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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 16 SEPTEMBER 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b09310h6)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b095bdhw)
South and West, Episode 5

California Notes: Now in the West, Joan Didion is asked to write about Patty Hearst, but diverts to musing on her own sense of belonging in Hearst country, developed since childhood.

From the best-selling author of the award-winning The Year of Magical Thinking - excerpts from her never-before-seen notebooks.

Joan Didion has always kept notebooks of overheard dialogue, observations, interviews, drafts of essays and articles - and here is one that traces a road trip she took in June 1970, through Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama.

And in her native west, the memoir piece California Notes that began as an assignment from Rolling Stone on the Patty Hearst trial of 1976.

Read by Laurel Lefkow
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b09310hc)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b09310hh)

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b09310hm)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b09310hp)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b093hfpf)

A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b093hfph)
Living in Japan under North Korea's missiles

It's 6.02 and the text message on a listener's phone reads North Korea has launched a missile - take cover. iPM is the news programme that starts with its listeners. Email ipm@bbc.co.uk. Twitter: @BBCiPM. Presented by Luke Jones and Eddie Mair.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b09310hv)

The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b0939xjz)
Series 37, Listeners' Walks: Cornwall

Clare Balding takes the Cornish coastal path from Constantine Bay to Harlyn, in the company of two women for whom walking has been the cement in their friendship. Sarah Rossiter and Rebecca Newsom met at university and although their lives have taken them in very different directions; Sarah works for an investment bank , Rebecca for Greenpeace, they try to ensure they get together every few months to do some challenging hiking while putting the world to rights. In this series Clare will be walking with listeners who have recommended people or places the programme should feature. Sarah wrote to Ramblings wishing to share their enthusiasm for walking and walking together.
The route they take can be found on OS Explorer 106 Newquay and Padstow.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b09310hx)
Slaughter

Charlotte Smith visits an abattoir in Oxfordshire to follow the process of livestock slaughter and explore issues around animal welfare, Halal slaughtering and the what might the implications be of a Government decision to make CCTV mandatory in all abattoirs.

Abattoir owner Iain Mutch walks Charlotte through the process - arrival, stun, slaughter, and finally to butchery - and asks whether people should know more about how their meat is produced. Technical Manager Gary Fowkes explains the intricacies of the process and the importance of keeping the livestock calm at the point when they're killed.

Producer: Toby Field.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b09310j2)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b095pkp6)

News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b09310j7)
David Essex

As he prepares to join the forthcoming Living Legends tour, David Essex tells us about his route from blue-eyed East End boy to star of stage, screen and soap via a barrage of screaming fans. The Living Legends tour begins in October.

Comedian Katherine Ryan joins the Saturday Live panel show ahead of her stand-up tour. She'll tell us how she's found her move from Canada to the UK has been good for her career and... her skin. Katherine's tour runs from September to March.

For Barney Shaw it's all about the attraction of olfaction. The former civil servant sniffs out the biology, psychology and history of our sense of smell. The Smell of Fresh Rain by Barney Shaw is published by Icon.

Following a horse riding accident Claire Lomas became paraplegic. She has since become a campaigner, fundraiser and completed the 2012 London Marathon in 17 days using a robotic suit.

Dianne Buswell is the Rev's partner for Strictly. She'll tell us about the challenges that lie ahead.

Plus, the Inheritance Tracks of guitar hero Wilko Johnson. He chooses Cathy's Clown by the Everly Brothers and Highway 61 Revisited by Bob Dylan.


SAT 10:30 Punt PI (b093hv5r)
Series 10, Missing Priest

One afternoon in July 1953 Father Henryk Borynski, a Polish priest living in Bradford, took a telephone call. His housekeeper heard him say "OK, I'll go". He put on his hat, and his coat and left. He was never seen again.

Many Poles fled to the United Kingdom during World War II and settled in Bradford. With the onset of the Cold War they became exiles, unable to return to Poland. In his sermons, Father Borynski was an outspoken critic of the Soviet system and many believed he could have been a victim of communist agents operating in England.

Steve Punt investigates, following leads and opening Secret Service files, to find out what might have happened to Father Borynski.

Producer Neil McCarthy.


SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b093hv5t)

Sam Coates of The Times looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
Accusations the government is manipulating parliamentary procedure, managing expectations in the Brexit negotiations, and the pressures on Phillip Hammond as he announces the date of the budget.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b09310j9)

A tour of Angela Merkel's childhood, swapping books with Kurdish fighters and reading the landscape of Gabon with the Baka Pygmies. Kate Adie introduces correspondents' stories.

Jenny Hill visits the town where Angela Merkel grew up as she tries to learn more about the notoriously private politician.

Richard Hall's repeated trips to the Quandil mountains of Iraq allow him to assess the evolution of the PKK. But is a copy of Hemingway's 'For Whom The Bell Tolls' an appropriate gift for a battled hardened Kurdish commander fighting IS?

Nick Thorpe meets the migrants trying to cross the Hungary-Serbia border and Richard Banerji visits the Indian city where locals claim the biryani was invented.

And Andy Jones learns how the Baka of Gabon are turning their mastery of the country's tropical forests against the poachers that prowl the region.

Producer: Joe Kent.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b09310jc)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b093hv5w)
Convictions, insurance and the law

Thousands of Barclay's customers are experiencing problems with an 'upgrade' to their DIY investment platform. What's gone wrong?

Major insurers are breaking the law by taking into account old criminal records, disadvantaging millions of people with spent convictions, according to research conducted by the offender charity Unlock.

Last week we investigated the poor resale values of homes in new retirement complexes. This week we hear from a listener where this is affecting her ability to pay for care.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Reporter: Tony Bonsignore
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Andrew Smith.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b093hf8z)
Series 94, 15/09/2017

Andy Hamilton, Desiree Burch, Hugo Rifkind and Kerry Godliman join host Miles Jupp to hash out the week's news which includes a double defeat for Theresa May, Hilary Clinton's new book and a drunk Welshman on a stag do setting a world record.

Written by James Kettle, Madeleine Brettingham, Nick Doody with additional material from Robin Morgan and Jenny Laville.
Producer was Joe Nunnery
A BBC Studios Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b09310jj)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b09310jl)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b093hf93)
Simon Boyd, Sir Vince Cable, Caroline Flint MP, Sir Patrick McLoughlin

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Thomas Hardye School in Dorchester with a panel including the Managing Director of Dorset based REIDsteel Simon Boyd, the Leader of the Liberal Democrats Sir Vince Cable, the Labour MP Caroline Flint and the Chairman of the Conservative Party Sir Patrick McLoughlin.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b09310jn)

Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Drama (b071h2x6)
Trial by Laughter

Trial by Laughter by Ian Hislop and Nick Newman.
William Hone is the forgotten hero of free speech in Britain. He was a bookseller, publisher and satirist. In 1817, he stood trial for 'impious blasphemy and seditious libel'. His crime was to be funny. Worse than that he was funny by parodying religious texts. And worst of all, he was funny about the despotic government and the libidinous monarchy. A comedy drama based on the real trial transcripts.

Original music by Conrad Nelson
Director/Producer Gary Brown

Ian Hislop is the editor of Private Eye and a team captain on 'Have I got News for You'. Nick Newman is a satirical cartoonist for The Sunday Times and Private Eye. They have known each other since their schooldays and have written many successful TV programmes together including 'My Dad's the Prime Minister' and 'The Wipers Times'.


SAT 15:30 Tick Box Art (b0938p7s)

Is it possible, or desirable, to measure the quality of an artwork?

In a world of shrinking resources, the question of how we decide which art should receive finance is ever more pressing. Rosemary Laryea asks if, when putting money into good quality art is the goal, it's possible to set criteria to judge what makes "good art".

Rosemary talks to members of the public looking at - and arguing about - artwork, and discusses questions of artistic taste and judgement. She also hears from the jazz musician and rap artist Soweto Kinch, playwright Simon Stephens and filmmaker Destiny Ekaragha. Tiffany Jenkins makes the case for critics and Barry Smith, a philosopher of the senses, and the art critic Lynda Neade explore the idea of taste, subjective pleasure and expertise.

Arts Council England has trialled a method of measuring quality in the art it funds, called Quality Metrics. Audiences, artists and arts organisations are invited to assess artworks - exhibitions, dance pieces, digital art, poetry, theatre, music events and more - across a range of criteria, and become part of a conversation about what constitutes quality. Rosemary wonders whether this might be a way of finally answering the question of how we know something is good, while Dr Sarah Garfinkel shows that it might be our hearts, or rather our heartbeats, that hold the clue to understanding and mapping our aesthetic response.

Producer: Natalie Steed
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b09310jt)
East Dunbartonshire - The Best Place to be a Woman

We'll be discussing the best place in Britain to be a woman, hearing what's important to you about where you live and from five young women in East Dunbartonshire who tell us why they think their area came top of the research.

We'll also hear from Nancy Kelly the director of Policy Research at the National Centre for Social Research who crunched the numbers on our behalf and from Professor Susan Harkness, a social scientist, on the winners and losers of the list. And Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, Spice girl Geri Horner and comedian Shazia Mirza tell us how their hometown has shaped them.

We have music from the classical pianist Beatrice Rana.

And as parents get ready to pack their children off to university this weekend we hear from mother and daughter Nikki and Emily Woolf on the emotional impact of this milestone and from Lucy Tobin author of A Guide to Uni Life.

We hear from journalist and author Chris Hemmings on what it means to 'Be A Man'. The former 'lad' explores how masculine determination to be dominant not only impacts on the women and girls but also on the men and boys too.

Kate Millett whose 1970 book Sexual Politics became a keystone of second wave feminism has died at the age of 82. We discuss her legacy with crime writer Val McDermid, Ettie Bailey-King of The School's Consent Project and historian Mary Beard.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow
Picture Credit: East Dunbartonshire Council.


SAT 17:00 PM (b09310jw)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b093hfph)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b09310jy)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b09310k3)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b09310k5)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b09310k7)
PP Arnold, Michael Frayn, Camille O' Sullivan, Adam Kay, Amadou & Mariam, Micah P Hinson, Phil Gayle, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Phil Gayle are joined by P.P. Arnold, Camille O' Sullivan, Michael Frayn and Adam Kay for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Amadou & Mariam and Micah P Hinson.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b093hvb7)
Jake Wood

Edward Stourton looks at Jake Wood, founder of Team Rubicon, the international disaster relief group staffed by veterans as it works in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma. He finds out what motivates the former marine and talks to General David Petraeus and General Sir Nick Parker, former UN worker Ben Parker and friends, family and colleagues.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b09310k9)
Mother, Smile, Kathe Kollwitz, Prism, Title sequences

Writer / director Darren Aronofsky's Mother! is a horror film starring Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem. A young woman is single handedly restoring her husband's country home which has been destroyed by fire, when their seemingly tranquil life is disrupted by the arrival of a mysterious couple played by Michelle Pfeiffer and Ed Harris.

Booker prize winning Irish writer Roddy Doyle frequently returns in his novels to a childhood in the 1960s and 1970s on a housing estate in north Dublin. His new novel Smile returns to the trauma of school days when 54-year-old Victor Forde, separated from his television presenter wife, is confronted by memories of his experiences at the Christian Brothers school he attended as a child.

Kathe Kollwitz was one of the leading artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, notable for the emotional power of her drawing, printmaking and later sculpture. Portrait of the Artist: Kathe Kollwitz at Birmingham's Ikon Gallery includes around forty works from the British Museum's remarkable print collection. Known for painting, printmaking and sculpture, her most famous art cycles, including The Weavers and The Peasant War, depict the effects of poverty, hunger, and war on the working class.

Hampstead Theatre presents the world premiere of Terry Johnson's new play Prism, based on the extraordinary life of double Oscar-winning cinematic master Jack Cardiff. Cardiff is played by Olivier award winning actor Robert Lindsay and Prism also stars Claire Skinner.

And a look the art of the opening title sequences with reference to a number of recent dramas as well as classic favourites. How much has the aesthetic of the opening title sequence changed and what is the future for the form?

Image: Left to right: Javier Bardem and Jennifer Lawrence in mother!. Credit: Paramount Pictures.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b095fvqy)
As the Statues Fall

From Saddam Hussein in Iraq, Cecil Rhodes at Oriel College or Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville - public statuary is a lightning conductor for popular protest and unrest. But why are these figures of the past - often erected in another era with different moral expectations - so often in the front line of political conflict today? Lawrence Pollard and guests gather in the sound archives to listen to the symbolic moments that statues fall and explore the difference between iconoclasm by the powerful and powerless and what these events tell us about history, identity and nature of collective memory. With Dr Madge Dresser, Dr Rahul Rao, Afua Hirsch and Tiffany Jenkins.

Producer: Viv Jones.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b08tbvv6)
Reading Europe - Italy: Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, Episode 1

The third book in Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan novels, charting the lifelong relationship between two girls, Lila Cerullo and Elena Greco, who grew up together in the slums of post-War Naples.

Elena, having escaped to Milan after the publication of her first book, struggles to find the courage to live, parent and write again after her marriage to her increasingly dismissive husband Pietro.

Lila, meanwhile, also struggles to rise above her social conditions and desperately tries to find a way to better herself in whatever way she can. By day she suffers the daily abuse and exploitation at work in the local sausage factory and by night she works hard with her partner, Enzo, to make a difference with her life by studying hard the ever-changing face of technology.

Struggling with periods of mental darkness, she also wrestles with being a parent and finding the time to be true to herself. Eventually she is encouraged by a group of old friends and young students to admit her anger at the social adversity and abuses suffered by the women at work in the factory and to stand up and shout about it.

As always, amid the troubles, the two women turn to each other, gaining either strength or weakness from the other, not always to happy effect.

Dramatised for radio by Timberlake Wertenbaker
Directed by Celia de Wolff

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b09310kk)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b0939hpt)
Housing Law

A judge led inquiry has been set up to establish the facts of the devastating Grenfell Tower fire. The tragedy has shone a spotlight on issues of housing safety. Clive Anderson and guests discuss topical housing law issues. Does the law sufficiently protect the tenure, safety and other legal rights of tenants in both the private and public sectors?

There is consensus in the legal community that housing law is under-resourced, unnecessarily complex and, in many ways, outdated. But what rights should tenants have?

Barrister Liz Davies says a lack of legal aid is preventing tenants from bringing unsafe and unsatisfactory housing to court. Current legislation means a legal claim only arises where the rented property is in "disrepair". A tenant has legal recourse if their boiler is broken, but none if the heating is functioning but inadequate.

The programme discusses concerns that current protections are unevenly applied. Private landlords can be inspected and works required by environmental health officer. But these officers cannot compel their own local authorities to act.

In 2012, the Welsh Assembly announced it would bring into legislation Law Commission recommendations that will dramatically simplify the rental market. Solicitor David Smith, who was involved in drafting the legislation, says the hugely complicated process will take another couple of years. Should England follow suit?

Part-time judge Caroline Hunter is supportive of a greater role for specialist tribunals to increase efficiency and access to justice. Barrister Matt Hutchings QC argues for additional social housing saying that, without more homes, additional laws will only add further complexity.

Producer: Matt Willis
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b0938k8x)
Series 31, Semi-Final 2, 2017

(11/13)
Which jazz drummer was a child prodigy in the 1920s, reputedly earning more than any child performer apart from the film actor Jackie Coogan? And in which film did Marni Nixon, whose singing voice had doubled for many a famous film star down the years, finally first appear on screen?
Paul Gambaccini has the answers to these and many other questions in the second semi-final of Counterpoint - but will the competitors know? Another of the places in the 2017 Final awaits the winner of today's contest. To get that far, as always, they'll have to put in a creditable performance on a musical 'specialist subject' which they've had no chance to prepare.
Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 Ian Sansom Is Falling (b0931gt1)

Sherlock Holmes is falling.

James Stewart is falling.

Alice. Dorothy. Martha Graham.

King Kong. Thelma and Louise.

Gandalf. Dumbledore.

Mufasa in The Lion King.

Luke Skywalker is falling.

From the fall of Icarus, who fell when he ignored his father's warnings and flew too high on his wings of wax and feathers; to Phaethon, who fell when he was struck by Jupiter's thunderbolt - Ian Sansom investigates the true meaning of falling in art, literature, dance and music.

With the backdrop of an eerie descent into falling dreams - created from electronic sound and recorded testimonies by BBC Radiophonic Workshop pioneer, Delia Derbyshire - Ian meets dream expert Ian Wallace, who reveals what falling dreams could mean and why they are among the most common we experience. He speaks to US artist Kerry Skarbakka, whose performance based photographs capture our existential anxieties through the act of falling. And he asks psychologist Roger Bailey why the fear of falling is so hard-wired into the human psyche.

The sound of the rushing air, the inevitability of descent...it goes on and on.

Producer: Steven Rainey.



SUNDAY 17 SEPTEMBER 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b093hw24)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Short Works (b093hdl0)
Series 1, The Unknown

An original short story commissioned by Radio 4. As read by the acclaimed Irish actress Ruth McCabe (Philomena, Catastrophe.)

Dermot Bolger is one of Ireland's most prolific writers. His radio plays for BBC Radio 4 include 'The Night Manager' and 'The Fortunestown Kid'. The audio version of his novel 'The Woman's Daughter' has been broadcast in seven countries and won the Worldplay Award for best script.

Reader ..... Ruth McCabe
Writer ..... Dermot Bolger
Producer ..... Michael Shannon.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b093hw26)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b093hw28)

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b093hw2b)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b093hw2d)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b094rkpy)
St Dunstan, Stepney

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from the church of St Dunstan, Stepney in Greater London. St Dunstan's tower contains a ring of ten bells. Three were recast by the Whitechapel Foundry in 1952 and the remaining seven bells were cast by Thomas Mears in 1806. The Tenor weighs twenty eight and three quarter hundred weight and is tuned to D flat.

The bells are famous for being part of the "Oranges and Lemons" Nursery Rhyme which ends with:- "Pray, when will that be says the bells of Stepney".

We hear now the eight largest bells ringing Grandsire Triples.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b093hvb7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b093hw2g)

The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b093hw2j)
Man's Best Friend

When looking back over his career as a poet, Michael Symmons Roberts realised that dogs were a recurring theme in his work. While he's unsure why man's best friend seems to crop up in his poetry so frequently, Michael knows he's not alone in finding dogs fascinating.

Dogs have featured in Egyptian sacred iconography, Old Testament and New Testament texts, and had lead or walk-on parts in countless poems, novels, films, paintings and songs ever since. Michael looks at why the figure of a dog, or dogs, goes back so far in our cultural history, and why we still can't let it go.

The programme features the poetry of A E Stallings, Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Alicia Ostriker, as well as Robert's own Self-Portrait with Dog. Musical selections include Gershwin's Walking the Dog and James MacMillan's Sun Dogs, as well as Kate Bush and Seasick Steve.

Presenter: Michael Symmons Roberts
Producer: Michael Wakelin
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b094s0jj)
Future Food: The Seed Co-operative

Dan Saladino heads to Lincolnshire, to a community-owned company that is thinking big about seeds and our food future.

This is the last in a special series of three programmes, profiling the finalists in the 'Future Food' category in the 2017 BBC Food and Farming Awards.

Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b093hw2l)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b093hw2n)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b093hw2q)
Religious education; Ahmad Nawaz; Sikhs on the census

New research suggests that a quarter of England's secondary schools are not offering Religious Education, despite the fact that it is a legal obligation to do so. Alex Strangways-Booth reports.

This week, Israel's Supreme Court decided that ultra-Orthodox Jews are no longer exempt from military service. Edward explores the importance of this decision.

Bob Walker has been to meet monks from the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery in Tibet. They are currently touring the UK with performances of ancient Tibetan music.

It has been reported this week that 80% of 999 calls are not crime related. They are often from people with problems who simply have nowhere else to turn. For a number of years, Police Forces have been paying charities to run programmes to help these callers. Edward talks to Mike Royal, Church Engagement Team Leader at the Cinnamon Network, which runs projects funded by the Police.

Fergus Butler-Gallie, a Church of England ordinand, has put together a 'Glossary of commonly-misunderstood words from the Book of Common Prayer'. He'll be shedding light on the meaning of words from the 16th century that are still spoken in churches today.

Over 100 MPs have signed a letter to The National Statistics Authority calling for British Sikhs to be classified as an ethnic group on the next census form. Sikh MP Preet Gill is in favour but journalist Sunny Hundal, who writes on issues affecting the Sikh community, does not agree.

In 2014, the Taliban attacked a school in Peshawar, Pakistan, and killed 150 children and staff. Anwar Nawaz was 14 at the time and survived by 'playing dead'. He talks to Edward about that day and why he is encouraging British children make the most of their education.

Producers:
Helen Lee
Rajeev Gupta

Editor:
Amanda Hancox.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b094s0jl)
Practical Action

Simon Reeve makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Practical Action.

Registered Charity Number 247257
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Practical Action'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Practical Action'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b093hw2s)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b093hw2v)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b094s0jn)
Constance Coltman: Called to Serve

On 17th September 1917 Constance Coltman took a radical step; she was ordained as a Christian minister. She was one of the first women in Britain to serve as a minister in a mainstream Church and to mark the 100th anniversary of her ordination, the Revd Dr Kirsty Thorpe explores her life and her legacy. The preacher is the Revd Rose Hudson Wilkin who reflects on the nature of vocation, ministry and her own career.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b093hf95)
On authenticity

Authenticity, writes Monica Ali, has become the yardstick by which we measure the value of much of our day-to-day lives.

"In this hyper-mobile, hyper-connected world" she says, "the cult of authenticity is flourishing".

But what does it mean to be "authentic"?

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b09388dz)
Tara Robinson on the Common Tern

Theatre director Tara Robinson on the arctic tern and her grandfathers passion for birdwatching in today's Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Mark Ward
Picture: Dale Ayres.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b093hw2x)

Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b093hw2z)

Adam and Ian have a memorable encounter, and Jennifer hears more than she bargained for.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b094s2s6)
Paul Greengrass

Paul Greengrass has directed three Jason Bourne films, starring Matt Damon, Captain Phillips with Tom Hanks in the title role, and the 9/11 film United 93, which earned him an Academy Award nomination. He won a Bafta for the film The Murder of Stephen Lawrence, and he wrote and directed the acclaimed Bloody Sunday.

His father was a merchant seaman and his mother a teacher and he grew up in Gravesend in Kent. Expelled from his first secondary school, at his next he made his first film at the age of 16. After learning the craft of documentary-making on World In Action at Granada TV, he turned to making feature films.

In October 2017, Paul will receive the BFI fellowship, the British Film Institute's highest accolade.

Presenter: Kirsty Young
Producer: Cathy Drysdale

Photo: Amanda Benson.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b093hw31)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b0938k91)
Series 79, Episode 6

Nicholas Parsons challenges Paul Merton, Rufus Hound, Jenny Eclair and Zoe Lyons to speak on the topics on the cards without deviation, hesitation or repetition.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.

A BBC Studios Production.


SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b094s2sb)
Future Food

Seaweed, hydroponics and seeds. Dan Saladino meets the 'Future Food' finalists in the 2017 BBC Food and Farming Awards, and asks what their stories tell us about the future of what, and how, we all eat.

Presenter: Dan Saladino
Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b093hw33)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b093hw35)

Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 From Our Home Correspondent (b094s2sg)

Mishal Husain introduces the latest collection of dispatches from journalists and writers around the United Kingdom, reflecting the range of contemporary life across the country. This month we hear about one family's sobering experience of how patients with sepsis are treated, plus how coracle fishermen in West Wales are seeking to ensure a future for their fishery. Andy Kershaw recalls the night Jimi Hendrix came to play the West Yorkshire town of Ilkley. The programme will, as usual, also feature topical items.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b093hdky)
Tresco Abbey Garden: Correspondence Edition

Eric Robson hosts a correspondence edition of the programme from Tresco Abbey Garden on the Isles of Scilly. Pippa Greenwood, James Wong and Bob Flowerdew answer the questions from the postbag, along with Mike Nelhams, Curator of the gardens at Tresco Abbey.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b094s2sl)
Omnibus - Health Matters

Fi Glover introduces conversations about Air Ambulance rescue, the decision to donate a kidney to a stranger, and the pressures of work as a junior doctor in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Midnight's Children (b094s2sq)
Omnibus, The Shadow of the Mosque

A new dramatization of Salman Rushdie's ground-breaking novel of love, history and magic. Saleem is reunited with the other Midnight's Children in terrifying circumstances. Dramatised by Ayeesha Menon and starring Nikesh Patel, Aysha Kala and Nitin Ganatra.

Sound design by Peter Ringrose
Produced and directed by Emma Harding

All other parts were played by Ronny Jhutti, Abhin Galeya, Emilio Doorgasingh, Selva Rasalingam, Kerry Gooderson and Sheetal Kapoor.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b094s2sv)
Helen Sedgwick

Helen Sedgwick's new novel The Growing Season imagines a world in which babies develop not in the womb, but in a hi-tech pouch, meaning men and women can share the responsibilities of pregnancy. She talks to Mariella Frostrup about the questions of sexuality, family and biotechnology raised by her book.

Also on the programme, a report from a writers' pitching competition in York, the joy of imaginary gardens and the latest literary news from Australia.


SUN 16:30 Make It Real (b094hm67)

The poet Ross Sutherland takes a visceral look at the art of professional wrestling - from its violent theatre to its tendency to bleed through the fourth wall. Exploring the porous boundary between the reality of the ring and the world outside, searching for the edges of the story.

Ross speaks to wrestlers and writers, diving into the world of two of the UK's independent wrestling promotions - Progress Wrestling and Insane Championship Wrestling. We eavesdrop on a violent wedding, speak to a villain carved out of the Conservative Party and explore wrestling's complex relationship with pain and politics.

Image credit: Robbie Boyd (Warrior Fight Photography)

Produced by Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b0938tnj)
The Secrets of Smyllum Park

Over many generations the Catholic church provided shelter and care for vulnerable children whose families had been broken by death or poverty. But many of those who grew up in these orphanages claim the care they offered amounted to years of serious beatings and emotional abuse which scarred them for life.

File on 4 investigates one such former institution, Smyllum Park in Lanark, uncovering new evidence of alleged abuse and raising serious questions about child deaths at the orphanage, before it was closed in 1981.

In Scotland, the ongoing child abuse inquiry has vowed to get to the bottom of what happened at Smyllum Park and other children's homes but it has been beset with delays, resignations and claims of political interference.

File on 4 asks whether the inquiry is digging deep enough to uncover the truth about what happened at Smyllum Park and why it has taken more than 50 years for the truth to come out.

Producer: Ben Robinson
Reporter: Michael Buchanan.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b093hvb7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b093hw37)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b093hw39)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b093hw3c)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b093hw3f)
Liz Barclay

Liz Barclay chooses her BBC Radio highlights.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b094s2sz)

Ian wants to forge ahead, and who will win best in show?


SUN 19:15 Mr Muzak (b094hm69)
Series 1, We've Only Just Begun

Richie Webb stars as performance shy cocktail pianist Nigel Penny.

Nigel Penny's attempts to live his life in the background are thwarted by the surprise arrival of his entrepreneurial half-brother, Pav (Paul G Raymond). Pav hooks Nigel up with desperate wannabe singer Rachel (Jess Robinson) and strong-arms the pair onto the books of his fledgling entertainment agency.

With a gig at a Carpenters-themed wedding on the horizon, Nigel has to contend not only with his job at an Italian Restaurant run by a probably-not-an-actual-Italian, but also with Pav's mysterious new Ukrainian friend, Stan (Dave Lamb), and some disturbing news about his new musical partner.

Directed by Jim North and Matt Katz
Written and Produced by Richie Webb
A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Hiding Out (b094s2t5)
Series 1, Episode 14

As part of their final Media Degree assessment at NUC in Northern Ireland, three final year university students - Natalie Driver, JJ Collins and Vic Grant - decide to make a podcast about a cold case which happened in Colecastle fourteen years ago. On Saturday April 26th 2003, Toby Ellis was minding his four month old nephew, Derek Ellis. He nipped into his local newsagents and left the pram outside on the street. He claimed he left the child for no longer than two minutes. During this time, the baby was abducted and six days later the infant's body was discovered buried in a nearby wooded area, Mountfort. Cause of death, a blow to the head. No one was ever charged with the murder and the case has remained on-going.

The first episode of Hiding Out is a podcast hosted by one of the students, Natalie; she reveals she is currently in hiding fearing for her safety. Having published their first podcast on The Murder at Colecastle, her fellow student Vic had received a call from someone who had heard the podcast claiming they had new evidence about the day the child was abducted. Vic and JJ met with the source. That was 3 days ago and no one has seen or heard from either Vic or JJ since... The only contact Natalie has received is a text sent from her classmate JJ's phone which reads "We're watching you. Stop this now." Natalie knows their disappearance is clearly linked to digging into the murder of Derek Ellis. If she finds them, she may finally find the truth of what happened in Colecastle. Natalie's nightly podcasts of 'Hiding Out' are attracting more and more interest - #whereisnatalie and #findvicandjj are rife with speculation. Are these three students actually in danger? Or - as their media lecturer believes - is this all an elaborate media hoax?

Gerard Stembridge ..... Writer
Gemma McMullan ..... Series Producer & Director.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b093hf8v)
Are natural disasters on the rise?

Disasters
Are natural disasters on the rise? Following the devastating hurricanes to have battered the Caribbean and the United States, the floods in Asia and the mudslides in Sierra Leone, the UN Secretary General told a press conference that the number of disasters in the world has quadrupled since the 1980s - is he right?

Police Pay
Theresa May said at Prime Ministers Question's that pay for certain police officers who started in 2010 had risen by 32%. This statement outraged the Police Federation - Tim Harford puts this claim into context and discovers that that the Prime Minister picked this particular group of officers for a reason.

Zillions
We like a specific number on More or Less but the English language isn't always so exact. It turns out that people love words that give a sense of size, but are vague about an actual number, terms like zillion and umpteenth. Helen Zaltzman is the presenter of the podcast 'The Allusionist' that looks at the way we use language. Tim has been talking to her about what are called indefinite hyperbolic numbers.

A present for a Statistically significant other.
Last series, Dave called us for help. 'What should he buy his statistics-mad partner who also loved cross-stich?' Zillions of More or Less listeners got in touch to suggest ideas - so did he take their advice?


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b093hf8s)
Sir Peter Hall, Kate Millett, Sir Edward du Cann, JP Donleavy

Matthew Bannister on

Sir Peter Hall, the director who founded the Royal Shakespeare Company, ran the National Theatre and created many acclaimed theatrical and operatic productions.

Kate Millett, the radical feminist whose 1970 book Sexual Politics suggested that men's institutionalised power over women is a social construct, rather than innate or biological.

Sir Edward Du Cann, the Tory MP and businessman who chaired the 1922 backbench committee, fell out with Edward Heath, and went bankrupt in the 1990s.

J.P. Donleavy, the US-born Irish writer whose bawdy tale of Dublin Life - The Ginger Man - sold fifty million copies.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b093hv5w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b094s0jl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b093b1x0)
Crossing the Line

What red lines need to be crossed before companies retreat from foreign markets? As political turmoil engulfs Turkey, total economic collapse threatens in Venezuela and other global threats emerge, In Business explores the point at which businesses decide that enough is enough. Does it depend on the size of the investment and do companies in different sectors play by different rules? And what reputational risk might companies suffer if they get that calculation wrong? Presenter, Matthew Gwyther, talks to business people who have stayed and those who have left. Did they see the red line clearly or would they make a different call second time around?
Producer: Rosamund Jones.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b093hw3h)

Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b0939zyc)
The Work

Francine Stock talks to the makers of The Work, a documentary about a group therapy session between convicts in Folsom Prison that takes unexpected twists and turns.

The A to Z of film-makers continues as Mike Leigh takes on Jerry Lewis, championed by critics Anna Smith and Jonathan Romney.

Comedian Rosemary Fletcher takes on the ultimate romantic comedy cliché in her series Rosemary Versus The Rom-Com

Main Image: Folsom Prison Yard, from The Work. Credit: Joe Wigdahl.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b093hw2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 18 SEPTEMBER 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b093hw59)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:17 Thinking Allowed (b0939gm2)
Management Jargon

Management speech - Laurie Taylor explores the origins and purpose of 'Business Bullshit', a term coined by Andre Spicer, Professor of Organizational Behaviour at Cass Business School, City University of London and the author of a new book looking at corporate jargon. Why are our organisations flooded with empty talk, injuncting us to "go forward" to lands of "deliverables," stopping off on the "journey" to "drill down" into "best practice."? How did this speech spread across the working landscape and what are its harmful consequences? They're joined by Margaret Haffernan, an entrepreneur, writer and keynote speaker and by Jonathan Hopkin, Associate Professor of Comparative Politics at the LSE.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b094rkpy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b093hw5c)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b093hw5f)

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b093hw5h)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b093hw5k)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b094s3ks)

A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b093hw5m)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (b093hw5p)

The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03nt7vc)
David Rothenberg on the Brown Thrasher

In the first of five Tweets of the Day this week, professor of philosophy and music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology David Rothenberg discussed the brown thrasher.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. In this latest series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer: Tim Dee
Picture: Denise Laflamme.


MON 06:00 Today (b093hw5r)

News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b0952587)
Orhan Pamuk on competing myths

Andrew Marr talks to the Nobel Prize-winning author Orhan Pamuk about his latest novel, The Red-Haired Woman. Set in Istanbul in the 20th century, it's a family drama which weaves together competing foundation myths of patricide and filicide and pits tradition against modernity; east and west. There are more competing ideologies in Jon Sopel's 'Notes from Trump's America' which paints a picture of a country riven by divisions between black and white, rich and poor, the urban and the rural. Reality and fantasy play a part in the choreographer Shobana Jeyasingh's critique of the orientalist ballet La Bayadere. She looks back to the moment in the 19th century when genuine Indian dancers were rejected in favour of the idealised exotic version of the temple dancer in the Western imagination. 'What Shadows' is a play that tells the story of Enoch Powell's famous 'rivers of blood' speech from 1968, and its impact on the country decades later. The play's director Roxana Silbert says the play shows how prejudice can be found across the political spectrum.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b09526h6)
Following Pappano, Episode 1

All major opera houses rely on well established productions of repertoire classics. Puccini's La bohème is a permanent fixture in the list of the world's top five Operas as measured by performance numbers and John Copley's 1974 staging at Covent Garden was a familiar and much loved favourite. However the time has come to replace it with a new production and the challenge to do that with a fresh staging falls to the team of Music Director Sir Antonio Pappano and stage director Richard Jones.
In five programmes across the week Radio Four follows Maestro Pappano as the new production takes shape. We hear him working with singers, discussing the particular challenges of operating at the very highest level of Operatic performance and expectation and giving candid insights into the often perilous journey to an opening night.
We also hear from the team both on and off stage who work alongside Pappano, including the young cast who are acutely aware that the production they are replacing opened with singers like Placido Domingo and Sir Thomas Allen. There are also stage directors, set-builders, movement directors and Maestro Pappano's trusted repetiteur. But at the heart of it, in the weeks leading up to opening night and as the curtain rises, is the Music director himself, combining the orchestral brilliance of Puccini's score and the dazzling qualities of the singers on stage to produce what they all hope will be a worthy addition to the Royal Opera House's Puccini tradition. "He is" as one orchestra member says, "more of a storyteller than a conductor. Everything he tells us is about the drama and the dramatic purpose of what's happening on stage."

Producer: Tom Alban.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b093hw5t)
Leomie Anderson, Give Up Your Seat, Rae Earl

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b09528ch)
Just a Girl, Episode 1

The third series continuing the journey of Amy, just your average 13 year old transgender child in the modern world.

A very ordinary family has come to terms with the less ordinary experience of Amy, who was born Ben. In this third series, Amy chases her dream of musical theatre but there is trouble ahead when a petition is started about which school toilet she uses.

This accessible new drama was inspired by real life experiences.

Thanks to Susie Green and the parents at Mermaids, a charity offering support to gender variant children, teenagers and their families (www.mermaidsuk.org.uk), and the Tavistock Clinic.

Episode 1
Amy is full of excitement about her West Side Story audition, and grandad Ted is gearing up for salsa lessons. Then news of a petition about Amy breaks.

Writer...............................Mark Davies Markham
Piano playing by Sarah Spencer

Co-Producers..............................Polly Thomas and Eloise Whitmore
Production Coordinator...........Sarah Kenny
Executive Producer...............Melanie Harris

A Naked production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 11:00 No Place of Greater Safety (b09525dm)

Today's wars are fought without rules. In Syria, Afghanistan, Yemen, South Sudan and a dozen other places, the customary laws that govern conflicts - like the Geneva Conventions - have been torn up. Hospitals and other medical facilities have become the front line. Where can civilians go for aid when there are no longer safe places for doctors and nurses to practice medicine?

Michael Goldfarb looks at the relentless assaults on medical practitioners in recent years.

The numbers are devastating. In 2016 there was an assault on a medical facility almost every single day. More than 60 percent of Syria's medical infrastructure has been damaged or destroyed. For every soldier killed, ten civilians die.

Through the personal testimony of veteran medical workers who have been under fire, Michael tells the story of how destroying hospitals has become a tactic of war. He investigates why the Geneva Conventions have been ignored and whether it is time for new rules to govern modern warfare, whose primary target is civilians, not soldiers.

A Certain Height production for BBC Radio 4

Photo credit: (c)Medecins Sans Frontieres.


MON 11:30 Fags, Mags and Bags (b0952b1r)
Series 7, Begrudging a Crunchie

The hit series returns for a seventh series with more shop based shenanigans and over the counter philosophy, courtesy of Ramesh Mahju and his trusty sidekick Dave. Written by and starring Donald Mcleary and Sanjeev Kohli.

Set in a Scots-Asian corner shop, the award winning Fags, Mags & Bags sees a return of all the shop regular characters, and some guest appearances along the way, from the likes of Sean Biggerstaff, Mina Anwar, Greg McHugh and Simon Greenall.

In the final episode of the series, Malcolm surprises Ramesh by announcing she wants to become a Foster carer.

Join the staff of Fags, Mags and Bags in their tireless quest to bring nice-price custard creams and cans of coke with Arabic writing on them to an ungrateful nation. Ramesh Mahju has built it up over the course of over 30 years and is a firmly entrenched, friendly presence in the local area. He is joined by his shop sidekick, Dave.

Then of course there are Ramesh's sons Sanjay and Alok, both surly and not particularly keen on the old school approach to shopkeeping, but natural successors to the business. Ramesh is keen to pass all his worldly wisdom onto them - whether they like it or not!

Producer: Gus Beattie for Gusman Productions
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b093hw5w)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b08yg2gw)
18 September 1917 - Ralph Winwood

On this day in 1917, the new French Premier, Painleve, made his maiden speech in office, and at St Judes vicarage, Dorothea prepares for her first day back at the Bevan.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b093hw5y)
Home care, Hot puddings, Polish fashion

News and discussion of consumer affairs.


MON 12:57 Weather (b093hw60)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b093hw62)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


MON 13:45 Join the Dots (b0952b9y)
Series 1, The First Dot

Janet Ellis explores the etymology of the word 'dot'. it's all to do with pus and phlegm. A 40,000 year old dot that may help change our understanding of the behaviour of Neanderthal man and, move over colouring books, dot to dot is the new craze.

Janet tries, literally, to find the first dot.

The simple dot is one of the first marks ever made. Later, the dot helped make sense of the written word and, in the digital domain, its use helps everything work. Somehow, from being a word probably uttered infrequently, it is now absolutely part and parcel of our vocabulary.

Each programme in this series circles a different aspect of this simple mark.

From the morse code that could have saved the Titanic, to Harold Pinter's love of those three dots... the first Braille newspaper, royal polka-dot socks, to the conceptual art of a young Aboriginal artist - just some of the dots you'll encounter when you join the dots.

A former Blue Peter presenter, Janet Ellis has presented several features for BBC Radio 4, appears regularly on Broadcasting House reviewing the papers, and on Channel 5's The Write Stuff. Her first novel, The Butcher's Hook, was published in 2016 and longlisted for the prestigious Desmond Elliott Prize. She has been a judge for the Costa New Novel Prize and was awarded an MBE for services to charity and theatre in 2016.

Contributors to this first programme include Dr Tania Styles of the Oxford English Dictionary, and Professor Paul Pettitt from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Durham.

Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Dora production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b094s2sz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b0952dzn)
Rumpole, Rumpole and The Way Through the Woods

Rumpole's surprised when he discovers he's a dog lover at heart - and perplexed as he defends a man who insists he's guilty of murder.

What's more, it's clear to Rumpole that the guilty party is among the hunting fraternity and not among the hunt saboteurs who, in 1966, are making their presence felt and their beliefs known on the hunting fields of Britain.

Adapted for radio by Richard Stoneman
Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b0952dzq)
Series 31, Semi-Final 3, 2017

(12/13)
Benjamin Britten's 'War Requiem' was commissioned for the opening of the rebuilt Coventry Cathedral in the 1960s - but do you know which composer's choral work 'The Beatitudes' was also first unveiled on that occasion? And if that's not the kind of 60s music you're steeped in, try this: which California band had Grace Slick as its singer?

There's just one place left in the 2017 Final of Counterpoint. The three heat winners who return to face Paul Gambaccini's questions today will have to prove that their knowledge is wide-ranging enough to get them over the final hurdle in the race for the trophy. And they'll have to identify music from much longer ago than the 1960s, and from much more recently too, if they're to stand a chance.

As always, there'll be plenty of musical treats, some of which will be familiar, and others that might whet your appetite for something new.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (b0952dzs)
BBC National Short Story Award 2017, The Collector by Benjamin Markovits

Kyle Soller reads the first entry in contention for the twelfth BBC National Short Story Award. Set in the US where a man is struggling to come to terms with recent events which are clouded in mystery.

Now in its twelfth year, the five shortlisted stories in contention for the BBC National Short Story Award 2017 reflect an energy and excitement about short fiction from a generation of the UK's most dynamic, contemporary writers. This year all the shortlisted writers are already novelists of stature, indeed three of them were included in the most recent Granta 20 under 40 Best of Young British Novelists; now they have also embraced the freedom of the short story. Prepared to take risks and play with the form, each illustrates the story's potential to create bold, powerful, humane and tender narratives and prove how current the short story is in the UK just now.

The shortlist will be announced live on Radio 4's Front Row at 7.15 on Friday, 15th September and the shortlisted stories will be broadcast from Monday, 18th September until Friday, 22nd September at 3.30pm by a cast of some of Britain's most exciting acting talent including Kyle Soller, Joanna Vanderham, Jamie Parker and Tamara Lawrance. The authors themselves will appear on Front Row throughout the week. The winning story will be revealed at the award ceremony on 3rd October which will be broadcast live from the Radio Theatre at BBC Broadcasting House at 7.15.

Abridged by Rowan Routh
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.


MON 16:00 My Muse (b0952jk9)
Series 2, Lynne Truss on Joni Mitchell

Not everyone appreciates the tonalities, lyrics or even the shrieky voice of Canadian artist and musician Joni Mitchell but in a dusty class room in 1971 Lynne Truss decided she loved the writer of Woodstock, Big Yellow Taxi and Both Sides Now. It was a bond forged in the face of the frosty indifference of fellow pupils in Miss Cheverton's music class at the Tiffin Girls School in Kingston Upon Thames.

Even Lynne is slightly mystified when she was asked who was her muse that, as a person mostly famous for writing a book on punctuation, she replied; Joni Mitchell. Lynne explores why a series of albums from Ladies of the Canyon to Heijra taking in Blue, Court and Spark and The Hissing of Summer lawns' has wrought such influence over so many.

For her aficionados Joni Mitchell is more than a song writer. Lynne observes that for some the attachment goes beyond the personal; its a complete identification with the struggles of dealing with high emotion and how to cope.

In the programme she speaks to the poet and playwright Liz Lochhead, the author Linda Grant, Elbow's front man Guy Garvey, her latest biographer the Syracuse University academic David Yaffe and Gina Foster the singer with the UK act Joni's Soul, which she insists is not a tribute but a celebration act.

Lynne contends that despite at the time being overshadowed in favour of Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Paul Simon and others Joni Mitchell will come to be regarded as the greatest exponent of the art of singer-song writer from that era and concludes that what makes her a muse can be found less in the brilliant lyrical summations of eternal questions like love, loss and freedom but more in her absolute commitment never to compromise her art - to remain true, above all else, to her own muse.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b0952jkc)
Religious Polls

The first Gallup national poll into religion was carried out in 1935. Ever since - but especially with the arrival of the internet - pollsters have fed a hungry media the latest statistics about belief in God and church attendance. How important is the polling industry to our understanding of religion? What can the polls not tell us? What is their relationship to academic social sciences? Professor Robert Wuthnow from Princeton University argues that polling on religion is a huge waste of money and creates rather than reflects categories of believers and non-believers. Also joining Ernie Rea to discuss the promise and pitfalls of religious polls are Professor David Voas from University College London, Katie Harrison from the Faith Unit at Comres and Andrew Graystone, founder and former director of the Church Media network.

Producer: Rosie Dawson.


MON 17:00 PM (b093hw64)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b093hw66)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b0952jkf)
Series 79, Episode 7

Nicholas Parsons challenges Sheila Hancock, Tony Hawks, Phill Jupitus and Jenny Eclair to speak on the topics on the cards without deviation, hesitation or repetition.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Victoria Lloyd.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b0952jkh)

Kate focuses on joy, and Harrison feels the pressure.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b093hw68)
Jane Goldman and Matthew Vaughn

The screenwriter and director discuss their action sequel Kingsman: The Golden Circle.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b09528ch)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Frontline Prince (b0952jkk)

'This is a most rotten war unless you are actually fighting.' Edward VIII, the king who abdicated, was deeply marked by his experience of World War One. Heather Jones reveals the true story of the front-line prince, drawing on new research from the Royal Archives. Anxieties over the risks of exposing young members of the Royal Family to the realities of combat are nothing new. But the first frontline Prince of the modern age was transformed and marked by his experience of the Great War: this was a time vital to the development and public image of the future King Edward VIII.

Yet his wartime role is little remembered or known. Unlike the other heads of European monarchy, Edward was constitutionally bound and politically protected. Germany's Crown Prince was directing the forces at Verdun whilst Edward was supposed to be safely away from the front. Heather Jones has spent the last four years piecing together Edward's crisis at not being allowed to serve in direct combat, and his role as an ordinary staff officer. The young prince struggled with ideas of heroism, masculinity & service as he donned khaki & alarmed those charged with protecting him with his risk taking. Heather Jones tells the story of the Prince who wanted to fight - and whose bravery turned sour in the years of conflict.

Producer: Mark Burman.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b0939wgq)
Starting from Scratch in Uganda

Uganda has now taken in more than a million refugees who have fled civil war in neighbouring South Sudan. And more are coming every day. It's said that Uganda has the most generous refugee policy in the world, with new arrivals given land and allowed to work. But the majority of South Sudanese refugees are women and children who have lost almost everything and, as Ruth Alexander discovers, the reality of starting a new life from scratch is far from straightforward.

Produced by John Murphy.


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b0938p7q)
Nightingale

Brett Westwood soaks in a sound bath of nightingale song as he explores how this dull, brown bird continues to inspire human creativity. Featuring folk musician Sam Lee, philosopher and professor of music David Rothenberg, Bristol University reader Francesca MacKenney, the British Trust for Ornithology's Chris Hewson, poet Jack Thacker and Professor Stephanie Weiner of Wesleyan University. Producer: Tom Bonnett.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b0952587)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b093hw6b)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Short Works (b0952jv5)
BBC National Short Story Award 2017, Some Trick with Elastic

Five commissioned short stories to celebrate the BBC National Short Story Awards :

1. 'Some Trick with Elastic' by last year's winner, KJ ORR.

A man walks into a bar in evening dress, hands waving in the air. But it's all too much for the bartender.

Read by Blake Ritson

Producer Duncan Minshull.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b0938p81)
Eat My Words: How to Describe Food Flavours

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright ask Great British Menu judge Andi Oliver and author of The Flavour Thesaurus Niki Segnit how they describe the flavours of food. Niki describes coriander and lime as "the wooh woohs in 'Sympathy for the Devil' - completely and utterly indispensable". But grapefruit, on the other hand, is "standoffish".. She brings a cheese and a mystery item into the studio for Michael and Laura to taste and then try to put into words.
Simile and metaphor, comparision, classification, memory, humour, disgust - all of these help in the tricky but satisfying task of pinning down the unpindownable.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 A Good Read (b082hg9l)
Michael Grade and Gia Milinovich

Harriett Gilbert talks about beloved books with television executive Michael Grade and science presenter Gia Milinovich. Talk spirals away from books to cricket and apartheid, and the true beauty of science.. Michael's choice is Basil D'Oliveira by Peter Oborne, Gia's is Surely You're Joking Mr Feynman by Richard Feynman and Harriett picks We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson.
Producer Beth O'Dea.



TUESDAY 19 SEPTEMBER 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b093hw88)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b09526h6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b093hw8b)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b093hw8d)

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b093hw8g)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b093hw8j)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0962glx)

A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b093hw8l)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0952pgw)
David Rothenberg on the Mocking Bird

David Rothenberg grew up in Connecticut at a time when mockingbirds moved north filling the air with a kaleidoscope of calls, as he explains for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. In this latest series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Tim Dee.


TUE 06:00 Today (b093hw8n)

News and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b0952pgy)
Jennifer Doudna

Jennifer Doudna's research has transformed biology. And this is not an understatement. Her work has given us the tools to edit genes more precisely than ever before.

Her scientific career began with work to understand the actions of RNA, part of the machinery of every cell. But, after a meeting in 2005 with a colleague at the University of California, Berkeley, where Jennifer is currently a professor of chemistry and of molecular and cell biology, she changed her direction of research. Through collaborations all over the world she's since developed the gene editing system called CRISPR/cas9. She's been awarded multiple prizes for her work. The CRISPR/cas9 system has created opportunities that could be used for both for good and for ill. Unlike many scientists who leave the ethical implications of their research to others, Jennifer Doudna has decided to engage with her critics. She talks to Jim al-Khalili about her decision to do this.


TUE 09:30 One to One (b0952ph0)
Nature Cure

Does being in nature aid our mental health? Isabel Hardman, Deputy Editor of The Spectator, discusses with Dr Alan Kellas, a psychiatrist who advises the Royal College of Psychiatry on the subject. Isabel explains that her keen interest arises out of her own struggles with depression, and how she's found running and developing her interest in plants to have been of particular benefit during her recovery.

Meeting Alan in quiet woodland, they discuss the benefits of exercising outdoors, of watching the seasons turn, and having regular places to visit that take us outside ourselves, allowing us to move beyond our preoccupations. Alan describes the ways in which he also has learned to slowly resolve difficult things in a particular woodland setting.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b0952ph2)
Following Pappano, Episode 2

The second in the series of programmes following Sir Antonio Pappano and his team as they prepare for a new production of Puccini's La Boheme.

All major opera houses rely on well established productions of repertoire classics. Puccini's La bohème is a permanent fixture in the world's top five Operas as measured by performance numbers and John Copley's 1974 staging at Covent Garden was a familiar and much loved favourite. However the time has come to replace it with a new production and the challenge to do that with a fresh staging falls to the team of Music Director Sir Antonio Pappano and stage director Richard Jones.
In five programmes across the week Radio Four follows Maestro Pappano as the new production takes shape. He works with singers, discusses the particular challenges of operating at the very highest level of Operatic performance and expectation and gives candid insights into the often perilous journey to an opening night.
We also hear from the team both on and off stage who work alongside Pappano, including the young cast who are acutely aware that the production they are replacing opened with singers like Placido Domingo and Sir Thomas Allen. There are also stage directors, set-builders, movement directors and Maestro Pappano's trusted repetiteur. But at the heart of it, in the weeks leading up to opening night and as the curtain rises, is the Music director himself, combining the orchestral brilliance of Puccini's score and the dazzling qualities of the singers on stage to produce what they all hope will be a worthy addition to the Royal Opera House's Puccini tradition.

Producer: Tom Alban.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b093hw8r)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0952ph4)
Just a Girl, Episode 2

The third series continuing the journey of Amy, just your average 13 year old transgender child in the modern world.

A very ordinary family has come to terms with the less ordinary experience of Amy, who was born Ben. In this third series, Amy chases her dream of musical theatre but there is trouble ahead when a petition is started about which school toilet she uses.

This accessible new drama was inspired by real life experiences.

Thanks to Susie Green and the parents at Mermaids, a charity offering support to gender variant children, teenagers and their families (www.mermaidsuk.org.uk), and the Tavistock Clinic.

Episode 2
Charlotte's sugar free regime for the whole family is not popular. Amy is practising hard for her role in the school musical, but the family is shaken when the press start to take an interest in the petition about her.

Writer...............................Mark Davies Markham
Piano playing by Sarah Spencer

Co-Producers..............................Polly Thomas and Eloise Whitmore
Production Coordinator...........Sarah Kenny
Executive Producer...............Melanie Harris

A Naked production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b0952ph6)
Baobab

A mature Baobab tree looks like its standing with its head in the ground and its roots in the air - hence the name the Upside-Down tree. But this tree is no joke. It is of enormous spiritual and cultural importance to local people and is also known as The Tree of Life highlighting its importance as a source of water, food, medicine and materials; for example, the bark is used for making rope, the petals for glue and the roots for making ink. But it's the edible fruits, high in vitamin C and anti-oxidants that in recent years have increased the commercial value and importance of the tree as Brett Westwood discovers as he explores our relationship with this iconic tree. Producer Sarah Blunt.


TUE 11:30 Laverne in the Willows (b071vlmg)

Lauren Laverne has long been a firm fan of Kenneth Grahame's classic children's book 'The Wind in the Willows', in particular that most sparky of characters Mr. Toad, whose desire to have everything and anything new makes him such a vibrant fore-runner of the modern consumer. Lauren sets about telling the story of the book and its creator, Kenneth Grahame, who came up with the adventures of Mole, Ratty and friends as bedtime stories for his headstrong young son Alistair - thought by many to be the model for Mr. Toad himself. Along the way Lauren will visit the school that once was home to the Grahame family, and where he turned the stories into the book we're now so familiar with. She'll also hear from the author of the 'How to Train Your Dragon' series of books, Cressida Cowell, about her own love of 'Wind in the Willows', as well as Tom Moorhouse, an Oxford Universtity Ecologist who is writing a series of sequels to Grahame's classic tale.

Featuring the composition 'Nur Musik' by Mark Simpson.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b093hw8t)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b08yg2jp)
19 September 1917 - Kitty Lumley

On this day in 1917, socialist and women's activist Annie Besant was released from prison in India, while in Folkestone, Kitty Lumley feels trapped.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b093hw8w)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b093hw8y)

The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b093hw90)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


TUE 13:45 Join the Dots (b0952qpx)
Series 1, Picture the Dot

Janet Ellis gets close to the canvas to see how this elemental mark has inspired great world art, from the dots of the Australian Western Desert to 19th Century Paris.

The simple dot is one of the first marks man ever made. From being a word we uttered infrequently, the advent of digital has made it one we use all the time.

The dot. We wear it, listen to it, read it and gaze on it. We send it through the air and under the waves. Each programme in this series circles a different aspect of this simple mark.

Contributors are Aboriginal Australian artist Christian Thompson and Dr Karen Serres, the Courtauld Gallery Schroder Foundation Curator of Paintings.

Geoffrey Bardon and Fay Nelson's contributions are from the film documentary Mr Patterns and used with kind permission of the Bardon family and the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia's Film Australia archive. The music is by Steve Francis.

Christian Thompson's collection We Bury Our Own can be seen at https://www.christianthompson.net/we-bury-our-own-2012

Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Dora Production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b0952jkh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b0952qpz)
Rumpole, Rumpole for the Prosecution

Horace Rumpole's client asks him to do something he's always sworn he will not do - appear for the prosecution. It's a case where the injured party is dead and cannot speak for herself.

There's a piece of evidence that just doesn't add up and a literary reference which only Rumpole recognises as a clue.

Adapted for radio by Richard Stoneman
Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b0952qq1)
Series 13, Lost in Translation

Secret languages, loving acts of translation and musical instruments with an unrecognised power - Josie Long presents new documentaries about translation.

From the man who introduced a poet to Iran through a tender act of love for his father, to a debate about breaching the peace.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (b0952qq3)
BBC National Short Story Award 2017, The Edge of the Shoal by Cynan Jones

Shortlisted stories in contention for the BBC National Short Story Award 2017.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b0952qq5)
Malorie Blackman on Language

Malorie Blackman, author of Noughts and Crosses, talks in depth to Michael Rosen about language: the writing that has shaped her and how she's used language in her own influential work. Her lifelong love of reading was fostered by the libraries she went to as a child. If she had to choose between being a reader and being a writer, she says, she'd choose being a reader..
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b0952qq7)
Series 43, Andrea Catherwood on Constance Markievicz

Constance Markievicz led an amazing life - a leading figure during the Easter Rising of 1916, she was the first woman elected to Westminster though she never took her seat. Markievicz was born into a wealthy anglo-Irish family and gained her exotic surname from marriage to a Polish count. She was adventurous, flamboyant, committed to woman's rights, court-martialled and nearly shot.
Nominating her is Andrea Catherwood, ex-ITN correspondent who made her first documentary for Radio 4. Alongside her in the studio is Lindie Naughton, author of Markievicz - A Most Outrageous Rebel.

Matthew Parris presents, the producer in Bristol is Miles Warde.


TUE 17:00 PM (b093hw92)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b093hw94)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 The Tim Vine Chat Show (b0952qq9)
Series 2, Torquay

Tim Vine has been travelling the length and breadth of this fair land to not only uncover the best stories of the Great British public but also to take every possible opportunity to tell a ridiculous joke and sing a preposterous song along the way.

In episode 2 Tim visits the legendary Babbacombe Theatre in Torquay where the seaside crowd sing a song about a box and a local laughter yoga teacher leads an impromptu workshop.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b0952qqc)

Josh makes a loss, and should Roy speak up?


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b093hw96)
Bill Murray

The Hollywood actor and cellist Jan Vogler discuss their new classical album.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0952ph4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b0952qqf)
Paralympic Sport - Fair Play?

The ethos of the paralympic movement is fair and equal competition. At its heart is the classification system designed to ensure people of equal impairment compete against each other.

The International Paralympic Committee has warned that some athletes are exaggerating their disability - known as intentional misrepresentation - in order to get into a more favourable class. It said this was in "grave danger of undermining the credibility of the sport."

File on 4 has spoken to athletes, parents and coaches who say they too are concerned the system is being abused. They claim less disabled athletes are being brought into sports in the quest for medals. Some athletes have decided to quit competing altogether as they no longer believe there is a level playing field. They claim more disabled athletes are being squeezed out of para competition.

The first ever athletes forum for the paralympic movement was held this summer. It too says there is a lack of trust about classification among competitors and called for greater transparency saying athletes should have the ability to raise concerns about fellow competitors.

Is doubt about the current system threatening trust in the paralympic movement?

Reporter: Jane Deith
Producer: Paul Grant.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b093hw98)

News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b0952qqh)

Dr Mark Porter presents a series on health issues.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b0952pgy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b093hw9b)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Short Works (b0952qqk)
BBC National Short Story Award 2017, Bearded

Five commissioned short stories to celebrate the BBC National Short Story Awards :

2. 'Bearded' by Ross Raisin.

Someone is hogging the hair-dryers in the changing rooms, and the next in line has little time to wait. The clock ticks down..

Reader Chris Pavlo

Producer Duncan Minshull.


TUE 23:00 Spotlight Tonight with Nish Kumar (b0952qqm)
Series 2, Episode 1

We all like to think we know about the news and yet, whilst jokes about Donald Trump's tiny hands are all well and good, do you still have that nagging suspicion there's important things going on beneath the headlines you'd like to know about? Well, help is at hand! Nish Kumar is here to cast his spotlight on the week's most talked about news items, taking an in-depth look at the biggest stories from the past seven days as well as scrutinising the bigger issues of the moment.

Starring Nish Kumar with Sarah Campbell.

Written by Sarah Campbell, Max Davis, Gabby Hutchinson-Crouch, Nish Kumar, and Tom Neenan.

It was produced by Matt Stronge and was a BBC Studios Production.


TUE 23:30 A Good Read (b06zrzx5)
Rebecca Root & Jake Arnott

The Long Firm author Jake Arnott and Rebecca Root, who recently became the first trans actor to play a trans role in a mainstream BBC series, Boy Meets Girl, nominate favourite books for discussion with Harriett Gilbert. Mother Night by Kurt Vonnegut is Jake's choice, while Rebecca has gone for a graphic novel, Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth, by Chris Ware. Harriett nominates Maggie and Me, Damien Barr's memoir of growing up gay in Thatcher's Britain.
Producer Sally Heaven.



WEDNESDAY 20 SEPTEMBER 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b093hwc9)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b0952ph2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b093hwcc)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b093hwcf)

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b093hwch)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b093hwck)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b096hc2v)

A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b093hwcm)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0952stp)
David Rothenberg on the Superb Lyrebird

As David Rothenberg suggests in this Tweet of the Day the superb lyrebird is a bird which evolved to excess experimentation and craziness.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. In this latest series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Tim Dee

Image : Roger Powell.


WED 06:00 Today (b093hwcp)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Choral History of Britain (b0952str)
Series 1, Singing for Solidarity

Roderick Williams explores how singing together is at the heart of being human and the social bonds we make. From protest songs and football chants, to work choirs and national anthems choral singing has been used to galvanise people around ideas, emotions and causes. Roderick Williams is usually a solo singer of international renown but here seeks out the experience of singing as part of a huge chorus performing Mahler's Second Symphony in order to "feel the air vibrate" and hears from Roger Scruton about the ideological power of a choir singing in four part harmony. He hears from singers in workplace and protest choirs as well as members of the West Albion Away Singing Section about how singing together can emphasise common purpose and raise the emotional temperature.


WED 09:30 Owning Colour (b08lh65s)
Series 1, Blue

Designer Wayne Hemingway looks at five colours that have been at the centre of ownership and trademark battles, revealing the complex status of colours in our society - their artistic, commercial and cultural impact.

He explores our response to colour - whether it's the red soles of designer shoes, the blue strip of a football team or the purple of a chocolate bar wrapper - interviewing those involved in branding, advertising and IP, as well as the psychologists, scientists , colour gurus, artists and those creating the colours of tomorrow using Nanotechnology.

Programme 2 - Blue
Blue is the world's favourite colour - we live on a blue planet. It's also the colour of Blackburn Rovers - Wayne Hemingway's home football team. It's associated not only with the beautiful game, but also with the town itself through a blue check for which Blackburn was famous. Wayne is in the stands to cheer his team on in a match against Manchester United - in red. He considers the importance of owning colour both in the commercial and artistic worlds.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b0952stt)
Following Pappano, Episode 3

The Third programme in the series following Sir Antonio Pappano as he and his collaborator Richard Jones prepare for the Royal Opera House Covent Garden's first new production of Puccini's La Boheme in over forty years.

All major opera houses rely on well established productions of repertoire classics. Puccini's La bohème is a permanent fixture in the world's top five Operas as measured by performance numbers and John Copley's 1974 staging at Covent Garden was a familiar and much loved favourite. However the time has come to replace it with a new production and the challenge to do that with a fresh staging falls to the team of Music Director Sir Antonio Pappano and stage director Richard Jones.
In five programmes across the week Radio Four follows Maestro Pappano as the new production takes shape. He works with singers, discusses the particular challenges of operating at the very highest level of Operatic performance and expectation and gives candid insights into the often perilous journey to an opening night.
We also hear from the team both on and off stage who work alongside Pappano, including the young cast who are acutely aware that the production they are replacing opened with singers like Placido Domingo and Sir Thomas Allen. There are also stage directors, set-builders, movement directors and Maestro Pappano's trusted repetiteur. But at the heart of it, in the weeks leading up to opening night and as the curtain rises, is the Music director himself, combining the orchestral brilliance of Puccini's score and the dazzling qualities of the singers on stage to produce what they all hope will be a worthy addition to the Royal Opera House's Puccini tradition.

Producer: Tom Alban.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b093hwcr)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b0952stw)
Just a Girl, Episode 3

The third series continuing the journey of Amy, just your average 13 year old transgender child in the modern world.

A very ordinary family has come to terms with the less ordinary experience of Amy, who was born Ben. In this third series, Amy chases her dream of musical theatre but there is trouble ahead when a petition is started about which school toilet she uses.

This accessible new drama was inspired by real life experiences.

Thanks to Susie Green and the parents at Mermaids, a charity offering support to gender variant children, teenagers and their families (www.mermaidsuk.org.uk), and the Tavistock Clinic.

Episode 1
Amy is full of excitement about her West Side Story audition, and grandad Ted is gearing up for salsa lessons. Then news of a petition about Amy breaks.

Writer...............................Mark Davies Markham
Piano playing by Sarah Spencer

Co-Producers..............................Polly Thomas and Eloise Whitmore
Production Coordinator...........Sarah Kenny
Executive Producer...............Melanie Harris

A Naked production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b0952sty)
Alan and Jack - An Epidemic of Selfishness

Friends who volunteer for charity despair of the self-absorption they see around them. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 The Frontline Prince (b0952jkk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Relativity (b0952sv0)
Series 1, Episode 3

Richard Herring's brand new comedy about four generations of a family. Starring Alison Steadman, Phil Davies and Richard Herring.

Relativity is a witty and loving portrait of family life, with affectionate observation of inter generational misunderstanding, sibling sparring and the ties that bind, that will resonate with anyone who has ever argued with their dad about how to pronounce crisp brand names.

Episode 3
A Christmas visit to Doris in her care home is simultaneously poignant and hilarious, as Ken insists on firing mental maths questions at Doris to keep her brain cells in good working order, while Margaret struggles to get her mother simply to recognise her.

Written by Richard Herring and produced by Polly Thomas.
Sound Design: Eloise Whitmore
Broadcast Assistants: Bella Lamplough Shields, Bryony Jarvis Taylor
Producer: Polly Thomas
Executive Producers: Jon Thoday and Richard Allen Turner
An Avalon Television production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b093hwct)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b08yg2m8)
20 September 1917 - Adeline Lumley

On this day in 1917, Jamaican seventeen year old Herbert Morris, believed to be suffering from shell shock, was shot at dawn for desertion in France, while in Folkestone, a traumatised soldier shares a day of small joys with Adeline Lumley.

Written by Shaun McKenna & Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b093hwcw)

Consumer affairs programme.


WED 12:57 Weather (b093hwcy)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b093hwd0)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


WED 13:45 Join the Dots (b0952sv2)
Series 1, The Language of Dots

Janet Ellis looks at how the dot has helped us communicate and reflects on the dot in computer language. Morse code, Braille and the dots that get our email delivered.

The simple dot is one of the first marks man ever made. From being a word we uttered infrequently, the advent of digital has made it one we use all the time.

The dot. We wear it, listen to it, read it and gaze on it. We send it through the air and under the waves. Each programme in this series circles a different aspect of this simple mark.

Contributors include Dr Tilly Blyth, Head of Collections Science Museum London, and Robert Saggers, Heritage Manager at the Royal Institute of Blind People.

Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Dora production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b0952qqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b0952sv4)
Rumpole, Rumpole and The Quacks

It's 1966, and Rumpole meets a delightful, wise and kindly Asian Doctor who, unexpectedly accused of unprofessional conduct, needs his help.

The case involves both Rumpole and Phyllid, Rumpole's dear friend and his "Portia of the Chambers", as they learn about the shadowy behaviour of some unscrupulous drug companies and the correct way to diagnose glandular fever.

Their friendship also becomes just a tad more ambiguous as both their marriages prove irksome.

Adapted for radio by Richard Stoneman
Directed by Marilyn Imrie
A Catherine Bailey production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b093hwd2)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.


WED 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (b0952sv6)
BBC National Short Story Award 2017, if a book is locked there's probably a good reason for that, don't you think? by Helen Oyeyemi

Shortlisted stories in contention for the BBC National Short Story Award 2017.


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b0952sv8)

Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b093hwd4)

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 16:55 The Listening Project (b0952svb)
Kieran and Katie - Put the Biscuit Down

Friends feel the pressure to look good and keep fit. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 17:00 PM (b093hwd6)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b093hwd8)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 John Shuttleworth's Lounge Music (b082wwlw)
Series 2, Episode 1

John Shuttleworth invites celebrated pop stars to his Sheffield home to perform one of their own songs and also, more importantly, one of his.

In the first show of this series, John welcomes Chris Difford from Squeeze - but not before he has ejected Ken from the front door with his unwanted request to show John and Chris his new windows.

Chris is soon invited to "show us what you can do" and plays his classic song Up the Junction. John is duly impressed - but the admiration starts to fade when John finds out that Chris once took 50p from his mum's purse to place an advert in a shop window. Can John condone theft and forgive Chris, or will Chris have to redeem himself with his rendition of John's song Fish and Chips?

Also, Tom Robinson gives advice on how to become a radio DJ following pop success in Top Tips on the Telephone.

Written and Performed by Graham Fellows with special guests Chris Difford and Tom Robinson
A Chic Ken production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b0952svd)

Susan's hopes are shattered, and Ed feels overlooked.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b093hwdb)
Benedict Cumberbatch

The Sherlock actor talks about bringing Ian McEwan's novel The Child in Time to TV.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0952stw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b0952svg)
Youth Justice

There has been a 64 per cent drop in the number of young people being dealt with in the youth justice system. The reduction reflects an underlying fall in youth crime, but also a sustained commitment by police and the courts to finding other ways of dealing with young offenders to avoid criminalising them. Clive Anderson and guests discuss the need for further reforms.

Barrister Shauneen Lambe, executive director of Just for Kids Law, says the system is still too punitive and does not adequately deal with young people with the most serious problems, including repeat offenders.

Solicitor Greg Stewart who has represented young offenders in court for 25 years, says many of the recent reforms simply "re-arranged the furniture" and believes further wholesale changes are needed, including raising the minimum age of criminal responsibility. At 10 years old in England and Wales, it is among the lowest in the world.

Also taking part are Chief Constable Olivia Pinkney who leads for the National Police Chiefs Council on young people's issues, and Malcom Richardson, chair of the Magistrates Association.

The programme discusses new sentencing guidelines for young offenders, a damning report on youth custody institutions by the Chief Inspector of Prisons and a new report by David Lammy raising serious concerns about the treatment of black, Asian and minority ethnic young people in the youth justice system.

Clive asks if our system is currently too harsh or too lenient in its approach to young offenders. Do we have the right range of punishments and alternatives to custodial sentences? Do our courts sufficiently recognise recent advances in understanding of the adolescent brain?

Producer: Brian King
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 David Baddiel Tries to Understand (b0952svj)
Series 3, Bitcoin

David Baddiel investigates Bitcoin. What is it, and how does it work?

Bitcoin is often in the news, but David has always been confused about what, exactly, it is. And with the help of two experts in the field David sets out to find out. He starts by speaking to Nathaniel Popper, whose best-selling book Digital Gold tells the history of how Bitcoin was invented. Invigorated by his new-found knowledge, his second interview heads in a more practical direction.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b0952svl)
Fight the Power

Meet Gina Lopez, the radical green activist who suddenly found herself appointed Environment Minister for the Philippines. Rodrigo Duterte was elected President with the promise to cut crime by killing thousands of criminals. He lived up to expectations, initiating a vicious war against suspected drug dealers, ignoring the protests of international human rights groups.

But Duterte wasn't just tough on street criminals, he also planned to crack down on the environmental abuses of large corporations perceived to have exploited the people and landscape of the islands. To achieve those ends he offered radical green activist, Gina Lopez the office of Environment Minister. Flushed with sudden and unexpected power Lopez removed licences from mining companies she suspected of abusing the environment. Peter Hadfield tells the story of what happened next.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.


WED 21:30 Choral History of Britain (b0952str)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b093hwdd)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Short Works (b0952svn)
BBC National Short Story Award 2017, Dear Mister Burke

Five commissioned short stories to celebrate the BBC National Short Story Award:

1. 'Dear Mister Burke' by Tea Obreht.

Mrs Mary Winters determines to get to the bottom of the mystery concerning Colnel McCabe. Does he lie at Elk Point, after all?

Reader Sara Kestelman

Producer Duncan Minshull.


WED 23:00 Charlotte and Lillian (b095g3xb)
Series 1, The Introduction

In the throes of splitting up from her boyfriend, 29-year-old Charlotte (Helen Monks) is determined to prove she's not as self-centred as he says she is. She signs up as a volunteer to visit the elderly, expecting to be paired with a frail and needy old lady who's full of gratitude and appreciation for such a selfless act. Instead she meets 82-year-old Lillian (Miriam Margolyes), a belligerent and feisty old bat who sees through her in an instant.

Needless to say, they don't get on - but Charlotte and Lillian's conflicting outlooks on life belie a striking similarity in their personalities. Both are profoundly selfish, self-involved and stubborn; both are quietly curious about each other (though they'd never dream of admitting it); and both are lonely.

With every visit, their arguments grow more heated, the resolutions more uneasy and the outcomes more entertaining, as Charlotte and Lillian discover eye-opening truths about themselves and each other.

This four-part, two-actress comedy, written by Holly Walsh and Kat Sommers, was recorded on location and features the fantastic combination of Miriam Margolyes and Helen Monks, working together for the first time.

As the series opens, Charlotte arrives -late - at Lillian's flat, fresh from another argument with her soon-to-be-ex. She's expecting a grateful, attentive old lady, so is pretty put out when Lillian seems more concerned with that afternoon's edition of Flog It!. Lillian, on the other hand, is irritated by the constant chirrups from Charlotte's phone and how Charlotte can't stop looking at it.

Neither of them is expecting things to develop so speedily.

A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Before They Were Famous (b05xh3nk)
Series 3, Episode 4

Ian Leslie presents the show which brings to light the often surprising first literary attempts of the world's best known writers.

In this episode, the author of Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk is found to have started out doling out questionable advice as editor of the letters page of a US newspaper's children's supplement.

Next up, we hear Marcel Proust's unexpected ornithological leanings and previously undiscovered entries from Raymond Chandler's adolescent diaries.

To finish, there's another of Henrik Ibsen's uncomfortable Christmas cracker jokes.

Producer: Claire Broughton
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:30 A Good Read (b05nvfr1)
Ian Rankin and Joe Boyd

Crime writer Ian Rankin and record producer Joe Boyd talk to Harriett Gilbert about some of the great books they've read, including The Wilder Shores of Love by Lesley Blanch, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia by Mohsin Hamid and The Islanders by Pascal Garnier.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


WED 23:55 The Listening Project (b0952svq)
Donald and Chris - A Peace-loving Household

Friends reflect on pacifism and the impact of religious upbringing. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.



THURSDAY 21 SEPTEMBER 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b093hwg8)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b0952stt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b093hwgb)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b093hwgd)

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b093hwgg)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b093hwgj)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b096lb91)

A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b093hwgl)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0952zl1)
David Rothenberg on the White-Crested Laughingthrush

The white crested laughing thrush is a superb accompaniment to David Rothenberg as he plays the clarinet, the best bird to play along with in this Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. In this latest series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Tim Dee

Image WikiCommons / cuatrock77.


THU 06:00 Today (b093hwgn)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b0952zl3)
Kant's Categorical Imperative

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss how, in the Enlightenment, Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) sought to define the difference between right and wrong by applying reason, looking at the intention behind actions rather than at consequences. He was inspired to find moral laws by natural philosophers such as Newton and Leibniz, who had used reason rather than emotion to analyse the world around them and had identified laws of nature. Kant argued that when someone was doing the right thing, that person was doing what was the universal law for everyone, a formulation that has been influential on moral philosophy ever since and is known as the Categorical Imperative. Arguably even more influential was one of his reformulations, echoed in The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in which he asserted that humanity has a value of an entirely different kind from that placed on commodities. Kant argued that simply existing as a human being was valuable in itself, so that every human owed moral responsibilities to other humans and was owed responsibilities in turn.

With

Alison Hills

David Oderberg

and

John Callanan

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b0952zl5)
Following Pappano, Episode 4

The fourth programme in the series following Sir Antonio Pappano and his collaborator Richard Jones prepare for the Royal Opera House Covent Garden's new production of Puccini's La Boheme.

All major opera houses rely on well established productions of repertoire classics. Puccini's La bohème is a permanent fixture in the world's top five Operas as measured by performance numbers and John Copley's 1974 staging at Covent Garden was a familiar and much loved favourite. However the time has come to replace it with a new production and the challenge to do that with a fresh staging falls to the team of Music Director Sir Antonio Pappano and stage director Richard Jones.
In five programmes across the week Radio Four follows Maestro Pappano as the new production takes shape. He works with singers, discusses the particular challenges of operating at the very highest level of Operatic performance and expectation and gives candid insights into the often perilous journey to an opening night.
We also hear from the team both on and off stage who work alongside Pappano, including the young cast who are acutely aware that the production they are replacing opened with singers like Placido Domingo and Sir Thomas Allen. There are also stage directors, set-builders, movement directors and Maestro Pappano's trusted repetiteur. But at the heart of it, in the weeks leading up to opening night and as the curtain rises, is the Music director himself, combining the orchestral brilliance of Puccini's score and the dazzling qualities of the singers on stage to produce what they all hope will be a worthy addition to the Royal Opera House's Puccini tradition.

Producer: Tom Alban.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b093hwgq)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0952zl7)
Just a Girl, Episode 4

The third series continuing the journey of Amy, just your average 13 year old transgender child in the modern world.

A very ordinary family has come to terms with the less ordinary experience of Amy, who was born Ben. In this third series, Amy chases her dream of musical theatre but there is trouble ahead when a petition is started about which school toilet she uses.

This accessible new drama was inspired by real life experiences.

Thanks to Susie Green and the parents at Mermaids, a charity offering support to gender variant children, teenagers and their families (www.mermaidsuk.org.uk), and the Tavistock Clinic.

Episode 4
As her parents try to resolve the petition, Amy gets more support from young people and decides to take her activist campaign to social media. Ted's accident shocks everyone.

Writer...............................Mark Davies Markham
Piano playing by Sarah Spencer

Co-Producers..............................Polly Thomas and Eloise Whitmore
Production Coordinator...........Sarah Kenny
Executive Producer...............Melanie Harris

A Naked production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b0952zl9)
Panama's Vanishing Islands

Reports from around the world.


THU 11:30 Art in Miniature (b0952zlc)

Tiny bathers relax in a puddle of oily water on a pavement; a galleon sails on the head of a pin, a dancer twirls next to a mote of dust under a microscope - Dr Lance Dann, lover of miniature worlds, crouches down on hands and knees to better observe the world of tiny art.

Prompted by advances in technology, and the enduring wonder of things created on a really, really tiny scale, Lance Dann follows his own obsession with the miracle of miniature art.
Knocking on the tiny doors of creators from street artist Slinkachu, whose mesmerising cityscapes are created, photographed and abandoned in the street, to the collection of antique miniature portraits in Sotheby's where expert Mark Griffith Jones delicately reveals the hidden treasures that span from over 500 years of art history.

The 21st century has experienced a revival of the small in art Desiree De Leon has attracted hundreds of thousands of followers for her Instagram account of small doodles, whilst the 'the chewing gum man' Ben Wilson, has gathered a loyal following for his hidden gems scattered about the London streets.
Every morning Ben gets up and starts creating tiny tiles on which his innermost feelings are expressed - and then he leaves them on the Underground for people to find.

Then there is the barely visible - Willard Wigan MBE - the poster-boy of microscopic art, a dyslexia sufferer who has found relief in the creation of tiny art works. Recognised globally, his sculptures, which are small enough to fit on the head of a pin, sell for six-figure sums.
"I work between my heartbeats. I have one-and-a-half seconds to actually move. And at the same time I have to watch I don't inhale my own work."

Then there is the nearly invisible - Jonty Hurwitz - who sculpts with Nano-technology, and sometimes loses sight of it in the process.
"When I found the sculpture it was one of the most moving moments of my life, you see all these grotesque pieces of dust as the microscope is moving around and suddenly there's a woman, dancing"

What is the enduring appeal of the miniature in art, and where has this revival come from?
To discover where it hides, why it appeals, and how the artists' work on such delicate objects, Dann plays with scale, sound and voices to bring a closer, more microscopic focus on the art world.

Presenter: Lance Dann is an associate member and former sound designer of The Wooster Group, a writer and director of a range of radio dramas including podcast "Blood Culture", commissioned by The Welcome Trust, and won a Prix Marulic for his production of Moby Dick for BBC Radio 4.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

iplayer photograph.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b093hwgs)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b08yg2rf)
21 September 1917 - Victor Lumley

On this day in 1917, 27 were killed in a munitions factory explosion in Arklow, Ireland, and at the Bevan hospital, Victor Lumley's day is volatile.

Written by Shaun McKenna & Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b093hwgv)

Consumer affairs programme.


THU 12:57 Weather (b093hwgx)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b093hwgz)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


THU 13:45 Join the Dots (b0952zlf)
Series 1, Playing the Dot

Then there was a pause... Janet Ellis explores the role of the dot in early punctuation, Harold Pinter's love of the pause, and listens to the music of the dots.

The simple dot is one of the first marks man ever made. From being a word we uttered infrequently, the advent of digital has made it one we use all the time.

The dot. We wear it, listen to it, read it and gaze on it. We send it through the air and under the waves. Each programme in this series circles a different aspect of this simple mark.

Contributors include theatre director David Leveaux, writers Keith Huston and Lynne Truss, and composer Gary Yershon.

Harold Pinter extract taken from Penguin Random House audiobook Various Voices, with permission of The Harold Pinter estate.

Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Dora production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b0952svd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Original British Dramatists 2015 (b05xd508)
doyouwishtocontinue

Original British Dramatists: Discover five new voices over five Dramas

doyouwishtocontinue by Christine Entwisle

Winner of the 2014 BBC Writer's Prize.

A deliciously comic drama about a 40-something woman at the end of her tether who finds a resolution in the most unlikely of places.

The BBC Writer's Prize was established to create a unique opportunity for new and established writers who want to write for Radio Drama. The response was extraordinary, with nearly 800 original scripts submitted to BBC writers room for consideration.

The judges said: "Christine Entwisle has managed to write a play about a severely depressed woman at the end of her tether that is moving, sharp and very very funny. Debra hates the world, hates people, in fact seems to hate everything apart from animals, and yet, as in all the best plays the unexpected happens and when it happens the results are unexpected."

Christine Entwisle has worked in theatre as a director, writer and actress for twenty five years. On winning she said "I cannot believe I have won the BBC Writer's Prize. I am shocked and utterly delighted. I am so grateful that people have taken the time to read my work, and that they have seen enough potential in it to support me. Which gives me all the hope I need to carry on writing."

Directed by Kirsty Williams.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b0952zlh)
Series 37, Listeners' Walks: Blaneau Ffestiniog

In this series of Ramblings, Clare Balding is walking with people or in places recommended by listeners. Eryl Davies wrote to the programme suggesting a walk in the hills of North Wales with her father, Tegid. He lives near Blaneau Ffestiniog and loves to explore the area everyday, usually alone with his dog Twm. Not that unusual except that Tegid has no sight and relies on his memory and his canine companion to find the way. He has always loved walking and when he can, likes to share his passion with the rest of the family. Today he's joined by Eryl and his sixteen year old grandson, Llewellyn.

Their route can be found on OS Outdoor Leisure map 18

Producer: Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b094s0jl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 BBC National Short Story Award (b0952zlk)
BBC National Short Story Award 2017, Murmur by Will Eaves

Shortlisted stories in contention for the BBC National Short Story Award 2017.


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b0952zlm)
Bertrand Tavernier

Director Bertrand Tavernier takes Francine Stock on a journey through French cinema, as his new documentary on the Nouvelle Vague and beyond is released.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b093hwh1)

Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (b093hwh3)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b093hwh5)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Women Talking About Cars (b0952zlp)
Series 2, Esther Rantzen

The light hearted interview show where Victoria Coren Mitchell interviews a well known woman about the cars she has known and uses them as a vehicle to talk about her life. This week Esther Rantzen tells the story of her journey from her first memories of her grandmother's sedate Hawker Siddely limousine through to the intensity of the That's Life years and helming one of the nation's most popular television programmes through to the joys of becoming a grandmother herself. And you can find out what no driving test examiner should ever say to a successful candidate.
With contributions from the audience and readings by Morwenna Banks.
Produced by Gareth Edwards

A BBC Studios production.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b0952zlr)

Lexi has to make plans, and Adam insists on being realistic.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b093hwh7)
Juliet Stevenson

The actor discusses playing a fierce female aviator in the play Wings.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0952zl7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b0952zlt)

Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.


THU 20:30 In Business (b0952zlw)
Playing the Market

From the film Wall Street, to the play Enron, finance workers and bankers tend to be portrayed negatively in works of fiction.
Andrew Dickson traces the history of these depictions, asking if they're fair - and if more positive portrayals would enhance the reputation of the City
He speaks to playwrights, a bond trader turned thriller writer, a film historian and a veteran of the banking industry

Producer: Penny Murphy.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b093hwh1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b0952zl3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b093hwh9)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Short Works (b0952zly)
BBC National Short Story Award 2017, The Cold God of Bad Luck

Five commissioned short stories to celebrate the BBC National Short Story Award:

4. 'The Cold God Of Bad Luck' by Colin Barrett.

Lorna keeps an eye on boozy Bo, a very boozy Father, and a Mother in denial, despite being a woman of 'consuming selfishness' herself. It's one heck of a family..

Reader Deirdre Mullins

Producer Duncan Minshull.


THU 23:00 Bunk Bed (b0952zm0)
Series 4, Episode 5

Everyone craves a place where their mind and body are not applied to a particular task. The nearest faraway place. Somewhere for drifting and lighting upon strange thoughts which don't have to be shooed into context, but which can be followed like balloons escaping onto the air. Late at night, in the dark and in a bunk bed, your tired mind can wander.

This is the nearest faraway place for Patrick Marber and Peter Curran. Here they try to get the heart of things in an entertainingly vague and indirect way. This is not the place for typical male banter. From under the bed clothes they play each other music and archive of H G Wells, a Russian radio station for spies, and cheesy pop anthems.

Work, family, literature, and their own badly-scuffed dreams are the funny, if warped, conversational currency.

Produced by Peter Curran.
A Foghorn production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:15 Elvis McGonagall Takes a Look on the Bright Side (b0435j99)
Series 1, Taking Care of Business

Stand-up poet, armchair revolutionary, comedian and broadcaster Elvis McGonagall (aka poet and performer Richard Smith) is determined to do something about his bitter, dyspeptic and bloody minded view of contemporary life. There are good things out there, if he could only be bothered to find them.

From his home in the Graceland Park near Dundee, the Scottish punk poet goes in search of the brighter side of life. With the help of his dog,Trouble, his friend, Susan Morrison, and his own private narrator, Clarke Peters, Elvis does his very best to accentuate the positive - he really does. Recorded almost entirely on location, in a caravan on a truly glamorous industrial estate somewhere in Scotland.

Episode 3. Taking Care of Business. Elvis rails against the wage gap, franchises, capitalism and corporate nonsense, until he is persuaded that his poetry is a bankable concern. He embarks on the glittering road to profit.

As Elvis, poet Richard Smith is the 2006 World Poetry Slam Champion, the compere of the notorious Blue Suede Sporran Club and appears regularly on BBC Radio 4 ("Saturday Live", the "Today Programme", "Arthur Smith's Balham Bash", "Last Word", "Off The Page" and others as well as writing and presenting the popular arts features "Doggerel Bard" on the art of satiric poetry and "Beacons and Blue Remembered Hills" on the extraordinary resonance of A.E. Housman's 'Shropshire Lad', which was recorded on location as well.

(further info at www.elvismcgonagall.co.uk)

Written by Elvis MacGonagall, with Richard Smith, Helen Braunholtz-Smith and Frank Stirling.

Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 A Good Read (b06kcbw6)
Philip Pullman and Caroline Criado-Perez

Author Philip Pullman & journalist Caroline Criado-Perez talk about books they love with Harriett Gilbert. Philip champions Sculptor's Daughter: A Childhood Memoir by Tove Jansson, the writer of the Moomin books. Caroline's choice is The Beggar Maid: Stories of Flo and Rose by Alice Munro and Harriett's is The Quiet American by Graham Greene.
Producer Beth O'Dea.



FRIDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b093hwk6)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b0952zl5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b093hwk8)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b093hwkb)

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b093hwkd)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b093hwkg)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b096nj7l)

A short reflection and prayer with Pádraig Ó Tuama.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b093hwkj)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b09534fz)
David Rothenberg on the Veery Thrush

Slow down the song of the veery thrush and what have you got? For David Rothenberg in this Tweet of the Day, its compressed tiny bits of music that humans can really relate to.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. In this latest series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Tim Dee

Image : Salaman.


FRI 06:00 Today (b093hwkl)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b094s2s6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b09534g7)
Following Pappano, Episode 5

The final episode in the series following the Music Director of the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, Sir Antonio Pappano, as he and his team prepare for a brand new staging of Puccini's Opera La Boheme.

All major opera houses rely on well established productions of repertoire classics. Puccini's La bohème is a permanent fixture in the world's top five Operas as measured by performance numbers and John Copley's 1974 staging at Covent Garden was a familiar and much loved favourite. However the time has come to replace it with a new production and the challenge to do that with a fresh staging falls to the team of Music Director Sir Antonio Pappano and stage director Richard Jones.
In five programmes across the week Radio Four follows Maestro Pappano as the new production takes shape. He works with singers, discusses the particular challenges of operating at the very highest level of Operatic performance and expectation and gives candid insights into the often perilous journey to an opening night.
We also hear from the team both on and off stage who work alongside Pappano, including the young cast who are acutely aware that the production they are replacing opened with singers like Placido Domingo and Sir Thomas Allen. There are also stage directors, set-builders, movement directors and Maestro Pappano's trusted repetiteur. But at the heart of it, in the weeks leading up to opening night and as the curtain rises, is the Music director himself, combining the orchestral brilliance of Puccini's score and the dazzling qualities of the singers on stage to produce what they all hope will be a worthy addition to the Royal Opera House's Puccini tradition.

Producer: Tom Alban.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b093hwkn)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b09534g9)
Just a Girl, Episode 5

The third series continuing the journey of Amy, just your average 13 year old transgender child in the modern world.

A very ordinary family has come to terms with the less ordinary experience of Amy, who was born Ben. In this third series, Amy chases her dream of musical theatre but there is trouble ahead when a petition is started about which school toilet she uses.

This accessible new drama was inspired by real life experiences.

Thanks to Susie Green and the parents at Mermaids, a charity offering support to gender variant children, teenagers and their families (www.mermaidsuk.org.uk), and the Tavistock Clinic.

Episode 5
Just as the family think everything has been restored, and Amy enjoys taking part in the school musical, there is more trouble in store.

Writer...............................Mark Davies Markham
Piano playing by Sarah Spencer

Co-Producers..............................Polly Thomas and Eloise Whitmore
Production Coordinator...........Sarah Kenny
Executive Producer...............Melanie Harris

A Naked production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:00 The Free Degrees (b09534gg)

The story of the "earn while you learn" degree apprenticeships that are attracting government funds, talented students and high level jobs.

The Degree Apprenticeship, launched in 2015, allows students to combine four years' work experience with studying for a degree. Unlike many other students who leave university with thousands of pounds worth of debt, these are free degrees.

With business partners like pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, Barclays and Pizza Hut, Manchester Metropolitan University is at the forefront of this revolution in higher education. Since 2015, they have seen the number of degree apprenticeship students grow from 60 to almost 700 - working their way through degrees ranging from digital technology to management. The University now has 15 per cent of all degree apprentices in the country.

Samantha Fenwick meets pioneer students Jess, Aaron and Izzy to find out why they chose this route over a traditional degree and how they juggle the pressure of a demanding job with staying on top of university course work.

It's tough, but the rewards are good and - unlike most of their friends - they have money in the bank and can afford holidays and even first houses.

Samantha also hears from employers who are investing heavily in degree apprenticeships as a way of tackling their skills shortages, particularly in areas like software engineering, cyber security and analytics.

Presenter: Samantha Fenwick
Producer: Maria Mcgeoghan
A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 The Rivals (b04vkmhh)
Series 3, The Knight's Cross Signal Problem

Based on a short story by Ernest Bramah.
Dramatised by Chris Harrald.

Inspector Lestrade was made to look a fool in the Sherlock Holmes stories. Now he is writing his memoirs and has a chance to get his own back, with tales of Holmes' rivals. He continues with blind detective Max Carrados as they try to discover who caused a horrific train crash at Knights Cross where the driver of the train swears the light was green and the signalman swears the light was red.

Directed by Liz Webb

Episode by Chris Harrald inspired by the short story 'The Knight's Cross Signal Problem' by Ernest Bramah: http://fullreads.com/literature/the-knights-cross-signal-problem/.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b093hwkr)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b08yg2wl)
22 September 1917 - Sylvia Graham

On this day in 1917, the National Health Insurance Commission recommended free treatment of all invalided soldiers and sailors, and in Folkestone, in the final episode of Season 11, Sylvia Graham tries to make amends.

Home Front returns on 13 November with a new season set in Tynemouth

Written by Shaun McKenna & Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 12:15 Four Seasons (b09534gq)
Autumn

Four Seasons returns with poems of autumn, old and new, read by actors and poets to mark the turning of the year.


FRI 12:18 You and Yours (b093hwkt)

Consumer news and issues.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b093hwkx)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b093hwkz)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


FRI 13:43 Four Seasons (b095fx0h)
Autumn

Four Seasons returns with poems of autumn, old and new, read by actors and poets to mark the turning of the year.


FRI 13:45 Join the Dots (b09534h0)
Series 1, The Dancing Dot

Janet Ellis explores our love affair with the polka-dot and what it says about us.

The simple dot is one of the first marks man ever made. From being a word we uttered infrequently, the advent of digital has made it one we use all the time.

The dot. We wear it, listen to it, read it and gaze on it. We send it through the air and under the waves. Each programme in this series circles a different aspect of this simple mark.

Contributors include film and TV costume designer Leonie Hartard, designer Cressida Bell, and a clown, Mattie Faint.

Producer: Caroline Raphael
A Dora production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b0952zlr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b095382z)
Lying Low

Stephen Wakelam's new play about Samuel Beckett's mysterious three-week stay in Folkestone in March 1961.

The playwright checks deliberately into a quiet hotel under a pseudonym and it's here that he befriends Janet who works part-time at the hotel while studying for her French A-level. They bond over an Agatha Christie novel. This burgeoning friendship tests Janet's loyalties, presenting her with a dilemma she needs to resolve.

Pianist ..... Pete Ringrose

Produced and directed by Gemma Jenkins

This clever blend of fact and fantasy is inspired by the three weeks Samuel Beckett spent in Folkestone prior to his marrying his long-term partner, Suzanne Deschevaux-Dumesnil. He checked into the Bristol Hotel on Folkestone Leas under the pseudonym, Mr S Barclay, instructing his close friends to keep absolutely quiet about his whereabouts.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b0953831)
70th Anniversary Garden Party at Ness Botanic Gardens: Part One

Eric Robson hosts a very special edition from Ness Botanic Gardens where GQT held its 70th birthday garden party. On the anniversary panel with Eric are Matt Biggs, Anne Swithinbank, Matthew Wilson - alongside returning panellist and special guest Roy Lancaster.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:35 BBC National Short Story Award (b095386s)
BBC National Short Story Award 2017, The Waken by Jenni Fagan

Shortlisted stories in contention for the BBC National Short Story Award 2017.


FRI 16:00 Four Seasons (b095fx0k)
Autumn

Four Seasons returns with poems of autumn, old and new, read by actors and poets to mark the turning of the year.


FRI 16:03 Last Word (b0953bdl)

Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b0953bdx)

Investigating the numbers in the news.


FRI 17:00 PM (b093hwl1)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 17:58 Four Seasons (b095fx0m)
Autumn

Four Seasons returns with poems of autumn, old and new, read by actors and poets to mark the turning of the year.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b093hwl3)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b0953bdz)
Series 93, 22/09/2017

Satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Miles Jupp.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b0953bf1)

David will not bend the rules, and it is a busy night at The Bull.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b093hwl5)

News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b09534g9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b094hn4t)

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Lancing College in West Sussex.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b0953bf3)

A reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b08yg6pn)
18-22 September 1917

The final omnibus of Season 11, Broken and Mad, set in Folkestone, in the week, in 1917, when the National Health Insurance Commission recommended free treatment for all invalided soldiers and sailors, and in Folkestone, Dorothea prepares for her first day back at the Bevan hospital.

Written by Shaun McKenna and Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole

Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews

Home Front returns on 13 November with a new season set in Tynemouth.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b093hwl7)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Short Works (b0953bf5)
BBC National Short Story Award 2017, Memento Mori

Five commissioned short stories to celebrate the BBC National Short Story Award :

5. 'Memento Mori' by Stephanie Victoire.

The photographer is hired to take a portrait shot of Ada. Then someone else appears in the frame..

Reader Carl Prekopp

Producer Duncan Minshull.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b0952qq7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:25 A Good Read (b06j21bx)
Fraser Nelson and Adam Mars-Jones

Editor of The Spectator Fraser Nelson and critic Adam Mars-Jones talk about books they admire with Harriett Gilbert. Adam recommends I Knew The Bride, a moving collection of poems by Hugo Williams, and Fraser's choice is an historical novel of great relevance now: The Emigrants by Vilhelm Moberg. Harriett brings along Rum Punch by Elmore Leonard, which was adapted into the film Jackie Brown by Quentin Tarantino.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


FRI 23:55 Four Seasons (b095fx0q)
Autumn

Four Seasons returns with poems of autumn, old and new, read by actors and poets to mark the turning of the year.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b09528ch)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b09528ch)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b0952ph4)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b0952ph4)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b0952stw)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b0952stw)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b0952zl7)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b0952zl7)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b09534g9)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b09534g9)

A Good Read 23:30 MON (b082hg9l)

A Good Read 23:30 TUE (b06zrzx5)

A Good Read 23:30 WED (b05nvfr1)

A Good Read 23:30 THU (b06kcbw6)

A Good Read 23:25 FRI (b06j21bx)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b093hf95)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b0953bf3)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b09310jn)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b093hf93)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b094hn4t)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b095fvqy)

Art in Miniature 11:30 THU (b0952zlc)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b093hwh1)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b093hwh1)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 MON (b0952dzs)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 TUE (b0952qq3)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 WED (b0952sv6)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:30 THU (b0952zlk)

BBC National Short Story Award 15:35 FRI (b095386s)

Before They Were Famous 23:15 WED (b05xh3nk)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b094rkpy)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b094rkpy)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b0952jkc)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b095bdhw)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b09526h6)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b09526h6)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b0952ph2)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b0952ph2)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b0952stt)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b0952stt)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b0952zl5)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b0952zl5)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b09534g7)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b093hw2x)

Bunk Bed 23:00 THU (b0952zm0)

Charlotte and Lillian 23:00 WED (b095g3xb)

Choral History of Britain 09:00 WED (b0952str)

Choral History of Britain 21:30 WED (b0952str)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b0952svl)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b0938k8x)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b0952dzq)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b0939wgq)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b0952zl9)

David Baddiel Tries to Understand 20:45 WED (b0952svj)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b094s2s6)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b094s2s6)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b071h2x6)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b08tbvv6)

Drama 14:15 MON (b0952dzn)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b0952qpz)

Drama 14:15 WED (b0952sv4)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b095382z)

Elvis McGonagall Takes a Look on the Bright Side 23:15 THU (b0435j99)

Fags, Mags and Bags 11:30 MON (b0952b1r)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b09310hx)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b093hw5m)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b093hw8l)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b093hwcm)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b093hwgl)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b093hwkj)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b0938tnj)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b0952qqf)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b094s2sb)

Four Seasons 12:15 FRI (b09534gq)

Four Seasons 13:43 FRI (b095fx0h)

Four Seasons 16:00 FRI (b095fx0k)

Four Seasons 17:58 FRI (b095fx0m)

Four Seasons 23:55 FRI (b095fx0q)

From Our Home Correspondent 13:30 SUN (b094s2sg)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b09310j9)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b093hw68)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b093hw96)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b093hwdb)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b093hwh7)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b093hwl5)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b093hdky)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b0953831)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b0952qq7)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b0952qq7)

Hiding Out 19:45 SUN (b094s2t5)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b08yg6pn)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b08yg2gw)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b08yg2jp)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b08yg2m8)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b08yg2rf)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b08yg2wl)

Ian Sansom Is Falling 23:30 SAT (b0931gt1)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b093b1x0)

In Business 20:30 THU (b0952zlw)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b0952zl3)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b0952zl3)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b093hw98)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b0952qqh)

John Shuttleworth's Lounge Music 18:30 WED (b082wwlw)

Join the Dots 13:45 MON (b0952b9y)

Join the Dots 13:45 TUE (b0952qpx)

Join the Dots 13:45 WED (b0952sv2)

Join the Dots 13:45 THU (b0952zlf)

Join the Dots 13:45 FRI (b09534h0)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b0938k91)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b0952jkf)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b093hf8s)

Last Word 16:03 FRI (b0953bdl)

Laverne in the Willows 11:30 TUE (b071vlmg)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b09310k7)

Make It Real 16:30 SUN (b094hm67)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b09310h6)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b093hw24)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b093hw59)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b093hw88)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b093hwc9)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b093hwg8)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b093hwk6)

Midnight's Children 15:00 SUN (b094s2sq)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b093hv5w)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b093hv5w)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b093hwd2)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b093hf8v)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b0953bdx)

Mr Muzak 19:15 SUN (b094hm69)

My Muse 16:00 MON (b0952jk9)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b0938p7q)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b0952ph6)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b09310hp)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b093hw2d)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b093hw5k)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b093hw8j)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b093hwck)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b093hwgj)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b093hwkg)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b093hw2g)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b09310jc)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b093hw31)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b093hw5w)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b093hw8t)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b093hwct)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b093hwgs)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b093hwkr)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b09310hv)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b093hw2n)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b093hw2v)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b09310kk)

News 13:00 SAT (b09310jl)

No Place of Greater Safety 11:00 MON (b09525dm)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b094s0jj)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b0952ph0)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b094s2sv)

Original British Dramatists 2015 14:15 THU (b05xd508)

Owning Colour 09:30 WED (b08lh65s)

PM 17:00 SAT (b09310jw)

PM 17:00 MON (b093hw64)

PM 17:00 TUE (b093hw92)

PM 17:00 WED (b093hwd6)

PM 17:00 THU (b093hwh3)

PM 17:00 FRI (b093hwl1)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b093hw3f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b093hfpf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b094s3ks)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b0962glx)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b096hc2v)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b096lb91)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b096nj7l)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b093hvb7)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b093hvb7)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b093hvb7)

Punt PI 10:30 SAT (b093hv5r)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b094s0jl)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b094s0jl)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b094s0jl)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b0939xjz)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b0952zlh)

Relativity 11:30 WED (b0952sv0)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b09310j7)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b09310k9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b09310hh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b093hw28)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b093hw5f)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b093hw8d)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b093hwcf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b093hwgd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b093hwkb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b09310hc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b09310hm)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b09310jy)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b093hw26)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b093hw2b)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b093hw37)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b093hw5c)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b093hw5h)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b093hw8b)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b093hw8g)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b093hwcc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b093hwch)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b093hwgb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b093hwgg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b093hwk8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b093hwkd)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b0952qq1)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (b093hdl0)

Short Works 22:45 MON (b0952jv5)

Short Works 22:45 TUE (b0952qqk)

Short Works 22:45 WED (b0952svn)

Short Works 22:45 THU (b0952zly)

Short Works 22:45 FRI (b0953bf5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b09310k5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b093hw3c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b093hw66)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b093hw94)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b093hwd8)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b093hwh5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b093hwl3)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b093hw2j)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b093hw2j)

Spotlight Tonight with Nish Kumar 23:00 TUE (b0952qqm)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b0952587)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b0952587)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b094s0jn)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b093hw2q)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b093hw2z)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b094s2sz)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b094s2sz)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b0952jkh)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b0952jkh)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b0952qqc)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b0952qqc)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b0952svd)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b0952svd)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b0952zlr)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b0952zlr)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b0953bf1)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b0952zlt)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b0939zyc)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b0952zlm)

The Free Degrees 11:00 FRI (b09534gg)

The Frontline Prince 20:00 MON (b0952jkk)

The Frontline Prince 11:00 WED (b0952jkk)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b0952pgy)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b0952pgy)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b094s2sl)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b0952sty)

The Listening Project 16:55 WED (b0952svb)

The Listening Project 23:55 WED (b0952svq)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b093hwd4)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b093hf8z)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b0953bdz)

The Rivals 11:30 FRI (b04vkmhh)

The Tim Vine Chat Show 18:30 TUE (b0952qq9)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b093hw35)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b093hw6b)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b093hw9b)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b093hwdd)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b093hwh9)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b093hwl7)

Thinking Allowed 00:17 MON (b0939gm2)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b0952sv8)

Tick Box Art 15:30 SAT (b0938p7s)

Today 07:00 SAT (b095pkp6)

Today 06:00 MON (b093hw5r)

Today 06:00 TUE (b093hw8n)

Today 06:00 WED (b093hwcp)

Today 06:00 THU (b093hwgn)

Today 06:00 FRI (b093hwkl)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b09388dz)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03nt7vc)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b0952pgw)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b0952stp)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b0952zl1)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b09534fz)

Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b0939hpt)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b0952svg)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b09310j2)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b09310jj)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b09310k3)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b093hw2l)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b093hw2s)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b093hw33)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b093hw39)

Weather 05:56 MON (b093hw5p)

Weather 12:57 MON (b093hw60)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b093hw8y)

Weather 12:57 WED (b093hwcy)

Weather 12:57 THU (b093hwgx)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b093hwkx)

Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b093hv5t)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b093hw3h)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b09310jt)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b093hw5t)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b093hw8r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b093hwcr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b093hwgq)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b093hwkn)

Women Talking About Cars 18:30 THU (b0952zlp)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b0938p81)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b0952qq5)

World at One 13:00 MON (b093hw62)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b093hw90)

World at One 13:00 WED (b093hwd0)

World at One 13:00 THU (b093hwgz)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b093hwkz)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b093hw5y)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b093hw8w)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b093hwcw)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b093hwgv)

You and Yours 12:18 FRI (b093hwkt)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b093hfph)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b093hfph)