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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 01 JULY 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b08vwnc8)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b08x9813)
Believe Me, Episode 5

When Eddie Izzard was six, he and his brother Mark lost their mother. That day, he lost his childhood too.

From early childhood memories of happy days running with a gang of local kids, doing naughty-ish things in Bangor, County Down, to months of loneliness and isolation at boarding school, Eddie Izzard has experienced loss in a way that no child should at such a tender age. And this, as well as struggling both with dyslexia and also trying to understand his gender and sexuality issues at a time when they were not openly discussed, leads to a fascinating insight into the early life of one of Britain's most idiosyncratic and cerebral of performers.

In his memoir, Eddie takes us on a journey through his life - one during which he has discovered much about himself along the way, and come to terms with not fitting into the box that most of us like to put people in.

With a nod to the surreal humour and disarming candour of his shows, and some occasional digressions, Believe Me tells the story of a little boy who lost his mother yet who has risen to become a star of comedy and drama, a leading advocate of total clothing rights, and an extreme runner of marathons.

Written and read by Eddie Izzard
Directed by Lizzie Davies
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08vwncb)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08vwncd)

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08vwncg)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b08vwncj)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08w14rm)

A reading and a reflection to start the day with the Rev'd Dr Stephen Wigley, Chair of the Wales Synod of the Methodist Church.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b08wm52q)
Is my tower block safe?

After the Grenfell tragedy, a former firefighter investigates his own high-rise tower block in Manchester.
iPM is the news programme that starts with its listeners. Email ipm@bbc.co.uk. Twitter: @BBCiPM. Presented by Luke Jones and Eddie Mair.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b08vwncl)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b08vwncn)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b08vzq7t)
Wimbledon

When Andy Murray steps out onto Centre Court to defend his 2016 title at the All England Lawn and Tennis Club in Wimbledon it will be the culmination of a year's work by a team of people who dedicate their lives to this iconic sporting landscape. Alison Mitchell takes a break from the commentary box to go behind the scenes of this iconic sporting venue.

Starting on the roof of the broadcast centre she speaks to Ashley Jones from Wimbledon Museum about how the grounds have moved twice since the club was founded in 1868, and explains how a broken piece of garden equipment led to the inception of the Championships.

Alison describes the Centre Court commentary box as an 'Alice in Wonderland' moment, and squeezes through its narrow doors, ducking under its low ceilings to speak to John Barrett about his life-long relationship with the Championships from visiting as a boy, to later playing there, and then his many years commentating for the BBC including that epic 1980 men's final between John McEnroe and Bjorn Borg.

She goes court-side with Head Groundsman Neil Stubley to talk about the upkeep of the playing surface, before joining Johnny Perkins on 'Henman Hill' to find out how this patch of spare ground has become an integral part of the Championship experience.

For podcast subscribers there's also an interview with Ronald McIntosh about how his first assignment at Wimbledon turned into the longest-running match in tennis history with John Isner triumphing over Nicholas Mahut 70-68 in the final set, an encounter now marked by a plaque at Court 18.

Producer: Toby Field.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b08vwncq)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b08vwncs)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b08wlc6b)

News and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b08vwncv)
Judy Murray

With Judy Murray, Wolfgang Puck, chef who's catered to the Oscars for 23 years, British female racing driver Jamie Chadwick, and Inheritance Tracks from Ute Lemper.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08wm8zp)
Series 17, Yeovil

Jay Rayner and the culinary panel are in Yeovil. Zoe Laughlin, Silvana Franco, Tim Anderson and Rob Owen Brown answer the audience questions.

Up for discussion this week are eggs of all varieties - including how to cook the perfect fried egg, silicon kitchenware, and edible plants.

Producer: Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b08wm8zr)

Sam Coates of the Times looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b08vwncx)
Strange Locations and Free Minds

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b08vwncz)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b08wm8zt)
Is dynamic pricing coming to a supermarket near you?

The latest news from the world of personal finance.


SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (b08w11zk)
Series 18, 30/06/2017

Recorded the day before transmission, the satirical sketch show remains as sharp and topical as ever. Impressions and caricatures are the charming couriers of explosively satirical truth-bombs.

The series is written by Private Eye writers Tom Jamieson and Nev Fountain, together with Tom Coles, Ed Amsden, Sarah Campbell, Laurence Howarth, James Bugg, Laura Major, Max Davis, Jack Bernhardt and others.

The series stars Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Lewis MacLeod, Deborah Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey.

A BBC Studios Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b08vwnd1)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b08vwnd3)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b08w11zp)
Owen Smith MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from The Braid Museum and Arts Centre in Ballymena County Antrim with Owen Smith the Shadow Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b08vwnd5)

Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions?. Email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Tweet,#BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.
Lines open at 1230 on Saturday 03700 100 444.

Presenter Anita Anand
Producer: Maire Devine
Editor Eleanor Garland.


SAT 14:30 Dangerous Visions (b08wm8zw)
Darkness at Noon

By Arthur Koestler
Adapted by Simon Scardifield

At the height of the media attention during the Monica Lewinsky scandal, US President Bill Clinton reportedly referred to Arthur Koestler's novel, telling an aide, "I feel like the character in the novel Darkness at Noon....I am surrounded by an oppressive force that is creating a lie about me and I can't get the truth out."

Clinton was referring to Nicholas Rubashov, the protagonist of Koestler's novel inspired by the Moscow Trials of Stalin's Russia. Rubashov, once a powerful player in the regime, finds the tables turned on him when he is imprisoned and psychologically tortured. His reflections on his previous life and experiences in prison are at the heart of this thought-provoking masterpiece.

Written after Koestler became disillusioned with Communism, Darkness at Noon is a moving and thought-provoking indictment of totalitarianism. Simon Scardifield's new adaptation draws on Koestler's original manuscript - which had been thought lost for 75 years, after Koestler hurriedly fled Paris before the German occupation in 1940, only to be recently discovered in a Zurich library.

Directed by Sasha Yevtushenko.


SAT 15:30 Laura Barton's Notes from a Musical Island (b08vy0yd)
Series 2, Surf and Furze

Laura Barton takes a close listen to the music of one of Britain's long-isolated locations, Cornwall.

The tradition of communal singing known as a Shout hasn't just survived in Cornwall. As Laura discovers in a pub outside Redruth, it's thriving. In a bar packed with young and old, songs about mining and fishing, in Cornish and English, compete with hymns and the occasional import from overseas, in high energy performances that define an oral tradition. None are sung more full-heartedly than Kerra Kernow, beloved Cornwall.

Laura talks with Hilary Coleman of the celebrated Cornish folk group Dalla about the qualities of the folk tradition in the Duchy and with two singer-songwriters. Florence MacDonald, who also teaches music in primary schools, describes what drew her back to Cornwall, and Ruarri Joseph, aka William the Conqueror, considers the balance he maintains between the demands of touring and the allure of the surf off Newquay and the woods and hills of his childhood home.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b08vwnd7)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Takeover Guest Editor Best Bits

The actor and playwright Zawe Ashton discusses her feelings of anxiety and fear of getting her period on stage. The psychologist Philippa Perry tells us how common it is for women when they are under pressure and what it says about how we and society view the female body.

The author and illustrator Shirley Hughes gives us a masterclass for aspiring picture book writers and illustrators with the Freelance designer Ness Wood and the Editorial Director of Children's picture books at Penguin, Andrea Macdonald.

Dame Ann Dowling the first woman to become President of the Royal Academy of Engineering discusses her love of Opera. The Opera singer and teacher Nelly Miricioiu and her student Hanna-Liisa Kirchin on piano illustrate the operatic voice.

The five times Paralympic swimming champion Ellie Simmonds tells us about her newly discovered love of travelling solo. Amy Baker the author of Miss-adventures: A tale of ignoring life advice while back packing around South America and Sophie Radice discuss the ups and downs of going abroad alone.

Karen Blackett the Chair of Mediacom tells us about her guilty pleasure - watching TV dating shows like The Bachelor and The Millionaire Matchmaker. We hear from the series editor of Channel 4's First Dates Lana Salah and the journalist and blogger Daisy Buchanan about their appeal.

We have music from the singer songwriter Ayanna Witter-Johnson - another of Zawe Ashton's choices.

And Shirley Hughes discusses making her own clothes and hats and some of the funny feedback she gets from the children who read her books.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b08vwnd9)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b08vzq84)
Land - the mother of all monopolies

Evan Davis presents the business magazine.


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08vwndc)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b08vwndf)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08vwndh)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b08vwndk)
Alice Cooper, Eddie Izzard, Tape Face, Elkie Brooks, Poppy Ajudha, Emma Freud, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Emma Freud are joined by Alice Cooper, Eddie Izzard and Tape Face for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy With music from Elkie Brooks and Poppy Ajudha.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b08wmcyc)
Sir Martin Moore-Bick

Mark Coles profiles Sir Martin Moore-Bick, the retired judge leading the public inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire

Sir Martin was born in Wales and educated at Cambridge. His career has spanned nearly five decades after being called to the Bar in 1969.
As a lawyer, he specialised in commercial law which involved dealing with disputes relating to maritime and land transport of goods.
He was a judge for more than twenty years in the Commercial Court and Court of Appeal until his retirement in 2016.

Producers: Smita Patel and Jordan Dunbar.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b08vwndm)
Alone In Berlin, Ink, Christopher Wilson, White Cube, Earl Slick and Lied

Emma Thompson and Brendan Gleeson in a film adaptation of Hans Fallada's novel Alone In Berlin - based on a true story of small scale wartime heroism.
Ink - a play about Rupert Murdoch's acquisition of The Sun in 1969 and the grubby world of redtop journalism.Opening at London's Almeida Theatre.
Christopher Wilson's novel; Zoo, a comedy set in Stalin's dying days, about a boy who inadvertently becomes the food taster for The Man of Iron
Dreamers Awake is a new exhibition at White Cube Gallery looking at women in the Surrealist movement and its lasting influence on female artists
2 TV music documentaries about famous rock sideman including Earl Slick (who played guitar with David Bowie, John Lennon and many more) and Becoming a Lied Singer in which Baritone Thomas Quasthoff gives his personal guide to Lieder - poems of nature, love and death for solo voice and piano.
Tom Sutcliffe's guests will be Stephen Hough, Georgie Hopton and Natalie Haynes. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b08wmcyf)
The Thirty Year Itch

In 2008, the Crash delivered a severe challenge to the economic liberalism that had long dominated our politics. Ever since, British politicians have been searching for a new big idea that can shape the next few decades, as economic and social liberalism has shaped our lives up to today.

And now, a range of commentators are telling us that the general election has brought all this to crisis point.

So - how can we make sense of all this? To get a glimpse of what the future may hold, we need to look back to the past.

Because this isn't the first time a dominant set of ideas has broken down. The Keynesian 'consensus' ruled from the Second World War, based around full employment - until after thirty years, it broke down amid 1970s strikes and stagflation and Thatcherism took over.

And before that, an earlier version of global liberal economics dominated - until the Wall Street Crash and the Depression laid the ground for the postwar welfare state.

So in this programme, documentary-maker Phil Tinline tells the dramatic story of the breakdown of the post-war approach, through the epic fights of the Seventies - and uses it to try to work out where we're up to today.

He talks to historians and politicians about the way the 1970s became a battle for power between government and trade unions, which ended in Mrs Thatcher's victory. And he hears from thinkers - variously labelled 'Blue Labour', 'Red Tory' and 'post-liberal' - who have been arguing ever since the Crash that the new battle for power is against both centralised government and big corporations.

Over the last few years, leading figures in both big parties have tried to use these ideas to take on concentrations of power and break through to a new orthodoxy. But, like those politicians who challenged the power of the trade unions in the 1970s, they have repeatedly come up against the power of the status quo and the taboos that underpinned it.

So - does the election, and the struggle over the meaning of Brexit, mean that these ideas might now find their moment? Or does the story of the 1970s actually suggest that we might be simply heading back to something more like the big-government model of the post-war years?

Speakers include: Phillip Blond, Rowenna Davis, Maurice Glasman, David Goodhart, Dominic Sandbrook, David Skelton, Peter Snowdon.

Producer/ Presenter: Phil Tinline.


SAT 21:00 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07ks4mb)
Series 1, Omnibus

Bridget Kendall presents a new oral history of the early turning points in the Cold War.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b08vwndp)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (b08vy0y6)
Hilary Mantel, Silence Grips the Town

The story of how an obsessive relationship with history killed the young Polish writer Stanislawa Przybyszewska, told by best-selling author, Hilary Mantel. The brilliant Przybyszewska wrote gargantuan plays and novels about the French Revolution, in particular about the revolutionary leader Robespierre. She lived in self-willed poverty and isolation and died unknown in 1934. But her work, so painfully achieved, did survive her. Was her sacrifice worthwhile? "She embodied the past until her body ceased to be," Dame Hilary says. "Multiple causes of death were recorded, but actually she died of Robespierre."

Over the course of these five lectures, she discusses the role that history plays in our lives. How do we view the past, she asks, and what is our relationship with the dead? The lecture is recorded before an audience in the ancient Vleeshuis in Antwerp, a city which features in Mantel's novels about Thomas Cromwell and the cosmopolitan world of the early Tudors. The lecture is followed by a question and answer session chaired by Sue Lawley.

The producer is Jim Frank.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b08vxt13)
Series 7, The University of Liverpool

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from the University of Liverpool with specialist subjects including Physiology, Egyptology and Psychology and questions ranging from the great god Ammit, the Eater of the Dead, to Buzz Aldrin and from gallstones to Gershwin.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Justin Bieber. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Roehampton, Hull, Queen's University Belfast and St John's College, Cambridge.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 The Honky Tonk Nun (b08mb1ft)

Kate Molleson travels to Jerusalem to meet a legend of Ethiopian music, the piano-playing nun, Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guèbrou.

Born in 1923 to a noble Ethiopian family, Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam Guèbrou was celebrated as a young musician in Addis Ababa - even performing for the Emperor Haile Selassie. But when she was mysteriously refused permission to take up a scholarship at the Royal Academy of Music in London, her life changed forever, and she abandoned music.

For 10 years she lived on the holy mountain of Guishen, barefoot, in solitary prayer and meditation, until the monastery had to close and Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam headed home to Addis Ababa. There, she slowly returned to the piano keyboard, composing languorous waltzes, infected with the spirit of ancient Ethiopian music and with a free-wheeling sense of time.

In 1996, as her music became the 21st release in the now famous Ethiopiques series of records, she came to international attention. By this time she had fled the communist regime in Ethiopia and moved to Jerusalem to work for the Ethiopian Orthodox Patriarchy, where she now lives in a small cell, surrounded by her religious paintings, photographs of her family and of Emperor Haile Selassie propped up on top of her piano.

In recent years she has been moved to publish her work, editing a lifetime of manuscripts with the help of the Israeli musician and composer Maya Dunietz, and has set up a foundation in her name to help children to acquire instruments and music education.

A long time fan of Emahoy Tsegué-Maryam's music, journalist Kate Molleson talks with the musician turned nun who, now in her 90s, has led a remarkable life and is still driven to compose her unique music.

Produced by Peter Meanwell
A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4.



SUNDAY 02 JULY 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b08wmjnf)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Short Works (b08w0znd)
Series 1, Super Rich Kids

A young girl growing up amongst extreme wealth finds comfort in her shabbiest possessions. This new story by Molly McGrann is inspired by the Frank Ocean track.
Read by Camille Marmié
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08wmjnh)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08wmjnk)

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08wmjnm)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b08wmjnp)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b08wmmw7)
Church of Saints Probus & Grace, Cornwall

Church bells from the Church of Saints Probus & Grace, Cornwall.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b08wmcyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b08wmjnr)

The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b08wmjnw)
What Would Happen If?

Writer and priest Malcolm Doney argues that imagination is central to almost every decision we make. For Malcolm, conscious, imaginative thinking is essentially the basis of what it means to be human.

Malcolm draws upon the story of Jesus who himself left no written manifesto. In his physical absence, Jesus' followers were left with the imaginative project of living lives modelled on his. They had to re-imagine a new life without him.

Malcolm explores the work of Nobel Prize winner Peter Medawar, historian Yuval Noah Harari, as well as poets John Koethe and Emily Dickinson. Using this diverse array of sources, Malcolm reveals that imagination is vital to the progress of science and lies at the beating heart of music. He concludes that ultimately, imagination is fundamental to empathy and at the core of that most life-giving command "love thy neighbour as thyself".

Presenter: Malcolm Doney
Producer: Jonathan O'Sullivan
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 The Living World (b08wmmw9)
A Shell Nesting Bee

Brett Westwood relives programmes from The Living World archives. In this episode from 2014, Trai Anfield is in Dorset with naturalist John Walters.

Solitary bees build their nests in some interesting places, but none more so than Osmia bicolor, a mason bee that's preferred real estate is the empty shells of snails. Emerging in spring a few weeks after the males, the mated female spends two days lining and provisioning the shell before laying her eggs and sealing the shell. But she's not finished yet. Perhaps to prevent hungry predators in search of its original slimy occupant from destroying her nest, the snail bee hides the shell under a wigwam of twigs and sticks. Join presenter

Trai Anfield and naturalist John Walters as they look for this pioneering little bee on the chalk hillsides above Cerne Abbas.

Producer Andrew Dawes.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b08wmjny)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b08wmjp0)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b08wmjp2)
The first Archbishop of New York, Muslim leadership, Angels

Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme, presented by Edward Stourton.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b08wmmwc)
Coram

Peter Capaldi makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Coram.

Registered Charity Number 312278
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Coram'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Coram'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b08wmjp4)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b08wmjp6)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b08wmmwh)
On this rock I will build my church

Petertide is one of the traditional periods for the ordination of new priests and deacons. This morning we join the Bishop of Dorking, the Rt Revd Dr Jo Bailey Wells at Guildford Cathedral as she presides at an ordination service for the first time as a Bishop. Some of the candidates for ordination offer reflections on their call to ministry and their hopes for the future. The preacher is the Bishop of Guildford, the Rt Revd Andrew Watson. The Guildford Cathedral Girls Choir are directed by Katherine Dienes-Williams and accompanied by Richard Moore. Producer: Andrew Earis.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b08w11zr)
The Mark of a Man

"It seems indisputable, to me", writes Will Self "that what makes it possible for our attractions to each other to be as deep and profound as they are, is some sort of difference - whether it be given, or something we create".

Will reflects on what a truly gender-fluid society might look like.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b08vxt0j)
Gary Moore on the Capercaillie

Wildlife sound recordist Gary Moore describes for Tweet of the Day, the surprising encounter he had with capercaillie when in the Scottish Highlands.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Tom Bonnett.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b08wmjpc)

Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b08wmjpf)

Lilian has a lot on her mind, and Harrison thinks it is time to move on.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b08wmmwn)
Professor Carlo Rovelli

Kirsty Young's castaway is the theoretical physicist, Professor Carlo Rovelli. His book 'Seven Brief Lessons on Physics' became one of the fastest-selling science titles of all time, catapulting him from the world of academia into the global spotlight. Committed to bridging the gap between science and art and making complex scientific issues comprehensible for the lay person, he is currently Professor of Physics at Aix-Marseille University.

Born in Verona, and an only child, he was encouraged to learn, to be independent and dreamed of travelling through space. By the age of 12 his long-standing rebellious streak was visible and he would later interrupt his university career to travel. Now in his early sixties, his academic career has seen him work in Europe and America and among the scientific community he is best known as one of the founders of Loop Quantum Gravity theory.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b08wmjph)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b08vxv2y)
Series 67, Episode 1

The 67th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning 'antidote to panel games' promises yet more quality, desk-based entertainment for all the family. The series starts its run at the Yvonne Arnaud Theatre in Guildford where regulars Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are joined on the panel Andy Hamilton and Jo Brand, with Jack Dee as the programme's reluctant chairman. Regular listeners will know to expect inspired nonsense, pointless revelry and Colin Sell at the piano. Producer - Jon Naismith. It is a BBC Studios production.


SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b08wmmwq)
Hunting with the Hadza

Dan Saladino eats with one of the last remaining hunter gatherer tribes, Tanzania's Hadza.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b08wmjpk)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b08wmjpm)

Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 Learning from Life and Death (b08wmpnl)
Series 1, 02/07/2017

Part one of a three-part series, in which the journalist and author Matthew Syed explores how and why individuals and organisations learn from their mistakes or fail to do so. He explores the common obstacles to learning lessons from experience and how they can be surmounted.

The series follows a wide-ranging approach, taking in government and public services such as the NHS and the Police, the commercial world from aviation to Google, the role of education, and underlying principles of psychology and philosophy, scientific method and individual decision-making.

Interviewees in the series include the comedian John Cleese, the entrepreneur Richard Branson, the inventor James Dyson, the campaigner Alastair Campbell, and Sara Thornton, head of the National Police Chiefs Council, as well as others from the fields of medicine, education, social work, manufacturing, government policy and academic research.

Producer: Martin Rosenbaum.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08w0znb)
Folkestone

Eric Robson and his panel of experts visit Folkestone. Pippa Greenwood, Matt Biggs and Bob Flowerdew answer the horticultural questions from the audience.

This week the panellists discuss lemon/lime varieties to grow in an orangery, the best homemade feeds for flowering plants, and ways to rid your greenhouse of ants.

Also, Matt Biggs buzzes off to the RSPB Dungeness to investigate all things bees.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Phil Barrett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b08wmwyw)
Omnibus - The World According to Boys

Fi Glover introduces conversations about re-constructed families, good behaviour and dealing with a stammer in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b08wmwyy)
A Perfect Spy, Episode 1

by John le Carré
1/3. 'Love is whatever you can still betray. Betrayal can only happen if you love.' So says Magnus Pym, the spy of the title; and he has betrayed a lot in his life - countries, friends and lovers. When Magnus disappears after his father's funeral MI6 launches an urgent manhunt to prevent his defection. Dramatised by Robert Forrest.

Other parts are played by the cast.
Director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland.


SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b08wmyc1)
Deborah Levy - Swimming Home

Deborah Levy discusses her novel Swimming Home with James Naughtie and a group of readers.

Swimming Home was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2012 and is about a famous British poet on holiday with family and friends on the French Riviera when an unstable young woman, Kitty Finch, turns up out of the blue. At the beginning of the novel she emerges naked from the villa's swimming pool as the group return from a day trip.

From this moment a tangled web of relationships is pulled apart, testing the characters to the limit and exposing all their anxieties and their fears - with the swimming pool at centre stage of the story.

Kitty is obsessed with the poet Joe, and is determined he should read a long poem of her own, also called Swimming Home. Through the novel, she exposes a crack in the marriage of Joe and Isobel his war correspondent wife, watched on by their 14 year old daughter and the neighbour Madeleine.

Presenter : James Naughtie
Interviewed guest : Deborah Levy
Producer : Dymphna Flynn

August's Bookclub choice : Bel Canto by Ann Patchett (2001).


SUN 16:30 Hadraawi: The Shakespeare of Somalia (b08wmyc3)

BBC Africa Editor Mary Harper meets Somalia's most beloved poet in a rare glimpse into the country's soul.

In Hargeisa, the capital of the self-declared Republic of Somaliland, everyone knows the nation's most famous living poet - Hadraawi. They call him their Shakespeare. His work over the last 50 years has given voice to Somalis' desire for love, freedom, justice and peace.

The poetry of Mohamed Ibrahim Warsame 'Hadraawi' holds a mirror up to all aspects of life - social tensions, politics, love, peace and the fractures of the Somali people. Born in 1943 to a nomadic camel-herding family, forged as a poet in Somalia's liberal years pre-1969, jailed in 1973 for 'anti-revolutionary activities' without trial under the military junta, a campaigner for peace, Hadraawi's poetry tells the story of modern Somalia.

Now in his 70s, this encounter with Hadraawi at his home in Somaliland was recorded just as the first rains fell after the devastating three-year drought. The self-declared republic is rarely seen by the outside world, as the shadow cast by the ongoing violence in Somalia to the south is long. But it's a place Mary Harper has come to know and love during 25 years writing about and reporting on Somalia for the BBC. It is a nation of poets, where poetry is woven deep into the fabric of everyday life.

Poems featured are from Hadraawi: The Poet and the Man, published by Ponte Invisible/Redsea Online/The Poetry Translation Centre. Clarity translated by WN Herbert and Said Jama Hussein, and The Killing of the She-Camel translated by WN Herbert, Said Jama Hussein and Maxamed Xasan 'Alto'.

Produced by Eve Streeter
A Greenpoint production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b08vyly5)
Children with ME

File on 4 investigates claims that parents whose children suffer from a crippling illness that leaves them sick and permanently exhausted have been falsely accused of child abuse.

Parents of children with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) reveal how they have been investigated and referred for child protection measures on suspicion of a rare form of child abuse known as Fabricated or Induced Illness (FII).

FII, also sometimes known as Munchausen's Syndrome by Proxy, is extremely rare and occurs when a parent or carer exaggerates or deliberately causes the symptoms of a child's illness. One charity says FII is being used inappropriately by education and health professionals. We talk to families who claim the stress caused by this accusation has made their children worse.

With doctors divided over the best way to treat children, what's the impact on families?

Reporter: Matthew Hill
Producer: Nicola Dowling.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b08wmcyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08wmjpp)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b08wmjpr)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08wmjpt)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b08wmjpw)
Antonia Quirke

This week Antonia Quirke's picks writers and musicians reach into the past plucking crystalline moments from their youth and childhood. Glenn Gould playing Bach for comfort; a cake eaten at a party before disaster strikes; breath turning to ice inside a fur hood on the Canadian frontier. From a desolate Garret in Gdansk to the welcoming streets of Sheffield and crowd-pleasing pubs of Cornwall - all via deepest, darkest Peru...


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b08wmyc5)

Harrison's scheme is uncovered, and Tom clears the air.


SUN 19:15 The Absolutely Radio Show (b08wmyc7)
Series 2, Episode 2

The cast of TV's hugely popular sketch show return for their second series on BBC Radio 4. Pete Baikie, Morwenna Banks, Moray Hunter, Gordon Kennedy and John Sparkes revisit some of their much-loved sketch characters, while also introducing some newcomers to the show.

In 2013, the group that made their name on Channel Four in the 1980s and 90s got back together for Radio 4's Sketchorama: Absolutely Special - which won the BBC Audio Drama Award for Best Live Scripted Comedy. The first series of The Absolutely Radio Show picked up a Celtic Media Award nomination for Best Radio Comedy.

Cast:
Peter Baikie
Morwenna Banks
Moray Hunter
Gordon Kennedy
John Sparkes
Gus Beattie
Gordon Kennedy

Produced by Gordon Kennedy and Gus Beattie.
An Absolutely/Gusman production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Hiding Out (b08wmyll)
Series 1, Episode 3

As part of their final Media Degree assessment at NUC in Northern Ireland, three final year university students - Natalie Driver, JJ Collins and Vic Grant - decide to make a podcast about a cold case which happened in Colecastle fourteen years ago. On Saturday April 26th 2003, Toby Ellis was minding his four month old nephew, Derek Ellis. He nipped into his local newsagents and left the pram outside on the street. He claimed he left the child for no longer than two minutes. During this time, the baby was abducted and six days later the infant's body was discovered buried in a nearby wooded area, Mountfort. Cause of death, a blow to the head. No one was ever charged with the murder and the case has remained on-going.

The first episode of Hiding Out is a podcast hosted by one of the students, Natalie; she reveals she is currently in hiding fearing for her safety. Having published their first podcast on The Murder at Colecastle, her fellow student Vic had received a call from someone who had heard the podcast claiming they had new evidence about the day the child was abducted. Vic and JJ met with the source. That was 3 days ago and no one has seen or heard from either Vic or JJ since... The only contact Natalie has received is a text sent from her classmate JJ's phone which reads "We're watching you. Stop this now." Natalie knows their disappearance is clearly linked to digging into the murder of Derek Ellis. If she finds them, she may finally find the truth of what happened in Colecastle. Natalie's nightly podcasts of 'Hiding Out' are attracting more and more interest - #whereisnatalie and #findvicandjj are rife with speculation. Are these three students actually in danger? Or - as their media lecturer believes - is this all an elaborate media hoax?

Gerard Stembridge ..... Writer
GEmma McMullan ..... Series Producer and Director.


SUN 20:00 Feedback (b08w0znj)

As Middle East editor, Jeremy Bowen has one of the BBC's most difficult, and often dangerous, jobs. He sits down with Feedback's Roger Bolton to reflect on his career and his Radio 4 series, Our Man in the Middle East.

Last week, Ed Miliband impressed listeners with an assured week sitting in for Jeremy Vine. This week it's been the turn of former conservative leader Iain Duncan Smith. Feedback listeners pass judgment on how he measures up to his predecessor in the Radio 2 hotseat.

Over the last month, Feedback has been inundated with comments taking issue with how the BBC has covered recent major incidents and terror attacks. The BBC's Director of Editorial Policy and Standards, David Jordan, responds to listeners' questions and explains the BBC's guidelines for dealing with tragic and complex events.

Finally, listeners share their thoughts on Radio 4's Dangerous Visions, a season of dark, disturbing and dystopic drama and readings.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b08w0zng)
Lord Joffe, Michael Bond, Ann Louise Gilligan, Carla Fendi, John Avildsen

Matthew Bannister on

Lord Joffe, the lawyer who defended Nelson Mandela at the infamous Rivonia trial. He went on to co-found the Allied Dunbar insurance company and sat as a Labour peer in the House of Lords.

Michael Bond who created Paddington Bear, the Herbs and the guinea pig Olga Da Polga.

Ann Louise Gilligan the former nun who campaigned for her same sex marriage to be recognised in Irish law.

Carla Fendi, one of five sisters who turned their family business in Rome into a global fashion brand.

And John Avildsen who directed two Rocky films and the Karate Kid.

Producer: Neil George.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b08wm8zt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b08wmmwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 Analysis (b08vxv34)
Who Speaks for the Workers?

Union membership is in decline whilst structural changes in the economy - including the rise of the so-called gig economy - are putting downward pressure on wages, and creating fertile conditions for exploitation by unscrupulous employers. So who is going to ensure that workers get a fair deal? Sonia Sodha, chief leader writer for the Observer, investigates.
Producer: David Edmonds.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b08wmjpy)

Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b08vzq7w)
Burton and Taylor's love nest

Antonia Quirke visits the house that Richard Burton bought for Elizabeth Taylor in a fishing village in Mexico, that's now a deluxe hotel. When the lovers conducted their affair out in the open in Puerto Vallarta, the paparazzi soon followed, and eventually the the small town was transformed into a tourist mecca.

Director Ceyda Torun explains how she invented new technology to follow a herd of cats through the streets of Istanbul for her documentary Kedi.

Antonia visits St Leonards, where King Harold's consort Edith Swan Neck is memorialised with a delapidated public sculpture. There she meets film-maker Andrew Kotting, who is trying to restore Edith's memory with a new documentary Edith Walks, in which he and five friends hike 108 miles from Waltham Abbey to the South East coast as an act of pilgrimage.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b08wmjnw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 03 JULY 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b08wmjtw)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b08vzj4g)
Global inequality - Signs of 'nation'

Global inequality: is the Global South catching up with the North, as many corporations and governments have claimed for the last 30 years? Laurie Taylor talks to Jason Hickel, fellow in anthropology at the LSE, who argues that the divide is actually greater than ever. They're joined by Marian Tupa, Senior Policy Analyst at the Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity at the Cato Institute, Washington DC.

Also , Michael Skey, Lecturer in Communication and Media Studies at Loughborough University explores the markers and symbols of nation and national identity across Britain.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b08wmmw7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08wmjty)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08wmjv0)

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08wmjv2)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b08wmjv4)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08wp80t)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Stephen Shipley, Radio Producer and broadcaster.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b08wmjv6)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (b08wmjv8)

The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08wn2jh)
John McPherson on the Hooded Crow

Wildlife photographer John McPherson recalls, for Tweet of the Day, watching hooded crows working intelligently to obtain food caught by an otter on the Isle of Mull.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


MON 06:00 Today (b08wmjvd)

News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b08wmjvg)
From Darwin to Big Data with Richard Dawkins

On Start the Week Andrew Marr asks whether scientists have failed in their task to communicate their work to the wider public. The 'passionate rationalist' Richard Dawkins has spent his career trying to illuminate the wonders of nature and challenge what he calls faulty logic. But he wonders whether Darwin would consider his legacy now with 'a mixture of exhilaration and exasperation'. The child psychologist Deborah Kelemen has been working with young children to find out what they make of adaptation and evolution with the storybook, How the Piloses Evolved Skinny Noses, and is encouraged by the sophistication of their understanding. The mathematician Cathy O'Neil says it's time people became more aware of the mathematical models and algorithms that dominate everything we do online and in finance, and yet are increasingly opaque, unregulated and left unchallenged. While Alex Bellos looks to improve numeracy with puzzles and brainteasers which have been entertaining and frustrating people for centuries.
Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b08wn2jk)
Big Pig, Little Pig, Episode 1

When Jacqueline Yallop moves to south-west France with her husband, she embraces rural village life and buys two pigs to rear for slaughter. But as she gets to know the animals better, her English sentimentality threatens to get in the way and she begins to wonder if she can actually bring herself to kill them.

This is a memoir about that fateful decision, but it's also about the ethics of meat eating in the modern age, and whether we should know, respect and even love the animals we eat.

At its heart, this book is a love story, exploring Jacqueline's increasing attachment for her particular pigs, and celebrating the enduring closeness of humans and pigs over the centuries.

Written by Jacqueline Yallop
Read by Imogen Stubbs
Abridged by Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08wmjvj)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


MON 10:45 Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (b08wn2jm)
The Days of Anna Madrigal, Episode 1

Tales of the City: The Days of Anna Madrigal by Armistead Maupin. Dramatised by Lin Coghlan.
Episode 1.
The final series of Tales of the City. Now ninety-two, and committed to the notion of 'Leaving like a lady', Mrs Madrigal has seemingly found peace with the 'Logical' family that has grown around her. But there are ghosts in her past that are the key to her identity and they trouble her. Is she prepared to confront them?

Director/Producer Gary Brown

'The Days of Anna Madrigal' is the ninth novel of Armistead Maupin's bestselling 'Tales of the City' series. It features one of modern literature's most unforgettable characters - Anna Madrigal, the legendary landlady of 28 Barbary Lane as she embarks on a road trip that will take her deep into her past.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b08wn2jp)
The End of the Road?

Mary is 86 and facing an eye test to decide if she can continue to drive. Will the test put an end to her 65 year driving career - or can she carry on?

She's been diagnosed with several eye conditions including glaucoma, cataracts and macula degeneration, and now she faces the field of vision test - the test which will decide whether she's fit to continue to drive.

She lives in rural Somerset, where public transport is scarce. For 40 years she had the same Morris Traveller and now she drives a Fiat. Although she says, "a car is only necessary in that it has four wheels. And a roof is quite useful." If she has to stop driving, she'll have to depend on her daughter - this is not what she wants. "It's absolutely typical of my age - we fear that if we once give way, the flood gates will open, and we will become dependent."

This is more than a story about driving - it's about independence and the possible loss of it. But is there something else in Mary's life that could pose a greater threat to her driving than any eye test?

Produced in Bristol by Polly Weston.


MON 11:30 Sisters (b08wn2jr)
Series 2, Blackout

Susan (Susan Calman) and Fiona (Ashley Jensen) are grown up sisters who live together. But that's all they have in common. Written by Susan Calman, Sisters tackles the painfully funny world of the love/hate relationship you can never escape.

In this first episode, the sisters' flat is plunged into darkness when they suffer a power cut. Next door neighbour and token family member Blake (Nick Helm) doesn't provide the necessary support as he is preoccupied with selling something special online. As the darkness continues, fear of intruders and speculation about paranormal activity take hold and all three descend into a world of paranoia and mutual suspicion.

It's a situation exacerbated by the fact that Susan is harbouring a stray cat and is very keen that Fiona doesn't discover this - especially as Fiona is violently allergic to pets of any description.

A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b08wmjvl)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b08wn9m0)
Series 1, Cuneiform

The Egyptians thought literacy was divine; a benefaction which came from the baboon-faced god Thoth. In fact the earliest known script - "cuneiform" - came from Uruk, a Mesopotamian settlement on the banks of the Euphrates in what is now Iraq. What did it say? As Tim Harford describes, cuneiform wasn't being used for poetry, or to send messages to far-off lands. It was used to create the world's first accounts. And the world's first written contracts, too.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editors: Richard Knight and Richard Vadon.


MON 12:13 You and Yours (b08wmjvn)

News and discussion of consumer affairs.


MON 12:57 Weather (b08wmjvq)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b08wmjvs)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


MON 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b08wn9m2)
Series 2, The Fall of Khrushchev

Bridget Kendall continues her series tracing the crucial moments in the Cold War.

Today: the fall of Khrushchev and the rise of Brezhnevism.

In 1964 the Soviet premiere Nikita Khrushchev was deposed, to be replaced by the more conservative Leonid Brezhnev. Thus the zig-zagging and inconsistent liberalisation associated with Khrushchev's Thaw gradually made way for the stagnation of the Brezhnev period.

Bridget hears from two people reflecting on life in the Soviet Union during those years.

With Pavel Litvinov and Zinovy Zinik

Producer: Martin Williams.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b08wmyc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b08wn9m4)
Foreign Bodies: Keeping the Wolf Out, Behind the Wall

Special Investigator Bertalan Lázár returns in Philip Palmer's crime drama set in communist Hungary in 1963. Fighting the criminals is hard enough but there are other more sinister battles raging in higher places.

The violin was played by Sam McGregor

Directed by Toby Swift

Keeping the Wolf Out is part of Radio 4's 'Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze'.


MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b08wn9m6)
Series 31, Heat 1, 2017

(1/13)
Paul Gambaccini welcomes the first of the competitors in the 2017 season of Radio 4's music quiz, who this week come from London, Exeter and Sunderland. Whether it's Beethoven or Bowie, Kiri te Kanawa or Kraftwerk, there's always something to suit every taste and no shortage of intriguing musical extracts. The contestants are tested on their range of musical general knowledge, as well as being asked to choose a musical subject on which to answer individual specialist questions, from a list of which they've had no advance warning. Today's winner will go forward to the semi-finals in September.


MON 15:30 Food Programme (b08wmmwq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 Quirke's Cast and Crew (b08wn9m8)
Series 1, Camera Operator and Grip

In this third episode Antonia heads to Dudley and encounters a gang of smooth operators on the set of the latest series of Peaky Blinders and puts some key roles into the frame. She journeys through the latest Star Wars films with an industry-renowned grip that also discusses his close-up work on Daniel Craig's most iconic Bond moments, and catches a team excitedly preparing camera equipment for the final series of Game of Thrones.

Throughout, Antonia watches the cast and crews in action, grabbing them in the moments between filming and creating, revealing their various and sometimes entirely surprising contribution to productions, exploring the latest equipment and challenges. Along the way she gathers fascinating and often very moving stories of life behind the scenes. These aren't just the tales of the great actors of our times, but of the people who made those actors and actresses great, content instead to be the stars behind the camera.

Producer: Stephen Garner.


MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b08wn9mb)
Series 16, What Particles Remain to be Discovered?

"What Particles Remain to be Discovered?"

Brian Cox and Robin Ince return for a new series of the hugely popular, multi-award winning science/comedy show. Over the series a variety of scientists and comedy science enthusiasts will take to the stage to discuss everything from the glory of insects to whether free will is just an illusion. They'll be joined by the usual eclectic selection of guests over the series, including comedian Sara Pascoe, Dane Baptiste, Katy Brand and Eric Idle, as well as astronauts Sandra Magnus and Apollo astronaut and moon walker Charlie Duke, for a space traveller special.

The first show will see Python legend and Monkey Cage theme tune creator Eric Idle take to the stage alongside physicists Jonathan Butterworth and Catherine Heymans to ask "what particles remain to be discovered?" . They'll be looking at life beyond the Higgs Boson and asking whether a new, as yet undetected particle could answer arguably the greatest question in physics and finally uncover the mysterious unknown elements that make up the 95% of our Universe that are known as Dark Matter and Dark Energy.


MON 17:00 PM (b08wmjvy)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08wmjw1)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b08wn9md)
Series 67, Episode 2

The 67th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning 'antidote to panel games' promises more homespun wireless entertainment for the young at heart. This week the programme pays a return visit to the Yvonne Arnaud Theatre in Guildford where regulars Barry Cryer and Tim Brooke-Taylor are once again joined on the panel Andy Hamilton and Jo Brand, with Jack Dee in the chair. At the piano - Colin Sell. Producer - Jon Naismith. It is a BBC Studios production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b08wn9mg)

Lynda sticks to her guns, and Matt wants everything to be right.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b08wmjw3)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


MON 19:45 Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (b08wn2jm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 In the Rough: Golf's Uncertain Future (b08wn9mj)

Golf is in a hole with huge numbers leaving the sport while cycling is free-wheeling to incredible popularity. Mark Hodkinson examines this social and sporting phenomenon.

Golf clubs, many dating back over a century, are closing all over Britain at an alarming rate, with potentially catastrophic consequences for the industry.

Participation has also declined steadily over the past decade. According to England Golf, between 2004 and 2013, one in five golfers in England gave up their club membership.

But golf is still the fifth largest participation sport in the UK and brings £3.4 billion to the British economy. So can the trend be reversed?

Journalist and broadcaster Mark Hodkinson investigates the fall-off in the company of Golf Business magazine editor Alistair Dunsmuir, John and Marie Llewellyn who started the website Golf's Missing Links and John Hopkins, former golf correspondent of the Times.

Mark considers whether declining participation is principally down to changing social trends. We work longer hours, have less free time than ever before and more households have two working parents. Who has the time to spend a whole day on the golf course? Also, despite golf's young and cool starts such as Ricky Fowler, Rory McIlroy and Jordan Speith, the sport retains its high-brow image with cliquey clubhouses, ties and jackets, no trainers, ladies afternoons and so on.

So what are we doing if we're not playing golf? Thousands of ex-golfers have swapped their plus fours and clubs for Lycra and a bike. In the wake of Bradley Wiggins' and Chris Froome's victories in the Tour de France, and the successes of Team GB in recent Olympics, the sport is ever growing.

A Smooth Operations production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b08wnc03)
Constitutions at Work

What steers the creation and shape of a constitution - and how do they work during times of political turmoil?

In ordinary times constitutional debate often seems an abstract business without very much relevance to the way we live our lives. But political turmoil can operate like an X-ray, lighting up the bones around which the body politic is formed.

Drawing on recent political events, Edward Stourton explores the effectiveness of the constitutions of the United Kingdom, the USA and France and asks are they doing what they were meant to do?

CONTRIBUTORS

Lord Peter Hennessy, Professor of Contemporary British History, Queen Mary University of London

Alison Young, Professor of Public Law, University of Oxford

Professor Tom Ginsburg, University of Chicago Law School

Sophie Boyron, Senior Lecturer, University of Birmingham Law School

David S Bell, Professor of French Government and Politics, University of Leeds

Presenter: Edward Stourton
Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith.


MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b08vy0yb)
Tardigrade

When Brett Westwood heard he was going to encounter arguably 'the world's toughest animal' he didn't expect to find it on a garage roof in County Durham - but all became clear when he came face to face with the Tardigrade. First described in 1773 and so named because they resemble slow-moving bears, these microscopic animals are probably the closest thing to an alien we are likely to encounter. Capable of living without water and then being revived after 30 years, the Tardigrade or moss-piglet as they are also called, challenge our ideas about what defines life. And as if that wasn't enough, they are probably the cutest little creature you could hope to meet! Producer Sarah Blunt.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b08wmjvg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b08wmjw5)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b08wmjw7)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Dangerous Visions (b08vxvr9)
Fahrenheit 451, Episode 1

Fahrenheit 451 is the temperature at which paper burns.

It's Guy Montag's job to know these things: he's a fireman and he burns books for a living. He loves his job doing this service for the public, but he is not happy. As his life unravels he begins to question all his beliefs.

Ray Bradbury's cult classic was first published in 1953 but it imagines a world very like 2017, in which sophisticated mass media are used to pacify and control people; love is a commodity; attention spans are short and police hunts are live entertainment.

Poetic, dazzling and shocking: Ray Bradbury's vision of the future has become terrifyingly familiar.

Abridged by Sara Davies and read by Alex Jennings.
Music: 'Stitch' from the album Bella by PT-1, on Bandcamp.

Part of BBC Radio 4's 'Dangerous Visions' season.


MON 23:00 Inside the Brain of Gerald Scarfe (b08wp16h)

The brain - the final frontier. Radio 4 is setting out on an exploration of the creative mind.

Gerald Scarfe's drawings have intrigued and alarmed for more than fifty years but where do his ideas come from? Professor Vincent Walsh of the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience has a theory he wants to pursue. Vincent is an expert in the workings of the visual brain; he thinks that two specific areas may be talking to each other in an unexpected way, resulting in recognisable faces being mixed up with recognisable objects, hence Mrs Thatcher as an axe, a handbag, and even a shark.

Now, cartoonist and neuroscientist are going to meet. "I for one would be fascinated to know what's going on in my brain - please pursue this," says Gerald Scarfe.

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08wp167)

Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 04 JULY 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b08wmjy5)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b08wn2jk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08wmjy7)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08wmjy9)

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08wmjyd)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b08wmjyg)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08xx85j)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Stephen Shipley, Radio Producer and broadcaster.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b08wmjyj)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08wp3fq)
Joe Harkness on the Nightingale

Norfolk based bird therapist Joe Harkness on the calming effect a nightingale song can be for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


TUE 06:00 Today (b08wmjyl)

News and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (b08wp3g3)
Hilary Mantel, Can These Bones Live?

Hilary Mantel analyses how historical fiction can make the past come to life. She says her task is to take history out of the archive and relocate it in a body. "It's the novelist's job: to put the reader in the moment, even if the moment is 500 years ago." She takes apart the practical job of "resurrection", and the process that gets historical fiction on to the page. "The historian will always wonder why you left certain things out, while the literary critic will wonder why you left them in," she says. How then does she try and get the balance right?

The lecture is recorded in front of an audience in Exeter, near Mantel's adopted home in East Devon, followed by a question and answer session. The Reith Lectures are chaired by Sue Lawley and produced by Jim Frank.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b08xd0v7)
Big Pig, Little Pig, Episode 2

When Jacqueline Yallop moves to south-west France with her husband, she embraces rural village life and buys two pigs to rear for slaughter. But as she gets to know the animals better, her English sentimentality threatens to get in the way and she begins to wonder if she can actually bring herself to kill them.

This is a memoir about that fateful decision, but it's also about the ethics of meat eating in the modern age, and whether we should know, respect and even love the animals we eat.

At its heart, this book is a love story, exploring Jacqueline's increasing attachment for her particular pigs, and celebrating the enduring closeness of humans and pigs over the centuries.

Written by Jacqueline Yallop
Read by Imogen Stubbs
Abridged by Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08wmjyn)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


TUE 10:45 Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (b08wp3gf)
The Days of Anna Madrigal, Episode 2

Tales of the City: The Days of Anna Madrigal by Armistead Maupin. Dramatised by Lin Coghlan.
Ep 2.

As Michael and Ben prepare for 'Burning Man' art festival in Nevada, Shawna makes them an offer that could change their lives.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.


TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b08wp3gh)
Cow

Brett Westwood investigates the peaceful, hefty, cud-chewing beasts which have been by our side for thousands of years. In Natural Histories we find out what Shakespeare made of this special relationship, hear Dinka songs from the intense cattle-based cultures of South Sudan and travel to a Leicestershire dairy where robots do the milking. It's a pastoral scene and a violent one too: the fearsome virility of the bull in the poetry of Lorca, sacred cows prompting vigilante violence in India, and a Greek tyrant who would bake his victims alive in a giant metal bull, its resonance turning their cries to moos. From all this bovine history it's clear that the domestication of the cow has fundamentally changed human society.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


TUE 11:30 Yangon Renaissance: Punks, Poets and Painters (b08wp54l)

After decades suppressed by Myanmar's military regime, we go inside Yangon's booming counter-cultural art scene to reveal the city as seen through the eyes of the young artists on the frontline of change.

Until censorship was lifted in 2012, dissident artists, musicians and poets lived with the threat of jail for speaking out against the military regime that had gripped Myanmar - or Burma - since 1962 and turned it into a police state. Now, from modern art to punk rock and poetry, a new vibrant youth culture is flourishing. It's something that was inconceivable only five years ago, when there was no internet, no mobile phones, and no freedom of expression.

Recorded on location in the country's biggest city, we meet the emerging artists and performers breaking through and forging a new Myanmar.

It's a critical juncture in Myanmar's history, but the rules are still unclear. How open can the artists be? Work by former political prisoners is now on show, and even the country's former spymaster has opened an art gallery. But we hear from a young poet who was imprisoned for six months for a six-line poem deemed to insult the former president and released in 2016. Under Aung San Suu Kyi's government, prosecutions under the notorious 66D defamation clause, seen by critics as a weapon to silence anyone speaking out against the state, have risen sharply. Old habits of self-censorship can be hard to break.

But are young artists optimistic about their country's future? You bet they are.

Produced by Eve Streeter
A Greenpoint production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b08wmjyq)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b08wp54n)
Series 1, Video Game

From Spacewar to Pokemon Go, video games - aside from becoming a large industry in their own right - have influenced the modern economy in some surprising ways. Here's one. In 2016, four economists presented research into a puzzling fact about the US labour market. The economy was growing, unemployment rates were low, and yet a surprisingly large number of able-bodied young men were either working part-time or not working at all. More puzzling still, while most studies of unemployment find that it makes people thoroughly miserable, the happiness of these young men was rising. The researchers concluded that the explanation was simply that this cohort of young men were living at home, sponging off their parents and playing video games. They were deciding, in the other words, not to join the modern economy in some low-paid job, because being a starship captain at home is far more appealing.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editors: Richard Knight and Richard Vadon.


TUE 12:13 You and Yours (b08wmjys)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b08wmjyv)

The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b08wmjyx)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


TUE 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b08wp54q)
Series 2, The Chinese Cultural Revolution

Bridget Kendall explores what happened when China broke with the USSR and, in 1966, launched a Cultural Revolution aimed in part at laying claim to pure communism in the face of Moscow's more revisionist approach.

She hears the stories of Sir John Weston, then a young British diplomat, recalls what happened when Red Guards stormed the British Embassy.

And brothers Chen Zhang Gong and Chen Zhang Rang remember the very painful story of how they watched helplessly as their teacher father was hounded to death by their fellow pupils.

Producer: Phil Tinline.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b08wn9mg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Drama (b08wp54s)
Foreign Bodies: Keeping the Wolf Out, Waiting by the River

Philip Palmer's detective series continues as Bertalan and Franciska get sucked deeper into a battle of wits that could destroy them both.

Directed by Toby Swift

Keeping the Wolf Out is part of Radio 4's 'Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze'.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08wm8zp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Making History (b08wp54v)
Segregation in wartime Britain

Helen Castor and her guests discuss the history stories that are alive today.

Seventy five years on from the first American bomber raid taking off from British soil to attack targets in Nazi-occupied Europe, poet Sugar Brown hears how the thousands of Yanks who arrived in the UK in 1942 were segregated by race - both when they were in uniform and when they were out on civvy street.

On the eve of the announcement of the Art Fund Museum of the Year, we hear from two retired ladies who, having completed a journey on every London bus route, are now visiting every museum in the capital. Iszi Lawrence asks them what makes a good museum.

Tom Holland meets with the author Peter Frankopan to hear how China's new Belt and Road initiative has its historical roots in the Silk Road which, for a millennium, connected the Korean peninsular and Japan to the Mediterranean Sea.

And as a new TGV line opens to Bordeaux we ask what's 'must-see' in that fabulous city for the historian.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:00 In the Criminologist's Chair (b08wrbyf)

Criminologist David Wilson talks to former criminal turned journalist Erwin James. James committed a string of petty offences before carrying out two brutal murders. He fled to France and joined the Foreign Legion, before returning to Britain where he stood trial and was sentenced to life.

In prison he started writing a newspaper column and began coming to terms with what he had done, helped by a prison psychologist. He later wrote a book, "Redeemable". But what is redemption, and is it even possible without the forgiveness of those who have been hurt?

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b08wp59r)
Kathy Burke and Tom Allen

Actor Kathy Burke and comedian Tom Allen talk books with Harriett Gilbert. Kathy's favourite book is Hangover Square by Patrick Hamilton. She first read it when she was 14 and has gone back to it over and over again, irresistibly drawn by the central character, George Harvey Bone.
Role Models, a kind of memoir by the American film-maker John Waters (Hairspray, Cry-Baby) is a book that means a lot to Tom Allen. It's a celebration of the outsider and of a different way of seeing life.
Then Harriett gets them to read Crampton Hodnet by Barbara Pym. To say that the book does not go down at all well would be a severe understatement.. but the resulting conversation is hugely enjoyable.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 17:00 PM (b08wmjyz)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08wmjz1)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Meet David Sedaris (b08wp5cq)
Series 6, 04/07/2017

The globetrotting, trash-picking, aisle-rolling storyteller is back with more words of wit and wisdom. He opens this series with a new story fresh from the pages of The New Yorker, Untamed, and extracts from his book Theft By Finding, a compilation of diary entries from 1977-2002.

With sardonic wit and incisive social critiques, David Sedaris has become one of America's pre-eminent humour writers. The great skill with which he slices through cultural euphemisms and political correctness proves that he is a master of satire and one of the most observant writers addressing the human condition today.

David Sedaris's first book, Barrel Fever (1994), which included The SantaLand Diaries. was a critical and commercial success, as were his follow-up efforts, Naked (1997), Holidays on Ice (1997) and Me Talk Pretty One Day (2000). He became known for his bitingly funny recollections of his youth, family life and travels, making semi-celebrities out of his parents and siblings.

David Sedaris has been nominated for three Grammy Awards for Best Spoken Word and Best Comedy Album. A feature film adaptation of his story C.O.G. was released after a premier at the Sundance Film Festival (2013). He has been a contributor to BBC Radio 4 since 1996.

Producer: Steve Doherty
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b08wp6h8)

Will tries to gather support, and Brian makes his pitch.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b08wmjz3)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


TUE 19:45 Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (b08wp3gf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b08wp6hb)
Mental Health Parity: Progress or Pipe Dream?

Current affairs documentary series.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b08wmjz5)

News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b08wp6hd)

Dr Mark Porter presents a series that aims to demystify perplexing health issues.


TUE 21:30 Out of the Ordinary (b08h0c9h)
Series 5, A Righteous Education?

Jolyon Jenkins investigates the network of private Christian schools in Britain that teach that evolution untrue, homosexuality is wrong, and that wives should submit to their husbands.

These schools use the Accelerated Christian Education (ACE) curriculum, originally devised by a fundamentalist Texan who thought that all education needed to assume the literal truth of the bible. The entire curriculum, including science, makes continual reference to God's plan. It promotes creationism, and the false idea that humans and dinosaurs co-existed on earth.

The system requires children to sit in "offices" - desks screened off from their neighbours - and work their way in silence through the "packets of accelerated Christian education" and then take multiple choice tests. The system requires no teachers, only "supervisors". Pupils do not usually take A levels but special Christian exams.

Although some pupils make it to university and have successful careers, Jolyon speaks to others who feel that the system has not served them well. Are ACE pupils being well prepared for life in modern Britain? For years, Ofsted has appeared to show little interest in the contents of the ACE curriculum but a few recent inspections of ACE schools suggest that this may be changing.

Presenter/Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b08wmjz7)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Dangerous Visions (b08vyqbl)
Fahrenheit 451, Episode 2

Montag's wife had her stomach pumped last night. But will she even remember? He's not certain of anything anymore.

Ray Bradbury's visionary cult classic, abridged by Sara Davies. Read by Alex Jennings.


TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b08wn9mb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08wp6lm)

Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 05 JULY 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b08wmk1q)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b08xd0v7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08wmk1s)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08wmk1v)

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08wmk1x)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b08wmk1z)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08y0bq7)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Stephen Shipley, Radio Producer and broadcaster.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b08wmk21)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08wpd52)
John MacPherson on the Herring Gull

Wildlife photographer John MacPherson recalls a childhood memory of his mother and a herring gull for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


WED 06:00 Today (b08wmk23)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Only Artists (b08wpd56)
Series 2, 05/07/2017

Two artists discuss creative questions.


WED 09:30 Voices of the First World War (b08wpd58)
From Beneath: Mines at Messines

Dan Snow presents the story of WWI through the voices of those who were there.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b08xd1j7)
Big Pig, Little Pig, Episode 3

When Jacqueline Yallop moves to south-west France with her husband, she embraces rural village life and buys two pigs to rear for slaughter. But as she gets to know the animals better, her English sentimentality threatens to get in the way and she begins to wonder if she can actually bring herself to kill them.

This is a memoir about that fateful decision, but it's also about the ethics of meat eating in the modern age, and whether we should know, respect and even love the animals we eat.

At its heart, this book is a love story, exploring Jacqueline's increasing attachment for her particular pigs, and celebrating the enduring closeness of humans and pigs over the centuries.

Written by Jacqueline Yallop
Read by Imogen Stubbs
Abridged by Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08wmk25)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


WED 10:41 Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (b08wpd5b)
The Days of Anna Madrigal, Episode 3

Tales of the City: The Days of Anna Madrigal by Armistead Maupin. Dramatised by Lin Coghlan.
Ep 3.

Mrs Madrigal prepares to go back to her home town and Michael and Ben argue over Shawna's offer.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b08wpd5d)
Lynn and Phoebe - Best Day Ever

A mother recalls how the achievement of taking her severely disabled younger daughter to a gig at Wembley with her elder daughter broadened their horizons. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 In the Rough: Golf's Uncertain Future (b08wn9mj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Bad Salsa (b06vkj1w)
Series 1, Jumping the Shark

A second series of the sitcom about three women who meet during cancer treatment and start going to salsa class together to maintain their friendship. As they adjust to life after cancer they realise that they've all changed. This second series begins as Jill has left her husband and son to live at her new boyfriends' parent's house, Camille is planning a huge life change and Chippy has a new live-in wannabe step-father in the shape of Gordon from their salsa class.

In the second episode, Marco's sister arrives and is not impressed by his new girlfriend - Camille. Jill is still trying to decide whether to have reconstruction while Tim lives the high-life on a photo shoot and Chippy thinks she can save her budding relationship with a lie.

The series is not about cancer, but about life after cancer, how you cope the changes in your outlook, your desires and your expectations. It's also about how other people cope with the change in you.

Written by Kay Stonham

Produced and directed by Alison Vernon-Smith.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b08wmk27)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b08wpgh2)
Series 1, Intellectual Property

When the great novelist Charles Dickens arrived in America in 1842, he was hoping to put an end to pirated copies of his work in the US. They circulated there with impunity because the United States granted no copyright protection to non-citizens. Patents and copyright grant a monopoly, and monopolies are bad news. Dickens's British publishers will have charged as much as they could get away with for copies of Bleak House; cash-strapped literature lovers simply had to go without. But these potential fat profits encourage new ideas. It took Dickens a long time to write Bleak House. If other British publishers could have ripped it off like the Americans, perhaps he wouldn't have bothered. As Tim Harford explains, intellectual property reflects an economic trade-off - a balancing act. If it's too generous to the creators then good ideas will take too long to copy, adapt and spread. But if it's too stingy then maybe we won't see the good ideas at all.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editors: Richard Knight and Richard Vadon.


WED 12:13 You and Yours (b08wmk2g)

Consumer affairs programme.


WED 12:57 Weather (b08wmk2j)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b08wmk2l)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


WED 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b08x34gw)
Series 2, The Prague Spring

Bridget Kendall explores the major turning points in the later decades of the Cold War.

In August 1968 a Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia brought the period of liberalisation known as the Prague Spring to an end. The social and cultural reforms aimed at achieving 'socialism with a human face' came to an abrupt halt. It was justified under the principles of what became known as the Brezhnev Doctrine, whereby the Soviet Union had the right to intervene anywhere in the Eastern Bloc where socialism was under threat. Czechoslovakia entered a period of repression

Bridget Kendall hears the stories of three people caught up in the invasion and active on the streets of Prague.

With Hana Laing, Julius Tomin and Zdena Tomin.

Producer: Martin Williams.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b08wp6h8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b08wpgh4)
Foreign Bodies: Keeping the Wolf Out, Heroes

Philip Palmer's Cold War crime drama concludes. Unexpected alliances form when backs are against the wall.

Directed by Toby Swift

Keeping the Wolf Out is part of Radio 4's 'Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze'.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b08wmk2n)
Money Box Live: Childcare Costs

Financial phone-in.


WED 15:30 Inside Health (b08wp6hd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b08wphj8)

Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b08wmk2q)

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 17:00 PM (b08wmk2s)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08wmk2v)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 John Finnemore's Double Acts (b08tcp50)
Series 2, Here's What We Do

It's Pidge and Gavin! The old team back together again for one last mission.

Kieran Hodgson and Ethan Lawrence star in another two-hander written by Cabin Pressure's John Finnemore.

Written by John Finnemore
Produced by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b08wphjd)

Justin gets the lie of the land, and Pat warns against probable pitfalls.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b08wmk2x)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


WED 19:45 Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (b08wpd5b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b08wphjg)

Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Claire Fox, Matthew Taylor, Anne McElvoy and Shiv Malik.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b08wphjj)

Talks with a personal dimension.


WED 21:00 Science Stories (b08wphjl)
Series 5, 05/07/2017

Caroline Herschel, the discoverer of six comets in the late 18th century, was the first female professional scientist in Britain. Naomi Alderman tells her story.


WED 21:30 Only Artists (b08wpd56)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b08wmk2z)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b08wmk31)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Dangerous Visions (b08vzj4v)
Fahrenheit 451, Episode 3

The Mechanical Hound doesn't seem to like Montag. And his new neighbour, the 'crazy' seventeen-year-old, Clarisse McClellan, has disappeared.
Ray Bradbury's visionary cult classic, abridged by Sara Davies. Read by Alex Jennings.


WED 23:00 The Damien Slash Mixtape (b08wphwm)
Series 1, Episode 4

Multi-character YouTube star Damien Slash makes the move from online to Radio 4, in this new fast-paced, one-man sketch comedy show. From the surreal to the satirical, from the zeitgeist to the absurd, Damien serves up a range of high octane characters, all from his own voice. Adverts, actors, hipsters, trolls - no aspect of modern life is left un-skewered.

Written by and starring Damien Slash (aka Daniel Barker).
Additional material by Robin Morgan.
Produced by Sam Bryant.
A BBC Studios production.


WED 23:15 Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair (b04d4qpn)
Series 1, A Trolley for a Change

by Jenny Éclair

A grandmother visits an upmarket supermarket to buy her grandchildren a meal they won't forget, but the trip proves memorable for all the wrong reasons.

Produced by Sally Avens.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08wphwp)

Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



THURSDAY 06 JULY 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b08wmk50)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b08xd1j7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08wmk52)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08wmk56)

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08wmk58)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b08wmk5b)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08y40jg)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Stephen Shipley, Radio Producer and broadcaster.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b08wmk5d)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08wqlm5)
Mya Rose Craig on the White-Tailed Eagle

Bristol based Schoolgirl Mya Rose Craig recalls seeing a white tailed eagle in her holidays for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


THU 06:00 Today (b08wmk5g)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b08wmk5j)
Bird Migration

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss why some birds migrate and others do not, how they select their destinations and how they navigate the great distances, often over oceans. For millennia, humans set their calendars to birds' annual arrivals, and speculated about what happened when they departed, perhaps moving deep under water, or turning into fish or shellfish, or hibernating while clinging to trees upside down. Ideas about migration developed in C19th when, in Germany, a stork was noticed with an African spear in its neck, indicating where it had been been over winter and how far it had flown. Today there are many ideas about how birds use their senses of sight and smell, and magnetic fields, to find their way, and about why and how birds choose their destinations and many questions. Why do some scatter and some flock together, how much is instinctive and how much is learned, and how far do the benefits the migrating birds gain outweigh the risks they face?

With

Tim Guilford

Barbara Helm

and

Richard Holland

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b08xd2cz)
Big Pig, Little Pig, Episode 4

When Jacqueline Yallop moves to south-west France with her husband, she embraces rural village life and buys two pigs to rear for slaughter. But as she gets to know the animals better, her English sentimentality threatens to get in the way and she begins to wonder if she can actually bring herself to kill them.

This is a memoir about that fateful decision, but it's also about the ethics of meat eating in the modern age, and whether we should know, respect and even love the animals we eat.

At its heart, this book is a love story, exploring Jacqueline's increasing attachment for her particular pigs, and celebrating the enduring closeness of humans and pigs over the centuries.

Written by Jacqueline Yallop
Read by Imogen Stubbs
Abridged by Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08wmk5l)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


THU 10:45 Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (b08wqlm7)
The Days of Anna Madrigal, Episode 4

Tales of the City: The Days of Anna Madrigal by Armistead Maupin. Dramatised by Lin Coghlan.
Episode 4.

As she travels to her home town of Winnemucca, Mrs Madrigal remembers when she was a boy and her intense friendship with Lasko.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b08wqlm9)

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.


THU 11:30 My House (b08wqlmc)

Manchester International Festival (MIF) is the world's first festival of original, new work and special events. The Festival is staged every two years in Manchester, UK - the next edition will take place from 29 June to 16 July 2017 at venues all over the city.

In the run-up to MIF17, the Manchester International Festival (MIF) is running a project called "Festival in My House", inviting and producing ordinary people's ideas for tiny arts festivals, to be held in their own homes. Festival In My House brings the arts and MIF into in local communities around Manchester.

In this programme, Nija Dalal-Small, who held one of these 'tiny festivals' in her own Levenshulme home, visits some of the others - including ones hosting a Parisian post-punk band, a spoken word celebration and a classical music event - as well as attending a festival in a residential home... Nija speaks with the artists and guests as they experience the arts in this unique, intimate way.

Presenter: Nija Dilal Small
Producers: Nija Dilal Small & Geoff Bird.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b08wmk5n)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b08wqlmf)
Series 1, Passport

How much might global economic output rise if anyone could work anywhere? Some economists have calculated it would double. By the turn of the 20th century only a handful of countries were still insisting on passports to enter or leave. Today, migrant controls are back in fashion. It can seem like a natural fact of life that the name of the country on our passport determines where you can travel and work - legally, at least. But it's a relatively recent historical development - and, from a certain angle, an odd one. Many countries take pride in banning employers from discriminating against characteristics we can't change: whether we're male or female, young or old, gay or straight, black or white. It's not entirely true that we can't change our passport: if you've got $250,000, for example, you can buy one from St Kitts and Nevis. But mostly our passport depends on the identity of our parents and location of our birth. And nobody chooses those.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editors: Richard Knight and Richard Vadon.


THU 12:13 You and Yours (b08wmk5q)

Consumer affairs programme.


THU 12:57 Weather (b08wmk5s)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b08wmk5v)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


THU 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b08wqlmh)
Series 2, America's Vietnam War

Bridget Kendall explores how three US veterans were shaped by their brutal, sometimes downright horrific, experiences in the Vietnam War, and how it affected their view of America's Cold War mission.

With Scott Camil, John Ketwig and Paul Sutton

Producer: Phil Tinline.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b08wphjd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b08wqnzv)
Lost in France

At the age of 29, career girl Helen splits from her boyfriend, quits her job in recruitment,
and decides to retreat to the Dordogne for a family holiday with her mother and grandmother.
But it seems all three women are facing problems at home - mainly to do with men.
Will they fare any better abroad? Comedy by Alice Burden and Harriet Collings.

Producer/director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b08wqp00)
BBC Monitoring at Caversham

For 75 years a stately home near Reading has eavesdropped on the world. As BBC Monitoring changes, Caz Graham hears why the organisation is leaving Caversham.

Caz speaks to staff past and present to hear about the vital daily work conducted behind the grand portico, amidst splendid grounds, listening in to and translating radio broadcasts since 1943.

Retired staff recall being on shift when major world events occurred, such as the deaths of Stalin, Franco and Brezhnev. With its roots in short wave technology, Caversham's sensitive radio aerials and satellites could be retuned to listen in to countries around the world. Current manager at BBC Monitoring, Chris Greenway, describes the organisation's work today, for example tracking social media and the broadcasting activities of Islamic State (IS).

Producer: Mark Smalley.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b08wmmwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Bookclub (b08wmyc1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b08wqp04)

Looking at the latest cinema releases, DVDs and films on TV.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b08wmk5x)

Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (b08wmk5z)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08wmk61)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Paul Sinha's History Revision (b08wqs1g)
Series 3, Episode 4

Comedian and quizzer Paul Sinha returns to Radio 4 for a third series of his award-winning History Revision. In previous series, Paul has told you how Portugal's invasion of Morocco in 1415 lead directly to the 2014 World Cup; how the 1909 launch of an Austro-Hungarian submarine prevented Dr Zhivago winning an Oscar; and the story the black woman who refused to give up a seat on an Alabama bus and ended up changing the law - no, it wasn't Rosa Parks.

This series will once again see Paul shine a light on the important historical moments that you never got taught at school, and explain why so much of what you did learn is wrong. There will also, as ever, be puns.

In this final episode, Paul looks at some political blunders which have not yet been turned into films, and also the history of historical films - from the first ever film, to the least accurate film, to the film that killed off the greatest percentage of its cast and crew, he celebrates cinema's documentation of the otherwise undocumented.

Paul Sinha's History Revision was the winner of the 2016 Rose d'Or for 'Best Radio Comedy'.

Written and performed by ... Paul Sinha
Producer ... Ed Morrish
Production co-ordinator ... Tamara Shilham

A BBC Studios production.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b08wqs1j)

Jennifer is told not to splash the cash, and Jill finds a target for her anger.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b08wmk6j)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


THU 19:45 Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (b08wqlm7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b08wqs1l)

Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.


THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b08wqs1n)

Evan Davis presents the business magazine.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b08wmk5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b08wmk5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b08wmk6p)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b08wmk6r)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Dangerous Visions (b08vzq86)
Fahrenheit 451, Episode 4

Montag is too distressed to go to work, after what happened yesterday. He's supposed to burn books, that's his job.
Burning things.
Not people.

Ray Bradbury's visionary cult classic, abridged by Sara Davies. The reader is Alex Jennings.


THU 23:00 Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! (b06z2pmy)
Series 2, The Bodyguard

Milton offers his services as a bodyguard and discovers that a South American diva and a tent full of home-made jam don't mix - as well as he'd imagined.

Mention Milton Jones to most people and the first thing they think is 'Help!'. Because each week, Milton and his trusty assistant Anton (played by Milton regular, Tom Goodman-Hill) set out to help people and soon find they're embroiled in a new adventure. Because when you're close to the edge, then Milton can give you a push.

"Milton Jones is one of Britain's best gagsmiths with a flair for creating daft yet perfect one-liners." The Guardian.

"King of the surreal one-liners." The Times

"If you haven't caught up with Jones yet - do so!" The Daily Mail

Written by Milton with James Cary (Bluestone 42, Miranda) and Dan Evans (who co-wrote Milton's Channel 4 show House Of Rooms), the man they call "Britain's funniest Milton" returns to the radio with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes.

The cast includes regulars Tom Goodman-Hill (Spamalot, Mr. Selfridge) as the ever-faithful Anton, Josie Lawrence and Dan Tetsell.

With music by Guy Jackson.

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08wqtm3)

Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



FRIDAY 07 JULY 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b08y7fwb)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b08xd2cz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08y7fwd)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08y7fwg)

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08y7fwj)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b08y7fwl)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08y7864)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Canon Stephen Shipley, Radio Producer and broadcaster.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b08y7fwn)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08wr9fm)
Josh Myers on the Short-Eared Owl

Josh Myers recalls how the short eared owl helps with his tourette's for Tweet of the Day.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Tom Bonnett.


FRI 06:00 Today (b08wmk8k)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b08wmmwn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b08xd38g)
Big Pig, Little Pig, Episode 5

When Jacqueline Yallop moves to south-west France with her husband, she embraces rural village life and buys two pigs to rear for slaughter. But as she gets to know the animals better, her English sentimentality threatens to get in the way and she begins to wonder if she can actually bring herself to kill them.

This is a memoir about that fateful decision, but it's also about the ethics of meat eating in the modern age, and whether we should know, respect and even love the animals we eat.

At its heart, this book is a love story, exploring Jacqueline's increasing attachment for her particular pigs, and celebrating the enduring closeness of humans and pigs over the centuries.

Written by Jacqueline Yallop
Read by Imogen Stubbs
Abridged by Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08wmk8m)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


FRI 10:45 Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (b08wr9fp)
The Days of Anna Madrigal, Episode 5

Tales of the City: The Days of Anna Madrigal by Armistead Maupin. Dramatised by Lin Coghlan.
Ep 5

Michael, Ben and Shawna arrive at the Burning Man festival. And Mrs Madrigal remembers her troubled relationship with Lasko.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.


FRI 11:00 Speaking with Smaller Tongues (b08wr9fr)

Penzance-born Rory McGrath writes and performs a Cornish song at the SUNS International Festival - a multilingual alternative to the Eurovision song contest, where English is banned.

Rory talks with fellow performers, and to academics, about how the internet and the spread of English as a lingua franca is threatening to smother small languages. The United Nations predicts that 90% of Europe's 200 minority languages will have ceased to exist by the end of the 21st century.

A Terrier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Polyoaks (b08wr9ft)
Series 5, Easy GPeasy

It's a red letter day for the Polyoaks surgery. Against all the odds, Practice Manager Monica (Polly Frame) seems actually to have balanced the books. Jeremy (David Westhead) is seeing private patients and is building up a nice little client list, Roy (Nigel Planer) has seen the light and is threatening to abandon drugs completely and Hugh (Simon Greenall) is strangely pleased to have been assessed as officially average by the Care Quality Commission.

What can possibly go wrong? And how soon?

The beleaguered West Country clinic carries on indomitably in its struggle against targets, government initiatives and patients. Dr. Phil Hammond and David Spicer continue painting their satirical portrait of a thoroughly modern health service.

Written by Dr Phil Hammond and Mr David Spicer
Directed by Frank Stirling
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b08wmk8p)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b08wr9fw)
Series 1, Tally Stick

Tally sticks were made from willow harvested along the banks of the Thames in London. The stick would contain a record of the debt. It might say, for example, "9£ 4s 4p from Fulk Basset for the farm of Wycombe". Fulk Basset, by the way, might sound like a character from Star Wars but was in fact a Bishop of London in the 13th century. He owed his debt to King Henry III. Now comes the elegant part. The stick would be split in half, down its length from one end to the other. The debtor would retain half, called the "foil". The creditor would retain the other half, called the "stock". (Even today British bankers use the word "stocks" to refer to debts of the British government.) Because willow has a natural and distinctive grain, the two halves would match only each other. As Tim Harford explains, the tally stick system enabled something radical to occur. If you had a tally stock showing that Bishop Basset owed you five pounds, then unless you worried that Bishop Basset wasn't good for the money, the tally stock itself was worth close to five pounds in its own right - like money; a kind of debt, which can be traded freely.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editors: Richard Knight and Richard Vadon.


FRI 12:13 You and Yours (b08wmk8r)

Consumer news and issues.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b08wmk8t)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b08wmk8w)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


FRI 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b08wr9fy)
Series 2, The Coup in Chile

Bridget Kendall explores the major turning points in the later decades of the Cold War.

Throughout the Cold War, one of the key concerns of the United States was to keep countries in Latin America and the Caribbean from moving into the Soviet camp.

Whether a government declared itself to be Communist, like Castro's Cuba, or was merely a left-wing administration, the assumption was that it represented a potential threat.

So when, in 1970, Salvador Allende was elected President of Chile, representing a left-wing coalition, the US was not slow to react. After sponsoring a coup attempt in 1970, the US would - throughout the years of Allende's presidency - attempt to undermine his socialist government from within.

Although the violent military coup that would eventually take place on September 11th 1973, which installed the leadership of Augusto Pinochet, was not directly orchestrated by the CIA, it arguably could not have come about without its destabilising influence over the preceding years.

The coup involved the bombing of the Chilean presidential palace, known as the Moneda. Bridget Kendall hears from three people who were close to the Moneda that day.

With Jack Devine, Osvaldo Puccio and Steven Volk.

Readings by John Norton.

Producer: Martin Williams.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b08wqs1j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b08wr9g2)
The Archivist

The Archivist by Kellie Smith
A psychological thriller. Like many young parents Ben and Clare enjoy basking in the responses they get from uploading photos and videos of their family on social media. But things spiral out of control when Ben starts to secretly film his family for his personal archive.

Produced and directed by Pauline Harris.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08wr9g4)

Horticultural panel programme.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (b08wr9g6)
Series 1, The Road to True Love

A new story by the acclaimed Irish novelist Niall Williams, author of the 2014 Man Booker Prize longlisted 'History of the Rain'. Williams has written several best selling novels, including 'Four Letters of Love' and 'The Fall of Light', and has lived in County Clare in the west of Ireland for over thirty years.

Reader ..... Dermot Crowley
Writer ..... Niall Williams
Producer ..... Michael Shannon.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b08wr9g8)

Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.


FRI 16:30 Feedback (b08wr9gb)

Radio 4's forum for audience comment.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b08wr9gd)
Marion and Fiona - Music and Memories

Friends reflect on how the different music of their youth continues to influence them and distinguish their experiences. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b08wmk8y)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08wmk90)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (b08wr9gg)
Series 18, 07/07/2017

Recorded the day before transmission, the satirical sketch show remains as sharp and topical as ever. Impressions and caricatures are the charming couriers of explosively satirical truth-bombs.

The series is written by Private Eye writers Tom Jamieson and Nev Fountain, together with Tom Coles, Ed Amsden, Sarah Campbell, Laurence Howarth, James Bugg, Laura Major, Max Davis, Jack Bernhardt and others.

The series stars Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens, Lewis MacLeod, Deborah Stephenson and Duncan Wisbey.

A BBC Studios Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b08wr9gj)

Fallon grasps the nettle, while Lynda and Lilian are forced together.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b08wmk92)

News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.


FRI 19:45 Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (b08wr9fp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b08wr9gl)
Suella Fernandes MP, Jack Monroe, Chuka Umunna MP

Ritula Shah presents political debate and discussion from Hungerford in Berkshire with a panel including the chair of the European Research Group Suella Fernandes MP, political activist and writer Jack Monroe, and the Labour MP Chuka Umunna.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b08wr9gn)

A reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b08wr9gq)
Series 2, Omnibus 1

Bridget Kendall presents a new oral history of the early turning points in the Cold War.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b08wmk94)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b08wmk96)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Dangerous Visions (b08w14fc)
Fahrenheit 451, Episode 5

Montag has resolved to quit his job as a fireman. No more burning books. But it's a dangerous stand to take . And he must tell Millie.
Ray Bradbury's visionary classic, abridged by Sara Davies. Read by Alex Jennings.


FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b08wp59r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08wr9gv)

Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b08wr9gx)
Emma and Emily - The Prom

The embarrassment of meeting a teacher in the supermarket, and the year-long planning required for the School Prom. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 MON (b08wn9m0)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 TUE (b08wp54n)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 WED (b08wpgh2)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 THU (b08wqlmf)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 FRI (b08wr9fw)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b08wp59r)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b08wp59r)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b08w11zr)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b08wr9gn)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b08vxv34)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b08wnc03)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b08vwnd5)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b08w11zp)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b08wr9gl)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b08wmcyf)

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City 10:45 MON (b08wn2jm)

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City 19:45 MON (b08wn2jm)

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City 10:45 TUE (b08wp3gf)

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City 19:45 TUE (b08wp3gf)

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City 10:41 WED (b08wpd5b)

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City 19:45 WED (b08wpd5b)

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City 10:45 THU (b08wqlm7)

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City 19:45 THU (b08wqlm7)

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City 10:45 FRI (b08wr9fp)

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City 19:45 FRI (b08wr9fp)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b08wmk5x)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b08wmk5x)

Bad Salsa 11:30 WED (b06vkj1w)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b08wmmw7)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b08wmmw7)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b08x9813)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b08wn2jk)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b08wn2jk)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b08xd0v7)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b08xd0v7)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b08xd1j7)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b08xd1j7)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b08xd2cz)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b08xd2cz)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b08xd38g)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b08wmyc1)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b08wmyc1)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b08wmjpc)

Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze 21:00 SAT (b07ks4mb)

Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze 13:45 MON (b08wn9m2)

Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze 13:45 TUE (b08wp54q)

Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze 13:45 WED (b08x34gw)

Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze 13:45 THU (b08wqlmh)

Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze 13:45 FRI (b08wr9fy)

Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze 21:00 FRI (b08wr9gq)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b08wn9m6)

Dangerous Visions 14:30 SAT (b08wm8zw)

Dangerous Visions 22:45 MON (b08vxvr9)

Dangerous Visions 22:45 TUE (b08vyqbl)

Dangerous Visions 22:45 WED (b08vzj4v)

Dangerous Visions 22:45 THU (b08vzq86)

Dangerous Visions 22:45 FRI (b08w14fc)

Dead Ringers 12:30 SAT (b08w11zk)

Dead Ringers 18:30 FRI (b08wr9gg)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b08wmmwn)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b08wmmwn)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b08wmwyy)

Drama 14:15 MON (b08wn9m4)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b08wp54s)

Drama 14:15 WED (b08wpgh4)

Drama 14:15 THU (b08wqnzv)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b08wr9g2)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b08vwncq)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b08wmjv6)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b08wmjyj)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b08wmk21)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b08wmk5d)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b08y7fwn)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b08w0znj)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b08wr9gb)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b08vyly5)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b08wp6hb)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b08wmmwq)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b08wmmwq)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b08wphjj)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b08vwncx)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b08wqlm9)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b08wmjw3)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b08wmjz3)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b08wmk2x)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b08wmk6j)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b08wmk92)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b08w0znb)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b08wr9g4)

Hadraawi: The Shakespeare of Somalia 16:30 SUN (b08wmyc3)

Hiding Out 19:45 SUN (b08wmyll)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 12:04 SUN (b08vxv2y)

I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue 18:30 MON (b08wn9md)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b08wmk5j)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b08wmk5j)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b08wmjz5)

In the Criminologist's Chair 16:00 TUE (b08wrbyf)

In the Rough: Golf's Uncertain Future 20:00 MON (b08wn9mj)

In the Rough: Golf's Uncertain Future 11:00 WED (b08wn9mj)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b08wp6hd)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b08wp6hd)

Inside the Brain of Gerald Scarfe 23:00 MON (b08wp16h)

John Finnemore's Double Acts 18:30 WED (b08tcp50)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b08w0zng)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b08wr9g8)

Laura Barton's Notes from a Musical Island 15:30 SAT (b08vy0yd)

Learning from Life and Death 13:30 SUN (b08wmpnl)

Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair 23:15 WED (b04d4qpn)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b08vwndk)

Making History 15:30 TUE (b08wp54v)

Meet David Sedaris 18:30 TUE (b08wp5cq)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b08vwnc8)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b08wmjnf)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b08wmjtw)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b08wmjy5)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b08wmk1q)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b08wmk50)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b08y7fwb)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b08wm8zt)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b08wm8zt)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b08wmk2n)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b08wphjg)

My House 11:30 THU (b08wqlmc)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b08vy0yb)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b08wp3gh)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b08vwncj)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b08wmjnp)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b08wmjv4)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b08wmjyg)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b08wmk1z)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b08wmk5b)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b08y7fwl)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b08wmjnr)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b08vwncz)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b08wmjph)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b08wmjvl)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b08wmjyq)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b08wmk27)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b08wmk5n)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b08wmk8p)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b08vwncl)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b08wmjp0)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b08wmjp6)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b08vwndp)

News 13:00 SAT (b08vwnd3)

Only Artists 09:00 WED (b08wpd56)

Only Artists 21:30 WED (b08wpd56)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b08vzq7t)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b08wqp00)

Out of the Ordinary 21:30 TUE (b08h0c9h)

PM 17:00 SAT (b08vwnd9)

PM 17:00 MON (b08wmjvy)

PM 17:00 TUE (b08wmjyz)

PM 17:00 WED (b08wmk2s)

PM 17:00 THU (b08wmk5z)

PM 17:00 FRI (b08wmk8y)

Paul Sinha's History Revision 18:30 THU (b08wqs1g)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b08wmjpw)

Polyoaks 11:30 FRI (b08wr9ft)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b08w14rm)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b08wp80t)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b08xx85j)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b08y0bq7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b08y40jg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b08y7864)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b08wmcyc)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b08wmcyc)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b08wmcyc)

Quirke's Cast and Crew 16:00 MON (b08wn9m8)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b08wmmwc)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b08wmmwc)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b08wmmwc)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b08vwncv)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b08vwndm)

Science Stories 21:00 WED (b08wphjl)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b08vwncd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b08wmjnk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b08wmjv0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b08wmjy9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b08wmk1v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b08wmk56)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b08y7fwg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b08vwncb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b08vwncg)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b08vwndc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b08wmjnh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b08wmjnm)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b08wmjpp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b08wmjty)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b08wmjv2)

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Short Works 00:30 SUN (b08w0znd)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (b08wr9g6)

Sisters 11:30 MON (b08wn2jr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b08vwndh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b08wmjpt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b08wmjw1)

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Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b08wmk2v)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b08wmk61)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b08wmk90)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b08wmjnw)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b08wmjnw)

Speaking with Smaller Tongues 11:00 FRI (b08wr9fr)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b08wmjvg)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b08wmjvg)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b08wmmwh)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b08wmjp2)

Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! 23:00 THU (b06z2pmy)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b08vxt13)

The Absolutely Radio Show 19:15 SUN (b08wmyc7)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b08wmjpf)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b08wmyc5)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b08wmyc5)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b08wn9mg)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b08wn9mg)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b08wp6h8)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b08wp6h8)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b08wphjd)

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The Archers 19:00 THU (b08wqs1j)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b08wqs1j)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b08wr9gj)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b08vzq84)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b08wqs1n)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b08wqs1l)

The Damien Slash Mixtape 23:00 WED (b08wphwm)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b08vzq7w)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b08wqp04)

The Honky Tonk Nun 23:30 SAT (b08mb1ft)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b08wn9mb)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b08wn9mb)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b08wm8zp)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b08wm8zp)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b08wmwyw)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b08wpd5d)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b08wr9gd)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b08wr9gx)

The Living World 06:35 SUN (b08wmmw9)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b08wmk2q)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (b08vy0y6)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (b08wp3g3)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b08wn2jp)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b08wmjpm)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b08wmjw7)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b08wmjz7)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b08wmk31)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b08wmk6r)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b08wmk96)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b08vzj4g)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b08wphj8)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b08wp167)

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Today 07:00 SAT (b08wlc6b)

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Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b08vxt0j)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b08wn2jh)

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Voices of the First World War 09:30 WED (b08wpd58)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b08vwncn)

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Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b08wm8zr)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b08wmjpy)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b08vwnd7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b08wmjvj)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b08wmjyn)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b08wmk25)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b08wmk5l)

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World at One 13:00 MON (b08wmjvs)

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World at One 13:00 WED (b08wmk2l)

World at One 13:00 THU (b08wmk5v)

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Yangon Renaissance: Punks, Poets and Painters 11:30 TUE (b08wp54l)

You and Yours 12:13 MON (b08wmjvn)

You and Yours 12:13 TUE (b08wmjys)

You and Yours 12:13 WED (b08wmk2g)

You and Yours 12:13 THU (b08wmk5q)

You and Yours 12:13 FRI (b08wmk8r)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b08wm52q)