Radio-Lists Home Now on R4

RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 30 SEPTEMBER 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b095ptzv)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b096nbjf)
Wounds, Episode 5

After nearly three decades reporting conflict from all over the world for the BBC, Fergal Keane goes home to Ireland to tell a story that lies at the root of his fascination with war. It's a family tale about how the ghosts of the past return to shape the present.

Fergal's grandmother, Hanna Purtill, her brother Mick and his friend Con Brosnan, along with many of their neighbours, found themselves caught up in the revolution that followed the 1916 Easter Rising. They took up guns to fight the British Empire and create an independent Ireland.

Many thousands of people took part in the War of Independence and the Civil War that followed. Whatever side they chose, all were changed in some way by the costs of violence. Fergal uses the experiences of his ancestral homeland in north Kerry to examine why people will kill for a cause and how the act of killing reverberates through the generations.

In the final episode, Fergal looks back on his grandparents' generation to examine the cost and legacy of war in Ireland. He reflects on how the wounds of the past shaped the island on which he grew up. "I look back on my grandparents' generation and see a people exhausted and traumatised by conflict."

Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Produced by Pippa Vaughan
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b095ptzx)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b095ptzz)

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b095pv01)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b095pv03)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b095tsv2)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi YY Rubinstein, a writer, teacher and broadcaster.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b095tsv5)
I have no urge to have sex with another human being

In iPM's second programme on asexuality, one listener on finding his identity. iPM is the news programme that starts with its listeners. Email ipm@bbc.co.uk. Twitter: @BBCiPM. Presented by Luke Jones and Eddie Mair.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b095pv0c)

The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b095tjvw)
Series 37, Overton Hill, The Ridgeway

Clare Balding joins Multiple sclerosis sufferer, Jo Fielder, on a training walk, just before she attempted to cover the entire length of the Ridgeway in just seven days. They were joined by Jo's husband, Jake and former track and field athlete, David Hemery. Winner of the 400 metres hurdles in the 1968 summer Olympics in Mexico City, David has been a source of inspiration and training advice to Jo as she prepares for this challenge. Tune in to find out if she made it.

Map ref: SU 09358 68848 OS Explorer 157 Marlborough and Savernake Forest.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b095pv0f)
Food Waste

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b095pv0h)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b096dhg8)

News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b095pv0k)
Monty Don

Monty Don joins presenters Aasmah Mir and Shaun Keaveny to discuss his television gardening career and how getting your hands dirty is good for your mental well-being.

Tree climber and award-winning documentary cameraman James Aldred shares his love of trees and the adventures he's had with gorillas, leopards, snakes and poisonous frogs in rainforests around the world.

Soil scientist Jackie Stroud loves worms. She reveals why.

And listener Suzanne Gray explains why, at the age of 49, she joined the Territorial Army to work as an operating theatre nurse in a military field hospital in Afghanistan.

We'll also hear the inheritance tracks of TV property presenter Kirstie Allsopp.

Presenters: Aasmah Mir & Shaun Keaveny
Producer: Paul Waters.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b096dhng)
Series 18, Bletchley Park

Jay Rayner and the team visit Bletchley Park near Milton Keynes. Zoe Laughlin, Tim Hayward, Rachel McCormack and Andi Oliver are this week's panellists.

Producer: Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

Food Consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 The Forum (b096ygs5)
The One Thousand and One Nights

The One Thousand and One Nights are a collection of fantastical stories of flying carpets, magic and genies whose ancient origins go back to the 7th century or earlier. The tales are told by Scheherazade who uses the power of storytelling night after night to stop her Sultan husband from beheading her. These highly influential stories were brought to the West in the 18th century and they have continued to evolve over the centuries. Rajan Datar and guests explore why these stories became so popular around the world and what they mean to us today.

With Rajan is Wen Chin Ouyang, Professor of Arabic at SOAS in London; Dr Sandra Naddaff, senior lecturer in Comparative Literature at Harvard University; and the Iranian TV producer Shabnam Rezaei.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b095pv0m)
Raqqa In Ruins

It's as if doomsday had arrived early in Raqqa as bats swoop over the remains of the city. Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories and analysis from around the world.

In Syria, Quentin Sommerville finds a city which had been occupied and terrorised by the so-called Islamic State and is now being destroyed by a thousand blows from coalition airstrikes.

In Colombia, Katy Watson reports from the border bridge which 25,000 Venezuelans cross each day. Most do so in search of food and medicine, but more and more are deciding to stay.

In South Africa, Milton Nkosi worries that history is repeating itself with the recent spate of political killings in KwaZulu Natal.

In America's Deep South, Fleur Macdonald joins fellow MacDonalds, Alexanders, Johnsons, MacSweeneys and MacWhannells as they celebrate their Scottish heritage and their allegiance to Clan Donald.

And in Spain, Chris Bockman visits what was Europe's second-biggest train station, but was left to rot and rust. Today the building in Canfranc attracts more curious visitors than it ever did passengers.

Producer: Joe Kent.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b095pv0p)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b096dht0)
40 years of Money Box

The latest news from the world of personal finance.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b095tpqh)
Series 94, 29/09/2017

Miles Jupp is joined by Holly Walsh, Andrew Maxwell, Fern Brady and Isabel Hardman to discuss the Labour Party Conference, Germany's election results & Donald Trump's feud with the NFL.

Written by Sarah Campbell, Jon Hunter and James Kettle with additional material from Athena Kugblenu and Jenny Lavillie.
The producer was Joe Nunnery and it was a BBC Studios Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b095pv0r)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b095pv0t)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b095tpqm)
Richard Burgon MP, Soumaya Keynes, Rory Stewart MP, Gisela Stuart.

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from All Hallows Catholic High School in Penwortham, Lancashire, with Shadow Justice Secretary Richard Burgon, Economics and Trade correspondent for The Economist Soumaya Keynes, International Development Minister Rory Stewart MP and the chair of Change Britain Gisela Stuart.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b095pv0w)

Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Drama (b096fsmx)
Stardust by Ray Connolly

Stardust by Ray Connolly
Show me a boy who never wanted to be a rock star and I'll show you a liar. Following on from the events of 'That'll be the Day', it's the early sixties and Jim Maclaine is now an aspiring pop musician. He seeks out his old mate Mike, because every pop star needs a road manager. Based on the seventies film of the same name.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.


SAT 15:30 Hull 2017: The Spirit of Hessle Road (b095tcx2)

Hessle road is an infamous working class district in Hull. But to those who live and work there, it's much more than that - it's a place of character, community but also hardship. This montage documentary pieces together the ghosts of Hessle Road's past through some of its most colourful characters.

It's a collection of moving, funny tales over a bed of traditional folk music from the beating heart of Hull, crowned as City of Culture 2017.

Hull's heritage is anchored in the sea. Its fishermen, the last of the great hunters, lived in the most colourful community in the world but were exposed to extreme danger in the perilous waters within the Arctic Circle. Their lives were held together by a set of primitive folk beliefs - magic and music. But behind the closed doors of this community are darker stories - 6,000 men left Hull for the sea but never returned. The families of those lost still live in the city's terraced houses.

"They were the underdogs, fighting against nature at sea and social prejudice at home.... George Orwell talked about society standing on the shoulders of the miners. But the port of Hull prospered on the backs of the trawlermen." - Historian and photographer Alec Gill, who has documented Hessle Road since the 1970s.

Among the Hessle Roaders we meet are the last remaining "headscarf revolutionary" Yvonne, a former night club singer and friend to Lillian Bilocca who marched to Downing Street to change the safety laws on trawler ships - and the raucous folk veteran Mick McGarry and HillBilly Troupe, keeping Hull's folk music scene alive.

Produced by Hana Walker-Brown
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b095pv0y)
Bananarama look back on their 80s heyday

Bananarama, the most successful girl group of all time, are reuniting for a UK wide tour. Siobhan Fahey, Sara Dallin and Keren Woodward look back on their eighties heyday.

The feminist campaigner Julie Bindel discusses the myth of sex work and why she believes in the abolition of the global sex trade. We also hear the counter argument from Laura Watson of the English Collective of Prostitutes and from Sake who is an independent sex worker.

In 1969 Rupert Murdoch bought The Sun newspaper, the play Ink tells the story of its first year. We hear from the actress Sophie Stanton who plays Joyce Hopkirk the women's editor and from the journalist Eve Pollard on what it was like as a woman in Fleet Street at the time.

As 2017 marks the centenary of the birth of one of the jazz greats Ella Fitzgerald. Record producer Juliette Pochin tells us about the process of creating a new album combining Ella's original vocals with the music of the London Symphony Orchestra.

We discuss diabulimia, the act of restricting insulin in order to lose weight - sixty per cent of women living with type 1 diabetes will have experienced an eating disorder by the time they are 25. We hear from Nabeelah who restricts her insulin and from Dr Jane Morris, Consultant psychiatrist in eating disorders at the Royal Cornhill Hospital in Aberdeen.

It's now 10 years since the first episode of the reality TV show Keeping up with the Kardashians. Sarah Carson a features editor at Radio Times and Nell Grecian a sex and dating blogger discuss the influence of the Kardashians on young women.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed
Edited by Jane Thurlow

Interviewed guests: Bananarama
Interviewed guest: Julie Bindel
Interviewed guest: Laura Watson
Interviewed guest: Sake
Interviewed guest: Eve Pollard
Interviewed guest: Sophie Stanton
Interviewed guest: Juliette Pochin
Interviewed guest: Nabeelah
Interviewed guest: Jane Morris
Interviewed guest: Sarah Carson
Interviewed guest: Nell Grecian.


SAT 17:00 PM (b095pv10)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b095tsv5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b095pv12)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b095pv14)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b095pv16)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b095pv18)
Vince Cable, John Thomson, Simon Amstell, Sudha Bhuchar, Jolie Holland, Samantha Parton, Josh Ritter, Emma Freud, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Emma Freud are joined by Vince Cable, John Thomson, Simon Amstell and Sudha Bhuchar for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Jolie Holland & Samantha Parton and Josh Ritter.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b096dhwl)
Gavin Williamson

This week the Chief Whip will deliver a major speech at the Tory party conference, just before the Prime Minister takes the stage.
But who is Gavin Williamson? Mark Coles looks at the life and career of the Yorkshire man who knows about pottery, loves hedgehogs and keeps an eight legged pet on his desk in parliament. And some say, has his sights set on higher political office.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b095pv1b)

British film Daphne portrays the hectic life of a young woman in an overwhelming, contemporary London
The National Theatre's touring production of Jane Eyre started in London, has been around the country and its back in the capital before heading off on tour again
Multi award-winning American documentary maker Ken Burns has a new series. It's about the Vietnam war and has just begun on BBC4
Italian author Nicola Lagioia's novel Ferocity won that country's highest literary award, how well does it work in translation?
An exhibition of the work of Jasper Johns has just opened at London's Royal Academy

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Sebastian Faulks, Meg Rosoff and Tiffany Murray. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Hull 2017: Contains Strong Language (b096fv0b)

Live from Hull, Jeremy Irons and Julie Hesmondhalgh perform poetry inspired by the city and its poets. Presenter Lindsey Chapman leads the poetic journey through the city. Part of Contains Strong Language, the BBC's season of Poetry and Performance from Hull.

Directed by Charlotte Riches
Produced by Susan Roberts.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b08vxjtw)
Reading Europe - Italy: Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, Episode 3

The third book in Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan novels, charting the lifelong relationship between two girls, Lila Cerullo and Elena Greco, who grew up together in the slums of post-War Naples.

Elena, having escaped to Milan after the publication of her first book, struggles to find the courage to live, parent and write again after her marriage to her increasingly dismissive husband Pietro.

Lila, meanwhile, also struggles to rise above her social conditions and desperately tries to find a way to better herself in whatever way she can. By day she suffers the daily abuse and exploitation at work in the local sausage factory and by night she works hard with her partner, Enzo, to make a difference with her life by studying hard the ever-changing face of technology.

Struggling with periods of mental darkness, she also wrestles with being a parent and finding the time to be true to herself. Eventually she is encouraged by a group of old friends and young students to admit her anger at the social adversity and abuses suffered by the women at work in the factory and to stand up and shout about it.

As always, amid the troubles, the two women turn to each other, gaining either strength or weakness from the other, not always to happy effect.

Dramatised for radio by Timberlake Wertenbaker
Directed by Celia de Wolff

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b095pv1d)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b095t4pg)
The Law and Climate Change

Can lawyers save the planet? Clive Anderson and guests discuss the role the law can play in reducing global warming.

The devastation caused in the Caribbean by Hurricane Irma is being blamed on global warming. The Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda, Gaston Brown says the worldâ€TMs major emitters of greenhouse gasses should be held responsible. But what law or court could achieve that?

A new scientific study says 30 per cent of the impact of global warming can be traced to the activities of just 90 companies. But what law or court could hold them liable?

On June 1, 2017, Donald Trump announced that the US was withdrawing from the Paris Agreement on climate change mitigation because it undermined his countryâ€TMs economy. Can lawyers force the US to rejoin?

In 2015 the Urgenda Foundation won a landmark court case which forced the Dutch government to increase its efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Similar court battles have since been won elsewhere in the world, most recently in South Africa where judges ruled against government support for a new coal-fired power station.

Legal experts representing both environmental and commercial interests discuss the strengths and weakness of current laws and regulations controlling greenhouse gas emissions. Do we need a specialised International Court on the Environment with powers to force governments and individual businesses to reduce emissions? Does the US withdrawal from the Paris Agreement undermine legal efforts to mitigate climate change? Can courts force companies to take measures which put them at a commercial disadvantage in the international market? How will Brexit affect climate change regulations in the UK?

An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b095qs4d)
Series 31, The Final, 2017

(13/13)
The most varied music quiz of them all reaches its climax for 2017, with the three competitors who have come through heats and semi-finals now facing the final challenge. Paul Gambaccini asks the questions that will determine who takes the 31st BBC Counterpoint title.

Would you know the name of the quirky Scottish folk group who performed at Woodstock, but were omitted from the film of the festival? Which British singer-songwriter who died earlier this year was once in a short-lived super-group called Oasis? And who is credited with inventing the name of Tchaikovsky's sixth symphony, the 'Pathetique'?

The answers to these and many other questions lie within today's grand Final - and there are plenty of musical extracts to jog your memory and perhaps lead you down new musical avenues.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 The Landscapes of Don McCullin (b092m9j6)

Sir Don McCullin, photographer and 'sky stalker', talks to Mariella Frostrup about the landscape surrounding his Somerset house.

McCullin's best known as a star photojournalist of the 1960's and 1970's, but he's also been photographing the Somerset fields for more than three decades. In this special programme he tells Mariella Frostrup why. "I was ready for the English landscape - it became my psychiatrist's chair. Having spent the last sixty years covering wars and tragedies, watching people being murdered and starving to death, I needed to save myself."

A revealing and intimate programme recorded entirely on location, featuring the sites he adores and rare access to his darkroom to discuss that burnt and brooding technique. The Tate is planning an exhibition of his landscapes next year. "There has to be a connection between the terrible imagery he has witnessed and these landscapes now, expunged of humanity - it's almost like they're an act of revenge." Mariella Frostrup

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde.



SUNDAY 01 OCTOBER 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b096gjd8)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Short Works (b095tn20)
Series 1, My Chemo Brain

By Susmita Bhattacharya. An auto-biographical piece of creative non-fiction about the challenges Susmita faced after breast cancer and, in particular, after chemotherapy.

Susmita Bhattacharya was born in Mumbai and sailed the world on oil tankers before settling down in the UK. She is an associate lecturer at Winchester University and leads the SO:Write Young Writers' workshops in Southampton. Her first story for radio, The Summer Of Learning, was broadcast in 2015. Her debut novel, The Normal State of Mind, was published the same year. Her short stories and poems have been widely published in the UK and internationally. She lives in Winchester with her family and cat named after a Bollywood star.

Writer: Susmita Bhattacharya
Reader: Susmita Bhattacharya
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b096gjdb)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b096gjdd)

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b096gjdg)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b096gjdj)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b096gnqn)
St Peters Cathedral, South Australia

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from St Peter's Cathedral in Adelaide, Australia. The bells were cast and installed by Taylors of Loughborough in 1946. The tenor, tuned to C, weighs over two imperial tons which makes it second only in weight to that of the tenor at Sherbourne Abbey. Here they are ringing Grandsire Triples.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b096dhwl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b096gjdl)

The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b096gjdn)
Judgement Day

Rabbi Shoshana Boyd Gelfand reevaluates our use of the word judgemental, arguing that it needn't have negative connotations. She concludes that, ultimately, we need to be judged.

For some people of faith the phrase 'judgement day' summons up images of fire and brimstone. Shoshana reveals that for Jews, judgement day is an annual event. Yom HaDin, The Day of Judgement, is the biblical name for the holiday known as Rosh Hashanah. Shoshana explores the traditions of both Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur (which follows ten days later).

Interweaving music ranging from Leonard Cohen's Who By Fire and Bob Marley's Judge Not to Mozart's Requiem Mass, Shoshana notes that the idea of a judgement day has always fascinated musicians. Interestingly, musical interpretations of the Day of Judgement vary wildly in tone. We hear the voices in Mozart's Requiem trembling with dread in response to a stern God, whilst Faure's Requiem does away with the wrathful imagery and depicts death as a peaceful release from struggle. Reflecting on the differences between these great composers' depiction of judgement day, Shoshana argues that we need a balance between judgement and mercy in our lives.

Shoshana goes on to reference the troubled history of the judicial system during the American Civil Rights Movement and the role of the therapist who must withhold their judgement when counselling their patients. She also examines the doctrine of karma - a system of divine justice.

Presenter: Shoshana Boyd Gelfand
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 The Living World (b096gnqq)
Hamsterley Forest

Brett Westwood relives programmes from The Living World archives. In this episode from 1991 Michael Scott travels to Country Durham where in Hamsterley Forest he meets botanist David Bellamy and Head Ranger Brian Walker on a tour of the area.

A combination of careful management and a degree of good luck have turned Hamsterley Forest, Co Durham, into a haven for wildlife. Along with almost 100 different varieties of tree, ferns, and other fascinating plants, the wood pasture and meadows provide ideal habitats for birds like the crossbill, siskin, curlew and nightjar.

Producer Andrew Dawes.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b096gjds)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b096gjdv)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b096gjdx)
Tohono O'odham tribe and Trump's wall, Christians return to Iraq, Anglican communion meets

Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b096gnqs)
Hope and Homes for Children

Lemn Sissay makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Hope and Homes for Children.

Registered Charity Number 1089490
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Hope and Homes for Children'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Hope and Homes for Children'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b096gjdz)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b096gjf1)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b096gnqv)
Harvest Service live from Holy Trinity, Westbury on Trym Church, Bristol

Sunday Worship for Harvest from Holy Trinity, Westbury on Trym Church, Bristol in its 1300th Anniversary Year. Focussing on the words of St Francis of Assisi the service explores our response and responsibility to ecology and the environment with seasonal music and prayers. Led by Fr André Hart and Canon Bruce Saunders.
Director of Music: David Ogden. Organist: Richard Johnson. Producer: Stephen Shipley.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b095tpqp)
The Triumph of Tribalism

Andrew Sullivan on how America has become "a truly tribal society".

"I've lived here since the Reagan era", he writes, "and there have been plenty of divides. But none quite as tribal or as rooted in non-negotiable identity as this one".

He warns of what the outcome might be and reminds the listener that a liberal democracy is always a precarious enterprise.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b095qmbn)
Melissa Harrison on the Tawny Owl

Nature writer Melissa Harrison describes how the call of a tawny owl takes her back to childhood, reminding her of people and a feeling that slipped into memory.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. In this latest series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Tom Bonnett
Picture: Jim Thurston.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b096gjf3)

Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b096gjf5)

Writer ..... Paul Brodrick
Director ..... Rosemary Watts
Editor ..... Huw Kennair-Jones

David Archer.....Timothy Bentinck
Ruth Archer.....Felicity Finch
Pip Archer.....Daisy Badger
Josh Archer.....Angus Imrie
Jolene Archer.....Buffy Davis
Pat Archer.....Patricia Gallimore
Helen Archer.....Louiza Patikas
Brian Aldridge.....Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge....Angela Piper
Lilian Bellamy.....Sunny Ormonde
Harrison Burns.....James Cartwright
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Justin Elliott.....Simon Williams
Rex Fairbrother.....Nick Barber
Toby Fairbrother.....Rhys Bevan
Eddie Grundy.....Trevor Harrison
Clarrie Grundy.....Heather Bell
Will Grundy.....Philip Molloy
Emma Grundy.....Emerald O'Hanrahan
Ed Grundy.....Barry Farrimond
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Kate Madikane.....Perdita Avery.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b096gnqx)
Siddhartha Mukherjee

Siddhartha Mukherjee is a cancer specialist. His biography of the disease, The Emperor of All Maladies, won the Pulitzer Prize in 2010. A haematologist and oncologist by training, his research focuses on cancer therapy and gene functions related to blood cells. His latest book, The Gene, goes in search of normality, identity, variation and heredity.

Born in India in 1970 he grew up with his extended family in Delhi. In his youth he trained as an Indian classical singer before travelling to the US to study biology at Stanford. At Oxford he was a Rhodes scholar before enrolling at Harvard to study medicine. He is currently Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Columbia University Medical Centre.

Presenter: Kirsty Young
Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b096gjf7)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b095qsgr)
Series 79, Episode 8

Nicholas Parsons challenges Paul Merton, Rufus Hound, Jenny Eclair and Zoe Lyons to speak on the topics on the cards without deviation, hesitation or repetition.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b096gnqz)
How We Eat: 1. Eating Alone

How we eat says so much about us. Where we come from, our family background, our feelings about our bodies even - our appetite for all kinds of pleasure... There was a time when how we eat was mostly about class, but whether you called it "tea" or "dinner" or "supper", there were still fixed conventions about when and where we ate, and what we ate. These days the certainties, the boundaries, have been broken up. How do we eat now? Well, differently, as this series reveals.

This first programme of How We Eat explores the pleasures and pitfalls of eating alone. As one in three households in Britain is now a single-person household, increasing numbers of people ARE eating on their own. Do we eat differently when we eat unobserved? How do people of all ages, from students to widowers, adjust to suddenly having to cook for themselves?

Sheila Dillon investigates the booming business of ready-meals for one, and hears embarrassing confessions about secret snacks: such as people who shut themselves in the utility room to gorge on chocolate, pretending they're doing the laundry. She visits inspirational cookery writer Anna del Conte, who's in her 90s, to talk to her about the delicious meals she makes for herself now that she's a widow. She goes to a cookery class at a hospice. She talks to students who admit to living on alcohol and crisps. And she meets a man who cooks fresh meals to share with his dog.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b096gjf9)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b096gjfc)

News with Mark Mardell including the latest from the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, Catalonia's independence referendum and the resurgence of radio pirates.


SUN 13:30 Hardeep's Sunday Lunch (b096gnr1)
Series 6, Inverness

In the first programme of this series, Hardeep is in his native Scotland to cook lunch for Inverness based friends Colin Campbell and Rona Tynan. Colin has lived with primary progressive multiple sclerosis since his 30s and at the age of 56 made the decision to end his life at a Swiss Clinic rather than face an unbearable, lonely decline. Hearing his plight, fellow MS patient Rona Tynan felt compelled to get in touch with him. The former London Met police officer has lived with MS for 12 years and she felt distressed that Colin wanted to end his life, especially when he was more able than her. In June this year, when Hardeep turned up at Rona's door to make the pair of them a haggis curry, Colin still had an appointment for the Swiss Clinic in his diary.

Producer: Helen Lee.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b095tn1x)
70th Anniversary Garden Party at Ness Botanic Gardens: Part Two

Peter Gibbs presents the second of two programmes from the GQT 70th birthday party at Ness Botanic Gardens. Bunny Guinness, James Wong, Pippa Greenwood and Bob Flowerdew answer the questions from the audience.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b096gpfc)
Omnibus - Facing Forward

Fi Glover introduces conversations between partners where one has a terminal or degenerative illness, and a father and son facing the inevitability of a funeral in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b096gqnt)
Reading Europe - Italy: The Story of a Lost Child, Episode 1

Elena Ferrante's story of a life long friendship between Lila and Lena comes to an end in this sad and surprising final chapter.

Lena, now a famous writer, returns to Naples with her two children to find Lila has also managed to turned her life around, despite remaining in the claws of violent and mafia run Naples. Finding themselves both pregnant, the complications of their friendship grows ever deeper and the tensions deepen. As the city attempts to rebuild itself, post war Naples continues to struggle to accept or change the inevitabilities of life.

Broken marriages, violent relationships, and the yearning for something more - something better is never far away. The violent past of these two extraordinary friends will always be there and, for one, there seems to be only one way out.

Written by Elena Ferrante
Translated by Ann Goldstein
Dramatised for radio by Timberlake Wertenbaker

Directed by Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b096gqnw)
Peter Hoeg - Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow

Peter Høeg's internationally bestselling Miss Smilla's Feeling For Snow was the original Scandi-crime thriller. First published in 1992 the novel's runaway success was due to its extraordinary central character, 37 year old Smilla Qaavigaaq Jasperson, as well as the unfamiliar backdrop of snowy Copenhagen and the icy wastes of Greenland. Smilla is half-Dane and half-Inuit; she is unmarried, childless, independent and irascible and yet she forms an unlikely friendship with her neighbour six year old Isaiah.

The book opens when the young boy has fallen to his death from the roof of their apartment building; it's ruled an accident, yet Smilla, an expert on ice and snow, can tell from his footprints that he was running from someone. She begins her own investigation, forming an uneasy friendship with another neighbour, a mechanic. Smilla uncovers a trail of clues, and her sense of snow leads her into a mystery that goes back decades.

Peter Høeg explains how the character of Smilla came to him in an unlikely way, as he saw a Somalian woman cross the street in Copenhagen and knew his next main character would be called Smilla. For Høeg, books are intuitive and less logical than daily life. He candidly discloses that Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow was written by a young and inexperienced novelist, and how looking back, he is dissatisfied and rather ashamed of its enigmatic ending. He says that writing a novel is like running a marathon, it's an intense experience, and by the end, the writer can lose concentration in his exhaustion. Presented by James Naughtie

Presenter : James Naughtie
Interviewed guest : Peter Høeg
Producer : Dymphna Flynn

November's Bookclub choice : Mother's Milk by Edward St Aubyn (2006).


SUN 16:30 The First Jazz Poet (b096gqw5)

Michael Rosen visits the seminary where Gerard Manley Hopkins revolutionised the rhythm and sound of poetry.

In 1875, stirred by the tragic drowning of five exiled German nuns off the Kent coast, Hopkins - studying in the Jesuit seminary of St Beunos in North Wales - brought together the rhythms of song, Welsh poetry and the chiming sounds of Old English alliteration to produce the extraordinary The Wreck of the Deutschland. This moment kick-started his poetry writing after a self-imposed abstinence of some seven years.

Michael Rosen visits St Beunos to feel the daily atmosphere of the seminary and the glorious landscape of the Vale of Clwyd which Hopkins invokes so powerfully in his sequence of poems written in the space of one year. Poet Michael Symmons Roberts joins him there.

Like many other students of English Literature, Michael was stunned by Hopkins' experimental breaking and re-making of the English language and heard similarities with the jazz of musicians like Miles Davies in these new rhythms. How was it that Hopkins could reject the long established pattern of poetry, with its metrical feet, and instead use the principal of the beat of music? How could he have been so inventive with poetry, fifty years ahead of his time, before 20th Century Modernist poets discovered how they could take these risks too? It's hard to hear Dylan Thomas' Under Milk Wood without hearing the presence of Hopkins behind it. For Seamus Heaney, Hopkins was "the main man"!

Michael Rosen and Michael Symmons Roberts walk through field and woods, look out over the Vale of Clwyd to see the view that Hopkins saw, discovering the distinctive elements of this amazing creative moment - the religious devotion of the seminary and the beauty of the landscape and the natural life within it.

The journals, letters and poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins are read by Samuel West.
Readings in copyright are by kind permission of Oxford University Press on behalf of The British Province of the Society of Jesus.

Producer: Emma-Louise Williams
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b095rs05)
Adoption: Families in Crisis

Adoption can transform lives. Today, most children available for adoption have had a difficult start. Removed from birth parents and taken into care, many have experienced abuse and neglect which can leave them with complex mental health and/or developmental needs. Adoption can provide them with stable and loving homes.

But what happens when the challenges the adoptive family faces become overwhelming? And is there enough support available to the families who give a home to some of the most vulnerable children in society?

File on 4 hears from adoptive parents struggling to cope with their children's complex problems - and battling with the authorities to get the help they desperately need.

The charity Adoption UK thinks as many as a quarter of all adoptive families are in crisis and in need of professional help to keep their family together. But are adoptive parents given enough information about the challenges they are likely to face and when they do encounter problems, is there enough help available?

Two years ago, the government set up a special fund designed to help adoptive families in England access a range of post-adoption therapeutic services. To date, more than £52 million has been spent via the Adoption Support Fund. But where is the money going and are the treatments on offer proven to be effective?

The truth is that no one really knows how many adoptions are 'disrupted' or end up in full break down when the child is permanently returned to care. But when they do, it is devastating for everyone involved. We speak to families fighting to get the help they need to stay together.

Reporter: Alys Harte
Producer: Jane Drinkwater.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b096dhwl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b096gjff)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b096gjfh)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b096gjfk)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b096gjfm)
Mark Thomas

Broadcasters choose their BBC Radio highlights.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b096gspv)

Adam tries not to seem ungrateful, and Justin's trip gets extended.


SUN 19:15 The Casebook of Max and Ivan (b096gspx)
Series 2, Case #96 - Community Disservice

A second series featuring acclaimed double-act Max and Ivan as incompetent private detectives for hire. Joanna Lumley guest stars.

The detectives investigate a series of mysterious thefts which threaten the very future of Nunhead Community Centre. Assisted by the permanently tired caretaker Gerry, they track the chief suspect, washed-up former B-Movie actress Lavinia Moncrief and eventually have to go undercover to infiltrate her bizarre acting classes. Also featuring bell ringers, hypnotism and a mutant komodo dragon.

Written by and Max Olesker and Ivan Gonzalez
Developed by John Stanley Productions
Produced by Ben Walker
A Retort production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 The Reservoir Tapes (b096gspz)
Series 1, Charlotte's Story

The story of a disappearance - told backwards.

Indira Varma kicks of Jon McGregor's 15-part specially commissioned short story series set in a Peak District village. Today: the community is rocked when a family walk on the moors takes a tragic turn. Now a reporter pieces together the mother's account of what happened...

The fifteen stories of The Reservoir Tapes each stand alone but together build a compelling portrait of a village shaken by tragedy, as they explore events that precede and follow the disappearance the teenage Becky Shaw on a family holiday. A companion to Jon McGregor's critically acclaimed Man Booker long-listed novel Reservoir 13, these stories and their different perspectives offer tantalizing glimpses as to might have happened to the young Becky.

Writer: Jon McGregor is an acclaimed British novelist who has been longlisted for the Man Booker Prize three times. His third novel, Even the Dogs, won the International Dublin Literary Award
Reader: Indira Varma is an acclaimed British actor, known for her roles in Luther and Game of Thrones.
Producer: Justine Willett.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b095tn27)
Uber; EU passports; counting domestic violence

Is Uber safe?

Recently Transport for London took the decision not to renew Uber's London license. One criticism of the company is that its drivers commit too many sexual offences. Billboards around the capital last year said that 32 of the 154 allegations of assault made against London taxi drivers between February 2015 and February 2016 involved Uber drivers. But is that a big number and how do the total number of allegations made compare to the years before Uber was even operating?

The Brits seeking European passports elsewhere

In partnership with Reality Check, More or Less has spoken to each of the other 27 countries in the EU to find out whether an increasing number of Brits living abroad have applied for citizenship. This has certainly been the trend in many countries. We'll reveal the most popular countries and tell the tale of how easy it may or may not have been to get the numbers!

How do we know if there is more domestic violence around?

If you want to look at whether the amount of domestic violence in the UK is going up or down, how would you measure it? Over the last three decades, this is something that Sylvia Walby, Professor of Sociology at Lancaster University, has been trying to figure this out. We speak to her about ways to improve the current statistics available.

Big polluters: container ships versus cars

A number of websites have claimed that '15 of the largest ships emit as much pollution as all the cars in the world.' That is a very catchy statement which gives an indication of the pollution produced by shipping containers around the world. But is it true. We look at the different types of emissions produced by container ships and cars.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Charlotte McDonald.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b095tn24)
Hugh Hefner, Stanislav Petrov, Teddy Taylor, Liz Dawn

Matthew Bannister on

Hugh Hefner who built the Playboy empire on a best selling magazine. Was he a libertarian who changed attitudes to sex or a sleazy pornographer?

Soviet officer Stanislav Petrov who is credited with averting a nuclear disaster during the Cold War.

The right wing Conservative M.P. Teddy Taylor best known for his outspoken opposition to the European Union.

And actress Liz Dawn who played Vera Duckworth in Coronation Street for nearly thirty years.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b096dht0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b096gnqs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b095tjw6)
The Business of Food Waste

With food waste a huge global problem, can business find new, profitable solutions? Tanya Beckett delves into pizza bins, visits larvae breeders and talks to everyone from bankers to hummus-makers as she investigates why this fast-changing business scene. How can new technology help tackle the problem? And are wasteful food consumers ready for radical change?

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Penny Murphy.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b096gjfp)

Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 23:00 Radiolab (b095vh40)
Series 2, The Good Show

Radiolab asks is 'survival of the fittest' compatible with animals helping each other out? With Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich.

Radiolab is a Peabody-award winning show about curiosity. Where sound illuminates ideas, and the boundaries blur between science, philosophy, and the human experience.

First broadcast on public radio in the USA.



MONDAY 02 OCTOBER 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b096gjhn)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:17 Thinking Allowed (b095t4pb)
Sectarianisation - The Middle East

Sectarianisation - Laurie Taylor asks if a new theory offers an explanation for contemporary conflicts across the Arab Islamic world. Have we become too wedded to a version of events which suggests that Shia and Sunni peoples are locked into a primordial, trans-historical battle, seemingly without end? He's joined by Danny Postel, Assistant Director of the Middle East and North African Studies Program at Northwestern University, Madawi Al-Rasheed, Visiting Professor at the Middle East Centre at the LSE and Patrick Cockburn, Middle East correspondent for the The Independent.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b096gnqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b096gjhy)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b096gjj3)

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b096gjj5)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b096gjj7)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b097lmdm)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi YY Rubinstein, a writer, teacher and broadcaster.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b096gjj9)
Operation Bo-Peep; Wine producing; Scottish oyster fishery

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (b096gjjc)

The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b096h1qz)
Stephen Moss on the Song Thrush

In the first of five recollections about his encounters with birds, writer and wildlife programme-maker Stephen Moss explains why the sound of the Song Thrush evokes such powerful memories of his grandfather.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt.


MON 06:00 Today (b096gjjf)

News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b096gjjh)
Power, the people and the Party

Live from Manchester during the Conservative Party conference, Sir David Cannadine argues that Victorian Britain was never far from revolution. He tells Andrew Marr how a century seen as conservative was actually troubled by political upheaval. Britain may have been the world's greatest empire but it was riven by self-doubt. Novelist Anthony Powell depicted the turbulence of the 20th century in his series A Dance to the Music of Time. Powell is seen as the arch-conservative, but biographer Hilary Spurling shows his fascination with power and people at every level of society. Jane Green tracked the 2017 General Election as co-director of the British Election Study. She explains how the public judges those in power, and why political reputations are hard to shake. And Phillip Blond, director of the think tank ResPublica, helped shape recent conservative ideas including the "big society" and the "northern powerhouse". He fears the Conservative Party could become irrelevant unless power is shared out.

Producer: Hannah Sander.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b096h1r1)
The Rub of Time, You Ask the Questions

Martin Amis is one of the most celebrated authors of modern times. A new collection rounds up his non-fiction pieces from 1986 to 2016, and this week five compelling topics are aired.

Some time back one of our national newspapers held a Q&A on the page with the author. Questions ranged from the serious to the odd, including views on father Kingsley, the hassle of smoking roll-ups, his child acting days and.. 'what question have you never been asked?'

Questioners Sarah Ridgeway, Tom Forrester, and Charlie Clements.

Reader Bill Nighy

Producer Duncan Minshull.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b096gjjk)
Domestic abuse, Women in medicine, Dressmakers of Auschwitz

New guidance for judges on child contact cases involving domestic abuse allegations come into force today. Judges must carefully consider the impact of domestic violence on children and question whether the "presumption of contact" should apply. Campaigners say previously the "presumptions" have resulted in devastating and tragic outcomes for children. Christina Blacklaws, Solicitor and Vice-President of the Law Society, and Katie Ghose, Chief Executive of Women's Aid, join Jane.

2017 marks the centenary of the Medical Women's Federation. To celebrate, every day this week we are speaking to leading female clinicians about the women from medical history who inspired them. Today, Jane talks to Professor Mary Horgan, President of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland and a leading specialist in the field of vaccinations. She picks Dorothy Stopford Price for her work on BCG vaccinations in Ireland.

The dress historian Lucy Adlington has written a novel for young adults entitled 'Red Ribbon'. It is inspired by the real female prisoners who worked in the tailoring studio at camp Auschwitz-Birkenau. They were tasked with making stylish clothes for Frau Hoss, the wife of the Nazi commander, as well as the wives of other male officers. She joins Jane to discuss.

As part of our Best Place to be a Woman series, we hear from young Muslim women about what life is like for them at the moment in Britain. Muna Ahmed got in touch to say, in her view, it's pretty grim. She sat down with a group of women, some who have converted to Islam and others, like her, who were born into the religion. They share stories of suspicion, harassment and abuse as they go about their lives online and on the street.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b096h4d0)
Gudrun's Saga, Episode 1

Lucy Catherine's Viking epic of love, revenge and leadership inspired by the Icelandic sagas

Gudrun, a young woman in 11th century Iceland, forges her path through a world of unearthly beauty yet uncompromising harshness. Left reeling from the part she played in her lover's death she's determined to rebuild her family and win back the trust of her husband.

Produced and directed by Gemma Jenkins

The first series ended with the death of Gudrun's lover, Kjartan, killed by his best friend and brother, Bolli. Bolli is married to Gudrun. He suspects his wife was behind the blood feud that led to Kjartan's death. Kjartan married into Norwegian royalty and when his wife returns to Iceland with plans to convert the country to Christianity it becomes clear her motives are far from pious.

Gudrun is under the protection of Freija, the Norse Goddess of love and war. She can sometimes be as slippery a customer as her protégée. Freija's voice cries out for a new kind of leadership. Is she really on Gudrun's side or does she have an agenda of her own?

Suspicious of how power and ambition are wielded by men Gudrun's left feeling increasingly isolated. She longs for the freedom to live her life according to her own rules, beholden to no-one.

The show is inspired by the famous Laxdaela Saga featuring the original Nordic Noir heroine, Guðrún Ósvífursdóttir. There is speculation that the saga was written by a woman. Gudrun has the same steely determination and in some cases the almost psychopathic single-mindedness of her successors, Lisbeth Salander and Saga Noren, not to mention the ability to scheme, manipulate and bend others to her will in the manner of Borgen's wily politician Birgitte Nyborg.

Kate Phillips returns as Gudrun. Previous roles include Jane Seymour in Wolf Hall, Linda in Peaky Blinders and Lise in War & Peace, all on BBC1.

And Gudrun returns for a third series in December.


MON 11:00 In the Criminologist's Chair (b08wrbyf)

Criminologist David Wilson talks to former criminal turned journalist Erwin James. James committed a string of petty offences before carrying out two brutal murders. He fled to France and joined the Foreign Legion, before returning to Britain where he stood trial and was sentenced to life.

In prison he started writing a newspaper column and began coming to terms with what he had done, helped by a prison psychologist. He later wrote a book, "Redeemable". But what is redemption, and is it even possible without the forgiveness of those who have been hurt?

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


MON 11:30 The Allotment (b08h08rd)

A comedy written by and starring Esther Coles (BBC2's "Nurse").

Esther takes refuge from a troubled world on her allotment where she finds serenity among the vegetables and loses herself in her bee keeping. While daughter Molly uses the shed as a makeshift study for her exams love-sick Robert has come to ask Esther to take him on a tour of her bee hive, but the spell is broken when Geoff wades in in a make-shift bee-keeping outfit in search of his stolen pumpkin.
Welcome to a quirky, warm world where troubles get lost in the long grass and small things can bring contentment.

Esther - Esther Coles
Robert - Mark Benton
Geoff - Paul Whitehouse
Molly - Patricia Allison
Sally - Arabella Weir
Grandma Maggs - Jane Horrocks

Produced by Gareth Edwards
A BBC Studios Production.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b096gjjm)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b096h4d4)
Series 1, Leaded Petrol

In the 1920s lead was added to petrol. It made cars more powerful and was, according to its advocates, a "gift". But lead is a gift which poisons people; something figured out as long ago as Roman times. There's some evidence that as countries get richer, they tend initially to get dirtier and later clean up. Economists call this the "environmental Kuznets curve". It took the United States until the 1970s to tax lead in petrol, then finally ban it, as the country moved down the far side of the environmental Kuznets curve. But as Tim Harford explains in this astonishing story, the consequences of the Kuznets curve aren't always only economic.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ben Crighton.


MON 12:13 You and Yours (b096gjjp)
Red squirrel conservation; Viagogo; AncestryDNA

The secondary ticketing website Viagogo has been criticised by MPs and musicians for charging fans over-inflated prices for concert tickets. Some people have even been denied entry to events because the tickets were fake. Banks used to deny customers refunds - but You and Yours has new figures to suggest that banks are starting to co-operate if people have problems with Viagogo.

Online bookie 888 has been fined a record £7.8 million for allowing gamblers who had self excluded from the website to log back in and play again. We hear from a listener who self excluded, was able to log back on, and win £10,000. But his winnings were denied because he had self excluded. Is he entitled to his winnings?

We report from Grasmere in the Lake District on the efforts volunteers go to to protect Red squirrel populations. They say that government grants are now hard to access which could threaten their conservation efforts.

We have the latest on our story about genealogy website AncestryDNA, who were keeping samples of customer's saliva. It was written in the small print and the website has now removed it, but we've found customer's DNA is still being stored unless you ask for it to be destoyed.

More than a dozen car manufacturers in the UK have launched scrappage schemes - where you trade in your old car and get a discount on a new one - but we investigate how some of these deals mean your car is sold on and not scrapped at all.

And, we have the latest on the court ruling deciding sleep-in carers for people with learning disabilities should be paid the minimum wage instead of a £35 flat fee. The government has delayed its decision on whether care homes should pay £400 million in back pay to carers. But how are these carers coping in the meantime?


MON 12:57 Weather (b096gjjr)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b096gjjt)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


MON 13:45 Prime Ministers' Props (b07mxt94)
Neville Chamberlain's Umbrella

Professor Sir David Cannadine explores political fame and image by looking at how an object or prop, whether chosen deliberately or otherwise, can come to define a political leader.

Sir David looks at the significance of these props of power - what they mean and what they become, and what happens when, almost inevitably, Prime Ministers lose control of their image and their props take on a hostile meaning, very different from their original intentions.

Neville Chamberlain always liked to carry a big black umbrella. It was intended to project an image of the quintessential Englishman, who was always smart, prepared and, in a manner of speaking, neatly furled. When Chamberlain arrived home after meeting Hitler at Munich in 1938, he was clutching Hitler's signed piece of paper in one hand and his brolly in the other. His umbrella now took on a new and potent symbolism as a "peace umbrella" and one that would keep the German bombs from raining down on British heads. He was sent hundreds of umbrellas by a grateful public and there was even a song composed at the time which contained the lyrics, "You look swell holding your umbrella / All the world loves a wonderful fella".

Yet as war broke out in Europe, Chamberlain's trademark brolly was quickly seized upon by his enemies as a laughable symbol of his gentlemanly ineffectiveness and it became a lightening-rod for critics of appeasement. Declassified MI5 records reveal how Hitler mocked him for it - and Chamberlain's once so celebrated umbrella morphed from useful trademark into an embarrassing symbol of political weakness and pusillanimity.

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b096gspv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b096h4t5)
Singles Going Steady

1961, Liverpool. Paul Farley's new play tells the story of a love affair conducted between a young couple who never meet, but who send each other singles made in an automatic record-your-own-voice booth.

Music for George's song written and performed by Brian Protheroe

Directed by Emma Harding.


MON 15:00 Quote... Unquote (b096h597)

The popular and evergreen quotations programme 'Quote ... Unquote' returns. Nigel Rees quizzes Simon Brett, Vanessa Feltz, Michele Hanson and Henry Normal.

Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, returns for a new series.

For over forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian KcKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote ... Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 1

Detective Fiction Author Simon Brett
Guardian Columnist Michele Hanson
Broadcaster Vanessa Feltz
Poet and writer Henry Normal

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Reader ... Charlotte Green
Producer ... Katie Tyrrell
Production co-ordinator ... Beverly Tagg

This is a BBC Studios Production.


MON 15:30 Food Programme (b096gnqz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 My Muse (b096h773)
Series 2, The Young'uns on Graeme Miles

"The terraced streets were my Grand Canyons, the shipyard cranes my redwood trees, those steelwork tips were my mountain ranges and the brickyard ponds were my seven seas".

These are the words of the songwriter Graeme Miles that inspired Sean Cooney, David Eagle and Michael Hughes of the Teesside folk group The Young'uns - Radio 2's Folk Band of the Year Award winners in 2015 & 2016. Stumbling across a folk club at the age of 17, school friends Sean, David & Michael first heard the songs of Graeme Miles - songs about their local area - songs that resonated. They realised that there was beauty to be found in a place they had been brought up to believe was "deprived" and "unromantic", and that Graeme's songs instilled a sense of pride.

For years now the band have been singing Graeme's songs, and, in this programme, they find out more about the man and his work. Featuring interviews with Graeme's widow Annie, and discussion and performances from esteemed musicians from the folk world, including the critically-acclaimed band The Unthanks, this programme highlights some of Graeme's finest songs. From an emotive performance of 'Waiting For The Ferry' on the banks of the River Tees, to a stirring rendition of 'Ring of Iron' accompanied by the legendary Billingham group The Wilson Family, The Young'uns discover more about their muse, and present the programme in their unique and humorous way.

Produced by Elizabeth Foster.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b096h775)
Series 12, Sin-eaters

Sin eating was an age old British practice carried out by those on the fringes of their communities. When someone died the sin eater would consume a ritualistic meal over the corpse and in doing so they would take on their sins. Whether they were outcasts because of this, or to start with folklorists can't say. What is known for certain though is that they were among the poorest - who else would do it?

While the practice may have died out over a hundred years ago there is a digital equivalent. Content moderators working in huge numbers across the world are fighting a losing battle both to keep horrible images from slipping into our social media feeds but also against the harm they suffer from witnessing so much gruesomeness.

Aleks Krotoski will hear about what happens when you stare into the abyss for too long.

Producer: Peter McManus.


MON 17:00 PM (b096gjjw)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b096gjjy)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b096h777)
Series 19, Episode 1

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Richard Osman, Arthur Smith, Lou Sanders and Phil Wang are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as dolphins, cows, Arnold Schwarzenegger and students.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b096h779)

Alistair and Anisha need to work together, and Ian reaches an agreement.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b096gjk0)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b096h4d0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Journey of a Lifetime (b096h77c)
Tajikistan - Finding the Woman of Stone

This year's winner of the Journey of a Lifetime Award, Nicole Bennet Fite, travels deep into the valleys of Tajikistan to find a shrine devoted to womens' resistance.

Nicole is a student of anthropology at Stanford University, California and a young radio maker. For six weeks this year she travelled around the small Central Asian republic of Tajikistan and visited the remote and beautiful Yagnob Valley.

On her first big solo adventure as a young woman, her aim is to hear about the experiences of women on her path through Tajikistan.

Crossing glaciers and skirting herds of goats, she makes her way to a shrine at the end of the valley. This sanctified place, deep in the forest, is the preserve only of women. Inside it is a boulder said to represent a Yagnob woman who turned herself to stone to avoid rape by Mongol armies attacking the village 800 years ago.

At the shrine, Nicole has her own epiphany.

About the Journey of a Lifetime award: Are you passionate about radio and podcasting? Are you excited about finding new ways to tell original stories in sound? And are you itching to explore and understand the world around you?

Then we have exciting news for you. The Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), in partnership with BBC Radio 4, is offering a £5,000 grant to help you make a journey - near or far - and a radio programme telling the world about it. You will be given BBC training and ongoing support from a BBC documentary producer.
If this sounds fun to you, you can find out how to apply by clicking on this link: http://bit.ly/1wBNKHB.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b096h77f)
The Fintech Revolution

Will technology radically reshape the highly profitable world of finance? Technology can revolutionise industries, making goods and services cheaper and more accessible. Television is going the same way with online services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime providing thousands of movies and boxsets. From the point of view of the consumer the picture is the same - we tend to have more choice and pay less money. Profits get squeezed. Yet there's one service we buy that seems to be a glaring exception - finance. Philip Coggan of The Economist asks whether the rapidly growing financial technology sector is about to change all that, creating a future that's much less comfortable for City fat cats, but better for everyone else.

Producer: Ben Carter

(Photo: Tech Globe on hand. Credit: Shutterstock).


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b095rbt9)
Moth

Brett Westwood steps into the world of a creature charged with the lore of night, whose dance with a flame has captivated us and whose cocoons have clothed us. Walk with him as he takes a journey into the domain of the moth. Producer: Tom Bonnett.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b096gjjh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b096gjk2)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b096h79w)
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 3/4, Episode 6

Sue Townsend's hilarious and heart breaking chronicle of a teenager growing up in the Midlands in the 1980s. A brand new serialisation, read by Harry McEntire, in the year that Adrian Mole himself turns 50.

It's 1981 and Margaret Thatcher is in power, Britain is at war in the Falklands and teenagers are growing up in a world without mobile phones or computer games. While his parents are downstairs, drinking, smoking and arguing about their failing marriage, Adrian is upstairs in his bedroom listening to Abba, reading great works of literature, writing poems, and penning letters to the BBC.

Despite the many challenges that life throws at him - including regular beatings from the school bully, unrequited love, raging hormones, a severe case of acne and numerous rejection letters - Adrian soldiers on bravely and wins a place in our hearts with his charming naïveté.

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b095rrzx)
Are we all speaking football?

Lifelong Arsenal supporter Michael Rosen and football-uninterested Dr Laura Wright talk to Adam Hurrey about the language, and in particular, the clichés of football. Football is a linguistic microclimate, with coinages shooting into everyday speech: back of the net!
Producer Sally Heaven.


MON 23:30 From Rags to Riches (b08nrsln)
Series 1, Episode 1

When are old clothes merely second hand and when are they vintage? Fashion historian Amber Butchart explores how our perception of cast off clothing has dramatically changed over the past hundred years.

In the first of two programmes, Amber visits shops, markets, museums and fashion houses in a quest to track how second hand clothes have gone from being simple hand-me-downs, only found in jumble sales and charity shops, to featuring in the pages of glossy fashion magazines and for sale at high prices in auction houses.

Producer: Phill Brown
An Alfi Media production for BBC Radio 4.



TUESDAY 03 OCTOBER 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b096gjlt)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b096h1r1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b096gjlw)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b096gjly)

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b096gjm0)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b096gjm2)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b097zvnb)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi YY Rubinstein, a writer, teacher and broadcaster.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b096gjm4)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b096hcch)
Stephen Moss on the Cetti's Warbler

In the second of five recollections about his encounters with birds, writer and wildlife programme-maker Stephen Moss recalls going in search of a bird that 50 years was rare but today are found all over southern Britain - and is most often heard before it is seen, having a very loud song! It is the Cetti's Warbler.In the second of five recollections about his encounters with birds, writer and wildlife programme-maker Stephen Moss recalls going in search of a bird that 50 years was rare but today are found all over southern Britain - and is most often heard before it is seen, having a very loud song! It is the Cetti's Warbler.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Sarah Blunt

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Sarah Blunt.


TUE 06:00 Today (b096gjm6)

News and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b096hcck)
Lucie Green on the sun

Lucie Green studies the sun - that giant, turbulent ball of burning gas at the centre of our solar system. Her first ambition was to become an art therapist, but she soon switched from art to astrophysics, and before long had fixed her gaze on our local star. It may be 93 million miles away, but the sun's extensive and ever changing magnetic field determines the 'weather' throughout our solar system. Under a worst-case scenario, bubbles of super-hot plasma and streams of high energy particles - spat out when the surface of the sun erupts - can hurtle towards planet earth, damaging communication and navigation satellites and bringing down electrical power supplies.Thanks to the work that Lucie and others have done to raise awareness of these coronal mass ejections, solar belches as Lucie likes to call them are now a recognised threat to national security, alongside flooding, pandemic flu and terrorist attacks.

Producer: Anna Buckley.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b096hcln)
Trevor Nelson and half siblings 1/3

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London and came to find out he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However, for Trevor and his three sisters who were raised by his parents in the UK, this was something that didn't really have an impact on his family life until much later when Trevor finally met his half siblings.

It's something that has fascinated Trevor all his life, and now in this series of One to One, he meets people to uncover what it's like to have, or to find out you have, half siblings.

In the first of his three programmes, he meets Adrienne who has eight half siblings but no full brothers and sisters. She tells Trevor that that there is no jealousy and rivalry and that they really are one big happy family. Really?

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b096hclq)
The Rub of Time, On the Road

Martin Amis is one of the most celebrated authors of modern times. A new collection rounds up his non-fiction pieces from 1986 to 2016, and this week five compelling topics are aired.

Like many major writers, he has experienced the highs and lows of the mega author tour. Travelling across America these experiences are even more comic and strange. Praised by readers, heckled by fellow authors, bumping into Jack Nicholson, it's never a dull moment as a 'hireling of my own novel'.

Reader Bill Nighy

Producer Duncan Minshull.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b096gjm8)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b096hcls)
Gudrun's Saga, Episode 2

Lucy Catherine's Viking epic of love, revenge and leadership inspired by the Icelandic sagas.

Gudrun's rival in love, Hrefna, returns to Iceland with a band of missionaries and a plan to convert the country to Christianity. Her motives for returning to the land where her husband was murdered are far less clear cut.

Produced and directed by Gemma Jenkins.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b096hclv)
Swallow

One swallow doesn't make a summer but it comes close: Brett Westwood explores a much loved and inspirational bird whose own definition of happiness is a field of cow dung. Mark Cocker is in one such field in Derbyshire; Anders Pape Moller catches breeding swallows in a cow byre in Jutland; and Angela Turner reminds us how a swallow lives when it leaves the European summer. Featuring poems by Swinburne and Keats and a song by Robert Burns. Producer: Tim Dee.


TUE 11:30 It's Just a Joke, Comrade: 100 Years of Russian Satire (b096hclx)
Series 1, Episode 1

The Russian Revolution unleashed a brand of humour that continues to this day. In this two-part series, comedian and Russophile Viv Groskop explores a century of revolutionary comedy and asks how it continues to shape the national psyche.

The series will rediscover comedy of the Revolution: Bolshevik satire, early Communist cartoons and jokes about Lenin, as writers, satirists and comedians recall the jokes and cartoons shared by their parents and grandparents.

Viv will investigate the birth of the 'anekdot' and trace the development of dark humour through the purges. She will look at how dissident humour in the late 1950s influenced comedy in London and New York, and meet contemporary comedians to gain an understanding of the shape and sound of the comedy circuit in Russia today.

Producer: Georgia Catt.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b096gjmc)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b096hclz)
Series 1, Dynamo

You might think electricity had an immediate and transformative impact on economic productivity. But you would be wrong. Thirty years after the invention of the useable light bulb, almost all American factories still relied on steam. Factory owners simply couldn't see the advantage of electric power when their steam systems - in which they had invested a great deal of capital - worked just fine. Simply replacing a steam engine with an electric dynamo did little to improve efficiency. But the thing about a revolutionary technology is that it changes everything. And changing everything takes imagination. Instead of replacing their steam engines with electric dynamos, company bosses needed to re-design the whole factory. Only then would electric power leave steam behind. As Tim Harford explains, the same lag has applied to subsequent technological leaps - including computers. That revolution might be just beginning.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ben Crighton.


TUE 12:13 You and Yours (b096gjmf)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b096gjmj)

The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b096gjml)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


TUE 13:45 Prime Ministers' Props (b07nrlqn)
Stanley Baldwin's Iron Gates

Professor Sir David Cannadine explores political fame and image by looking at how an object or prop, whether chosen deliberately or otherwise, can come to define a political leader - from Winston Churchill's cigar and siren suit to Margaret Thatcher's handbag.

Sir David looks at the significance of these props of power - what they mean and what they become, and what happens when, almost inevitably, Prime Ministers lose control of their image and their props take on a hostile meaning, very different from their original intentions.

In 1937, Stanley Baldwin retired in what was considered a blaze of glory, and he expected to live out his remaining days as a revered elder statesman behind his wrought-iron gates at his country estate, Astley Hall. But the Second World War changed everything and Baldwin's reputation collapsed when he became the scapegoat for Britain being ill-equipped to fight Hitler.

The problem became centred on his iron gates when, in September 1941, Stanley Baldwin's old enemy, Lord Beaverbrook, asked all local authorities to survey their area's iron and steel gates for requisitioning as scrap metal. Baldwin duly applied for exemption for the Astley Hall gates on the grounds of artistic merit. However Beaverbrook bit back and Baldwin's gates became something of a cause celebre and the focus for a national campaign hounding an old appeaser who was now seen to be hampering the war effort.

Stanley Baldwin's iron gates at Astley Hall were eventually removed, all except the pair of presentation gates given to him by the Worcestershire Association on his retirement. Sir David Cannadine goes in search of Baldwin's remaining gates to find out what happened to them.

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b096h779)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b05r3z3z)
Falling Faces

By Meic Povey

Since the death of his wife, Billy has lived on his own. But now it's time to stop grieving, and start living again.

Before she died Billy's wife, Sally, gave him a list of things to do once she was gone: Cancel loyalty cards; close bank account; retile hallway, and so on. Billy has followed her instructions religiously. Now, there is one item left on Sally's list - a full-length mirror in the bathroom they used to share.

Once in place the mirror dominates the room, and is hard to ignore. Billy is forced to confront his image - a man alone in the world. But he feels unexpectedly hopeful now the mirror is up. He finds he is glancing at his image more and more, and Billy realises that despite his 60-odd years he's looking pretty good.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b096dhng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b096hcz0)
Dare to Share

The ability to share underused resources like holiday homes and car journeys through online sites has disrupted many sectors of the economy. Many people now travel using 'Airbnb' or 'Uber' and being able to deal directly with the owner of the property or the driver of the car has opened up additional revenue streams for some and cheaper travel options for us all. As many more industries are about to be 'disrupted' by sharing technology Tom Heap discovers how the sharing economy might also be good for the planet.

New apps like Olio and Fat Llama or the Library of Things are designed to allow people to share everything from leftover food to lawnmowers. In a world where space is at a premium and less people will own their own home many of us may no longer want to store so much 'stuff'. The solution is to borrow what we need when we need it and many statistics suggest we have already reached a point of 'peak stuff'. Buying less manufactured goods may be bad for the economy but it could be good news for the planet. Tom finds out just how far the sharing economy can provide for his needs and asks if this shift in how and what we consume can really save energy and emissions.

Producer: Helen Lennard.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b096hcz2)
Autism and Communication

Michael Rosen finds out what the rest of society can learn about communication from people on the autism spectrum, by getting an insight into a different worldview. He meets Alis Rowe and Helen Eaton from the Curly Hair project. Producer Sally Heaven.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b096hcz4)
Toby Young and Sarah Vine

Writers Toby Young and Sarah Vine talk favourite books with Harriett Gilbert. Sarah has an insider's view of British politics- what made her choose John Preston's A Very English Scandal, the true story of Liberal Party leader Jeremy Thorpe's trial for murder? Toby Young picks Lionel Davidson's thriller Kolymsky Heights, and Harriett selects Conundrum, the memoir of travel writer and trans woman Jan Morris.
Producer Sally Heaven.


TUE 17:00 PM (b096gjmn)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b096gjmq)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 The Tim Vine Chat Show (b096hcz6)
Series 2, Abergavenny

Tim Vine has been travelling the length and breadth of this fair land to not only uncover the best stories of the Great British public but also to take every possible opportunity to tell a ridiculous joke and sing a preposterous song along the way.

In episode 4 Tim is in Wales at the Borough Theatre in Abergavenny. Dramatic events come in the form of an anecdote about a haunted hotel and a warship trying to do a three-point turn.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b096hcz8)

Oliver decides to step down, and Brian is forced to pay out.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b096gjms)
BBC National Short Story Award

Join John Wilson for a celebration of the power and possibilities of the short story as Chair of Judges Joanna Trollope announces the winner of the 2017 BBC National Short Story Award live from the Radio Theatre.

The judging panel Eimear McBride, Jon McGregor and Sunjeev Sahota discuss the merits of the entries from the shortlisted authors. In contention for the £15,000 prize are Helen Oyeyemi, Benjamin Markovits, Cynan Jones, Jenni Fagan and Will Eaves.

Radio 1 presenter Alice Levine will also announce the winner of the BBC Young Writers' Award and consider the strengths and emerging themes of the stories with judges Nikesh Shukla and Holly Bourne.

The BBC National Short Story Award is presented in conjunction with BookTrust.

Presenter : John Wilson
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b096hcls)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b096hczb)
Extremism: Hidden in Plain Sight

Manveen Rana uncovers hate speech and extreme Islamist messages in some of Britain's mainstream Urdu language newspapers, radio stations and TV channels.

While we are often told the internet and social media have accelerated the fermentation of extremist ideas, File on 4 reveals how widely-available 'old media' is also disseminating sectarian, anti-Semitic and even violent messages through newspapers and TV channels accessible in Muslim communities across the UK.

But at what point do these media outlets cross the line from bad taste to criminal behaviour? And are media regulators doing enough to prevent and punish the offenders?

Producers: Richard Fenton-Smith & Sajid Iqbal
Editor: Gail Champion.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b096gjmv)

News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b096hczd)

Dr Mark Porter presents a series on health issues.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b096hcck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b096gjmz)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b096hczg)
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 3/4, Episode 7

Sue Townsend's hilarious and heart breaking chronicle of a teenager growing up in the Midlands in the 1980s. A brand new serialisation, read by Harry McEntire, in the year that Adrian Mole himself turns 50.

It's 1981 and Margaret Thatcher is in power, Britain is at war in the Falklands and teenagers are growing up in a world without mobile phones or computer games. While his parents are downstairs, drinking, smoking and arguing about their failing marriage, Adrian is upstairs in his bedroom listening to Abba, reading great works of literature, writing poems, and penning letters to the BBC.

Despite the many challenges that life throws at him - including regular beatings from the school bully, unrequited love, raging hormones, a severe case of acne and numerous rejection letters - Adrian soldiers on bravely and wins a place in our hearts with his charming naïveté.

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Spotlight Tonight with Nish Kumar (b096hczj)
Series 2, Episode 3

We all like to think we know about the news and yet, whilst jokes about Donald Trump's tiny hands are all well and good, do you still have that nagging suspicion there's important things going on beneath the headlines you'd like to know about? Well, help is at hand! Nish Kumar is here to cast his spotlight on the week's most talked about news items, taking an in-depth look at the biggest stories from the past seven days as well as scrutinising the bigger issues of the moment.

Starring Nish Kumar with Sarah Campbell.

Written by Sarah Campbell, Max Davis, Gabby Hutchinson-Crouch, Nish Kumar, and Tom Neenan.

It was produced by Matt Stronge and was a BBC Studios Production.


TUE 23:30 From Rags to Riches (b08pfqqb)
Series 1, Episode 2

Fashion historian Amber Butchart discovers what happens to the clothes we give to charity shops. Some of them can end up travelling thousands of miles and affect people's lives in ways that goes well beyond raising money for worthy causes.

In the second and concluding episode, Amber travels to Senegal, via London and Yorkshire, to trace the process that our charity clothes go through and hears about the positive and negative impacts our donations are having globally.

Producer: Phill Brown
An Alfi Media production for BBC Radio 4.



WEDNESDAY 04 OCTOBER 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b096gjq9)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b096hclq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b096gjqf)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b096gjqh)

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b096gjqk)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b096gjqm)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b097rmmm)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi YY Rubinstein, a writer, teacher and broadcaster.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b096gjqp)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b096j14l)
Stephen Moss on the Bittern

In the third of five recollections about his encounters with birds, writer and wildlife programme-maker Stephen Moss recalls the first time he saw a Bittern - a bird which whilst it produces a loud booming call can be quite elusive.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series,a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt.


WED 06:00 Today (b096gjqr)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 A Choral History of Britain (b096j14n)

Roderick Williams shows how Britain has become an astonishingly fertile breeding ground for the world's very best professional choirs and choristers. He explores the hugely important role that our cathedrals and university chapels have played in sustaining these groups; plus the long, but not always illustrious, history that brought them here. And he asks what the future holds for this most British of musical institutions.

Producer: Chris Taylor for BBC Wales.


WED 09:30 Owning Colour (b08ljxb3)
Series 1, Purple

Designer Wayne Hemingway looks at five colours that have been at the centre of ownership and trademark battles, revealing the complex status of colours in our society - their artistic, commercial and cultural impact.

He explores our response to colour - whether it's the red soles of designer shoes, the blue strip of a football team or the purple of a chocolate bar wrapper - interviewing those involved in branding, advertising and IP, as well as the psychologists, scientists , colour gurus, artists and those creating the colours of tomorrow using Nanotechnology.

Programme 4 - Purple
From music to chocolate, purple has created its own brands. It appears the least in nature and its scarcity in everyday life led humans to link it with luxury and quality. Traditionally the chosen colour of royalty, dark purple has been fought over in the most famous of colour battles - Nestle vs Cadburys. The dispute over Pantone 2865c, the colour chosen by Cadburys over 100 years ago has been in and out of the courts for over a decade. Wayne uncovers our relationship to purple which, while being popular with teenagers, is also linked to death and mourning.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b096j14q)
The Rub of Time, Iris Murdoch: Age Will Win

Martin Amis is one of the most celebrated authors of modern times. A new collection rounds up his non-fiction pieces from 1986 to 2016, and this week five compelling topics are aired.

A feature film based on Iris Murdoch (with Kate Winslet and Judi Dench portraying her through the years), gives him chance to muse on the life and work of this acclaimed novelist. A unique and profound voice, movingly married to John Bayley, he describes her portrayal on celluloid, her eccentric domesticity, and her later descent as Alzheimer's takes hold.

Reader Bill Nighy

Producer Duncan Minshull.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b096gjqt)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b096j14s)
Gudrun's Saga, Episode 3

Lucy Catherine's Viking epic of love, revenge and leadership inspired by the Icelandic sagas.

The Norwegian priest Refkel has spent the winter working alongside Gudrun on her farm. As spring returns he redoubles his efforts to save her soul.

Produced and directed by Gemma Jenkins.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b096j14v)
Carmel and Muire - Drama Queens

A mother and daughter united by greasepaint. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Out of School, Out of Sight (b096j1b9)

Photo: Abdur Rahman and his wife Iram love home educating their 3 daughters and feel the girls get a terrific experience from the range of educational and social activities they plan as a family.

Nobody knows exactly how many children are being educated at home because parents are under no obligation to tell the authorities - registration isn't mandatory, although there were close to 30,000 children on the voluntary registers kept by local authorities in 2016/17 academic year. This represented a 97 per cent increase on the 2011 figures. Councils point to a number of reasons for the increase, including the fact that more parents are removing their children from school to avoid prosecution for poor attendance, or because the pupil might be at risk of exclusion.

In Bradford Winifred Robinson meets 14 year old Mohammed, whose mother opted for home education rather than have him sent to the pupil referral unit. She readily admits she's out of her depth trying to teach him and says she has not really managed to do it in the ten months that he's been at home. She says his bad behaviour at school had caused problems: "The school said if you don't want him going into the pupil referral unit, then you have to home school him. I'm not that educated myself and I work in the mornings, I didn't really know what I was agreeing to and it isn't working for him."

Mohammed agrees, saying that his Mum means well but has no understanding of the curriculum: "My mum, she isn't a teacher for teaching Maths, English and Science. I've got nothing to do, so I go back to sleep, or play on the X Box. When I went to school I was around other children and I was happy. Now it's just a boring being alone - I don't like it." Mohammed wants to get back into school, but he's now struggling to find a school that will take him and is worried about catching up.

According to Abdur Rahman, it is happening more frequently: he runs an intervention program for excluded youngsters and tells Winifred that if a child doesn't engage in school they can become a negative influence: "Eventually the only other option for the school is to say 'elective home school'. Abdur Rahman sees both extremes of the home education debate because he and his wife took the very positive decision to home educate their three daughters. They are able to give the girls attention and direction in their home classroom. His concern is at the other end of the spectrum when parents almost have the decision forced on them by schools who should be doing more to engage some pupils. They go to the parent and say, 'if you're child doesn't come to school you could be fined'. Then the option comes, 'well, you could elective home school'. Schools work like a business nowadays and if that child isn't going to get them what they need then they will go down this road."

Councillor Richard Watts chairs the Local Government Association's Children and Young People Board and thinks that strengthening the powers of local authorities will help avoid cases of children slipping below the radar: "What the lack of rules does is present some loopholes where some children are taken out of schools for reasons that don't have the child's best interest at heart and actually some schools we know are effectively putting a lot of pressure on parents to home educate their kids to get them off the roll when exam comes around.

It's an issue Lord Soley hopes to address through his private members bill, which would make it mandatory to register home educated pupils with the local authority, who would monitor their 'educational, physical and emotional development.' Currently, a parent of a school-age child must ensure he or she gets a full-time education, 'either by regular attendance at school or otherwise,' and that it must be suitable to their age and ability. Lord Soley says that whilst most parents do a good job of teaching their children at home, the voluntary system can leave some families slipping through the net.

Greg Smith, head of operations at Oxford Home Schooling, a not-for-profit trust that provides educational material for home educators, feels that the proposed measures go too far. He tells Winifred that the only other occasion on which the state has the right to enter your home is: "if you've committed a crime." He is worried that some local authorities treat home education on a par with truancy, or as a safeguarding problem, rather than working with parents: "Councils should be supporting these parents with the choices they are making."


WED 11:30 Mrs Sidhu Investigates: Murder With Masala (b096j4lp)
Series 1, Samosas, Suspicion and Stately Homes

A murder mystery with a quirky touch written by Suk Pannu and starring Meera Syal. The Indian Aunty from Slough gets mixed up in society crimes in Berkshire.

Mrs Sidhu (Meera Syal) is the interfering Indian chef with a taste for murder. Since her husband's death, she has built a successful reputation as a caterer in Slough and has expanded into well-heeled Berkshire, where the posh clients pay better. But when crime strikes, Mrs Sidhu embroils Inspector Burton (Justin Edwards) in the murky lives of gadget inventor, Lord Lucas, his icy wife Lady Lucas (Rachel Atkins) and bride to be Jemma Broghan (Amy Morgan).

Meanwhile at home, she is plagued by her wily catering supplier Mr Varma (Vincent Ebrahim) and her wayward son Tez (Hamza Jetooa).

In the first episode, Mrs Sidhu leaves Slough for a posh wedding at Lapsley Hall where the bride appeals for her help in finding her missing maid of honour. Meanwhile her son Tez is angry when she employs a French sous chef.

Writer Suk Pannu
Editor Leon Chambers
Studio Engineers Phil Horne, Leon Chambers
Director Marilyn Imrie
Producer Gordon Kennedy
Executive Producer Chris Pye

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b096gjqy)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b096j4lr)
Series 1, Limited Liability Company

Nicholas Murray Butler was one of the great thinkers of his age: philosopher; Nobel Peace Prize-winner; president of Columbia University. When in 1911 Butler was asked to name the most important innovation of the industrial era, his answer was somewhat surprising. "The greatest single discovery of modern times," he said, "is the limited liability corporation". Tim Harford explains why Nicholas Murray Butler might well have been right.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ben Crighton.


WED 12:13 You and Yours (b096gjr0)

Consumer affairs programme.


WED 12:57 Weather (b096gjr2)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b096gjr4)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


WED 13:45 Prime Ministers' Props (b07pgwg1)
Anthony Eden's Homburg Hat

Professor Sir David Cannadine explores political fame and image by looking at how an object or prop, whether chosen deliberately or otherwise, can come to define a political leader - from Winston Churchill's cigar and siren suit to Margaret Thatcher's handbag.

Sir David looks at the significance of these props of power - what they mean and what they become, and what happens when, almost inevitably, Prime Ministers lose control of their image and their props take on a hostile meaning, very different from their original intentions.

Anthony Eden was one of the briefest serving Prime Ministers of modern times, and his name became inseparably linked with the Suez fiasco of 1956, from which his reputation has never recovered. But in the earlier stages of his political career, Eden was widely regarded as the most attractive and glamorous figure in British public life. These qualities were both proclaimed and symbolised by his Homburg hat, which he briefly made fashionable when it became known as the Eden on Savile Row. In fact, Anthony Eden is the only British Prime Minister, apart from the Duke of Wellington, to have had an item of apparel named after him.

But with Eden's fall from grace, the Eden hat was quickly forgotten and one biographer wrote scathingly in the 1960s, "who wears an Anthony Eden hat today?"

And while we still use the phrase Wellington boot, and remember the victor of Waterloo, the Eden Homburg, and the man who gave his name to it, have both been largely forgotten.

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b096hcz8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b096j4lt)
The Slow Kapow

An unexpected event at school gives Ed special powers - like turning into a minotaur. Comic drama by Ed Harris.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b096gjr6)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b096hczd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b096j4lw)

Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b096gjr8)

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 17:00 PM (b096gjrb)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b096gjrd)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 John Shuttleworth's Lounge Music (b0848sqq)
Series 2, Episode 3

John Shuttleworth invites celebrated pop stars to his Sheffield home to perform one of their own songs and also, more importantly, one of his.

This week it's Nick Heyward from Haircut 100.

Ken is very excited as he's heard that Nick has had a spiritual awakening and he's keen to learn how he can have one of his own. John feels that Ken is being silly wearing a kaftan and beads, but Ken is convinced that Nick can help him and ignores John.

Also, Mary is not happy with the smell of the josticks that Ken has lit so he's ejected by John while Nick wins Mary over with his rendition of Can't Go Back To Savoury Now.

In Top Tips on the Telephone, John learns from Tony Christie about coping with Eurovision failure!

Written and Performed by Graham Fellows with special guests Nick Heyward and Tony Christie.
Produced by Dawn Ellis
A Chic Ken production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b096j4ly)

Jolene tries to be a voice of reason, and Alice plays peace-maker.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b096gjrg)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b096j14s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b096j4m0)
Sentencing

Against a record rise in the number of sentences being made more severe after being found to have been unduly lenient, Clive Anderson and guests discuss whether sentencing law is fit for purpose.

Should judges have the freedom to reflect a defendant's mitigating circumstances, even if that means wildly different sentences for the same crime? Or should rigid guidelines ensure consistency across the country, so that a shoplifter in Penrith is treated the same as one in Peterborough?

The Law Commission has just published a report which says complexity in current sentencing law is causing costly delays and prompting judges to make errors, and even leading to unlawful sentences. In a recent study, 30% of sentences were found to have been handed down incorrectly.

The prison population has doubled in the last 25 years. It is now the largest in Europe. Lord Justice Treacy, Chairman of the Sentencing Council, believes an increased focus by courts on victims has seen so-called sentence inflation - increasingly harsh sentences handed down for the same crimes.

Barrister Michelle Nelson is alarmed by the findings of David Lammy's review of the criminal justice system that ethnic minority offenders face bias and even overt discrimination in the way they are handled. BAME people accused of drugs offences are 240% more likely to be sent to prison than white offenders.

The legal director of the Howard League, Laura Janes, asks if the aim is to rehabilitate offenders or simply to punish them. She says the UK should follow Germany and make more use of suspended sentences - opportunities for offenders to reform themselves - rather than automatically handing down custodial sentences.

Producer: Matt Willis
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 David Baddiel Tries to Understand (b096j4m2)
Series 3, The Constitution

David Baddiel tries to understand the United Kingdom's constitution.

What does a constitution do? Does not having a written constitution mean we don't really have a constitution at all? Should we? And where does the Royal Family fit in? David speaks to Lord Lisvane, a former Clerk of the House of Commons, and to Lord Turnbull, once the country's top civil servant, to understand these and other puzzling questions about the constitution.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b096hcz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 A Choral History of Britain (b096j14n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b096gjrj)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b096j4m4)
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 3/4, Episode 8

Sue Townsend's hilarious and heart breaking chronicle of a teenager growing up in the Midlands in the 1980s. A brand new serialisation, read by Harry McEntire, in the year that Adrian Mole himself turns 50.

It's 1981 and Margaret Thatcher is in power, Britain is at war in the Falklands and teenagers are growing up in a world without mobile phones or computer games. While his parents are downstairs, drinking, smoking and arguing about their failing marriage, Adrian is upstairs in his bedroom listening to Abba, reading great works of literature, writing poems, and penning letters to the BBC.

Despite the many challenges that life throws at him - including regular beatings from the school bully, unrequited love, raging hormones, a severe case of acne and numerous rejection letters - Adrian soldiers on bravely and wins a place in our hearts with his charming naïveté.

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Charlotte and Lillian (b096j4m6)
Series 1, The Mirror

In the throes of splitting up from her boyfriend, 29-year-old Charlotte (Helen Monks) is determined to prove she's not as self-centred as he says she is. She signs up as a volunteer to visit the elderly, expecting to be paired with a frail and needy old lady who's full of gratitude and appreciation for such a selfless act. Instead she meets 82-year-old Lillian (Miriam Margolyes), a belligerent and feisty old bat who sees through her in an instant.

Needless to say, they don't get on.

Helping Lillian clear out her garage is undoubtedly a Good Turn, but it's not long before Charlotte's self-interest gets the better of her. She spots a vintage treasure in amongst Lillian's junk and, determined to get her hands on it, attempts to manipulate Lillian into giving it to her. Not only does her plan backfire spectacularly, but it also reveals how both women are just as greedy as each other.

This four-part, two-actress comedy, written by Holly Walsh and Kat Sommers, was recorded on location and features the fantastic combination of Miriam Margolyes and Helen Monks, working together for the first time.

A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Before They Were Famous (b05zl1bq)
Series 3, Episode 6

Ian Leslie presents the show which brings to light the often surprising first literary attempts of the world's best known writers.

To start off this episode, we hear Fay Weldon's illuminating quiz for Cosmopolitan Magazine - 'Are you too obsessed with your ex?'.

Next, it's Friedrich Nietzsche's lesser known work for a toy company catalogue - giving possibly more in depth descriptions than were initially required.

Then we hear from beloved poet Pam Ayres again, in a piece submitted to the Office of Information as a draft for a public safety announcement.

Finally, there's another of Henrik Ibsen's joke submissions for a Christmas cracker manufacturer.

Producer: Claire Broughton
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 World War One: The Cultural Front (b090v3bj)
Series 4, The Jazz Kings Go to War

In the first episode of a new series of The Cultural Front, Francine Stock tells the little known story of the 15th New York Regiment of the National Guard, who through acts of bravery and daring, came to be known as the Harlem Hellfighters.

They were an African American unit who, along with their military band, were sent to France in 1917.

It was a time of segregation in America; a time when Jim Crow laws still dominated society. The American military would not allow black soldiers to fight alongside white recruits so they gifted the 15th regiment to the French, following their terrible losses at the Somme and Verdun the year before.

The regiment was viewed as war fodder, they would entertain French villages before being sent off to the Frontline to fight, and most likely die.

But that did not happen.

The Harlem Hellfighters would not only go on to be the most decorated regiment in the American Expedition Force, but are credited with bringing jazz to Europe; a musical form which would define a generation.

Producer: Caitlin Smith.



THURSDAY 05 OCTOBER 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b096gjvk)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b096j14q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b096gjvm)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b096gjvp)

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b096gjvr)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b096gjvt)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b097rrdz)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi YY Rubinstein, a writer, teacher and broadcaster.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b096gjvw)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b096j56j)
Stephen Moss on the Coot

In the fourth of five recollections about his encounters with birds, writer and wildlife programme-maker Stephen Moss explains how a chance encounter with a coot when he was just three years old, inspired a lifelong passion for birds and bird-watching.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Sarah Blunt.


THU 06:00 Today (b096gjvy)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b096gjw0)
Constantine the Great

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the life, reputation and impact of Constantine I, known as Constantine the Great (c280s -337AD). Born in modern day Serbia and proclaimed Emperor by his army in York in 306AD, Constantine became the first Roman Emperor to profess Christianity. He legalised Christianity and its followers achieved privileges that became lost to traditional religions, leading to the steady Christianisation of the Empire. He built a new palace in Byzantium, renaming it Constantinople, as part of the decentralisation of the Empire, an Eastern shift that saw Roman power endure another thousand years there, long after the collapse of the empire in the West.

With

Greg Woolf

Lucy Grig

and

Christopher Kelly

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b096j56l)
The Rub of Time, Episode 4

Martin Amis is one of the most celebrated of modern-day authors. A new collection rounds up his non-fiction pieces from 1986 to 2016, and this week five compelling topics are aired.

He was a friend of the renowned SF writer JG Ballard, apparently you never say 'Sci-Fi' for this genre. Anyway, Ballard wrote vivid works such as The Drowned World, High Rise, Cocaine Nights, which Amis now toasts. And despite the unsettling and dystopian worlds evoked, full of menace and breakdown, he recalls a genial and welcoming man, as well as a great father to three children after his wife dies.

Reader Bill Nighy

Producer Duncan Minshull.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b096gjw2)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b096j5df)
Gudrun's Saga, Episode 4

Lucy Catherine's Viking epic of love, revenge and leadership inspired by the Icelandic sagas.

All that Gudrun holds dear is under threat and a betrayal closer to home forces her to act.

Produced and directed by Gemma Jenkins.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b096gjw4)

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.


THU 11:30 Hull 2017: Contains Strong Language (b096j5dh)
Part 1

Hull 17: Contains Strong Language - A City of Poets in its Own Words.

PART 1. Recorded live in Hull, Lindsey Chapman explores how Hull has proved so inspiring to poets past and present. Jeremy Irons and Julie Hesmondhalgh perform poetry by Philip Larkin, Stevie Smith and Imtiaz Dharker.

Part of Contains Strong Language, the BBC's season of Poetry and Performance from Hull.

Directed by Charlotte Riches
Produced by Susan Roberts.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b096gjw6)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b096j5dk)
Series 1, Paper Money

A young Venetian merchant named Marco Polo wrote a remarkable book chronicling his travels in China around 750 years ago. The Book of the Marvels of the World was full of strange foreign customs Marco claimed to have seen. One, in particular, was so extraordinary, Mr Polo could barely contain himself: "tell it how I might," he wrote, "you never would be satisfied that I was keeping within truth and reason". Marco Polo was one of the first Europeans to witness an invention that remains at the very foundation of the modern economy: paper money. Tim Harford tells the gripping story of one of the most successful, and important, innovations of all human history: currency which derives value not from the preciousness of the substance of which it is made, but trust in the government which issues it.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Ben Crighton.


THU 12:13 You and Yours (b096gjw8)

Consumer affairs programme.


THU 12:57 Weather (b096gjwb)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b096gjwd)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


THU 13:45 Prime Ministers' Props (b07qbcb0)
Sir Alec Douglas-Home's Matchsticks

Professor Sir David Cannadine explores political fame and image by looking at how an object or prop, whether chosen deliberately or otherwise, can come to define a political leader.

Sir David looks at the significance of these props of power - what they mean and what they become, and what happens when, almost inevitably, Prime Ministers lose control of their image and their props take on a hostile meaning, very different from their original intentions.

The aristocratic Sir Alec Douglas-Home appeared removed both from the majority of the British people and, to some extent, the modern world itself. He showed the depth of his inexperience when he casually commented to a reporter that he used matchsticks to help him understand economic problems. "When I have to read economic documents I have to have a box of matches and start moving them into position to simplify and illustrate the points to myself."

It was a gift for Leader of the Opposition, Harold Wilson, who used the matchstick comment to goad and embarrass the Conservative Prime Minister at every opportunity. The matchsticks came to define Sir Alec's inadequacies as leader and, when it came to problem-solving, his ultimately successful opponent Wilson was more familiar with slide rules than matchsticks.

Home's premiership was the second briefest of the twentieth century, lasting just two days short of a year. Who knows what would have happened if Sir Alec hadn't made that careless matchstick comment.

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b096j4ly)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b05vhkbn)
Lizzy Barry's Lesson

Lizzy Barry was without doubt the most celebrated and best loved actress of the Restoration. But though Mrs Barry would disagree, it may have been her liaison with the infamous libertine The Earl of Rochester which provided the key to her extraordinary success.

Snatched or indeed kidnapped from a theatre where she was playing an unimportant supporting role, Robin Glendinning imagines a period of enforced and brutal tutelage during which Lizzy's exposure to The Earl of Rochester's poetry, stage craft and lovemaking, takes a head-strong but unpolished performer and turns her into the theatrical force which brought to an end the melodramas of Mrs Betterton and blazed a trail for a new generation of actresses who would go on to dominate the London stage as Desdemona, Portia, Rosalind and Lady Macbeth.

Robin Glendinning has written around 20 radio plays for BBC including 'Condemning Violence' nominated for a Sony award and 'The Words are Strange' a Giles Cooper Award winner and 'Playing for Time - 3 Days in May 1940' part of the Churchill Season on Radio 4, Jan 2005. His stage credits include: Stuffing It. Gate Dublin, Tricycle London. Culture Vultures Lyric Belfast, Minerva Chichester. Mumbo Jumbo Royal Exchange Manchester, Lyric Hammersmith, Lyric Belfast. Donny Boy Royal Exchange Manchester, Tour with Tinderbox Theatre Belfast, Exeter Theatre, Royal Theatre Oslo. Summerhouse Druid Galway, Arts Theatre Belfast.

Writer ..... Robin Glendinning
Director ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b096jb1z)
Series 37, Listeners' Walks: Isle of Man, Glen Dhoo

Clare Balding's long-held wish, to sample the walking delights of the Isle of Man, is finally satisfied as she heads to the north of the Island to explore Glen Dhoo and Ravensdale. She walks in the company of local artist, Michael Starkey and guide Chris Callow, two proud Manxmen.

The walk can be found on 0S Landranger 95.

Producer Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b096gnqs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b096gqnw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b096jb21)
Blade Runner 2049

Francine Stock asks director Denis Villeneuve why he took on the sequel to the much loved classic Blade Runner.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b096gjwg)

Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (b096gjwj)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b096gjwl)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 My Teenage Diary (b096jb23)
Ian Rankin Special

Ian Rankin reads from his teenage diaries, and talks to host Rufus Hound about life growing up as a wannabe writer and punk rocker in Fife in the 1970s.

A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b096jb25)

Kate chooses her side, and Harrison and Fallon celebrate.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b096gjwn)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b096j5df)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b096jb27)

Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b096jb29)
Batteries

Evan Davis presents the business magazine.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b096gjwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b096gjw0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b096gjwq)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b096jb2c)
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 3/4, Episode 9

Sue Townsend's hilarious and heart breaking chronicle of a teenager growing up in the Midlands in the 1980s. A brand new serialisation, read by Harry McEntire, in the year that Adrian Mole himself turns 50.

It's 1981 and Margaret Thatcher is in power, Britain is at war in the Falklands and teenagers are growing up in a world without mobile phones or computer games. While his parents are downstairs, drinking, smoking and arguing about their failing marriage, Adrian is upstairs in his bedroom listening to Abba, reading great works of literature, writing poems, and penning letters to the BBC.

Despite the many challenges that life throws at him - including regular beatings from the school bully, unrequited love, raging hormones, a severe case of acne and numerous rejection letters - Adrian soldiers on bravely and wins a place in our hearts with his charming naïveté.

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Liam Williams: Ladhood (b096jb2f)
Series 2, Episode 1

Comedian Liam Williams recounts his youthful misadventures in this autobiographical sitcom. Episode one sees Liam anxiously awaiting A-Level results before trying to find his feet in a most alien of new environments, Cambridge University.

Ladhood was written and performed by Liam Williams and starred:

The producer was Joe Nunnery
It was a BBC Studios Production.


THU 23:30 World War One: The Cultural Front (b091rxt2)
Series 4, Reality and Reconstruction

In this week's Cultural Front, Francine Stock explores how artists reacted to the bitter reality of conflict.

First she learns from the meeting of Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen at Craiglockhart hospital in Edinburgh, an event that directly lead to Owen becoming one of the greatest War Poets in the British Canon. To commemorate their meeting, fiddle maker Steve Burnett has been commissioned to make an instrument for both men, and we get to hear them played together for the very first time.

Next we travel beyond the Eastern Front to the Russian Revolution. In time theatre and film will create an enduring myth, but we delve into the poetry that acts like snapshots of history, preserving the truth of the messy, divisive revolution and showing what it was really like to watch the entire social order crumble and reform into a new world.

Of course, not all artists tackled war head on in their art. 1917 was the year that saw Pablo Picasso begin his collaboration with The Ballet Russe and the creation of his biggest ever piece of work - The Parade Curtain. How would the public react to a piece that was all about youth, joy and defiance of war, when the people they loved were still fighting at the front?

Back home, sculptor Francis Derwent Wood was volunteering in a London hospital when he saw first hand what happened to the men who had been injured in the line of duty. Seeing the profound psychological impact on patients suffering facial injuries Wood decided to set up a studio within the hospital, with the goal of sculpting tin masks that would make the patient look as close as possible to how he had been before he was wounded. A century later, we're left puzzling about what these masks really are - a well intentioned but flawed medical tool, or a kind of anti-portraiture that shows the realities of war in a way that still feels visceral even today.



FRIDAY 06 OCTOBER 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b096gjyg)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b096j56l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b096gjyj)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b096gjyl)

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b096gjyn)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b096gjyq)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b098sfy0)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rabbi YY Rubinstein, a writer, teacher and broadcaster.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b096gjys)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b096jf3k)
Stephen Moss on the Great Crested Grebe

In the last of five recollections about his encounters with birds, writer and wildlife programme-maker Stephen Moss recalls his first encounter with what he describes as 'the most beautiful bird' he had ever seen - the Great Crested Grebe.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series,a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Sarah Blunt.


FRI 06:00 Today (b096gjyv)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b096gnqx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b096jf3m)
The Rub of Time, Tennis

Martin Amis is one of the most celebrated authors of modern times. A new collection rounds up his non-fiction pieces from 1986 to 2016, and this week five compelling topics are aired.

TENNIS.. the author has always been drawn to the game: as a player and it also appears in his fiction and journalism. In two accounts he first speculates on the 'tennis monster' - a body and mind made up of the greatest competitors. Then comes the moment he has to give up 'the beautiful game'.

Reader Bill Nighy

Producer Duncan Minshull.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b096gjyx)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b096jf3p)
Gudrun's Saga, Episode 5

Lucy Catherine's Viking epic of love, revenge and leadership inspired by the Icelandic sagas.

With her way of life threatened, Gudrun risks everything when she engages in a war of words with ruthless convert the Norwegian King, Olaf Tryggvason

Produced and directed by Gemma Jenkins.


FRI 11:00 Selling Barbara (b096jf3r)

90 year-old Barbara Smith loves donating to good causes, but has discovered some of the UK's biggest charities have bought and sold her name and address. It's meant she's been inundated with letters from charities she's never heard of. In this programme Barbara, with the help of her Producer, Lydia Thomas, investigates which charities have traded in her personal details, uncovering a web of buying and selling, and asks the charities why they did it. The charity sector has been under fire from the government about how it raises money. After the death of the poppy seller Olive Cooke, charities were criticised for harassing elderly and vulnerable people, calling people registered on a no calls list, and buying and selling donor's personal details in order to send them unsolicited letters. Barbara discovers that women of her age are particularly lucrative for charities, and some charities have taken advantage of that generosity. Smile Train, a charity that admits to sharing Barbara's data with other charities explains to Barbara why they traded her name and address - a practice they have since stopped. Barbara has donated to Oxfam every month for 30 years; Mark Goldring, the charity's Chief Executive invites Barbara to Oxfam's offices to show her the work the charity does. Barbara also finds out how the bad news stories about charities, including Oxfam have forced the charity to think about how it fundraises. Barbara interviews charity regulators who brought in new rules for charities; Paula Sussex from the Charity Commission, and Michael Grade, Chair of the Fundraising Regulator meet with Barbara.

Presenter: Barbara Smith
Producer: Lydia Thomas

Interviewees:

Michael Grade, Chair of the Fundraising Regulator
Paula Sussex, former Chief Executive of the Charity Commission
Mark Goldring, Chief Executive of Oxfam
Susu Stinton, Trustee, Smile Train
Mark Roy, Chairman ReAD Group.


FRI 11:30 The Rivals (b04xrj8n)
Series 3, Seven, Seven, Seven - City

Based on a short story by Julius Chambers
Dramatised by Chris Harrald

Inspector Lestrade was made to look a fool in the Sherlock Holmes stories. Now he is writing his memoirs and has a chance to get his own back, with tales of Holmes' rivals. He starts with gifted amateur sleuth Mrs Edith Marchmont, trying to stop a murder plot overheard on a crossed telephone line.

Directed by Liz Webb

Episode by Chris Harrald inspired by the short story 'Seven Seven Seven City' by Julius Chambers: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0600421.txt.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b096gjyz)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b096jkfr)
Series 1, Seller Feedback

Tim Harford introduces innovations that helped create the economic world.


FRI 12:13 You and Yours (b096gjz1)

Consumer news and issues.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b096gjz3)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b096gjz5)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


FRI 13:45 Prime Ministers' Props (b07syyrk)
Harold Wilson's Pipe and Mac

Professor Sir David Cannadine explores political fame and image by looking at how an object or prop, whether chosen deliberately or otherwise, can come to define a political leader - from Winston Churchill's cigar and siren suit to Margaret Thatcher's handbag.

Sir David looks at the significance of these props of power - what they mean and what they become, and what happens when, almost inevitably, Prime Ministers lose control of their image and their props take on a hostile meaning, very different from their original intentions.

Harold Wilson sought to enhance his political image, in part by wearing a Gannex mac which made him seem ordinary, and also by puffing at his pipe, as memorably expressed in Ruskin Spear's 1974 portrait of him.

Following Stanley Baldwin, who had also made much of his pipe, Harold Wilson hoped to convey an image that was homely, benevolent and avuncular, and to some extent he succeeded. But the unintended consequence was that the pipe also enhanced Wilson's reputation for evasiveness and deviousness. Whenever asked a difficult question by an interviewer, he would delay and distract attention by lighting up - and it was widely believed that, although he puffed his pipe in public, he preferred cigars in private. A rumour that his son, Robin Wilson, scotches.

The Gannex mac was also to become a hostage to fortune for Wilson. While he was the peak of his popularity, the Gannex made him look like a man of the people and the millionaire businessman who invented Gannex, Joseph Kagan, became a close friend of Wilson. But once Kagan fell from grace due to his crooked business dealings, Wilson's Kagan connection was further evidence to his enemies that he was not to be trusted.

Produced by Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b096jb25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b096jkft)
The Most Wanted Man in Sweden

Krister Henriksson (the original Wallander) and Nitin Ganatra (Masood in Eastenders) star in this funny yet poignant drama by Danny Robins (The Cold Swedish Winter). When an Iraqi asylum seeker unwittingly becomes the most wanted man in Sweden, he and his Swedish interrogator make a surprising plan to clear his name.

Nitin Ganatra plays Mohammed, a refugee who has arrived in Sweden after a long and arduous journey to escape the so-called Islamic State. He is sent to the tiny frozen town of Boliden in the far north of the country but, when one day he is arrested by armed police, he discovers that his face has been on every TV channel and newspaper front page as "The Most Wanted Man in Sweden". Taken to Stockholm to be interrogated, he finds himself trapped in a Kafkaesque nightmare, trying to prove himself innocent without knowing what he is accused of.

Krister Henriksson is Jörgen, the Swedish policeman who must get to the bottom of what has happened. Mohammed protests his innocence and his stories ring true, but is there something about his past that he is hiding? As Mohammed relates his sometimes dangerous journey to Sweden and his attempts to integrate with a people so different from his own, Jörgen, finds himself growing to like his suspect. But he is joined in the interrogation by Charles (Josh Lenn), an American intelligence officer with very different views.

The drama is inspired by the true story of Moder Mothanna Magid.

Music by Rawaa Barnes and Ramzi Sleiman
Written by Danny Robins
Directed by Frank Stirling
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b096jkfw)
Windsor

Peter Gibbs chairs GQT, continuing the programme's 70th Anniversary celebrations throughout 2017. Matthew Wilson, Anne Swithinbank and Matt Biggs take gardening questions from a local audience.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (b096jkfy)
Series 1, Firecracker

Fiery flash fiction for radio about magic bars, mojitos and house fires. By playwright Marietta Kirkbride.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b096jkg0)

Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b096jkg2)

Radio 4's forum for audience comment.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b096jkg4)

Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen. Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b096gjz7)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b096gjz9)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b096jkg6)
Series 94, 06/10/2017

Satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Miles Jupp.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b096jkg8)

Lilian has ammunition, and Emma eyes a new venture.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b096gjzc)

News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b096jf3p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b096jkgb)
Bernard Hogan-Howe, Andrea Leadsom MP, Caroline Lucas MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Southam College in Warwickshire with a panel including the former head of the Metropolitan Police Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, the Leader of the House of Commons Andrea Leadsom MP and the co-leader of the Green Party of England and Wales Caroline Lucas MP.

Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b096jkgd)

A reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious (b096jkgg)
Omnibus, Episode 2

Advertising guru Rory Sutherland explores the psychology underlying the greatest ad campaigns in history - with first-hand accounts from the creative minds that conceived them.

Produced by Steven Rajam

Why do certain marketing campaigns - from Nike's "Just Do It" to the MND Ice Bucket Challenge - cast such a spell over us? Rory Sutherland explores the story - and the psychology - behind ten of the most influential campaigns in history - with first-hand accounts from the creative minds that conceived them, and contributions from the worlds of evolutionary biology, behavioural psychology, socio-economics and anthropology.

Marketing. It's come to be one of the most misunderstood - and maligned - disciplines of our age: perceived variously as the Emperor's New Clothes, an emblem of the ills of capitalism, a shadowy dark art designed to steal away our hard-earned money and make us do (or buy, or vote for) things we don't want.

Yet marketing is undeniably a key part of contemporary culture. It's a science that's fundamentally about human behaviour - marketers, to some extent, understand us better than we know ourselves - and in the most successful campaigns we find our deepest emotions and urges, from altruism to shame, hope to bravado, systematically tapped into and drawn upon.

But what are these primal behaviours that the best campaigns evoke in us - and how do they harness them? Is marketing purely about commercial gain or can it underpin real common good and societal progress? And does the discipline manipulate our subconscious instincts and emotions - or simply hold a mirror to them?

Over ten episodes, senior advertising creative and Spectator writer Rory Sutherland unravels the story of some of the most powerful, brilliant and influential campaigns of our age. Set alongside personal testimonies from the brilliant minds that created them, we'll hear from a host of experts - from biologists to philosophers, novelists to economists - about how these campaigns got under our skin and proved to be so influential.

Contributors include: writer and former copywriter Fay Weldon; social behaviourist and expert on altruism Nicola Raihani; Alexander Nix, CEO of big data analysts Cambridge Analytica; philosopher Andy Martin; writer on Islamic issues and advisor to the world's first Islamic branding consultancy, Shelina Janmohamed; and evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b096gjzf)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b096jkgk)
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 3/4, Episode 10

Sue Townsend's hilarious and heart breaking chronicle of a teenager growing up in the Midlands in the 1980s. A brand new serialisation, read by Harry McEntire, in the year that Adrian Mole himself turns 50.

It's 1981 and Margaret Thatcher is in power, Britain is at war in the Falklands and teenagers are growing up in a world without mobile phones or computer games. While his parents are downstairs, drinking, smoking and arguing about their failing marriage, Adrian is upstairs in his bedroom listening to Abba, reading great works of literature, writing poems, and penning letters to the BBC.

Despite the many challenges that life throws at him - including regular beatings from the school bully, unrequited love, raging hormones, a severe case of acne and numerous rejection letters - Adrian soldiers on bravely and wins a place in our hearts with his charming naïveté.

Reader: Harry McEntire
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b096hcz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:25 World War One: The Cultural Front (b09293yn)
Series 4, An Intimate War

By 1917 soldiers had been fighting what seemed like a never ending war. They yearned for entertainment, an escape from the horror surrounding them.

In the final episode of this year's series on the Great War, Francine Stock finds out about popular cross-dressing theatre troupes who by 1917 were taking the Front Line by storm.

Female impersonators with names like the Sensual Salome and Bodo Wild would perform in front of huge crowds of admiring soldiers, who would send them love letters, perfume and stockings.

Although there was a widespread expectation that war would cause society to return to Victorian ideals about the roles of men and women, instead it started challenged traditional norms.

There was tension between the model of the war hero - as depicted in popular literature - and the private experience of the combatants who read these books and poems. Novels spoke of war as a "rattling good adventure yarn", but the real life battlefield told a different story.

Producer: Caitlin Smith.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b096yvyz)
Ivaline and Joy - I Haven't Wasted Much Time

A mother who arrived from Jamaica in the 1950s compares her experience with her daughter who was born in the UK. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b096h4d0)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b096h4d0)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b096hcls)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b096hcls)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b096j14s)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b096j14s)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b096j5df)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b096j5df)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b096jf3p)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b096jf3p)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 MON (b096h4d4)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 TUE (b096hclz)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 WED (b096j4lr)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 THU (b096j5dk)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 FRI (b096jkfr)

A Choral History of Britain 09:00 WED (b096j14n)

A Choral History of Britain 21:30 WED (b096j14n)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b096hcz4)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b096hcz4)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b095tpqp)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b096jkgd)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b096h77f)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b095pv0w)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b095tpqm)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b096jkgb)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b096gjwg)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b096gjwg)

Before They Were Famous 23:15 WED (b05zl1bq)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b096gnqn)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b096gnqn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b096h79w)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b096hczg)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b096j4m4)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b096jb2c)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b096jkgk)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b096nbjf)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b096h1r1)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b096h1r1)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b096hclq)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b096hclq)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b096j14q)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b096j14q)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b096j56l)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b096j56l)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b096jf3m)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b096gqnw)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b096gqnw)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b096gjf3)

Charlotte and Lillian 23:00 WED (b096j4m6)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b096hcz0)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b096hcz0)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b095qs4d)

David Baddiel Tries to Understand 20:45 WED (b096j4m2)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b096gnqx)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b096gnqx)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b096fsmx)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b08vxjtw)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b096gqnt)

Drama 14:15 MON (b096h4t5)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b05r3z3z)

Drama 14:15 WED (b096j4lt)

Drama 14:15 THU (b05vhkbn)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b096jkft)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b095pv0f)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b096gjj9)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b096gjm4)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b096gjqp)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b096gjvw)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b096gjys)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b096jkg2)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b095rs05)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b096hczb)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b096gnqz)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b096gnqz)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b095pv0m)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b096gjw4)

From Rags to Riches 23:30 MON (b08nrsln)

From Rags to Riches 23:30 TUE (b08pfqqb)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b096gjk0)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b096gjms)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b096gjrg)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b096gjwn)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b096gjzc)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b095tn1x)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b096jkfw)

Hardeep's Sunday Lunch 13:30 SUN (b096gnr1)

Hull 2017: Contains Strong Language 20:00 SAT (b096fv0b)

Hull 2017: Contains Strong Language 11:30 THU (b096j5dh)

Hull 2017: The Spirit of Hessle Road 15:30 SAT (b095tcx2)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b095tjw6)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b096gjw0)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b096gjw0)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b096gjmv)

In the Criminologist's Chair 11:00 MON (b08wrbyf)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b096hczd)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b096hczd)

It's Just a Joke, Comrade: 100 Years of Russian Satire 11:30 TUE (b096hclx)

John Shuttleworth's Lounge Music 18:30 WED (b0848sqq)

Journey of a Lifetime 20:00 MON (b096h77c)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b095qsgr)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b095tn24)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b096jkg0)

Liam Williams: Ladhood 23:00 THU (b096jb2f)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b095pv18)

Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious 21:00 FRI (b096jkgg)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b095ptzv)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b096gjd8)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b096gjhn)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b096gjlt)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b096gjq9)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b096gjvk)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b096gjyg)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b096dht0)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b096dht0)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b096gjr6)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b095tn27)

Mrs Sidhu Investigates: Murder With Masala 11:30 WED (b096j4lp)

My Muse 16:00 MON (b096h773)

My Teenage Diary 18:30 THU (b096jb23)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b095rbt9)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b096hclv)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b095pv03)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b096gjdj)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b096gjj7)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b096gjm2)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b096gjqm)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b096gjvt)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b096gjyq)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b096gjdl)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b095pv0p)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b096gjf7)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b096gjjm)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b096gjmc)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b096gjqy)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b096gjw6)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b096gjyz)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b095pv0c)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b096gjdv)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b096gjf1)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b095pv1d)

News 13:00 SAT (b095pv0t)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b096hcln)

Out of School, Out of Sight 11:00 WED (b096j1b9)

Owning Colour 09:30 WED (b08ljxb3)

PM 17:00 SAT (b095pv10)

PM 17:00 MON (b096gjjw)

PM 17:00 TUE (b096gjmn)

PM 17:00 WED (b096gjrb)

PM 17:00 THU (b096gjwj)

PM 17:00 FRI (b096gjz7)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b096gjfm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b095tsv2)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b097lmdm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b097zvnb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b097rmmm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b097rrdz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b098sfy0)

Prime Ministers' Props 13:45 MON (b07mxt94)

Prime Ministers' Props 13:45 TUE (b07nrlqn)

Prime Ministers' Props 13:45 WED (b07pgwg1)

Prime Ministers' Props 13:45 THU (b07qbcb0)

Prime Ministers' Props 13:45 FRI (b07syyrk)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b096dhwl)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b096dhwl)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b096dhwl)

Quote... Unquote 15:00 MON (b096h597)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b096gnqs)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b096gnqs)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b096gnqs)

Radiolab 23:00 SUN (b095vh40)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b095tjvw)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b096jb1z)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b095pv0k)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b095pv1b)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b095ptzz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b096gjdd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b096gjj3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b096gjly)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b096gjqh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b096gjvp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b096gjyl)

Selling Barbara 11:00 FRI (b096jf3r)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b095ptzx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b095pv01)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b095pv12)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b096gjdb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b096gjdg)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b096gjff)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b096gjhy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b096gjj5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b096gjlw)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b096gjm0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b096gjqf)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b096gjqk)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b096gjvm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b096gjvr)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b096gjyj)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b096gjyn)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (b095tn20)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (b096jkfy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b095pv16)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b096gjfk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b096gjjy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b096gjmq)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b096gjrd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b096gjwl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b096gjz9)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b096gjdn)

Spotlight Tonight with Nish Kumar 23:00 TUE (b096hczj)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b096gjjh)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b096gjjh)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b096gnqv)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b096gjdx)

The Allotment 11:30 MON (b08h08rd)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b096gjf5)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b096gspv)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b096gspv)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b096h779)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b096h779)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b096hcz8)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b096hcz8)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b096j4ly)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b096j4ly)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b096jb25)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b096jb25)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b096jkg8)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b096jb29)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b096jb27)

The Casebook of Max and Ivan 19:15 SUN (b096gspx)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b096h775)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b096jb21)

The First Jazz Poet 16:30 SUN (b096gqw5)

The Forum 11:00 SAT (b096ygs5)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b096dhng)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b096dhng)

The Landscapes of Don McCullin 23:30 SAT (b092m9j6)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b096hcck)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b096hcck)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b096gpfc)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b096j14v)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b096jkg4)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b096yvyz)

The Living World 06:35 SUN (b096gnqq)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b096gjr8)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b095tpqh)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b096jkg6)

The Reservoir Tapes 19:45 SUN (b096gspz)

The Rivals 11:30 FRI (b04xrj8n)

The Tim Vine Chat Show 18:30 TUE (b096hcz6)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b096h777)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b096gjfc)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b096gjk2)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b096gjmz)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b096gjrj)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b096gjwq)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b096gjzf)

Thinking Allowed 00:17 MON (b095t4pb)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b096j4lw)

Today 07:00 SAT (b096dhg8)

Today 06:00 MON (b096gjjf)

Today 06:00 TUE (b096gjm6)

Today 06:00 WED (b096gjqr)

Today 06:00 THU (b096gjvy)

Today 06:00 FRI (b096gjyv)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b095qmbn)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b096h1qz)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b096hcch)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b096j14l)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b096j56j)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b096jf3k)

Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b095t4pg)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b096j4m0)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b095pv0h)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b095pv0r)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b095pv14)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b096gjds)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b096gjdz)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b096gjf9)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b096gjfh)

Weather 05:56 MON (b096gjjc)

Weather 12:57 MON (b096gjjr)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b096gjmj)

Weather 12:57 WED (b096gjr2)

Weather 12:57 THU (b096gjwb)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b096gjz3)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b096gjfp)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b095pv0y)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b096gjjk)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b096gjm8)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b096gjqt)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b096gjw2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b096gjyx)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b095rrzx)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b096hcz2)

World War One: The Cultural Front 23:30 WED (b090v3bj)

World War One: The Cultural Front 23:30 THU (b091rxt2)

World War One: The Cultural Front 23:25 FRI (b09293yn)

World at One 13:00 MON (b096gjjt)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b096gjml)

World at One 13:00 WED (b096gjr4)

World at One 13:00 THU (b096gjwd)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b096gjz5)

You and Yours 12:13 MON (b096gjjp)

You and Yours 12:13 TUE (b096gjmf)

You and Yours 12:13 WED (b096gjr0)

You and Yours 12:13 THU (b096gjw8)

You and Yours 12:13 FRI (b096gjz1)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b095tsv5)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b095tsv5)