hope help?

Adventurer Sally Kettle argues that hope is not helpful, and suggests some alternative strategies.

Sally has twice rowed the Atlantic Ocean, and worries that hope can lead to a passive state of mind. There is nothing, she believes, like taking concrete steps to make things happen.

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling. Recorded live in front of an audience, speakers air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b01plf77)
The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b01pngpz)
Dignity

Mark Tully asks why dignity should be so important to us. It is considered a human right, but is it always so noble, or can we use a false sense of dignity to undermine others?

Drawing on stories about the British in India during the Raj, being visited while a patient in a hospice, and the enlightenment of the Buddha, the programme searches for what could be called a fundamental dignity.

In the end, Mark Tully concludes that if we want to be genuinely respected, we shouldn't demand respect, but if we are dignified we will be respected by those who are themselves dignified.

Producer: Adam Fowler
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b01pngq1)
Parmesan cheese, Scottish smoked salmon, stilton, champagne are just a few examples of food and drinks which have been successful in getting their name protected by the EU, and this has given them a brand worldwide. Now there's a Government drive to encourage more producers to apply for the same status to put British food on the map. Here in the UK, there are just 47 registered products, compared to countries like France which have more than 150. So on today's On Your Farm, we are at Conwy Bay in North Wales, to look at just how difficult it is to get this protection and whether it can really transform a business. For hundreds of years in Conwy, fishermen have been using small wooden boats to hand rake wild mussels from the riverbed - a tradition which has continued despite increasing competition from farmed mussels. Conwy mussels applied for a PDO ('Protected Designation of Origin') twelve months ago and they are expecting a decision to be made within the next few months.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b01plf79)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b01plf7c)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b01pngq3)
Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme with Edward Stourton.


SUN 07:55 Radio 4 Appeal (b01pngq5)
St Giles Trust

Jenny Agutter presents the Radio 4 Appeal for St Giles Trust
Reg Charity:801355
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope St Giles Trust.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b01plf7f)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b01plf7h)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b01pnjvn)
'Eye openers on God' - a service for Epiphany live from the University Church of St Mary the Virgin, Oxford. Preacher: Canon Brian Mountford; Leader: The Revd Rachel Greene; The Choir of the University Church is directed by Dr Gulliver Ralston, with Organist James Brown. Producer: Simon Vivian.


SUN 08:50 A Point of View (b01pnlsy)
American Ambivalence

Will Self looks back over 2012 and reflects on the confused relationship between Britain and the US. Love and hate, he argues, are there in equal measure.

Taking as his starting point the Tom Stoppard plays his American mother took him to see in the 1970s, he says our relationship with our friends across the pond has changed little in 40 years.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b01pnlt0)
News and conversation about the big stories of the week with Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b01pnlt2)
For detailed synopsis, please see daily episodes

Writer ..... Caroline Harrington
Director ..... Julie Beckett
Editor ..... Vanessa Whitburn

Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Kenton Archer ..... Richard Attlee
David Archer ..... Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Freddie Pargetter ..... Jack Firth
Lily Pargetter ..... Georgie Feller
Tom Archer ..... Tom Graham
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Matt Crawford ..... Kim Durham
Lilian Bellamy ..... Sunny Ormonde
Peggy Woolley ..... June Spencer
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
William Grundy ..... Philip Molloy
Nic Grundy ..... Becky Wright
Emma Grundy ..... Emerald O'Hanrahan
Edward Grundy ..... Barry Farrimond
Neil Carter ..... Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter ..... Charlotte Martin
Christopher Carter ..... William Sanderson-Thwaite
Alice Carter ..... Hollie Chapman
Mike Tucker ..... Terry Molloy
Vicky Tucker ..... Rachel Atkins
Brenda Tucker ..... Amy Shindler
Lynda Snell ..... Carole Boyd
Kirsty Miller ..... Annabelle Dowler
Jazzer McCreary ..... Ryan Kelly
Jim Lloyd ..... John Rowe
Paul Morgan ..... Michael Fenton Stevens
Iftikar Shah ..... Pal Aron.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b01pnlt4)
Sir Howard Stringer

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is Sir Howard Stringer. Now Chairman of the Board and formerly CEO of Sony, he was surely the only Chief Executive who was a decorated Vietnam vet as he knelt before the Queen to be knighted. It gives you something of an idea of the breadth and height of his achievements.

Born in Cardiff he went to 11 different schools before his 16th birthday and it clearly gave him restless feet. In the mid-sixties he headed to America where his first job was answering phones for the Ed Sullivan Show. He loved TV and it felt the same about him. He's won a raft of Emmys for his productions and worked with all the big beasts of the broadcasting jungle including Walter Cronkite, Dan Rather and David Letterman.

He has spent the last few years commuting between New York, Tokyo, London and Hollywood - the first and so far only westerner to run the Japanese giant Sony.

He says - "I think I'm a bit prone to new adventures. The same damned impulse that got me in trouble by sending me to America in the first place compels me to take challenges when offered them."

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 The Unbelievable Truth (b01phfmx)
Series 10

Episode 1

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents. Tony Hawks, Ed Byrne, Lucy Porter and Charlie Higson are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as Pies, Worms, Dancing and James Bond.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer: Jon Naismith.
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (b01pnlt6)
From Our Own Food Correspondent

Sheila Dillon presents a special New Year, "From our Own Food Correspondent" with stories from China, France, Italy, Britain and the United States that reflect our changing attitudes towards the food we eat

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b01plf7k)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b01pnlt8)
The latest national and international news with Norman Smith, including an in-depth look at events around the world. Email: wato@bbc.co.uk; twitter: #theworldthisweekend.


SUN 13:30 Inside the Aid Industry (b01pnltb)
Episode 1

The Kibera slum is five minutes from the centre of Nairobi in Kenya, one of the wealthiest cities in Africa and also the hub for humanitarian aid in the region. Over the years, hundreds of aid agencies have poured energy and resources into Kibera, yet there is still no running water or power, families live in one-room huts and children play near open sewers. Why does it seem that aid makes so little difference in a place like this?

In this programme Edward Stourton investigates the 'Kibera conundrum' as the effectiveness of international aid comes under increasing scrutiny.

Over the last 60 years, aid has saved lives in the poorest countries in the world. More children are going to school, fewer are dying from preventable diseases thanks to vaccination programmes funded by foreign aid. But could aid delivered by charities, the government and multilateral organisations such as the UN do more?

In Kibera, Edward Stourton talks to local people about the impact aid is having in the slum. He hears how many of the estimated 800 aid organisations claiming to work there - in an area covering two square miles - are 'briefcase NGOs', set up to access funding but which exist in name only. Other agencies such as Medecins Sans Frontiers provide vital healthcare for the community.

How far is aid tackling the causes and not just the symptoms of poverty? And are aid agencies sufficiently honest about the limits to what they can achieve?

Oxfam, Save the Children and Medecins Sans Frontiers talk candidly about how far aid is the solution to eradicating poverty.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01phm21)
Mercia

Peter Gibbs is joined by panel members Christine Walkden, Chris Beardshaw and Bob Flowerdew to kick off the new gardening year in the first Gardeners' Question Time programme of 2013, recorded in Mercia.

Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.

Q. Can growing Chrysanthemums and tomatoes in succession in the greenhouse border cause problems?

A. Certain plants are antithetical to other plants and leave residues in the soil that can harm them. It could be a problem, but you could dig a trench and refill it with old grass turfs and begin again.

Q. I have two Bromeliads, one a Tillandsia and the other a Guzmania. How can I propagate them and is it worth it?

A. Removed and divided offsets will normally take between 3-5 years to reach flowering size.

Q. Do the panel have any advice on building a Peach tree protection or cover, specifically how to attach plastic to the frame?

A. Peach trees need to be kept dry from around Christmas until the end of March in order to prevent Peach Leaf Curl. A temporary structure can be constructed with a sheet or Perspex fixed onto hanging basket brackets, with roller blinds pulled down around the sides. You can also spray with Bordeaux Mixture, or plant Avalon Pride, a new Peach variety that doesn't get Peach Leaf Curl very badly.

Q. What could I plant for colour, scent and structure to replace a Privet hedge that is 10ft high, 5ft wide and 60ft long.

A. A British native hedge of Rosa Rugosa, Crataegus Prunifolia, Sloe, Viburnum or Guelder Roses are advised, but will need maintenance just like the Privet. You could cut the existing Privet right back to the stumps and let it grow back to the desired size.

Q. Could the panel recommend any white flowered herbaceous perennials to grow beneath a holly hedge?

A. Campanula Alternifolia 'Alba', Wood Anemones and Digitalis Purpurea 'Albiflora' (perennial Foxgloves) are all recommended. Alternatively, the Sillybum Marianum milk thistle has white-marked leaves, while the Onopordon thistle is a grayish white colour.

Q. My two Prunus trees suffered from dieback over the summer. Can you advise?

A. There is some staining in evidence in the plant tissue below the bark which suggests bacterial canker. This can be tackled either by improving growing conditions or by removing the trees altogether.

Q. My Saffron Crocus bulbs, brought three years ago, are producing leaves but not flowers. Why not?

A. Move the bulbs in their pot into a greenhouse or other protected area to help them get started and protect them from any slugs!

Q. I'd like to create a small pond close to the house. How can I prevent this from becoming home to mosquitoes?

A. Place the pond so that it overlaps with as many different habitats as possible, which will encourage the wildlife. To discourage mosquitoes, plant and gravel right up to the water level and do not allow any mud.

Q. How can you encourage hens to lay on shredded paper?

A. Hens tend to prefer barley straw. If they really don't like the nest box, there may be mites or fleas, which can be treated with various products.


SUN 14:45 Witness (b01pnltd)
Fighting in the Iran-Iraq War

When Saddam Hussein ordered the invasion of Iran in 1980, he said his war would be over in days or weeks. But the Iran-Iraq War lasted for almost 8 years and claimed hundreds of thousands of lives. Ahmad al-Mushatat was a young medic who served in front line trenches during the last months of that war. Hear his story.

Photo: Ahmad al-Mushatat during the Iran-Iraq war, second from the right.


SUN 15:00 Classic Serial (b01pnltg)
The Eustace Diamonds

Episode 3

Rose Tremain's dramatisation of Anthony Trollope's The Eustace Diamonds stars Pippa Nixon as the beautiful Lizzie Eustace, fighting to retain possession of her magnificent diamond necklace, which she claims was left to her as a gift by her late husband Florian.

Her immediate relatives, spurred on by the intransigent family lawyer, Camperdown, argue that the diamonds are an heirloom and on no account can be retained by her. The dispute colours all Lizzie's subsequent relationships - with her cousin Frank, her new lover Lord Fawn, and her admirer Lord George. As gossip and scandal intensify, Lizzie is driven to increasingly desperate behaviour in an attempt to retain her jewels.

Harpist: Cecilia De Maria
Cellist: Alison Baldwin

Original Music: Lucinda Mason Brown
Produced and Directed by Gordon House
A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b01pnltj)
Ben Macintyre - Agent Zigzag

Ben Macintyre discusses Agent Zigzag - his bestselling book on the true story of a professional criminal named Eddie Chapman, a successful British double agent who infiltrated the Nazi intelligence services during World War II.

A notorious safe-breaker before the war, Chapman duped the Germans so successfully that he was awarded their highest decoration, the Iron Cross. He remains the only British citizen ever to win one.

His story is one of chance and charm. Recruited as a spy whilst serving time in a Jersey jail, Chapman persuaded his German spy-masters that he was serving the Third Reich, but when they parachuted him into Norfolk in 1944 he delivered himself immediately to MI5. Because of the advanced and highly secretive code breaking at Bletchley Park, MI5 were expecting this unknown spy, with his German name of Agent Fritz. Reflecting his ambivalent status, his new British handlers called him Agent Zigzag.

Ben Macintyre says that Chapman's missions of sabotage and feeding false messages back to Germany were instrumental in saving hundreds of lives, as well as averting the V1 bombers from St Paul's Cathedral.

James Naughtie presents and a group of Radio 4 listeners ask the questions.

February's Bookclub choice : Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b01pnltl)
Roger McGough presents requests for a range of playful poems that have a musical and satirical theme by WH Auden, Wallace Stevens, Anne Sexton and others. The readers are Patrick Romer, Kate Littlewood and Alun Raglan.
Producer: Mark Smalley.


SUN 17:00 Ben Goldacre's Bad Evidence (b01phhb9)
Medic and author Ben Goldacre explores the idea of evidence-based policy and asks if it can ever become a reality in the UK.

In medicine, how do we know if a particular treatment works? The simple answer is to subject it to a fair test against other treatments or a placebo. So far the best example of a fair test in medicine is a randomised controlled trial or RCT.

Often to referred to as 'the gold standard' when it comes to determining what works, RCTs are now commonplace in business. But what about government? The idea of evidence-based policy is hardly new - it's what social scientists have been banging on about since the 1960s. But in practice, when evidence has been used to determine policy, it's often been anything but 'gold-standard'.

In this programme, the medic and author of Bad Science, Ben Goldacre, sets out to explore the potential for putting RCTs at the heart of the policy-making process, arguing that not only can they reveal if our existing policies are effective but RCTs have the potential to transform the way we create and implement social policy across the country, from education to health, from welfare to crime.

Of course not everyone agrees that all you need is hard data to make the best policy. Experience, values, ideology - these, say critics should never be abandoned in favour of cold statistics. And whilst the RCT may work well for pills and potions, it's too blunt an instrument to deal with the subtle and complex challenges of assessing how best to punish crime, treat drug users or teach children from impoverished background to read and write. Just look at the recent fiasco over badger-culling. over a ten-year period, randomised experiments and pilot studies have resulted in no clear policy on how to prevent the spread of bovine TB. And then there's the ethical question - how for example could you allow randomisation to determine something as morally (and politically) sensitive as sentencing criminals, let alone teaching kids?

What is clear, is that bad policies cost us dear - both socially and economically. The challenges are many but the potential, argues Ben, could be truly transformational, both for society and for government.


SUN 17:40 From Fact to Fiction (b01pnft2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b01plf7p)
The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b01plf7r)
The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01plf7t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b01pnltq)
Zombies shuffle onto the World Service, Ghosts haunt Radio 4, a mad monk might just be the man from The Joy of Sex book and if you've got a problem with your saffron crocus who ya gonna call? I humbly suggest Pick of The Week, where we also knit socks from yellow smoke, stand on some steak with a Jelly Roll and place the entire Sioux nation in a field in Knotty Ash. Join me, Jon Holmes for my picks of the week.

Great Lives : Rasputin - Radio 4
Ken Dodd : How Tickled I've Been - Radio 2
News Quiz / Now Show - Radio 4
Belle De Jour's History of Anon - Radio 4
World Book Club: Pride and Prejudice - World Service
Today Programme: Poltergeist - Radio 4
Desert Island Discs : Sir Howard Stringer- Radio 4
Stop Calling Me "Dr Sex" - Radio 3
Gardener's Question Time - Radio 4
The Magic Faraway Tree - Radio 4
Vinyl revival: Tom Jones - 6music
Reimagining the City - Radio 4
Jazz is Dead - Radio 4
The Value of Culture - Radio 4
Men's Hour - Radio 5Live
Roger, The Eagle Has Landed - Radio 4
Elis James' Pantheon of Heroes - Radio Wales

If there's something you'd like to suggest for next week's programme, please e-mail potw@bbc.co.uk.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b01pnlts)
While Usha helps Ruth take down the Christmas decorations, they chat about Bob Pullen's funeral. Ruth also wants to hear about Usha's new tenant - Rob Titchener, the new herd manager for the Borchester Land Dairy. Usha thinks he sounds quite nice, and he's well-spoken.

Pip arrives back from her skiing trip, her best holiday ever. Now she wants to sleep for a week but Ruth reminds her it's Uni in the morning. Pip still intends to see Spencer later.

Usha introduces herself to Rob, who's in the process of moving his furniture in to Blossom Hill Cottage. He thinks it's delightful, and is sure his wife Jess will adore it. Rob explains that she will stay in Hampshire to look after her parents for now. He'll go back most weekends until the dairy's up and running.

On the journey home from Whitby, Lilian's relieved to establish that Peggy didn't hear who Lilian was speaking to on the phone on Friday. Matt's relieved to have Lilian back home. He's missed her and wants to go out to dinner to celebrate her homecoming. But all Lilian wants is a large gin, a long hot bath and her own bed.


SUN 19:15 Nick Mohammed in Bits (b00tt5pw)
Mr Swallow

Nick Mohammed (Reggie Perrin, I'm Sorry I've Got No Head) stars as lifestyle guru Mr Swallow as he presents his memory technique to a live studio audience.

Bits showcases the best of Nick Mohammed's idiosyncratic characters in a series of one off comic plays.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SUN 19:45 Fairy Tales Retold by Sara Maitland (b01pnlwg)
The Gingerbread Business

Acclaimed short story writer Sara Maitland gives a magical spin to the story of Hansel and Gretel, in The Gingerbread Business - a sumptuous tale of confectionery and cunning told by Lia Williams.

Producer Beth O'Dea.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b01phn0y)
The Parable of the Ox

Tim Harford tells us what a 'guess the weight of the ox' competition tells us about a bloated and dysfunctional financial system. It features two noted economics writers: James Surowiecki of the New Yorker and John Kay of the Financial Times and a brand new composition from the New Radiophonic Workshop.
Dr James Grime brings a real-live enigma machine into the studio and we ask how you measure which is the greatest racehorse of all time.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b01phm25)
An American General, a legendary radio producer, a former Times editor, a British composer, a cricket commentator

Matthew Bannister on

Norman Schwarzkopf, the American General nicknamed "Stormin' Norman" who led the international force which re-took Kuwait from Saddam Hussein's invading Iraqi army. We speak to his British counterpart Sir Peter de la Billiere

Charles Chilton, the legendary BBC Radio producer who gave us the serial "Journey Into Space". His friend David Jacobs pays tribute.

Lord Rees Mogg the former editor of the Times and newspaper columnist. We hear from his successor Sir Harold Evans and his son Jacob.

Sir Richard Rodney Bennett, the composer who wrote film, jazz and classical scores

And Christopher Martin Jenkins, much loved cricket commentator and writer who had a difficult relationship with technology.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b01pnfjm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:00 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b01pngq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b01phlgn)
Sounds Familiar

After years of promise, voice recognition is at last becoming a significant method of using computers and accessing the Internet. Why now, and what difference does it make? Peter Day talks to the companies at the forefront of developments in the field (including Massachusetts-based Nuance, one of the largest makers of voice recognition technology), and asks whether our relationship with machines will change once we have the ability to talk to them.
[Picture: The IBM Shoebox, introduced in 1962, could understand 16 words: zero, one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, minus, plus, subtotal, total, false, and off.].


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b01pnmcn)
Preview of the week's political agenda at Westminster with MPs, experts and commentators. Discussion of the issues politicians are grappling with in the corridors of power.


SUN 22:45 What the Papers Say (b01pnmcq)
David Aaronovitch of The Times analyses how the newspapers are covering the biggest stories in Westminster and beyond.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b01phlg8)
How the Grey Pound Is Influencing the Film World

In a special edition of the programme, Francine Stock looks at a growing number of films aimed at an older audience, known within the industry as the 'grey pound'.

Billy Connolly and Tom Courtenay discuss their retirement home comedy, Quartet, the directorial debut of Dustin Hoffman.

Francine visits the set of Roger Michell's latest, Le Weekend, starring Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan as a retired couple trying to rekindle the romance of their honeymoon.

Analyst Charles Gant reveals the films that made the industry sit up and notice the older cinemagoer, while president of Momentum pictures, Xavier Marchand, discusses his company's future plans for this audience.

Plus, Dame Helen Mirren, one of the most bankable British stars of the last 30 years.

Producer: Craig Smith.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b01pngpz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 07 JANUARY 2013

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b01plf8w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b01phj21)
Consuming passions

Consumer pleasures - Laurie Taylor explores the place of shopping in our lives, as well as within sociological thought. He's joined by Professor Colin Campbell, Dr Kate Soper and Professor Rachel Bowlby. Revised repeat.

Producer: Jayne Egerton


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b01pngpx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01plf8y)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01plf90)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01plf92)
The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b01plf94)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01px5wn)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church in the United Kingdom.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b01pnmg1)
Annual TB testing is being extended to cattle across a swathe of England from Nottinghamshire in the North to East Sussex in the South. It's part of a series of new cattle controls which the government hopes will prevent TB from moving beyond its established hotspots. Cattle vet Evan David tells Anna Hill what the changes will mean for farmers on the cusp of the problem in Oxfordshire.

The Food Standards Agency is reviewing the rules on selling unpasteurised milk, a product which is already banned in Scotland. Anna meets a Suffolk farmer who has diversified into selling raw milk from a vending machine at his farm gate.

Mussels fished from Conwy By by traditional hand rake could join products like Champagne and Stilton, which have had their name and origin protected by the EU. Fishermen hope that the mussels will be given PDO status in the coming months.

Presenter: Anna Hill
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


MON 05:57 Weather (b01plf96)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 06:00 Today (b01pnmg3)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk; Weather; Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b01pnmww)
Family Secrets: Sarah Dunant and Deborah Cohen

On Start the Week Andrew Marr begins the new year talking about lies and secrets, and the increasing blurring of public and private. Deborah Cohen charts family secrets and shame from the Victorian times to the present day, while Sarah Dunant and TV producer Alex Graham discuss how confession became entertainment, and the psychoanalyst Stephen Grosz listens to the hidden feelings of his patients.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b01pnmwy)
The Examined Life

Stephen Grosz - The Examined Life

The world bedevils us. To make sense of it, we tell ourselves stories. In a series of short, vivid, dramatic tales, using psychoanalytic insight without psychoanalytic jargon, The Examined Life tracks the collaborative journey of therapist and patient as they uncover the hidden feelings behind apparently ordinary behaviour patterns.

Written with precision and insight, these case studies are all based on actual people. While factually true, they demonstrate a novelist's sense of an ending and empathetic understanding of the subterfuges of the human mind.

In his work as a practising psychoanalyst, Stephen Grosz has spent the last twenty-five years uncovering the hidden feelings behind our most baffling behaviour. The Examined Life distils over 50,000 hours of conversation into pure psychological insight, without the jargon.

This extraordinary book is about one ordinary process: talking, listening and understanding. Its aphoristic and elegant stories teach us a new kind of attentiveness. They also unveil a delicate self-portrait of the analyst at work, and show how lessons learned in the consulting room can reveal as much to him as to the patient.

Episode 1 of 5
Stephen Grosz has been studying and working as a psychoanalyst in the UK for over twenty-five years. From over 50,000 hours of conversation he distils a series of true stories about the hidden feelings behind our most baffling behaviour. In the first of these he recounts an early experience when a patient's actions were unpredictable and shocking.

Read by Peter Marinker
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Partnership production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01pnmx0)
Lucy Tobin, Katriona Gilmore, child benefit

We discuss changes to who gets child benefit payments. Lucy Tobin, personal finance editor of the London Evening Standard on Ausperty - living well but spending less. We talk to the women at Great Ormond Street Hospital who are doing ground-breaking research into treating children with side effects associated with bone marrow transplants. Katriona Gilmore tells us about the Victorian Army surgeon who inspired her song, Dr James. Gilmore and Roberts are nominated for the best duo award in the BBC Radio Folk Awards 2013.
Presenter Jane Garvey.
Producer Sarah Crawley.


MON 10:45 The Cazalets (b01pnmx2)
The Light Years

Episode 6

by Elizabeth Jane Howard, dramatised by Sarah Daniels

Villy has to deal with her unexpected pregnancy, whilst Zoe attempts to hide her dinner dates with Dr Sherlock from her mother.

Produced and directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

As war looms, everything is about to change for 3 generations of the Cazalet family. There is just one idyllic summer left.

As Elizabeth Jane Howard approaches her 90th Birthday, Radio 4 is to broadcast all four of her Cazalet novels: The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off. The story of the family stretches over ten years. The dramatisations begin on New Year's Eve and finish in August 2013.


MON 11:00 Phelophepa (b01pnmx4)
Laverne Antrobus visits rural South Africa to tell the story of the extraordinary Phelophepa Health Train.

The Phelophepa (meaning good, clean health) is a mobile clinic which weaves its way through rural South Africa bringing doctors, nurses and psychologists to a population which has approximately one doctor for every five thousand people. Owned and operated by South Africa's state freight rail company, Transnet, and funded by a variety of organisations and companies, the Phelophepa has twenty permanent staff who live on the train and up to forty medical students who come and go on placements.

Every week the train moves to a different location; as it pulls into a station hundreds of people are waiting, desperate to be seen. There are simple solutions like glasses which cure years of 'blindness', hearing-aids, walking-sticks, as well as psychological counselling. Often, because the queues are so long and the journey home too expensive, patients will sit outside the train all night so they are first in the queue the following day.

Several years ago Laverne - who works as a psychologist in London - volunteered on the train. She returned in 2012 as part of this documentary for Radio 4.

For the programme Laverne caught up with the Phelophepa in Alice, a small town in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. She met doctors, student doctors, and of course the patients; many leave having received the treatment they need, however the painful truth is that not everyone can be seen. Often the train has to pull away for the next town, leaving patients (who had travelled miles to be there) behind.

Producer: Karen Gregor.


MON 11:30 Turf Wars (b00z5hr2)
Losing the Plot

In Nick Warburton's delicious comedy, James Fleet plays Edward, a bashful man who, passing a local allotment, speaks to an attractive female allottee. He decides there and then that he must apply for a plot. But doing so involves an interview with ferocious site-manager Bernie who runs the allotments with military rigour. It's all looking unlikely until Edward reveals that his father was a local landscape horticulturalist, one Bernie has admired all his life. Edward joins the site. And it is only then that he springs a surprise on Bernie. One that leads to explosive confrontation. Which of them will lose the plot?

Edward ..... James Fleet
Amanda .... Joanna Monro
Bernie ..... Jonathan Coy

Directed by Peter Kavanagh.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2011.


MON 12:00 You and Yours (b01pnmx6)
Compensation for victims of faulty breast implants, and how to stop your Christmas tree becoming landfill

Good news at last on compensation for some victims of faulty PIP breast implants.

You may be a little sad throwing out your Christmas tree, but don't get down in the dumps. If you dispose of it correctly, it could be serving as compost in a matter of weeks instead of landfill. We visit the tip to find out what happens to the rubbish you throw out and how much is reused.

And a Radio 4 presenter comes clean. Find out what they're admitting to.


MON 12:57 Weather (b01plf98)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b01pnmx8)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


MON 13:45 A Guide to Mountain and Moorland Birds (b01pnmxb)
Heather Moors

Which bird sounds like a coffee percolator and moves like a clockwork mouse? Well, the answer can be found in the first of a new series of guides to our commonest upland birds. Brett Westwood joins keen bird watcher Stephen Moss on the magnificent rolling hills of the Long Mynd in Shropshire where the air is filled with the 'go-back-back-back' calls of Red Grouse. With the help of recordings by wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson, Brett and Stephen offer a practical and entertaining guide to the birds which you're most likely to see and hear on heather moors in Upland Britain; birds like the Red Grouse, Black Grouse, Merlin and Short-eared Owl; an owl which you're likely to see hunting in daylight and whose eyes "look like fog lamps" exclaims Brett, "they glare at you bright, yellow and black!".

This is the first of five programmes to help you identify many of the birds seen and heard in Upland Britain; on heather moors, upland grasslands, cliffs and crags, bogs and mires and the high mountain tops. Not only is there advice on how to recognise the birds from their appearance, but also how to identify them from their calls and songs.

This series complements five previous series; A Guide to Garden Birds, A Guide Woodland Birds, A Guide to Water Birds, A Guide to Coastal Birds and A Guide to Farmland Birds and is aimed at both the complete novice as well as those who are eager to learn more about our upland visitors and residents.

PRODUCER: Sarah Blunt.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b01pnlts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b00rrljy)
The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Marlbourne Point Mystery

The Marlbourne Point Mystery

A new two-part Sherlock Holmes adventure, inspired by the stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and written by Bert Coules.

starring Clive Merrison as Sherlock Holmes
and Andrew Sachs as Dr John Watson

Featuring James Laurenson as Mycroft Holmes

Part 1: a disused lighthouse on a remote stretch of the Kent coast is the scene of a bizarre double death.

In his accounts of the career of his friend Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Watson often makes passing reference to a mystery which his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, never wrote about in full. Bert Coules, the chief writer behind BBC Radio 4's celebrated dramatisations of the complete Sherlock Holmes canon of fifty-six short stories and four novels, once again takes up the pen where Sir Arthur left off.

This is what Holmes buffs call a 'canonical pastiche': a new story written faithfully in the style of the original.

It brings to seventy-five the number of times Clive Merrison has played Sherlock Homes on BBC Radio 4.

Violinists: Leonard Friedman and Ian Humphries

Producer Patrick Rayner.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b01pnmxd)
(7/17)
What did the 'P.G.' stand for in the name of the writer P.G. Wodehouse? And what's a Wheatstone Bridge used for in an electrical circuit?

Brain of Britain returns to Media City in Salford for another heat featuring competitors from the North of England. This week's four contestants come from Westhoughton in Lancashire, Nuneaton, Derby and Haydon Bridge in West Yorkshire. They compete for a place in the semi-finals of this 60th season of the time-honoured general knowledge quiz.

Russell Davies is in the questionmaster's chair, and he'll also be selecting a pair of questions mailed to Brain of Britain by a listener, hoping to confound the combined brainpower of the contestants in order to win a prize.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 The Food Programme (b01pnlt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Johnny Cash and the Forgotten Prison Blues (b01pnmxg)
Danny Robins explores the little known story of Johnny Cash the prison reformer.

Cash's classic albums recorded at Folsom Prison and San Quentin are well known but few are aware that these were just two of many prison concerts he played over decades. Robins discovers how the singer became a passionate prison reformer who donated his own money to the cause, took a prisoner into his home and met Richard Nixon to force the issue.

Away from the spotlight of Folsom and San Quentin, Robins uncovers two neglected prison concerts. In Arkansas, he discovers a forgotten concert from one of the worst prisons in America at the time, Cummins Penitentiary. We go inside the prison, a place only few journalists have been allowed, and discover footage of Cash performing there. Robins looks at instruments of torture and meets one of the few men still alive who was at the concert, to discover what daily life was like in the prison a federal judge called "a dark and evil place".

He also unearths a prison album recorded at a Swedish prison in 1972, the only prison concert Cash ever performed outside America. Whereas Cummins represented everything Cash wanted to change about American prisons, Stockholm's Österåker prison represented everything he hoped they might become. Life at Österåker in the late 1960s and 70s was as liberal as Cummins was harsh, but was the Swedish way any more successful when it came to rehabilitating criminals?

Producer: Jo Wheeler
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b01pnmxj)
The Unification Church

The 1960s and 70s saw a proliferation of New Religious Movements in this country. Perhaps the best known is the Unification Church founded by the Rev Sun Myung Moon which attracted world wide attention because of mass weddings where couples who had often never met were paired together. The Rev Moon died last September and the movement is struggling to come to terms with his departure. So what will happen now? How do New Religious Movements survive when their founder dies?

Joining Ernie to discuss the Unification Church are Professor Eileen Barker, Director of Inform, an Information Network focusing on New Religious Movements, George Chryssides, Honorary Research Fellow in Contemporary Religion at the University of Birmingham and Jack Corley, Director of the UK branch of the Unification Church.


MON 17:00 PM (b01pnmy7)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01plf9b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b01pnn1d)
Series 10

Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Lloyd Langford, Henning Wehn, Celia Pacquola and Rhod Gilbert are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as Wine, The Queen, Baths and Wind.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Producer: Jon Naismith.
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b01pnn1g)
Brian shows Rob the latest progress on the dairy unit. Rob thinks everything's looking good so far, and wants to see how the anaerobic digester is coming on. Brian introduces him to Adam, who shows him round and then takes him to meet Jennifer.

Lilian calls on Jennifer to get away from Matt's excessive attention. She tells her about the awful time she had in Whitby. Alice has taken the afternoon off to help prepare for Jennifer's birthday party.

Alice tells Brian that it's a shame Rob's married, as the village is a bit short of available male talent.

Rob's surprised to learn than Lilian once lived in Blossom Hill Cottage. Alice goes off to get a knife to cut Jennifer's birthday cake and interrupts Lilian on the phone in the kitchen. She asks her if she's ok. Lilian sighs. Best laid plans and all that.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b01pnn1j)
Ryan Gosling and Sean Penn in Gangster Squad; author Sally Gardner

With Mark Lawson,

Ryan Gosling and Sean Penn star in Gangster Squad, in which the Los Angeles police in the late 1940s battle a mafia boss. Penn plays a ruthless mobster opposite Gosling as an LAPD outsider, who tries to bring order to the streets by breaking the law. Kamila Shamsie reviews.

Great Night Out is a new ITV comedy drama which focuses on four childhood friends, who are now in their mid-thirties and enjoy a weekly get-together in Stockport. The cast includes Ricky Tomlinson who plays the landlord of the local pub. Creators Mark Bussell and Justin Sbresni (The Worst Week of My Life) discuss finding humour in male relationships.

Today the Royal Opera House is inviting live cameras into the backstage areas never normally visible to audiences. Online viewers can watch multiple rehearsals and interviews, and can even get involved by asking questions and submitting videos of themselves singing Va Pensiero from Nabucco. Opera critic Rupert Christiansen gives his verdict on this experiment in openness.

Sally Gardner's book Maggot Moon was the winner of the Costa Children's Book Award and is in the running to receive the Book of the Year award, which is announced later this month. She reflects on the inspiration for her novel, which focuses on a 15-year-old dyslexic boy living in a violent, dystopian 1950s England.

Producer Claire Bartleet.


MON 19:45 The Cazalets (b01pnmx2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Do I Have a Right to Be Forgotten? (b01pnn4m)
When Emma Barnett, a tech-savvy 27 year old typed her name into a search engine she found photos from her past she would really rather forget. And she is not alone; millions of people are sharing photos, tweets and status updates with friends every day - later discovering, regretfully, that they live online forever.

But with the European Union hoping to enshrine a "right to be forgotten" will it become possible to own your online life? On this journey Emma discovers what rights she has to delete material from the internet and the implications this has on how we record events and write history.

Producer: Clare Walker

(Repeat).


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b01phktd)
Forced Confessions in Japan

Mariko Oi investigates forced confessions of suspects in the Japanese criminal justice system. She asks if the use of prolonged questioning and other dubious tactics by police and prosecutors might be one reason for Japan's astonishingly high conviction rate.
Producer: Nina Robinson.


MON 21:00 Material World (b01phlgb)
Norovirus; Superheroes; Army underpants

Winter vomiting bug is with us once again but what can science tell us about this recurrent illness? Quentin Cooper talks to experts in Britain and the US who are looking at the current outbreaks.

James Kakalios, Professor of Physics at Minnesota University, explains how he uses fictional superheroes to further his students' understanding of physics.

Following last week's programme about unsung scientific heroes, Quentin showcases some of the listeners' suggestions.

And he finds out why the British military is employing scientists to design underpants for soldiers serving in Afghanistan.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b01pnmww)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b01plf9d)
The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b01pnn4p)
Assessing the UK Coalition government - Cameron and Clegg present their mid-term plans; what's behind the Belfast protests? Chuck Hagel nominated as US Defence Secretary; and Ian Bremmer and Bronwyn Maddox discuss global risks and opportunities in 2013. Tonight presented by Ritula Shah.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01pnn4r)
The Knot

Episode 1

Dominic Kitchen is a wedding photographer who is used to seeing people tie the knot, an expression that also represents a sensation that he feels in the pit of his stomach. A sensation that emerges when he is in the presence of a certain person who could change his ordinary life forever. They have a secret that only they can ever know as it is something that society, even today, would struggle with. This is a tale of agonising loss and forbidden love.

Episode One
Dominic Kitchen is an ordinary young man who lives an ordinary life. But for how long will his life remain ordinary?

Written by Mark Watson
Abridged by John Peacock
Reader Julian Rhind-Tutt
Director Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b01phgjq)
Stenography

As courts around the world replace human stenographers with digital recording systems, Michael Rosen explores the ancient art of stenography. Michael looks at the work Charles Dickens did in London courts around 1830, and asks how his career as a shorthand reporter influenced his work. He investigates the mysteries of modern stenograph machines, and talks to people who operate them and to a leading barrister about the different ways we record words spoken in trials and other official proceedings.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01pnn4t)
The Home Secretary, Theresa May, faces pressure from MPs over how a terror suspect absconded while under an anti-terror control measure.
On its first day back from the Christmas break, the Commons debates the issue of corporate tax avoidance.
Labour MPs question the impact of cuts in police numbers.
And the Transport Secretary, Patrick McLoughlin, faces a committee of MPs investigating the future of the West Coast Mainline rail franchise.
Sean Curran and team report on today's events in Parliament.



TUESDAY 08 JANUARY 2013

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b01plfbc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b01pnmwy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01plfbf)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01plfbh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01plfbk)
The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b01plfbm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01py7wd)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church in the United Kingdom.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b01pp563)
Scottish fishermen warn their livelihood is under threat from Icelandic trawlers. The UK fishing minister says sanctions should be imposed if Iceland won't reduce its mackerel catch. But Iceland's fishing minister says they have every right to set their own quotas.

Milk prices are likely to go up this year because of global factors according to a leading dairy analyst. Dutch bank Rabobank says dairy farmers are still struggling to recover from last year's difficult conditions.

As the Food Standards Agency review the safety of selling unpasteurized milk, Farming Today visits a Devon cheesemaker who argues the case for using raw milk in her cheddar.

Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Ruth Sanderson.


TUE 06:00 Today (b01pp565)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b01pp567)
Amoret Whitaker

Jim Al-Khalili talks to Amoret Whitaker, an entomologist at the Natural History Museum in London. Her intricate understanding of the life cycles of the flies, beetles and the other insects' which feed on decomposing bodies means she is regularly called by the Police to the scene of a crime or a murder investigation. There she collects and analyses any insect evidence to help them pin point the most likely time of death. In some instances, this can be accurate to within hours.

She is just one of only a handful of forensic entomologists working in the UK. She talks to Jim about her life as a research scientist, breeding flies in the far flung towers of the Natural History Museum and her work as a forensic expert with police services across the country. Dropping her work at a moment's notice she can be called any time of day to anywhere in the country to attend a crime scene. She also talks about her regular trips to a research facility at the 'Body Farm' at the University of Tennesee in Knoxville in Ameria to get a better understanding of how real human bodies decompose.

Her passion is insects and while our instinctive reaction to flies and maggots may be one of revulsion - when you take time look at them properly, and in detail, she says you can see what truly incredible creatures they are.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b01pp569)
Martin Wainwright talks to Lindis Percy

In this series, where journalists follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most, Martin Wainwright interviews persistent campaigners. Having been brought up in a household that was always at action stations as part of his father's long campaign to become a Liberal MP, perseverance has always fascinated Martin. What instils it? What nurtures it? Can it become an obsession at the cost of everything else , including family?
In this first programme he talks to Lindis Percy, now approaching seventy, she's been a political campaigner for some forty years, for the last thirty of them on the issue of American airbases in the UK. Lindis has been arrested five hundred times and served fifteen prison terms but she continues to campaign undeterred. Under the banner of the Campaign for the Accountability of American Airbases she still demonstrated every Tuesday outside the base at Menwith Hill in North Yorkshire.
Martin joins her there to discover what still inspires her to lobby and litigate when so many of her fellow peace campaigners have fallen by the way side. As a mother of three and a lifelong worker in the National Health Service, how has she managed to juggle her campaigning with family and professional life?
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b01px4px)
The Examined Life

Stephen Grosz - The Examined Life

The world bedevils us. To make sense of it, we tell ourselves stories. In a series of short, vivid, dramatic tales, using psychoanalytic insight without psychoanalytic jargon, The Examined Life tracks the collaborative journey of therapist and patient as they uncover the hidden feelings behind apparently ordinary behaviour patterns.

Written with precision and insight, these case studies are all based on actual people. While factually true, they demonstrate a novelist's sense of an ending and empathetic understanding of the subterfuges of the human mind.

In his work as a practising psychoanalyst, Stephen Grosz has spent the last twenty-five years uncovering the hidden feelings behind our most baffling behaviour. The Examined Life distils over 50,000 hours of conversation into pure psychological insight, without the jargon.

This extraordinary book is about one ordinary process: talking, listening and understanding. Its aphoristic and elegant stories teach us a new kind of attentiveness. They also unveil a delicate self-portrait of the analyst at work, and show how lessons learned in the consulting room can reveal as much to him as to the patient.

Episode 2 of 5:
Continuing his series of true stories from the analyst's consulting room, Stephen Grosz examines secrets and the ways that people can protect themselves with lies and bluster.

Read by Peter Marinker
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Partnership production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01pp56c)
Bill Granger; Laurie Penny and Charlotte Vere; early motherhood

Bill Granger Cooks the Perfect...pork ragu. What is the best way for women to engage in the political process? March and shout loudly or lobby and persuade for change? Journalist Laurie Penny and Charlotte Vere, founder of Women On, a campaign group for women in the economy, join us to discuss. Melissa Viney asks if there's a conspiracy of silence surrounding the early months of motherhood. Authors Susie Boyt and Jane Rogers talk about the creative impulses behind their novel writing.
Jane Garvey presents.
Producer, Karen Dalziel.


TUE 10:45 The Cazalets (b01pp56f)
The Light Years

Episode 7

by Elizabeth Jane Howard, dramatised by Sarah Daniels

Clary is researching the seven deadly sins and wants to know more about lust, unaware that her stepmother Zoe is
indulging in quite a bit of it herself.

Produced and directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

The Light Year's is set in the lead up to the outbreak of World War II and focuses on the Cazalet family, who appear to have it all, but underneath have their share of longing, indiscretions, jealousies and misplaced loyalties.

As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 is to broadcast all four of her Cazalet novels:
The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off. The story of the family stretches over ten years. The dramatisations begin on New Year's Eve and finish in August 2013.


TUE 11:00 Saving Species (b01pp56h)
Series 3

International Wildlife

On Monday 7th, Tuesday 8th and Thursday 10th of January 2013 at 9.30pm, BBC 2 presents a series called "The Polar Bear Family and Me", a trio of films following a polar bear family in the Svalbard archipelago in the Arctic. The film highlights the trend of a reduction in sea ice being formed in the winter and the ice that does form is melting earlier than ever before. Saving Species investigates what the decline in sea ice means for the future of the polar bears in Svalbard.

Ellie Williams looks at the National Elephant Corridor Project in India which is redeveloping historical paths used by Asian elephants to travel between habitats. Many of the corridors have since been obstructed by villages, roads and railway lines so the project requires participation from communities and landowners.
In the 1980's the population of wild salmon in British rivers crashed by an estimated 70%. Initially the blame for this crash was put on the marine environment; was something affecting the adult fish returning to their spawning grounds? More recently attention has moved to freshwater rivers and whether the role the spawning and smolt survival plays a bigger influence. For 40 years the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust have carried out research on the river Frome in Dorset, which now is beginning to provide data which could one day lead to the creation of a model that could predict good and bad years for returning adult salmon adults.

Also in the programme - news from around the world with our regular news reporter, Kelvin Boot, plus details on how you can contribute and use the Open University's iSpot facility.
Presenter: Brett Westwood
Producer: Mary Colwell.


TUE 11:30 Scoring Father Brown (b01pp56k)
Scoring Father Brown is a unique exploration of the world of writing music for film and television. Debbie Wiseman takes us on her own individual journey as a composer, through the processes and stages she took, when scoring music for this television series. Based on the stories by G. K. Chesterton, Father Brown is a charismatic sleuth, concerned with the redemption of the soul. Music is required to underpin these episodes, such as heightening emotions or joining scenes together, but it is essential that from the very outset, for the music to capture the individual world of Father Brown.

Music is an integral part of many multimedia projects, from stage, to film. It has the ability to work alongside the visual narrative, enhancing emotions, evoking locations, and can even provide the listener with otherwise unknown information about a character. Debbie Wiseman, in writing music for the Father Brown series, takes us through many stages from going on location and meeting the cast, including Mark Williams who starred as Mr Weasley in the Harry Potter films, to decisions she has to make about where to place music within the series, and why.

Throughout the programme, Professor Eric Clarke from the Faculty of Music at the University of Oxford, will be giving us his views on the power of music to enhance a narrative, and its often subconscious impact upon the listener. The Father Brown production team also share their ideas about the series, and their requirements for the music.


TUE 12:00 You and Yours (b01pp56m)
Call You and Yours: Will the benefit cuts force people into work or send more people into poverty?

Call You and Yours - Will the benefit cuts force people into work or send more people into poverty?

The government wants a 1% cap on rises in most working-age benefits and tax credits over the next three years. Labour says the move will hit hard-working people and is the wrong priority.

There are around 2.8 million households of working age without jobs and soon 2.5 million will see their entitlements reduced in real terms. Of 14.1 million working-age households with someone in work, around 7 million will see their entitlements cut compared with what they might have expected.

Those with the lowest incomes will be affected the most, with the second-lowest 10th of the UK population hit hardest in cash terms, with an average drop of £150 per year compared to what they might have expected.

The cap would apply to working-age benefits including jobseeker's allowance, maternity and paternity pay, child and working tax credits and elements of housing benefit. It would not apply to disability benefits, carer's allowance, nor to the state pension or pension credit. The state pension will increase by 2.5% in April.

Are you affected by these cuts? Are you going to be worse off as a result? Or do you think the Government has got it right and it's long overdue?

03700 100 444 is the number or you can e-mail via the Radio 4 website or text us on 84844.

Presenter: Julian Worricker
Producer: Maire Devine.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b01plfbp)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b01pp56p)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


TUE 13:45 A Guide to Mountain and Moorland Birds (b01pp56r)
Cliffs and Crags

Brett Westwood is joined by keen bird watcher, Stephen Moss on the magnificent rolling hills of the Long Mynd in Shropshire. With the help of wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson they offer a practical and entertaining guide to the birds which you're most likely to see and hear on the cliffs and crags of upland Britain; birds like the Raven, Peregrine and one of Brett's favourite birds, the Mountain Blackbird or Ring Ouzel; a bird he first saw in April 1971 when it stopped off migration and "I've never missed an Ouzel April since then" he says, returning to the same site every year to see this rather striking-looking bird, with its sooty black feathers and white crescent or bib.

This is the second of five programmes to help you identify many of the birds seen and heard in Upland Britain; on heather moors, upland grasslands, cliffs and crags, bogs and mires and the high mountain tops. Not only is there advice on how to recognise the birds from their appearance, but also how to identify them from their calls and songs.

This series complements five previous series; A Guide to Garden Birds, A Guide Woodland Birds, A Guide to Water Birds, A Guide to Coastal Birds and A Guide to Farmland Birds and is aimed at both the complete novice as well as those who are eager to learn more about our upland visitors and residents.

PRODUCER: Sarah Blunt.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b01pnn1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b00rt94m)
The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Marlbourne Point Mystery

The Marlbourne Point Mystery

A new two-part Sherlock Holmes adventure, inspired by the stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and written by Bert Coules.

starring Clive Merrison as Sherlock Holmes
and Andrew Sachs as Dr John Watson

Featuring James Laurenson as Mycroft Holmes

Part 2: the shocking truth behind the mystery of the politician, the lighthouse and the trained cormorant is finally revealed.

In his accounts of the career of his friend Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Watson often makes passing reference to a mystery which his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, never wrote about in full. Bert Coules, the chief writer behind BBC Radio 4's celebrated dramatisations of the complete Sherlock Holmes canon of fifty-six short stories and four novels, once again takes up the pen where Sir Arthur left off.

This is what Holmes buffs call a 'canonical pastiche': a new story written faithfully in the style of the original.

It brings to seventy-five the number of times Clive Merrison has played Sherlock Homes on BBC Radio 4.

Violinists: Leonard Friedman and Ian Humphries

Producer Patrick Rayner.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b01pp5v6)
Series 3

Clare College, Cambridge

Jay Rayner presents the final episode in the current series of The Kitchen Cabinet from Clare College, Cambridge.

Tackling the audience's culinary concerns are: food-writer, broadcaster, and Cambridge-local Tim Hayward; renowned Michelin star chef and patron at London restaurant Murano, Angela Hartnett; The Kitchen Cabinet's resident food historian Dr Annie Gray; and the 2011 Masterchef-winner, originally from Wisconsin, Tim Anderson.

In the grand setting of Clare College the panel discuss traditional feasting rituals and are surprised to find members of the audience have eaten swan.

The panel also reminisce about their days of student cooking and the worst thing they have ever cooked, which finds Tim Anderson rummaging through rubbish bins. He suggests 'toast on beans' as his own take on a staple student dish and Dr Annie Gray explains the virtues of the toastie-machine.

The team take questions on whether granite can improve your baking, how to use up all those post Christmas cheeses, and what really constitutes 'fasting' - eating very little or eating nothing at all?

Japanese food-specialist Tim Anderson talks about Japanese cuisine beyond sushi and how to eat it at home, and the team look at some of the earliest references to Japanese food in British culture.

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun.

Produced by Robert Abel and Peggy Sutton.
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Lives in a Landscape (b01n6rb6)
Series 11

The Longest Commute in Britain

The Longest Commute in Britain

Geoff picks up a copy of "Horse and Hound" for his wife and strides toward Euston Station; Angus heads for the lounge car, where a whisky is ready and waiting; Mary leaves the offices of 'Country Life', and joins the London rush hour crowds wearing sturdy walking boots; meanwhile Ann Marie has taken up her position at the end of the platform 15, to await the longest train in the UK - it will be her job to unlock the doors, and ready the train for departure.

This is arguable the longest commute in the UK - the Caledonian Sleeper - which at a quarter of a mile long, is also the longest train.
Walkers, climbers, shooting-parties and Americans tourists are regular fare, but week in week out, the same faces return, the band of commuters who live in the Scottish Highlands, but work in London.

Would you, given the choice, choose to spent two nights a week on a train? Two nights of camaraderie in the lounge car; two nights of friendly exchanges, unwinding with late night whiskies; but two nights also of jolting rails, beds just a mite too short for the tallest folk, and the notorious uncoupling at Edinburgh.

Alan Dein rides the rails with the experts, through the long night of the long distance commuter, to find out where home really lies.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b01pp5v8)
The Language of Bereavement and Grief

The language of bereavement and grief are explored by writer Michael Rosen, as he talks to psychologists, teachers, hospice workers, childrens charities, and visits a Death Cafe.
Winstons Wish is a charity for children who have lost a parent, brother or sister. Michael sits in on a training session for teachers and carers in Cheltenham, and discovers how the language we use can either confuse or comfort young children. He talks to psychologist Colin Murray Parkes about the stages of grieving and the psychological complexity of dealing with loss. And he visits a Death Cafe, where like-minded people come together to discuss anything and everything about death and dying, whilst enjoying tea and cake.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b01pp5vb)
Series 29

John Stuart Mill

Max Mosley nominates the philosopher and proponent of personal liberty, John Stuart Mill, as his great life. With presenter Matthew Parris and biographer Richard Reeves.

Max Mosley trained as a barrister and was an amateur racing driver before becoming involved in the professional sport, latterly as president of the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. The youngest son of Sir Oswald Mosley, former leader of the British Union of Fascists, and Diana Mitford, his family name made a career in politics impossible. His choice of Mill as a great life is a result of his recent experiences of suing the News of the World for invasion of privacy, and giving evidence to the Leveson Inquiry. He says that both sides of the debate used Mill's work on liberty to justify their arguments.

Until summer 2012 Richard Reeves was Nick Clegg's Director of Strategy, and before that, head of the think-tank 'Demos'. His biography, 'John Stuart Mill - Victorian Firebrand', depicts Mill as a passionate man of action: a philosopher, radical MP and reformer who profoundly shaped Victorian society and continues to illuminate our own.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in 2013.


TUE 17:00 PM (b01pp5vd)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01plfbt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 I've Never Seen Star Wars (b01pp5vg)
Series 5

Dave Gorman

Marcus Brigstocke invites comic Dave Gorman to try new experiences, including horse-riding and a strip club. From January 2013.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b01pp56t)
Brenda escapes Lilian's bad mood and visits Mike and Vicky. She senses Mike's not feeling good but he reckons his nervousness is only natural. Vicky joins them and explains she's pretty useless right now. She wishes Bethany would just get on and get herself born.
Ed tries to explain to Mike that an extra penny a litre for the milk would make all the difference to him.
Resistant Mike says it's tough for all of them.
As she prepares the meal for Mike and Vicky, Susan tells Neil that Borchester Land's new herd manager Rob Titchener has been in the shop. Susan's worked out that he's only catering for himself. Neil invites Ed and Emma to join them all later but Ed insists they'll be fine upstairs. Neil doesn't think he looks very happy.
Mike feels a bit sorry for Ed but Vicky points out Mike had no choice but to drop his price. He mustn't feel guilty. Mike insists they don't say anything while at Neil and Susan's but Vicky can't help herself. She blurts out that Ed asked Mike to pay him more for the milk and points out what bad timing it was. Neil brightly asks them what they'd like to drink.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b01pp5zd)
Les Miserables; Ben Miller; Mo Yan's new novel

With Mark Lawson.

Tom Hooper, director of the King's Speech, has now taken on one of the most successful musicals of all time, Les Miserables. Jason Solomons reviews the film in which actors, including Anne Hathaway, Hugh Jackman and Russell Crowe, had to sing live on set.

The latest novel from Mo Yan, the Chinese winner of the 2012 Nobel Prize for literature, has been published in English before Chinese. Described as a "bizarre romp through the Chinese countryside" Pow! examines life in contemporary China. Alex Clark discusses Mo Yan's take on Chinese society.

Ben Miller returns to our screens this evening in the second series of Death in Paradise, a quirky TV crime drama set on the island of Guadeloupe. He reflects on playing a British police inspector who finds he is a fish out of water when he lands a job as the island's new detective.

Producer Olivia Skinner.


TUE 19:45 The Cazalets (b01pp56f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 A Tale of Two Villages (b01pq9lc)
20 years after its pit shut, the iconic Yorkshire village of Grimethorpe is thriving. So what's behind its successful regeneration and why have other villages fared less well?
When Michael Heseltine announced that Grimethorpe was closing villagers feared for their future. Crime levels shot up to unprecedented levels and property prices plummeted. Drugs were blighting lives and making people feel unsafe in their streets. But a group of villagers decided to try and stop the rot. They formed a successful Neighbourhood Watch project and began driving the dealers out.
Alongside their efforts, Barnsley Council spearheaded a multi million pound regeneration initiative to decontaminate the former pit site, build new road links, attract businesses and create a housing market. Among the employers to come to the area is the international online fashion retailer ASOS which is now the area's biggest private sector employer.
A palpable sense of hope now fills the village and people feel their future is once again secure.
But five miles east in the pit village of Thurnscoe residents are still waiting for regeneration to make a difference to their daily lives. Many people there feel that the village is dying on its feet and that the money spent hasn't delivered jobs or hope.
So why the difference? How did they take the grim out of Grimethorpe?
Producer Sally Chesworth.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b01pp5zg)
RNIB and GDBA - Plans for 2013

RNIB's CEO Lesley-Anne Alexander and Guide Dogs for the Blind CEO Richard Leamann join Peter White and talk about their charities' plans for the year ahead.
Peter asks them about service provision, their client base and their commitment to employ a greater number of blind and partially-sighted people.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b01pp5zj)
Dementia, Sleep, Thyroxine

Dr Mark Porter explores Dementia Challenge - the Department of Health's much publicised campaign to improve dementia care, including a new scheme to test everyone over 75 who's admitted to hospital for signs of the condition. Will this lead to overdiagnosis or will it get people treated early?

And prescribing sleeping tablets for those unable to rest on a noisy hospital ward may seem like a quick fix but there is strong evidence that they are linked to side effects including an increase in falls. Mark Porter investigates and finds some simple solutions to getting a good night's kip in hospital.

Plus a leading expert on the thyroid gland answers a listener's concerns about the use of the hormone thyroxine.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b01pp567)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 21:58 Weather (b01plfbw)
The latest weather forecast.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b01pp5zl)
MPs urged to back 1% cap on benefit rises, more protests in China over press freedoms, and a new government push to encourage teenagers to learn poems by heart. Tonight's programme presented by Ritula Shah.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01py4zn)
The Knot

Episode 2

Dominic Kitchen is a wedding photographer who is used to seeing people tie the knot, an expression that also represents a sensation that he feels in the pit of his stomach. A sensation that emerges when he is in the presence of a certain person who could change his ordinary life forever. They have a secret that only they can ever know as it is something that society, even today, would struggle with. This is a tale of agonising loss and forbidden love.

Episode 2
It is the annual Summer holiday in Southwold for Dominic and his family. His elder sister Victoria brings her friend Maudie from University. Dominic is growing up and so are his emotions.

Written by Mark Watson
Abridged by John Peacock
Reader Julian Rhind-Tutt
Director Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Heresy (b00sg1vh)
Series 8

Episode 2

Victoria Coren presents another edition of the show which dares to commit heresy.

Her guests this week are comedians David Baddiel and Lucy Porter and the co-presenter of daytime quiz show Pointless, Richard Osman. Together they have fun exposing the wrong-headedness of received wisdom and challenging knee-jerk public reaction to events.

Arguing against the common belief that "the economy is up the creek without a paddle", David Baddiel says we're actually sailing serenely through the recession. Lucy Porter isn't convinced that "the innocence of children is snatched away too fast these days" and wants to know when her 13 month old daughter will start paying her share of the household bills, and Richard Osman finds reasons not to mourn the passing of the News of the World.

Producer: Brian King
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01pp5zn)
Susan Hulme with the day's top news stories from Westminster, where MPs have been arguing over plans to cap the annual rise in many benefit payments.



WEDNESDAY 09 JANUARY 2013

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b01plfcq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b01px4px)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01plfcs)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01plfcv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01plfcx)
The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b01plfcz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01py7w6)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church in the United Kingdom.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b01pp88l)
The fruit and veg that are currently being grown in the UK are less nutritious than normal because of the wet weather. Protein and nutrients are being washed out of the soil resulting in less iron, copper and zinc in our vegetables. Professor Mike Gooding from Reading University says that fewer sunny days means that there is less sugar and starch in our fruit.

Sugar beet farmers are struggling to harvest their crop in the quagmire conditions - some farmers are leaving their crop unharvested. But a new generation of harvesters, called "Beet-Eaters" are rising to the challenge.

And Anna hears about the research that the Food Standards Agency is doing into unpasteurised milk.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emma Weatherill.


WED 06:00 Today (b01pp88n)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 The Cultural Exchange (b01py4fm)
As part of Radio 4's focus on creativity and culture in 2013, Mark Lawson and guests - including playwright Mark Ravenhill, TV executive Lorraine Heggessey, arts editor Sarah Crompton, and documentary maker Sarfraz Manzoor - debate how we can best navigate our way through the wide range of cultural experiences now on offer, and question why it is still so hard to predict what will prove successful.

Word-of-mouth recommendation - always a powerful force - can now be shared in a click.

Anyone with a computer can access dozens of reviews of major films, books and exhibitions - but does this sea of opinion sink the traditional critic, or do we need now more than ever a trusted guide?

And why is it still so hard to predict what will capture the imagination of readers, listeners and viewers? More information than ever is available, yet the works which reach out far beyond the anticipated audience are often quite unexpected - whether it's the global stage success of a children's book enacted with giant puppets (War Horse) or Fifty Shades of Grey.

Mark Lawson and guests debate what shapes how we make cultural choices in 2013, and looks ahead to a major Radio 4 project in which leading creative minds make daily cultural recommendations to listeners.

Producer Ella-mai Robey.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b01px4pz)
The Examined Life

Stephen Grosz - The Examined Life

The world bedevils us. To make sense of it, we tell ourselves stories. In a series of short, vivid, dramatic tales, using psychoanalytic insight without psychoanalytic jargon, The Examined Life tracks the collaborative journey of therapist and patient as they uncover the hidden feelings behind apparently ordinary behaviour patterns.

Written with precision and insight, these case studies are all based on actual people. While factually true, they demonstrate a novelist's sense of an ending and empathetic understanding of the subterfuges of the human mind.

In his work as a practising psychoanalyst, Stephen Grosz has spent the last twenty-five years uncovering the hidden feelings behind our most baffling behaviour. The Examined Life distils over 50,000 hours of conversation into pure psychological insight, without the jargon.

This extraordinary book is about one ordinary process: talking, listening and understanding. Its aphoristic and elegant stories teach us a new kind of attentiveness. They also unveil a delicate self-portrait of the analyst at work, and show how lessons learned in the consulting room can reveal as much to him as to the patient.

Episode 3 of 5:
We make stories to make sense of our lives. But it is not enough to tell tales. There must be someone to listen. Analyst Stephen Grosz recounts a session with a patient who revealed his inner life over the phone with a meticulous description of his house.

Read by Peter Marinker
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Partnership production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01pp88q)
Divorce and the over 60s; Maternal incest; Couples' wardrobes

Divorce and the over 60s, rising numbers of marriages are breaking down when couples near retirement. Uncovering hidden stories of abuse - maternal incest. Couples' wardrobes: Tanya Sarne and Andrew McGibbon. Protection for women trafficked from Nepal. Presented by Jenni Murray.


WED 10:45 The Cazalets (b01pp88s)
The Light Years

Episode 8

by Elizabeth Jane Howard Dramatised by Sarah Daniels

Everyone is extremely worried about the war, particularly Polly, but Neville can see how gas masks might protect him from the unwelcome approaches of relatives wanting to be kissed

The Light Years is set in the lead up to the outbreak of World War II and focuses on the Cazalet family, who appear to have it all, but underneath have their share of longing, indiscretions, jealousies and misplaced loyalties.

Produced and directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 is to broadcast all four of her Cazalet novels: The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off; The story of the family stretches over ten years. The dramatisations begin on New Year's Eve and finish in August 2013.


WED 11:00 The Path to English (b01pp88v)
Bobby Friction talks to adults who are learning English from scratch in the UK. Many of them are immigrants or refugees from different communities and countries who arrive with little English and quickly have to adapt.

How did they feel living in a country where they were unable to communicate? How did they deal with everyday situations like getting on a bus, shopping, going to a school or visiting a doctor? And how did they learn English - both formally and informally? We find a network of unofficial 'translators' in operation helping people get by. We speak to people who have been here for over 40 years as well as those who have recently arrived.

What English course provisions are there for people eager to enhance their language skills? We discover the challenges in funding English courses. And how is the necessity of learning English for the citizenship test changing the experience of people arriving in this country?

Bobby visits the Sparkhill Adult Education Centre in Birmingham and speaks to teachers and pupils learning English through ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages). He also discovers a community on the Soho Road in Birmingham which exists perfectly happily, running businesses and contributing to society while speaking very little English.

We visit the Chinese community of Manchester where the women in particular struggle with communication. We also meet a group of Eastern European supermarket distribution workers in Hertfordshire who are being taught English by their employer.

The programme also contains interviews with The Migrants' Rights Network and the Refugee Council.

Producer: Laura Parfitt
A White Pebble Media production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 11:30 Clare in the Community (b01pp88x)
Series 8

On Expenses

With society collapsing all around us Social Worker Clare Barker is appalled to be stuck indoors bean counting. But as Clare discovers anomalies in the Sparrowhawk Family Centre's expense claims will friendship and loyalty win over professional integrity?

Sally Phillips stars as Clare Barker the social worker who has all the right jargon but never a practical solution.

A control freak, Clare likes nothing better than interfering in other people's lives on both a professional and personal basis. Clare is in her thirties, white, middle class and heterosexual, all of which are occasional causes of discomfort to her.

Each week we join Clare in her continued struggle to control both her professional and private life. In her private life Clare is struggling to come to terms with Brian's infidelity. Will their relationship survive?

In today's Big Society there are plenty of challenges out there for an involved, caring social worker. Or even Clare.

Written by Harry Venning and David Ramsden

Clare ...... Sally Phillips
Brian ...... Alex Lowe
Nali ...... Nina Conti
Ray ...... Richard Lumsden
Helen ...... Liza Tarbuck
Simon ...... Andrew Wincott
Libby ...... Sarah Kendall
Paul ...... Ben Crowe
Mrs Manjula ...... Bharti Patel

Producer: Katie Tyrrell.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2013.


WED 12:00 You and Yours (b01pp88z)
Reporting fraud and the new culture of complaining

Action Fraud is the UK's national fraud and internet crime reporting centre. If you've been scammed, ripped off or conned, you can get in touch and report it. But a senior police officer who helped set up the centre says it isn't working properly and hasn't been well enough publicised. Traditionally British people have been reluctant to complain, preferring to suffer in silence when they're sold goods and services that don't come up to scratch. But a survey suggests that a new culture of complaining has developed, with increasing numbers of people willing to take a stand when they get poor service or shoddy goods. As English local authorities take on a bigger role in promoting public health, should their pension funds continue to invest in tobacco companies?

Presenter: Winifred Robinson
Producer: Jonathan Hallewell.


WED 12:30 Face the Facts (b01pp891)
Face the Facts Update

In July 2012, as the country prepared for the London Olympics, we reported the concern of the tourism industry that our visa system was making it too difficult for people to visit the UK. Senior figures in the industry said the UK was missing out on a huge rise in Chinese tourism because our visa application forms were too long and too intrusive. Potential visitors had to travel hundreds of miles to visit a centre for biometric testing. By comparison the so-called Schengen visa allows tourists to visit more than twenty European countries is much easier to obtain. As a result many Chinese travellers give up on visiting Britain and confine their trips to the Schengen countries. And, so say tourism leaders, the lost revenue can be counted in billions of pounds. However critics say an easier tourist visa system can make us more vulnerable to illegal immigration.

In December, the Government announced improvements designed to make it easier for visitors from China to come here. We ask the UK's primary tourism body - Visit Britain - how helpful the reforms will be.

We look forward to an inquest into a tower block fire which killed six people and may lead to safety improvements in such properties.

And what has become of the man who is accused of ripping off dozens of investors who handed over money to buy properties in Dubai and yet never set foot in their apartments? The liquidators of his company have so far been unable to find "Mr Bollywood" or the money.

Presenter: John Waite
Producer: Nick Jackson and Richard Hooper.


WED 12:57 Weather (b01plfd1)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b01pp893)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


WED 13:45 A Guide to Mountain and Moorland Birds (b01pp895)
Upland Grasslands

Brett Westwood is joined by keen bird watcher, Stephen Moss on the magnificent rolling hills of the Long Mynd in Shropshire as Skylarks rise up out of the heather all around them and pour out their liquid song. With the help of recordings by wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson, Brett and Stephen offer a practical and entertaining guide to the birds which you're most likely to see and hear on Britain's upland grasslands; birds like the Skylark (whose call Brett describes as sounding like "a sparrow with attitude"!), the Meadow Pipit, the Wheatear ("a bit like a light bulb against the moor" as it flies away from you), and the Curlew, whose bubbling song is so evocative of wild places.

This is the third of five programmes to help you identify many of the birds seen and heard in Upland Britain; on heather moors, upland grasslands, cliffs and crags, bogs and mires and the high mountain tops. Not only is there advice on how to recognise the birds from their appearance, but also how to identify them from their calls and songs.

This series complements five previous series; A Guide to Garden Birds, A Guide Woodland Birds, A Guide to Water Birds, A Guide to Coastal Birds and A Guide to Farmland Birds and is aimed at both the complete novice as well as those who are eager to learn more about our upland visitors and residents.

PRODUCER: Sarah Blunt.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b01pp56t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b01pp897)
Trevor Preston - Second Body

BAFTA-winning writer Trevor Preston draws on his own experience as an artist in this dark thriller. Anna is a painter driven to capture the haunting images of death that fill the twilight world of her dreams. But whose death do they foretell?

Directed by Toby Swift

Trevor Preston trained at the Royal College of Art before embarking on a career in television. He wrote for many of the best dramas of the 1970s and 80s, including Ace of Wands, Callan, The Sweeney, Minder, Out and Fox, for which Trevor received a BAFTA in 1981. His film work includes Billy the Kid and the Green Baize Vampire and the Mike Hodges directed I'll Sleep When I'm Dead with Clive Owen. Trevor has written three radio plays, the first of which, Flaw in the Motor, Dust in the Blood, was shortlisted for the Imison Award and a Mental Health in the Media Award in 2009.


WED 15:00 Money Box Live (b01pp899)
Tax and Self-Assessment

Do you need advice about paying or reclaiming tax? Or perhaps you're wrestling with your self-assessment form? For the answers to your tax questions call 03700 100 444 from 1pm or email moneybox@bbc.co.uk

The deadline for completing your online 2011-12 tax return and paying the tax you owe is weeks away. A late return will cost you £100 as an initial penalty, even if you don't owe any tax. You'll need to allow extra time if you haven't filed online before, as you must apply for an activation code which takes 7 days to arrive.

If you're affected by the changing Child Benefit rules you may have to register for self-assessment for the first time and send in a tax return for the year 2012-13. October 5 is the deadline for registering.

Maybe you're self-employed and need to ask about tax deductible expenses and allowances for this or previous years?

Perhaps you want to know about your personal allowance, tax on savings, shares, pension contributions or buying a home?

Will there be tax to pay if you give away or sell a valuable possession?

And what happens if you transfer an asset to a current or former spouse or civil partner?

Waiting to share their knowledge will be:

Anita Monteith, Technical Manager, Tax Faculty, Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales

Chas Roy-Chowdhury, Head of Taxation, Association of Chartered Certified Accountants

Eric Williams, Tax Partner, Grant Thornton

Whatever your tax question, our experts will do their best to help.

You can email your question to moneybox@bbc.co.uk. Or the number to call is 03 700 100 444 - lines are open between 1pm and 3.30pm on Wednesday. Standard geographic charges apply. Calls from mobiles may be higher.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b01pp5zj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b01pp89c)
Contagion; changing masculinity in retail

Contagion - how commerce spreads disease. Laurie Taylor talks to Mark Harrison, Professor of the History of Medicine, about the close intertwining between trade and germs from the 14th century to today. His new book explores the development of public health in the Western world as well as the global misuse of quarantines for political ends. Also, young men working in retail. The sociologist, Steven Roberts' research finds evidence for a new and softer kind of masculinity. He's joined by Professor Valerie Walkerdine, who's documented the changing relationship between men and work in a post industrial economy.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b01pp89f)
Hacked Off on Leveson

There are more developments in the Leveson story this week. As Oliver Letwin works on a draft Royal Charter, newspaper publishers meet to agree their own new road map and the Lords discuss regulation, Hacked Off's put out its own draft bill and the Information Commissioner's released his response to Leveson. Steve Hewlett hears from Hugh Tomlinson QC who's behind the Hacked Off bill and from Christopher Graham, the Information Commissioner. Newspapers this week have reported the commissioner warning about the potentially "chilling effects" on investigative journalism if the Leveson recommendations are implemented in full.
Channel 4 is yet to renew its deal with Group M, which buys around £250m of advertising from the broadcaster each year. There's disagreement over where Channel 4 is still as valuable to advertisers as it has been. Mathew Horsman of Mediatique media consultants and Lisa Campbell of Broadcast magazine look at the underlying performance and the overall strength of the broadcaster's programmes. Staying with Channel 4, employment lawyer Jane Moorman of Virtual Lawyers Ltd looks at John McCririck's claim for compensation after he was dropped from Channel 4 Racing at the age of 72. He's seeking £3,000,000 for age discrimination - a claim Channel 4 rejects and says it will vigorously defend.
The producer is Simon Tillotson.


WED 17:00 PM (b01pp89h)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01plfd3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Cabin Pressure (b01l02j9)
Series 4

Timbuktu

Cabin Pressure is a sitcom about the wing and a prayer world of a tiny, one plane, charter airline; staffed by two pilots: one on his way down, and one who was never up to start with. Whether they're flying squaddies to Hamburg, metal sheets to Mozambique, or an oil exec's cat to Abu Dhabi, no job is too small, but many, many jobs are too difficult...

Episode 1:

Hooray hooray, it's Birling Day once more, where the crew traditionally swap their dignity for cash! But where have all the camels gone? And why is Arthur reading a book?

Written by John Finnemore
Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b01pp89k)
Ed tells Neil that he can't see how he can scrape the money together to buy the herd management software. Neil tells Ed that Vicky mentioned he'd tried to negotiate the milk price with Mike. Neil suggests asking Mike again in a month or so, once things have settled down. Ed's not sure he can wait. Maybe he'd be better off selling to one of the big companies.
Roy tells Elizabeth they've sold their first Lower Loxley passport. The purchasers are regulars but Elizabeth is positive that if it makes them come more often they'll spend more money while there. They discuss plans for the renaming ceremony for the rare breeds centre. Roy's got everything in hand.
Kenton chats to Neil and David in the Bull. He's just heard that Jim, Joe and both Berts (Fry and Horrobin) are off to Liverpool next week for a winter break. He's trying to gather stuff for Farmhouse Breakfast week to make the pub feel more 'farmy' and wants to borrow David's tractor. David points out they use it all the time but agrees to lend him a harrow. Kenton wonders about asking Mike for something too. Neil says Mike's got rather more important things on his mind.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b01pp89m)
Tom Odell, Moby Dick, Utopia reviewed

With John Wilson.

David Cameron, Benedict Cumberbatch, Tilda Swinton and David Attenborough are among 135 people each reading a chapter a day of Herman Melville's epic novel Moby Dick, on a website curated by writer and whale enthusiast Philip Hoare. He talks about choosing an appropriate reading for the Prime Minister, and pairing chapters with works by artists such as Antony Gormley, Anish Kapoor and Tony Oursler - director of the video for David Bowie's new single - who created today's image of a whale's eye.

To mark the 150th birthday of the London Underground tomorrow, John and author Iain Sinclair go down the escalators to discuss the Tube's contribution to our culture, from the graphic-design, murals and architecture at the stations themselves, to the ways the Tube has cropped up in art, books and films - from Henry Moore's wartime drawings to American werewolves chasing hapless commuters.

Utopia is a new TV thriller which focuses on a mysterious graphic novel and the sinister events that befall a group of people when they get hold of an original manuscript of it. Graphic novel enthusiast Rachel Cooke gives her verdict.

Winner of the 2013 Brits Critics' Choice award Tom Odell has been writing music since he was 13. Now aged 22, he signed a record deal after four gigs. He discusses his debut EP Songs From Another Love, and the expectations that can accompany a high-profile award.

Producer Olivia Skinner.


WED 19:45 The Cazalets (b01pp88s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


WED 20:00 Decision Time (b01pp89p)
Nick Robinson shines a light on the process by which controversial decisions are reached behind closed doors in Westminster and Whitehall.
This week, he and his guests discuss whether the benefits for pensioners that top up the basic state pension should be paid to all pensioners, including the very well-off. Should the winter fuel allowance, free bus pass, prescriptions and eye tests, and free TV licences for the over 75s be scrapped, means-tested, or protected at all costs?
Decision Time examines how a decision that could face a government of any political complexion at the present time might be taken or blocked in Westminster and Whitehall with those who know the business of government and politics are done.
Joining Nick Robinson for this edition are Lord Turnbull, the former Cabinet Secretary; Peter Hain MP, former Secretary of State for Work and Pensions; Ros Altmann, Director-General of Saga; Chris Skidmore, Conservative MP, who has written about the 21st century welfare state; and Sean Worth, a former Number 10 adviser in the Coalition Government and now at the Policy Exchange think tank.
Producer: Rob Shepherd.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b01pp89r)
Series 3

Anwar Akhtar: The Meaning of Pakistan

Anwar Akhtar, Director of The Samosa, argues that Pakistan should think of itself as an Asian nation, not as an Arab one. And after years of working between Britain and Pakistan, he says British Pakistanis are uniquely placed to help Pakistan embrace its multicultural history - and to create a prosperous and peaceful future with India.

Four Thought is a series of talks which combine thought provoking ideas and engaging storytelling. Recorded live in front of an audience, speakers air their latest thinking on the trends, ideas, interests and passions that affect our culture and society.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Care to Be a Nurse? (b01p0fps)
Christina Patterson explores why nursing sometimes goes wrong, and investigates what can be done to put it right.

After she herself experienced nursing at its worst, in 2011 Christina spoke out in a Radio 4 Four Thought talk. In this programme she follows up, investigating the extent of poor nursing, asking why it happens so often, and getting to the bottom of what can be done to improve it.

As she speaks to her fellow patients, healthcare experts, politicians, and doctors, nurses and managers across the NHS, Christina hears about everything from faulty training programmes to inadequate regulatory regimes. But could the solution be something simpler to describe and much harder to deliver?

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:30 The Cultural Exchange (b01py4fm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b01plfd5)
The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b01pp89t)
How long will US troops stay in Afghanistan? A senior American diplomat voices concerns about a UK referendum on the European Union. And the 150th anniversary of the first journey on the London Underground. Presented by Ritula Shah.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01py52z)
The Knot

Episode 3

Dominic Kitchen is a wedding photographer who is used to seeing people tie the knot, an expression that also represents a sensation that he feels in the pit of his stomach. A sensation that emerges when he is in the precence of a certain person who could change his ordinary life forever. They have a secret that only they can ever know as it is something that society, even today, would struggle with. This is a tale of agonising loss and forbidden love.

Episode 3
Victoria recognised her younger brother's talent for photography and gave him a camera for Christmas. Luckily he brings it to her wedding as the official photographer fails to step up to the mark.

Written by Mark Watson
Abridged by John Peacock
Reader Julian Rhind-Tutt
Director Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Sarah Millican's Support Group (b010y7bp)
Series 2

2. 'I think I'm addicted to plastic surgery'

"I think I'm addicted to plastic surgery"

"My retired Dad has more of a social life than me - how can I get him to swap stripping for slippers?"

Sarah Millican is a life counsellor and modern-day agony aunt tackling the nation's problems head on, dishing out real advice for real people.

Assisted by her very own team of experts of the heart - man of the people local cabbie Terry, and self qualified counsellor Marion,

Sarah tackles the nation's problems head on and has a solution for everything.

Sarah ...... Sarah Millican
Marion ...... Ruth Bratt
Terry ...... Simon Daye
Rachel ...... lsy Suttie
Ian ...... William Andrews
Jeff ...... Kevin Eldon
Clive ...... Malcolm Tierney.

Written by Sarah Millican.

Producer: Lianne Coop

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in May 2011


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01pp8ct)
David Cameron defends the decision to cap benefit rises at 1% a year, calling it "fair and right".
The Prime Minister tells MPs that the coalition is acting "in the national interest".
The Labour leader, Ed Miliband, accuses the Government of "hitting women three times as hard" as men and of "dividing the nation".
The Justice Secretary says private firms and charities are to be given the job of supervising low-risk offenders.
Labour pledges to support a statutory code to protect pub landlords - if the Government is willing to to be tough enough.
In the House of Lords, peers demand tougher action against firms who avoid paying tax in the UK.
Sean Curran and the BBC's parliamentary team report.



THURSDAY 10 JANUARY 2013

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b01plff2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b01px4pz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01plff4)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01plff6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01plff8)
The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b01plffb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01pyx8j)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church in the United Kingdom.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b01pp985)
Farmers are fearful for their crops as the aggressive 'Spanish Slug' is found in the UK after causing problems in Scandinavia. A Swedish entomologist says experts from Europe need to exchange ideas on how to deal with the problem.
Unpasteurised milk can be sold openly in Ireland but its Food Standards Authority wants a complete ban. Ella McSweeney reports from Dublin on the debate.
A scientist from the university of Aberdeen tells Farming Today how genetic breeding could help plants retain nutrients even in rainy conditions.
Presented by Anna Hill. Produced by Ruth Sanderson.


THU 06:00 Today (b01pp987)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b01pp989)
Le Morte d'Arthur

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Thomas Malory's "Le Morte Darthur", the epic tale of King Arthur and his knights of the Round Table. Sir Thomas Malory was a knight from Warwickshire, a respectable country gentleman and MP in the 1440s who later turned to a life of crime and spent various spells in prison. It was during Malory's final incarceration that he wrote "Le Morte Darthur", an epic work which was based primarily on French, but also some English, sources.

Malory died shortly after his release in 1470 and it was to be another fifteen years before "Le Morte Darthur" was published by William Caxton, to immediate popular acclaim. Although the book fell from favour in the seventeenth century, it was revived again in Victorian times and became an inspiration for the Pre-Raphaelite movement who were entranced by the chivalric and romantic world that Malory portrayed.

The Arthurian legend is one of the most enduring and popular in western literature and its characters - Sir Lancelot, Guinevere, Merlin and King Arthur himself, are as well-known today as they were then; and the book's themes - chivalry, betrayal, love and honour - remain as compelling.

With:

Helen Cooper
Professor of Medieval and Renaissance English at the University of Cambridge

Helen Fulton
Professor of Medieval Literature and Head of Department of English and Related Literature at the University of York

Laura Ashe
CUF Lecturer and Tutorial Fellow at Worcester College at the University of Oxford

Producer: Natalia Fernandez.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b01px4q1)
The Examined Life

Stephen Grosz - The Examined Life

The world bedevils us. To make sense of it, we tell ourselves stories. In a series of short, vivid, dramatic tales, using psychoanalytic insight without psychoanalytic jargon, The Examined Life tracks the collaborative journey of therapist and patient as they uncover the hidden feelings behind apparently ordinary behaviour patterns.

Written with precision and insight, these case studies are all based on actual people. While factually true, they demonstrate a novelist's sense of an ending and empathetic understanding of the subterfuges of the human mind.

In his work as a practising psychoanalyst, Stephen Grosz has spent the last twenty-five years uncovering the hidden feelings behind our most baffling behaviour. The Examined Life distils over 50,000 hours of conversation into pure psychological insight, without the jargon.

This extraordinary book is about one ordinary process: talking, listening and understanding. Its aphoristic and elegant stories teach us a new kind of attentiveness. They also unveil a delicate self-portrait of the analyst at work, and show how lessons learned in the consulting room can reveal as much to him as to the patient.

Episode 4 of 5:
The collaborative conversations of the psychoanalyst, Stephen Grosz, and his patients as they excavate the hidden feelings behind the stories we tell about ourselves.

Read by Peter Marinker
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Partnership production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01pp98c)
Teaching children empathy; No Sex Affairs; Bernadine Bishop

Jenni Murray looks at how you teach children empathy with Nikkola Daniel and debates whether you can have a no sex affair with writers Lucy Cavendish and Paula Hall. Author Bernadine Bishop discusses facing death, food writer Bee Wilson on the history of the measuring cup and MP Jane Ellison tells us the current status of Keir Starmer's action plan to improve prosecutions on female genital mutilation in the UK.


THU 10:45 The Cazalets (b01pp98f)
The Light Years

Episode 9

by Elizabeth Jane Howard, dramatised by Sarah Daniels

Edward is finding it hard to please both his wife and his mistress, whilst Sid is having trouble just seeing Rachel

Produced and directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

The Light Years is set in the lead up to the outbreak of World War II and focuses on the Cazalet family, who appear to have it all, but underneath have their share of longing, indiscretions, jealousies and misplaced loyalties.

As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 is to broadcast all four of her Cazalet novels: The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off; The story of the family stretches over ten years. The dramatisations begin on New Year's Eve and finish in August 2013.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b01ppmrb)
Trafficking girls in India

In a major investigation, Natalia Antelava reports on the abduction of tens of thousands of young girls in India for forced marriages. Thousands more are sold as prostitutes and domestic servants. She follows the route of the traffickers, who take girls from destitute households in places like West Bengal to wealthier areas in Northern states, where a shortage of women is blamed by many on sex-selective abortions. It's a problem the United Nations describes as of 'genocidal proportions'. Natalia joins campaigners and police fighting the trade and hears the stories of the trafficked girls and from a trafficker himself.
Producer: Natalie Morton.


THU 11:30 Ravi Shankar: Sitar Hero (b00rmrpt)
Nitin Sawhney explores the life of the Indian musician Ravi Shankar as he approaches his 90th birthday.

Ravi Shankar is one of the greatest musicians the world has ever seen. In the West his outstanding career has sometimes been overshadowed by his brief association with the Beatles but he has been performing and composing at the highest level for over 70 years. The man who first brought Indian classical music to an international audience was once compared to Mozart by the great violinist Yehudi Menuhin. But it wasn't an easy journey to success - it took an arduous process of study and practice. Fellow musician and fan Nitin Sawhney meets his hero to discuss how he did it.

With contributions from Ravi Shankar's daughter Anoushka, one of India's biggest music stars Zakir Hussain, George Harrison's wife Olivia, The Who's Pete Townshend and music historian Ken Hunt.


THU 12:00 You and Yours (b01ppmrd)
Begging, divorce, blue plaques and energy in Northern Ireland

Radio 4's consumer affairs programme with Winifred Robinson. It's illegal in the rest of the UK and Aberdeen want to ban it too - begging.

What do Jimmi Hendrix, Virginia Woolf and Fred Perry have in common? They all have a Blue Plaque? There are almost 900 around the UK but English Heritage say they can no longer afford them.

And how the lack of legal aid for divorce means many people have to represent themselves in court or lose out.


THU 12:57 Weather (b01plffd)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b01ppmrg)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


THU 13:45 A Guide to Mountain and Moorland Birds (b01ppmrj)
Bogs and Mires

Two birds with green legs, one with wing mirrors and a Common Gull that's not common at all (!) are discussed when Brett Westwood is joined by keen bird watcher Stephen Moss in rather wild and windy weather on the rolling hills of the Long Mynd in Shropshire. With the help of recordings by wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson, they offer a practical and entertaining guide to the birds which you're most likely to see and hear on Britain's bogs and mires; birds like the Golden Plover with its hauntingly beautiful song, the Dunlin, Greenshank and Common Gull.

This is the fourth of five programmes to help you identify many of the birds seen and heard in Upland Britain; on heather moors, upland grasslands, cliffs and crags, bogs and mires and the high mountain tops. Not only is there advice on how to recognise the birds from their appearance, but also how to identify them from their calls and songs.

This series complements five previous series; A Guide to Garden Birds, A Guide Woodland Birds, A Guide to Water Birds, A Guide to Coastal Birds and A Guide to Farmland Birds and is aimed at both the complete novice as well as those who are eager to learn more about our upland visitors and residents.

PRODUCER: Sarah Blunt.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b01pp89k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b01ppmrl)
Elizabeth Lewis - January

By Elizabeth Lewis.

Daphne and Ben met as teenagers; theirs was a love story of passion and poetry. Now, more than 20 years later, they meet again and return to the coastal cottage where they first found love. But when they arrive at Dragon's Back Bay, they are haunted by the ghosts of a past that it's impossible to recapture.

A strange and haunting hymn to lost love and the inevitability of passing time.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b01ppmrn)
Heritage at Risk - West Midlands

Thousands of historic buildings and monuments are at risk of being lost through damage or neglect. Jules Hudson tours sites in the West Midlands to assess the level of damage, to ask what's key to helping preserve or restore them and ask if some merit the cost and effort involved.
Many walking through Bubbenhall village in Warwickshire may not know about the scheduled ancient monument under the earth because even signs of it are only visible for two weeks in the year but experts say it's key to understanding our ancestors.
He travels to Fazeley near Tamworth which has clusters of Grade 2 listed buildings but some have been destroyed by fire and others virtually abandoned by owners who can't afford the development work. He helps assess one of the buildings with experts from English Heritage who want to produce a database on the state of Grade 2 listed buildings.
Jules also explores nearby Middleton Hall which was so neglected it was used as a motorbike track. Volunteers set up a trust and have spent 35 years bringing it back into use. However, they say their work is still not done.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b01pngq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:55 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b01pnltj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b01ppn8j)
Les Miserables; Oscars; Underground

Francine Stock talks to Les Miserables director Tom Hooper, who broke with tradition by recording his actors singing live on set. Hooper began his career on Eastenders and went on to win an Oscar for The Kings Speech, but this is his first musical.

Tim Robey reports on the Oscar nominations.

Producer Alison Owen and screenwriter Stephen Fingleton discuss the new Hollywood Blacklist, a list of the hottest unproduced film scripts.

And composer Neil Brand talks about his new score for Anthony Asquith's 1928 silent film classic, Underground, which is re-released this week.


THU 16:30 Material World (b01ppn8l)
Kepler; Arctic Drilling; Sexy Brain Regions

Will the Nasa Kepler mission become one of the Space Agency's most famous and significant achievements? Quentin Cooper speaks to William Borucki, Principal Scientist on Kepler, who believes it will be. Also Dr. Stephen Lowry from the University of Kent describes how data collected from the fly by of the asteroid Apophis will help scientists track its course - and determine if it will hit the Earth. Dr. David McInroy from the British Geological survey talks about the difficulties of Arctic drilling and Dr. Tim Behrens from University College London explains why some areas of the brain are proving very popular with neuroscientists.
The producer is Ania Lichtarowicz.


THU 17:00 PM (b01ppn8n)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01plffg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Births, Deaths and Marriages (b01k2f7v)
Series 1

Episode 6

In this episode, the team is thrown into panic as Lorna announces there may be job cuts while Malcolm joins a dating website, fearing that unmarried registrars may be made redundant.

Births, Deaths and Marriages is the sitcom set in a Local Authority Register Office where the staff deal with the three greatest events in anybody's life.

Written by David Schneider (The Day Today, I'm Alan Partridge), who also stars as chief registrar Malcolm Fox - a stickler for rules and willing to interrupt any wedding service if the width of the bride infringes health and safety. He's unmarried but why does he need to be? He's married thousands of women.

Alongside him are rival and divorcee Lorna who has been parachuted in from Car Parks to drag the office (and Malcolm) into the 21st century. To her, marriage isn't just about love and romance, it's got to be about making a profit in our new age of austerity.

There's also the ever spiky Mary, geeky Luke who's worried he'll end up like Malcolm one day, and ditzy Anita who may get her words and names mixed up occasionally but, as the only parent in the office, is a mother to them all.

Cast:
Malcolm ...... David Schneider
Lorna ...... Sarah Hadland
Anita ...... Sandy McDade
Luke ...... Russell Tovey
Mary ....... Sally Bretton
Larry, Mr Charalambous ...... Mike Fenton Stevens
Malcolm's mum, Client registering birth ....... Mel Hudson
Julie, Jessica ...... Gina Peach
James ...... Arran Glass

Producer: Simon Jacobs
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b01ppn8q)
Tom's even more convinced that gourmet ready meals are the way forward. His plan involves setting up his own processing unit and buying in extra meat. Brenda knows that Pat and Tony will worry that Tom will neglect the core business. Tom says he's proposing to make the ready-meals the core business.
Pat asks Tom if he and Helen can manage everything while she and Tony have a week in Gran Canaria in February. Tom's not sure where he's going to find the time.
Mike explains to Brenda that he's worried about being at the birth. He's just so nervous about it. When Brenda offers to be there, Mike's delighted.
After three weeks, Paul and Lilian are finally together again, enjoying champagne in a hotel bed. Paul wants her to stay overnight but it's too risky for Lilian. She agrees to come back in the morning for a couple of hours.
Later, Paul shows Lilian the completed work on the church. With no reason to come back to Fawcett Major, Paul wonders if Lilian would come and stay with him in Watford. Lilian agrees to try to think of a suitable excuse.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b01ppn8s)
Oscar Nominations 2013

With Mark Lawson.
Nominations for the 2013 Oscars were announced this afternoon. Steven Spielberg's Lincoln heads the field with 12 nominations, followed by Life of Pi with 11.
Film reviewers Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Chris Tookey discuss the contenders live in the studio.
Cameron Mackintosh reflects on possible British success as one of the producers of the musical film Les Miserables, which has eight nominations. Animation directors Peter Lord and Sam Fell reveal stories behind their nominated films The Pirates! Band of Misfits and ParaNorman.
Mark also talks to director David O Russell, whose Silver Linings Playbook has eight nominations and is the first film to be nominated in all four acting categories since 1981, and to Michael Haneke, whose Amour is shortlisted in five categories including Best Film and Best Director.
Producer Nicki Paxman.


THU 19:45 The Cazalets (b01pp98f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Report (b01ppn8v)
Railways

Rail passengers are again facing inflation-busting fare rises on what is often described as has one of the most expensive rail systems in Europe. But despite the level of investment that's taking place in Britain's rail network, punctuality targets on the long-distance routes are being missed. In the West Midlands, trains haven't been turning up because of hundreds of cancellations in recent months. Reporter Jenny Chryss investigates whether rail passengers are getting value for money.


THU 20:30 In Business (b01ppn8x)
Starting Young

Starting Young
Leave college, start a business. That is the idea behind a high-powered new project called Entrepreneur First, taking 30 new graduates through the hazardous first stages of launching their own companies. Peter Day charts the progress of some of them..from initial idea to plausible proposition, and beyond.
Producer: Caroline Bayley
[Picture: James Hennessey, Emily Brooke and Zahid Mitha - the three young entrepreneurs In Business has tracked].


THU 21:00 Saving Species (b01pp56h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Tuesday]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b01pp989)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b01plffj)
The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b01ppn8z)
Supporters of Venezuela's Hugo Chavez rally, on the day he was due to be inaugurated for another term. How the UK economy is benefiting from space, and was it a good idea for Nick Clegg to admit to wearing a onesie? With Carolyn Quinn.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01py572)
The Knot

Episode 4

Dominic Kitchen is a wedding photographer who is used to seeing people tie the knot, an expression that also represents a sensation that he feels in the pit of his stomach. A sensation that emerges when he is in the presence of a certain person who could change his ordinary life forever. They have a secret that only they can ever know as it is something that society, even today, would struggle with. This is a tale of agonising loss and forbidden love.

Episode 4
With a career as a wedding photographer, Dominic has witnessed the tying of many knots, but he is unused to the sensation of the knot that he is beginning to feel in the pit of his stomach when in the presence of a certain person who will potentially change the course of his life forever.

Written by Mark Watson
Abridged by John Peacock
Reader Julian Rhind-Tutt
Director Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Shedtown (b01ppn91)
Series 2

Shed Report

Who hasn't thought about running away from it all at some time or other? Throwing caution to the wind, wrenching oneself out of a long established orbit to head for the deep space of the unknown?

In series two of Shedtown, our wooden icon of escape and isolation - the shed - continues to be a symbol of possibility and change. Our Sheddists arrived and survived - and, now waking from a beach-baked slumber, the familiar residents find faces old and new on the sand.

Episode 1:
Deborah Dearden arrives back at the beach. Not such a stranger - yet stranger still.

Barry............................Tony Pitts
Jimmy..........................Stephen Mangan
Eleanor..................Ronni Ancona
Colin........................Johnny Vegas
Deborah.....................Emma Fryer
William..................Adrian Manfredi
Diane....................Rosina Carbone
Dave......................Shaun Dooley
Father Michael........James Quinn
Wes......................Warren Brown
Nell...........................Eleanor Samson

Narrator.................Maxine Peake
Music....................Paul Heaton and Jonny Lexus

Written and Directed by Tony Pitts
Produced by Sally Harrison

A Woolyback Production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01ppn93)
Rachel Byrne with the day's top news stories from Westminster. MPs get a behind-the-scenes account of the so-called 'Plebgate' affair from Downing Street's top civil servant; the government gives an update on the recent violence in Northern Ireland; and emotional scenes in the Commons as MPs whose families have been affected by dementia speak out. Also, more arguments over planned changes to welfare. And a question about the Deputy Prime Minister's "onesie". Editor: Alan Soady.



FRIDAY 11 JANUARY 2013

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b01plfgc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b01px4q1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b01plfgf)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b01plfgh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b01plfgk)
The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b01plfgm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b01pyx9m)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church in the United Kingdom.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b01ppp2j)
Thousands of sheep and cattle have been killed in the bush fires sweeping across New South Wales and Tasmania, costing farmers millions of dollars. The Government's launched a new plan to rescue the ailing honey bee population in England and Wales. It will include more training for beekeepers and a code of welfare for bees. Also in the programme, an insight into intensive duck farming.
Presenter: Anna Hill
Producer: Sarah Swadling.


FRI 06:00 Today (b01ppp2l)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b01pnlt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b01px4q3)
The Examined Life

Episode 5

The world bedevils us. To make sense of it, we tell ourselves stories. In a series of short, vivid, dramatic tales, using psychoanalytic insight without psychoanalytic jargon, The Examined Life tracks the collaborative journey of therapist and patient as they uncover the hidden feelings behind apparently ordinary behaviour patterns.

Written with precision and insight, these case studies are all based on actual people. While factually true, they demonstrate a novelist's sense of an ending and empathetic understanding of the subterfuges of the human mind.

In his work as a practising psychoanalyst, Stephen Grosz has spent the last twenty-five years uncovering the hidden feelings behind our most baffling behaviour. The Examined Life distils over 50,000 hours of conversation into pure psychological insight, without the jargon.

This extraordinary book is about one ordinary process: talking, listening and understanding. Its aphoristic and elegant stories teach us a new kind of attentiveness. They also unveil a delicate self-portrait of the analyst at work, and show how lessons learned in the consulting room can reveal as much to him as to the patient.

Episode 5 of 5:
Analysts don't always have all the answers, sometimes they have questions and sometimes they have dreams. Stephen Grosz examines his own night time anxieties.

Read by Peter Marinker
Abridged and produced by Jane Waters
A Waters Partnership production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b01ppp2q)
Fat women in cartoons; Reclaim re-visited; women footballers' pay; sexual offences survey

Presented by Jenni Murray. Miss Moti is a cartoon character with a difference. She is an overweight Asian woman with no superpowers and she sometimes gets stuck in stairwells because of her size. How visible are fat women in cartoons and comic books? England Women's football team is involved in a row with the FA over pay. What implications could it have for the women's game? A government survey out today, for the first time collates sexual offence figures across departments, we ask, why it's taken so long. Four years ago Woman's Hour visited a mentoring scheme being run by the Manchester-based project, Reclaim. Sinead Andrews and Frances Capon were among those first participants and they join Jenni, along with Labour MEP for North West England Arlene McCarthy, who is a patron of Reclaim, to discuss life after the scheme.


FRI 10:45 The Cazalets (b01ppp2s)
The Light Years

Episode 10

by Elizabeth Jane Howard, dramatised by Sarah Daniels

As Zoe worries that she may be pregnant the rest of the family wait anxiously for news of the outcome of Chamberlain's meeting with Hitler.

Produced and directed by Sally Avens and Marion Nancarrow

The Light Years is set in the lead up to the outbreak of World War II and focuses on the Cazalet family, who appear to have it all, but underneath have their share of longing, indiscretions, jealousies and misplaced loyalties.

As Elizabeth Jane Howard enters her 90th Birthday year, Radio 4 is to broadcast all four of her Cazalet novels: The Light Years, Marking Time, Confusion and Casting Off. The story of the family stretches over ten years.
The dramatisations begin on New Year's Eve and finish in August 2013.


FRI 11:00 A Different Kind of Justice (b01ppp2v)
Facilitator Karl James tells the inside story of a Restorative Justice meeting between a burglar and his victim, tracing the profound effects on all involved.

Meetings between victims and the perpetrators of a crime are undergoing a huge expansion in the UK. New government legislation is being introduced to establish the practice, known as Restorative Justice, within the criminal justice system. Studies suggest the activity can reduce reoffending rates and help the victim come to terms with the crime.

In this programme, dialogue expert Karl James explores one of these encounters and talks to both the victim and the offender, getting both sides' perspective on what happened and the long-term consequences of their meeting.

In November 2008, Margaret interrupted a burglary in her own home. As she came through the backdoor, the burglar left through the front. He had taken a laptop full of photos commemorating her daughter Jessica's 18th birthday. Eight months later her daughter was killed in a tragic car accident. The theft of the laptop meant her parents were deprived of any recent family photos of their daughter. For Margaret, the burglary and her daughter's death became entwined, increasing her sense of anger and impotence. But, inspired by the memory of her daughter, Margaret agreed to meet the offender in a restorative justice conference in Preston Prison.

Ian was that burglar. In November 2008, he was a petty criminal, breaking into houses to fund his drug habit. Like Margaret, he had also lost a child - his 14-year-old son - and his life had gone off the rails.

Their meeting had a deep effect on both parties.

Producer: Russell Finch
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 When the Dog Dies (b01m5nlx)
Series 3

Where There's a Will

Ronnie Corbett returns for a third series of his popular sitcom by Ian Davidson and Peter Vincent.

Ronnie plays Sandy Hopper, who is growing old happily along with his dog Henry. His grown up children - both married to people Sandy doesn't approve of at all - would like him to move out of the family home so they can get their hands on the money earlier. But Sandy's not having it. He's not moving until the dog dies. And not just that, how can he move if he's got a lodger? His daughter is convinced that his too attractive lodger Dolores is also after Sandy and his money.

Luckily, Sandy has three grandchildren and, sometimes, a friendly word or a kindly hand on the shoulder can really help a Granddad in the twenty-first century. Man and dog together face a complicated world. And there's every chance they'll make it more so.

Episode One - Where there's A Will
Sandy has made a new will and son-in-law Blake can't wait to see what it says. Dolores suggests a phoney will to give Blake the shock of his life. When the penny drops, Blake exacts his revenge.

Sandy................Ronnie Corbett
Dolores..............Liza Tarbuck
Blake................Jonathan Aris
Mrs Pompom.....Sally Grace
Ellie..................Tilly Vosburgh

Producer: Liz Anstee
A CPL production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 You and Yours (b01ppp2x)
Pubs, financial advice, and fighting the flab Euro-style

Pub companies are to be regulated by the government because of concerns that some tenants in their pubs are being charged an unreasonable rent and are paying too high a price for their beer. New rules governing independent financial advisers have come into force; it means if you want it, you'll have to pay up front for it. Eon, the energy company, have gone back to the future and opened a high street shop giving customers an opportunity to speak to them face to face. January is when the UK goes gym and diet mad but what about in Europe; our correspondents report on fighting the flab Euro-style. The high street scheme that offers a refuge for people with mental disabilities who become distressed when they are out and about. It's the annual gadget bash in Las Vegas but how many of the 'oohs' and 'aahs' will turn into sales; what technology will we actually be buying in the coming year?


FRI 12:57 Weather (b01plfgp)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b01pppzq)
National and international news. Listeners can share their views via email: wato@bbc.co.uk or on twitter: #wato.


FRI 13:45 A Guide to Mountain and Moorland Birds (b01pppzs)
High Mountain Tops

Brett Westwood is joined by keen bird watcher Stephen Moss in rather wild and windy weather on the rolling hills of the Long Mynd in Shropshire and with the help of recordings by wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson, they offer a practical and entertaining guide to the birds which you're most likely to see and hear on Britain's high mountain tops; birds like Dotterel (which by an amazing bit of luck Brett and Stephen see on the Long Mynd as it stops off on migration), the colour changing Ptarmigan (known colloquially in America as the Snow Chicken because of its white colouring in winter) and a songbird, the Snow Bunting.

This is the last in a series of five programmes to help you identify many of the birds seen and heard in Upland Britain; on heather moors, upland grasslands, cliffs and crags, bogs and mires and the high mountain tops. Not only is there advice on how to recognise the birds from their appearance, but also how to identify them from their calls and songs.

This series complements five previous series; A Guide to Garden Birds, A Guide Woodland Birds, A Guide to Water Birds, A Guide to Coastal Birds and A Guide to Farmland Birds and is aimed at both the complete novice as well as those who are eager to learn more about our upland visitors and residents.

PRODUCER: Sarah Blunt.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b01ppn8q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b01phg8f)
Melissa Murray - Tom Thumb Redux

Research biologist Tom Latimer is losing his funding, his waistline and his young second wife Val. But his problems are about to get smaller - an awful lot smaller.

By Melissa Murray
Directed by Marc Beeby.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b01pppzv)
Essex

Recorded in Essex, the chair for this week's episode of Gardeners' Question Time is Eric Robson. Answering the audience's questions are panel members Matt Biggs, Christine Walkden and Bunny Guinness.
Produced by Howard Shannon
A Somethin' Else Production for BBC Radio 4.
Q: Is it possible to grow Medlars from seed, and if so do they have to be prepared in a particular way?
A: You can grow them from seed, though they may take longer than if grown on graft-stock and will be less uniformed. If growing from seed it is best to wash off any slime and give them a cold period, before sowing in a peat/grit mixture at the base of a north wall.
Q: What would you do with the soil from a container that has been badly infected with vine weevil?
A: You could get your mower roller and spread them in your compost, or dig a large hole around 4 feet (1.2 metres) deep and bury them in it. Alternatively you could leave them in the pot or box for at least a few years to allow them to die off before using the soil.
Q: This year on my allotment I planted some new Gladioli which turned out with skeletal leaves, and either did not flower or the flowers did not open properly. Someone suggested it was due to thrips. Should I destroy them?
A: Gladioli struggled in this last year generally because of the weather, they often suffered in soil that was too heavy and lacked enough sun. They grow best in a light, free-draining soil that stays warm. If it is infected with thrips you could place yellow sticky traps near the plants (the sort that are used for whitefly) to catch them.
Q: How long would you leave the ground fallow that was under conifers that have been cut down?
A: Anywhere where conifers have been is usually very dry, impoverished, and root-filled. You should try and get as many of the roots out as possible and improve the soil with organic matter over the winter time, particularly around where you are going to plant and allow it to settle. Be careful not to over-improve the soil because if you improve the soil in the planting hole then the roots tend not to go out from there.
Q: Could you recommend a disease-resistant climbing rose, preferably perfumed, for a North-facing wall?
A: Providing you do some sensible pruning to contain it, Rosa brunonii could do well. It is a large and vigorous rose with beautiful cream/white, flowers. Alternatively you could try Madame Alfred Carriere, which is also a white-flowered rose and vigorous. It is also worth remembering that when you are growing at the base of a wall to improve the soil before planting and make sure that it gets plenty of moisture because drying out at the roots is more likely to encourage powdery mildew.
Q: What is the best way to propagate Hardy Fuchsias?
A: You can treat them like normal Fuchsias and take soft-wood stem-tip cuttings, around three inches long (7.62cm), throughout the growing season. Remove the bottom leaves and put them in a pot and grow them in exactly the same way as you would normal Fuchsias. You could also take hard-wood cuttings from them, divide the stem lengths up to six to nine inches (15.24-22.86cm), and place in reasonably gritting compost in a deep pot. You could then store in a garage with a window, or in a sheltered position outside.
Q: I have grown potatoes for two years that are full of wireworm, how can I resolve the problem?
A: Wireworm often appears where you have newly-cultivated ground. Wireworms are very small at around 1-1.5cms long (0.4 inches), and they are hard and orange/brown in appearance. Over time they will disappear, especially if you are cultivating the ground and birds can gain access. They should disappear in around one to two years.
Q: How do you contain white rust on Chrysanthemums?
A: It is a very difficult disease to control as there is no fungicide approved for white rust. It is recognisable by white raised pustules on the underside of the leaf. It can be extremely debilitating and destroy a plant quite quickly. In most cases it is best to destroy the plant rather than attempt to save it.
Q: My greenhouse is in shade most of the day, there is nowhere else it can go. Can the panel suggest anything I could grow apart from moss? I will try anything.
A: Cucumbers do well with the shade, as well as watercress and wasabi. Cuttings will thrive initially in a shaded greenhouse and then can be moved to areas with more light. Lettuce will grow towards the beginning of the year before it gets too hot for them to germinate, and oriental vegetables would grow towards the end of the year.
Photographs courtesy of the Royal Horticultural Society.


FRI 15:45 Student Stories (b01pppzx)
American Refugee

Three stories about contemporary student life written by students. What is modern student life really like? Parties and Love and Lectures? Debts and daytime telly? Self-doubt and self-discovery? These stories, offering a snapshot of student life illustrate it is all this and more.

American Refugee, read by Charlene McKenna, follows a less than typical American post-graduate studying in Belfast. Kolbe Morrisey likes it on 'the Island' however one wonders how long will it be before his spiritual connection to his ancestors runs thin and he runs away?

American Refugee by Tyece Hocking
Read by Charlene McKenna
Produced in Belfast by Laura Conway.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b01pppzz)
A Nobel-winning scientist, a French mountaineer, a sociologist, a former BBC DG and the voice of Listen With Mother

Matthew Bannister on:
The former BBC Director General Alasdair Milne. A talented programme maker, he was involved in a series of rows with the Thatcher government and forced to resign by the Board of Governors.
The Italian neuro embryologist Rita Levi-Montalcini. She won the Nobel Prize for her work on cell growth.
The French mountaineer Maurice Herzog who was the first man to climb Annapurna, losing all his fingers and toes in the process.
The sociologist Stanley Cohen, who coined the term "moral panic" and devoted his life to human rights. His collaborator Professor Laurie Taylor pays tribute.
And the actress Daphne Oxenford, loved by a generation of children for reading stories on Listen with Mother.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b01ppq01)
As the New Year chimes beckoned in 2013, many Feedback listeners bemoan the loss of some of the most well-known and well-loved voices on BBC Radio - from presenters to continuity, across the networks. In their place is a swathe of new talent. We welcome in the New Year with your views on the changes.
Also, reporting climate change. This week, many listeners to bulletins in the Today programme contacted Feedback via Twitter and email to say they were dismayed by the reporting of Met Office research on climate change. The Met Office's chief scientist says she also had lots of correspondence after the broadcast.
BBC local radio has lost its regional evening programmes, and they are being replaced by a single broadcast across all stations - the Mark Forrest Show. We bring a dedicated panel of local radio listeners together with one of the programme's developers, to air their views on the new show.
And can local radio save your life? We hear from one listener who says he's still here because of it.
Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Kate Taylor
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 17:00 PM (b01ppq03)
Full coverage and analysis of the day's news.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b01plfgr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b01ppq05)
Series 79

Episode 4

A satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Sandi Toksvig. Panellists are Jeremy Hardy, Francesca Martinez, Fred Macaulay and Susan Calman.

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b01pw3fm)
Tony offers to take on a couple of morning milkings per week. Tom asks if he's discussed this with Pat. He hasn't. It's a matter of finding the right moment.
Tony's looking after Henry for a couple of hours. Pat insists he calls her if it gets too much for him. Tony tries to explain that he's ok and feels ready to take on some milking but Henry suddenly demands his attention.
Helen tells Pat that Tom's a bit stressed. Pat knows he wants to develop his business and realises they depend heavily on him. She's really grateful for all he does.
Peggy wants Lilian to fix her porch light. Lilian's gone out early to check on some builders but Matt offers to go straight over. When Lilian later takes Peggy to the Laurels, Peggy questions where she went earlier. She wonders if the trip to Whitby tired Lilian out, which is what Matt seems to think.
When Lilian returns home, Matt's looking forward to a whole weekend together. Lilian mentions that she's been invited to visit an old friend in London. It's the last opportunity to see her before they move to Dubai. She's sorry and promises to make it up to Matt.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b01ppq07)
My Mad Fat Diary; cellist Matthew Barley

With Kirsty Lang.
A Mormon community in Lancashire provides the setting for The Friday Gospels, a novel by Betty Trask Prize-winner Jenn Ashworth. She was raised as a Mormon until she was a teenager, and she reflects on why she wanted to write about her experience as a British Mormon, when most literature focuses on American Mormon communities.
My Mad Fat Diary is a new TV comedy drama series, based on the real life journals of Rae Earl, who recorded her teenage life in Lincolnshire. Stand-up comic Sharon Rooney stars as an overweight 16 year-old, recently released from a psychiatric hospital, and attempting to find a new circle of friends. Writer Grace Dent reviews.
Cellist Matthew Barley is celebrating Benjamin Britten's centenary year with 100 concerts and workshops, with a focus on the composer's Third Suite For Cello - written for Rostropovich in 1971. Barley's tour, Around Britten, visits castles, hospices, lighthouses and a cave in the Peak District - as well as concert halls from Orkney to Devon. He tells Kirsty the links between Britten, Russia and his own grandfather - and the experience of recording overnight in Canterbury Cathedral.
What Richard Did, the third film from Irish director Lenny Abrahamson, is set in the privileged world of Dublin's young elite. Richard, who is handsome, popular and the star of the rugby team, lives a charmed life - until his carefree existence is destroyed by a violent event. Meg Rosoff discusses the film's treatment of moral choices.
Producer Rebecca Nicholson.


FRI 19:45 The Cazalets (b01ppp2s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b01ppq09)
St Catherine's Church, New Cross, London

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from St Catherine's Church, New Cross, London, with Deputy Leader of the Labour Party Harriet Harman MP, Deputy Leader of the Liberal Democrats Simon Hughes MP, commentator Douglas Murray and Sir Malcolm Rifkind.
Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b01ppq0c)
Terminal Thoughts

Will Self wants to "nudge society in the direction of considering suicide acceptable" when the alternative is a slow and painful end. "I don't say any of these things idly," he writes, "like many of us in middle age, my last few years have been heavily marked by an increasing awareness of both my own mortality and that of those who I love."
Producer: Sheila Cook.


FRI 21:00 Saturday Drama (b00syrn5)
Simon Passmore - Going to Ground

By Simon Passmore

1940, Kent. England is on full alert in anticipation of a German invasion. As church bells sound the alarm, a secret resistance unit springs into action. Whatever happens, none of them expects to see their families again.

Directed by Toby Swift

******

This wartime drama features the exploits of an English guerrilla unit trained to make things as difficult as possible for the German invasion force.

The existence of the covert Auxiliary Units during World War II only became widely known in the 1990s. They were patrols of 4 to 8 men with orders to disappear as soon as the bells sounded. Southern England was dotted with dozens of secret underground bunkers which served as their bases. Trained and equipped with the best guerrilla weapons available, their orders were to sabotage and snipe at the invading army; to gather information on troop movements. Completely cut off by design, they operated in total secrecy and isolation. Their life expectancy was calculated officially at 14 days.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b01plfgt)
The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b01ppq0f)
Jimmy Savile report reveals decades of abuse, French troops have been deployed in Mali to help government forces fight Islamist rebels and President Barack Obama and Afghan President Hamid Karzai say the U.S. military mission in Afghanistan is expected to shift to a support role later this spring - a few months earlier than expected, with David Eades.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b01py5d8)
The Knot

Episode 5

Dominic Kitchen is a wedding photographer who is used to seeing people tie the knot, an expression that also represents a sensation that he feels in the pit of his stomach. A sensation that emerges when he is in the precence of a certain person who could change his ordinary life forever. They have a secret that only they can ever know as it is something that society, even today, would struggle with. This is a tale of agonising loss and forbidden love.

Episode 5
Dominic and his family are getting increasingly concerned about the health of their father. Meanwhile Dominic ties his own knot with Lauren, despite feeling somehow that somethings not quite right.

Written by Mark Watson
Abridged by John Peacock
Reader Julian Rhind-Tutt
Director Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b01pp5vb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b01ppq37)
Hold the front page! The House of Lords has finally debated the Leveson report on media ethics and newspaper regulation. Peers should have debated the proposals last month but the discussion was postponed after other parliamentary business over-ran.
During today's debate, Labour said it was ready to force a vote in the Commons if cross-party talks fail.
The new Business Minister, Lord Younger, told peers the Prime Minister didn't believe statutory legislation was needed to achieve the principles set out by Lord Justice Leveson but Lord Younger said the Culture Secretary, Maria Miller would not shy away from a press law as a last resort if a new system of self-regulation couldn't be made to work.