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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 27 MAY 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b08qxfy4)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b08rg43m)
Sound, Episode 5

In 1997, Bella Bathurst began to go deaf at the age of 28. Within a few months, she had lost half her hearing, and the rest was slipping away. She wasn't just missing punchlines, she was missing most of the conversation - and all of the jokes. For the next twelve years deafness shaped her life.

Sound draws on this experience, exploring the practical and emotional impact of losing your hearing, and what it teaches you about listening and silence, music and noise.

By 2009, Bella has made her peace with her hearing loss. She's found ways to cope, and ways to be happy. And she assumes this is the way life will always be. Then a routine visit to her audiologist changes everything.

Read by Adjoa Andoh
Abridged by Jo Coombs
Produced by Hannah Marshall

A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08qxfy6)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08qxfy8)

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08qxfyb)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b08qxfyd)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08r39dt)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rania Hafez, founder director of the professional network 'Muslim Women in Education' and a member of the Muslim institute.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b08r39dw)

iPM is the news programme that starts with its listeners. Email ipm@bbc.co.uk. Twitter: @BBCiPM. Presented by Luke Jones and Eddie Mair.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b08qxfyg)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b08qxfyj)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b08r1xcl)
Series 36, The Nidderdale Way: Scar House Reservoir to Ramsgill

Clare Balding embarks on the second leg of the Nidderdale Way , a 53 mile circular walk that begins and ends in the North Yorkshire town of Pateley Bridge.
Today she's joined by the Rev Darryl Hall and Methodist minister, Mike Poole, who work and walk together regularly , known locally as the Ant and Dec of the church. Mike's wife Julia also comes along with the map to ensure they stay on track. This section of the walk takes them through the small hill village of Middlesmoor. Its church, St Chads, boasts of having one of the best views in Britain and Clare believes the community can also brag about their very excellent public conveniences.
For this series Clare is using OS Explorer 298, starting reference for this walk 066 766, and the Harvey map of The Nidderdale Way.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b08qxfyl)
Chelsea Flower Show

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b08qxfyn)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b08rnz3j)

News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b08qxfyq)
Adrian Lester, James May, Marawa Ibrahim, Lottie Muir

Actor Adrian Lester, star of Sky drama Riviera; TV presenter and author of The Reassembler, James May; record breaking hula hooper and author of The Girl Guide, Marawa Ibrahim; plus cocktail gardener Lottie Muir from the Midnight Apothecary.


SAT 10:30 Costume Drama: The Wonderful World of Cosplay (b08rnz3l)

Yasmeen Khan dresses up as a radio presenter to talk to the people who put on the costumes and make-up of their favourite TV and film characters and gather together in halls and hotels for cosplay and costuming.

Many of these events, or Comic Cons, are huge with thousands of people flocking to mingle with each other and with some of the film and television stars who turn up to sign autographs, pose for photographs and top up their incomes.

But what do the so-called cosplayers get out of this? Costumes can be time-consuming and expensive, particularly as many cosplayers take pride in making their outfits as close to the real thing as possible. The bigger events can also be expensive. Yet many cosplayers will insist the costume world has changed their lives they have become more confident, have a secure social circle and all have a great deal of fun.

Yasmeen follows Star Wars cosplayer Beth Gourlay as she and her eight-year-old son Alexander son get ready for Digi-Con in Doncaster. Mum and son talk about what cosplay means to them as Beth helps Alex into his armoured Batman costume, making running repairs with needle and thread - and superglue. We also meet Kerry who is dressed as Ursula the Sea Witch from The Little Mermaid and Julian - a perfectly terrifying Darth Vader.

A few weeks later, Yasmeen travels to Margate to meet Thanet Cosplay founder Victoria Johnson and cosplay mover and shaker Scott Mason. She also talks to a principal Dalek, Barnaby Edwards, and C.A.T.S. Eyes actress Roz Landor, who made one appearance in Star Trek: The Next Generation.

Producer: Neil Rosser
A Spools Out production for Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (b08rnz3n)

Nick Robinson assesses developments in the election campaign.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b08qxfys)
A Haircut and a Pedicure

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b08qxfyv)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b08rnz3q)
The cost of driving while divorced

A Money Box listener tells how her best buy car insurance renewal quote jumped from £582 to £919 after she changed her status from married to divorced while keeping her former husband as the named second driver. Graeme Trudgill, Executive Director of the British Insurance Brokers' Association explains the so-called "divorce premium."

A tax which is added to many insurance bills is set to rise on June 1. Insurance Premium Tax which covers pets, cars and home contents will increase from 10% to 12%. There will be no extra on travel insurance which is already taxed at the higher rate of 20% and life insurance is exempt.

Hywel Williams from Plaid Cymru, Green Party MEP Molly Scott Cato and Sir Vince Cable from the Liberal Democrats outline their party's personal finance plans ahead of the General Election. Manifesto pledges include a living pension, a universal basic income and ending the married couples' tax allowance.

As new figures suggest that London rents have fallen for the first time in eight years - what's happening to prices beyond London and if that fall continues, will people who rent notice any difference financially? Johnny Morris, Research Director at Countrywide and John Bibby, Senior Policy Adviser with Shelter, discuss.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Reporter: Vivienne Nunis
Producer: Charmaine Cozier
Editor: Andrew Smith.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b08r3310)
Series 93, 26/05/2017

Jeremy Hardy, Holly Walsh, Suzi Ruffell and Andrew Maxwell are Miles' guests for another round of News Quizzing.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b08qxfyx)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b08qxfyz)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b08r34lx)
Rhun ap Iorwerth AM, David Davis, Nia Griffith, Isabel Oakeshott

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Crickhowell High School in Powys, Wales, with the Shadow Cabinet Secretary for Health and Social Care for Plaid Cymru in the Welsh Assembly, Rhun ap Iorwerth, the Brexit Secretary David Davis, the Shadow Defence Secretary Nia Griffith and the political journalist and author Isabel Oakeshott.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b08qxfz1)

Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions?. Email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Tweet,#BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.
Lines open at 1230 on Saturday 03700 100 444.

Presenter Anita Anand
Producer: Maire Devine
Editor Eleanor Garland.


SAT 14:30 Defoe (b07knzdg)
A Journal of the Plague Year

As part of BBC Radio 4's Defoe season, Ben Miles stars as the chameleon writer, businessman, debtor and hack, Daniel Defoe. In 1722, hoping to keep his creditors at bay, Defoe begins his fictional 'journal' of the Great Plague of 1665. But he soon comes to be haunted by the people he is conjuring.

Dramatised by Michael Butt

Directed by Emma Harding.


SAT 15:30 The Voices of... (b08r1tsz)
Series 2, Andy Partridge

An intimate portrait of the songwriter, singer and frontman of the new wave rock band XTC, Andy Partridge.

Brought up on a council estate in Swindon, Andy Partridge's escape from the poverty of his working class upbringing followed a classic path - art and music. At 15, he enrolled in what he calls the 'art floor' of the local college - Swindon didn't boast an actual art college. Then, he discovered the magnetic power of carrying around his Dad's old guitar. He didn't even have to play it to find himself the centre of attention.

In the years that followed - and in the wake of the punk explosion - he tasted celebrity and success with his band XTC. His curious vocal style and angular compositions were distinctive and influential. XTC built a cult status with songs such as Making Plans for Nigel and Senses Working Overtime, as well as albums including the acclaimed Skylarking.

But Swindon didn't lose Andy for long, despite the lure of London and New York. He lives there still, now with his American partner. And he's still writing songs - including for the recent album by the reformed Monkees.

In this programme, he talks about the trajectory of his career and the 'art blood' that has consistently flowed through his veins.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4

[Photo courtesy of Kevin Nixon, Prog Magazine].


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b08qxfz3)
Charlotte Harris and her Canadian-inspired garden

Charlotte Harris tells us about creating her first ever Show Garden at RHS Chelsea Flower show after five years of helping other designers behind the scenes. She heads an all female design team with her garden influenced by the forests and waterways of the Canadian Boreal.

In a new series looking at the experiences of children of alcoholics, we hear from Lynne who grew up in Yorkshire with an alcoholic mother who died 12 years ago from complications caused by her drinking.

Hilary Henriques the CEO of the National Association for Children of Alcoholics discusses the complexities of growing up with a parent addicted to alcohol.

Megan Hunter talks about her debut novel The End We Start From, a story about a woman who gives birth to her first child in the middle of a life-changing environmental crisis.

The Chief Operating Officer of Facebook Sheryl Sandberg talks about the loss of her husband Dave who died suddenly two years ago.

The songwriter, arranger, producer and television film composer Anne Dudley, has been awarded the Performing Rights Society for Music Outstanding Contribution to British Music at the Ivor Novello awards. She talks about some of her work including ABC's Lexicon of Love and the music for Poldark.

And Zoe Adjonyoh Cooks the Perfect Pan Fried Tilapia, a Ghanaian inspired dish.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b08qxfz5)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b08r39dw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08qxfz7)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b08qxfz9)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08qxfzc)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b08qxfzf)
Meera Syal, Anthony Head, Alistair McGowan, Rhyannon Styles, Ron Sexsmith, Mykki Blanco, Scottee, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Scottee are joined by Meera Syal, Anthony Head, Alistair McGowan and Rhyannon Styles. With music from Ron Sexsmith and Mykki Blanco.

Producer: Paula McGinley.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b08rp0gs)
David Lynch

Mark Coles profiles the director David Lynch, whose classic TV series Twin Peaks has just returned to the screen after 25 years.

Obsessed with drawing and painting from an early age, Lynch's mother didn't even allow him colouring books in case they halted his artistic development. Despite dropping out of art school, Lynch first made his name with surreal short films before directing the cult hit Eraserhead. There was further success with The Elephant Man and Blue Velvet before Twin Peaks brought his work to a mainstream TV audience.

Alongside his film work, Lynch has also produced paintings, photographs of abandoned factories, musical collaborations, and even designed nightclubs. A continual stream of creative output fuelled by Transcendental Meditation.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b08qxfzh)
Woyzeck, The Other Side of Hope, Handmaid's Tale, Elif Batuman, California exhibition

John Boyega plays the title role in Woyzeck; an updating of a 19th century German play about a man driven mad by circumstances. How well has the Star Wars actor adapted to the stage? And has Jack Thorne - who adapted Harry Potter for the theatre - made the play relevant for today's audience?
Finnish film director Aki Kaurasmaki's latest film is The Other Side of Hope - told in his trademark low key, quiet manner, it deals with a refugee arriving in Helsinki.
There's a new TV version of The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel, coming to Channel 4. It's had rave reviews in the US, will it beguile our reviewers?
Turkish/American writer Elif Batuman's latest novel The Idiot is set over the course of one year in a student's life at Harvard in the late 1980s. Her academic pursuits and longing for love are revealed in the novel (which intentionally shares its title with Dostoevsky)
California Designing Freedom is a new exhibition at London's Design Museum celebrating the enormous range of items designed in The Golden State. It ties together the explosion in design with the hippy movement and mind-expanding drugs.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Louise Doughty, Giles Fraser and Maev Kennedy. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b08rp0gv)
Femmes Fatales

Recorded on location in Manhattan, screen siren Kathleen Turner celebrates the enduring mystique of the femme fatale.

Turner, who famously played the husky-voiced femme fatale Matty walker in the steamy thriller Body Heat, traces the history of the Femme Fatale in cinema and in film noir where she was so often a central character.

Film noir always come to the fore during moments of deep cultural anxiety. And the character of the femme fatale shines a revealing light on the role of women in society and the relationship between the sexes.

It was towards the end of the Second World War that noir first emerged as a style of filmmaking. These were gritty thrillers that exposed the dark underbelly of the American Dream. In films such as Double Indemnity, Out Of The Past and The Postman Always Rings Twice, the femme fatale was the intelligent but heartless seductress who entrapped the male protagonist, for her own murderous and financial gain.

In the late 70s and early 80s, America experienced another moment of deep cynicism following the Vietnam war and filmmakers returned to film noir, with Kathleen Turner's Matty Walker as the ultimate neo noir femme fatale character in Body Heat. These films, not content with the racy innuendo of 1940s noir, shocked and thrilled audiences with explicit sex scenes. But through her typical tough dame talk, Matty Walker also draws attention to the underestimation of women by men.

With contributions from Eddie Muller (President of the Film Noir Foundation), Professor Ellis Cashmore and Nick James (Editor of the BFI's Sight and Sound magazine), Kathleen introduces standout performances from Lauren Bacall, Barbara Stanwyck, Rita Hayworth, Joan Crawford and Lana Turner.

The film noir femme fatale was a wonderfully meaty role for an up-and-coming Hollywood actress, such as British star Peggy Cummins. Now 91, she reflects on her role as the femme fatale in Joseph H. Lewis' Gun Crazy about an ambitious fairground sharp-shooter who goes on a bank robbing spree with her trigger-happy husband.

Julie Grossman (author of Rethinking The Femme Fatale in Film Noir) argues that we make blithe and easy reference to femmes fatales without considering their social and psychological context. Many 1940s femmes fatales in film noir were deeply interesting characters who felt trapped, bored or led deeply unfulfilling lives.

Kathleen argues that, despite great advances in gender equality since the 1940s, the femme fatale will always be relevant "because men will always be terrified of women."

Producer: Victoria Ferran
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b07h2v3d)
Miss Julie

A reimagined version of August Strindberg's 1888 stage play by Roger James Elsgood, starring Sofie Grabol, Lars Mikkelsen, and Marie Bach Hansen.

Strindberg's Miss Julie concerned a well-bred woman from the land-owning classes who has a one-night stand with her father's valet, Jean. Over the course of a midsummer night, Julie and Jean discuss their different stations in life and, emboldened by alcohol, she goads Jean to cross the social, economic and sexual lines that divide them and seduces him into her bed. Following their lovemaking, the axis of their relationship reverses - he now has power over her as she realises she is vulnerable to exposure and disgrace. Julie becomes conflicted about the implications of their deed and, with no one else to turn to, relies on Jean for advice. Jean is concerned about losing his job and he contrives a lethal scenario which best serves his needs.

In this new version, the themes that lead to the dramatic denouement are not so much those of social class, status, and breeding, but gender, identity and sexual orientation - issues that Victorian-era audiences were not ready for, but which are being openly debated today.

The production was recorded on location in a 19th-century country house in Ballerup on the island of Zealand in Denmark.

Written by August Strindberg
Adapted by Roger James Elsgood

Director: Willi Richards
Producer: Roger James Elsgood

An Art and Adventure production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b08qxfzk)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 FutureProofing (b08r1wz1)
Wealth

How will we become wealthy in future? Presenters Leo Johnson and Timandra Harkness journey to New York and the Arabian Gulf to discover how our understanding of wealth is changing. They explore new definitions of wealth, and find out how old money plans to hang on to its wealth in the face of challenges from technology and social tensions between generations.

Producer: Jonathan Brunert.


SAT 23:00 The 3rd Degree (b08r1n6w)
Series 7, The University of Roehampton

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from the University of Roehampton with specialist subjects including Anthropology, Law and Linguistics and questions ranging from brachiation and morphemes to Xanadu via Kanye West and Sir Philip Sydney.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Justin Bieber. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Queen's University Belfast, Hull, Derby, Liverpool and St John's College Cambridge.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b08qy2yj)
Being Lost

Roger McGough presents a selection of listeners' requests for poems about being lost. Suggestions range from poems that guide you through the forests' depths, to those reflecting inner labyrinths.

Producer: Eliza Lomas.



SUNDAY 28 MAY 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b08rp2rv)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Short Works (b08r320r)
Series 1, I Don't Want to Grow Up

A writer in an unnamed city struggles to stay focused on his work. This new story from Philip O Ceallaigh is inspired by the Ramones cover of Tom Waits' song.
Read by Robin Laing
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08rp2rz)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08rp2s4)

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08rp2s6)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b08rp2s8)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b08rp5vv)
St George's, Edinburgh

This week's Bells on Sunday, comes from the church of St Andrew's and St George's West, in Edinburgh. This Grade A listed building was completed in 1784 and serves the city's New Town Parish.
The tower holds a peal of eight bells cast by William & Thomas Mears of London in 1788. The tenor weighs fourteen and a half hundredweight and is tuned to E.
We hear now part of a full peal of Marlborough Surprise Major.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b08rp0gs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b08rp2sf)

The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b08rp2sk)
Truth

As the UK election approaches, Mark Tully seeks truth in a post-truth world. He considers how to recognise what is true among a cacophony of conjecture and, in the company of author Howard Jacobson, how fiction might lead us to truth. They agree that we live in times when the search for truth is particularly important - but more difficult than ever.

With help from the words of Mahatma Gandhi, Emily Dickinson, Joseph Goebbels and Lewis Carroll, Mark examines just how slippery the concept of truth can be, and how an untruth told often enough, with enough conviction, can become credible.

Or, as that great believer in manufactured truth, Humpty Dumpty, would have it, "when I use a word it means just what I choose it to mean."

Producer: Adam Fowler
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b08rp5vx)
Farming without Subsidies

In an year when trade deals and the future of farm support are at the front of British farmers' minds, Nancy Nicolson travels to New Zealand to hear from one ambitious producer about how farming for the market has been second nature for Kiwis, ever since farm subsidies were removed by their Government in the 1980s.

Will Anderson is the sixth generation to farm lush flat land near Palmerston North in North Island, but he's the first of the Morrison family to expand the business into hill land where he now runs sheep and Hereford cattle - the seed stock for the finishing business further down the hill .

He is investing heavily because he is confident about the future. And he says he is proud that he farms in the free market where efficiency is paramount.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b08rp2sm)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b08rp2sp)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b08rp2sr)
Faith response to the Manchester attack; Oscar Romero case reopened; 98-year-old bell ringer.

Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme presented by Martin Bashir.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b08rp5vz)
Acid Survivors Trust International

Samira Ahmed makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Acid Survivors Trust International.

Registered Charity Number 1079290
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'A S T I'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Acid Survivors Trust International'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b08rp2st)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b08rp2sw)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b08rp5w1)

A service of reflection from St Ann's Church in the centre of Manchester, not far from Manchester Arena where the bomb attack killed 22 people. Led by the Revd Nigel Ashworth. Director of Music: Simon Passmore; Producer: Stephen Shipley.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b08r34lz)
After Manchester

Howard Jacobson reflects on his home city's response to the Manchester attack.

What confronts the city now, he says, is dealing with the fact that the perpetrator came from within itself.

"All our cities shelter the same boy", he writes, "studiously immersed in the same story. And if we didn't know it before, stories can kill".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b08r1lj6)
Ashley Davies on the Kingfisher

Ashley Davies of the Slimbridge Wetland Centre reveals why a kingfisher changed his life.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Miles Warde.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b08rp2sy)

Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b08rp2t0)

Lilian is keen to help, and Pip needs some distance.


SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b08rpcqb)
Elif Shafak

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the Turkish writer Elif Shafak.

Elif Shafak has published ten novels and several volumes of non-fiction and her work is translated into 47 languages. She is the most widely read female novelist in Turkey today.

Born in 1971, she was raised by a single working mother and also, for the first ten years of her life, by her grandmother in Ankara. Her mother's job as a diplomat led to a move to Madrid when Elif was ten years old - and so began a peripatetic life which has taken her to places as diverse as Jordan and Germany, the United States and finally to London where she has lived for the past seven years.

Elif wrote her first novels in Turkish, but began writing in English shortly after the start of the new millennium. English, she says, has given her a new freedom to write about sensitive issues in Turkey. Her books draw on diverse cultures and reflect her interest in history, philosophy, spiritualism and Sufism. One commentator has said of her work: "Stepping into the writing of this Turkish-born author for the first time is like breaking through the back of a children's wardrobe and walking into a whole new multicultural world of lives and histories - and, above all, fabulous stories."

She is a regular columnist both for English as well as Turkish papers and also writes lyrics for rock musicians.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b08rp2t2)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b08r1pwp)
Series 78, 22/05/2017

Just A Minute is 50 years old this year! Nicholas Parsons has been hosting since day one, and presides over the following all-star panel: Paul Merton, Pam Ayres, Zoe Lyons and Julian Clary.

The panel have to talk on a given subject for sixty seconds without repetition, hesitation or deviation. How much does Pam know about New York City? Julian gives us everything he's go on Julius Caesar, Zoe talks about her love of pick 'n' mix, and Paul tells us about his strong point.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle and it was produced by Matt Stronge.

Just A Minute is a BBC Studios production.


SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b08rpd85)
Turmeric

Sheila Dillon takes a journey into the culinary use, history and the latest medical findings about turmeric.

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a member of the ginger family of plants - and its rhizome, the part mainly used in cooking, has a deep orange-golden colour that marks it out. Responsible for this distinctive hue is the bioactive compound, curcumin. Turmeric - and curcumin - have attracted a lot of attention in recent years, and much has been claimed about medicinal properties. In India, where most turmeric is still grown, turmeric - or haldi - has long been revered and widely used both as an essential savoury food ingredient and as a medicine, with the golden rhizome being particularly valued within the ancient medical system of Ayurveda.

Sheila investigates the health claims about turmeric and curcumin, talking to Dr Michael Mosley - former GP and presenter of BBC Two's Trust Me I'm A Doctor, about his team's recent research findings. Sheila also hears about an article published last month in British Medical Journal Case Reports, and speaks to its co-author Professor Jamie Cavenagh, a leading expert on blood cancer - and one of his patients Dieneke Ferguson, who turned to curcumin after all conventional treatment for her cancer was stopped. Also featuring in the programme are cook and food writer Monisha Bharadwaj - author of The Indian Cookery Course, Susie Emmett - radio producer who went to Andhra Pradesh, India, on the turmeric trail, as well as Dr Stephen Harris, Druce Curator of the Herbaria at Oxford University.

Presenter: Sheila Dillon
Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b08rp2t4)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b08rp2t6)

News and analysis presented by Mark Mardell including election latest.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08r320p)
Chelsea Physic Garden Postbag Edition

Eric Robson presents a postbag edition of the show from the Chelsea Physic Garden. Matthew Wilson, Matt Biggs and Pippa Greenwood answer the horticultural questions.

This week the questions come from listeners' correspondence on topics such as aiding an ailing Gunnera, planting a bog garden, and controlling a wandering Tayberry. They panel also offers advice on tending to a mammoth Magnolia and managing the suckers on a plum tree.

Matthew Wilson takes a tour around Chelsea Flower Show in order to sniff out some useful tips for the home gardener.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b08rpd87)
Omnibus - All About Sharing

Fi Glover with chats between a refugee and volunteer who met in the Calais Jungle, sisters whose love of dance influences their lives, and members of the band Brand New Friend, all in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b08rpdgz)
Pygmalion, Episode 1

Alistair McGowan, Morgana Robinson, Sian Phillips and Al Murray star in George Bernard Shaw's classic tale of Eliza Doolittle, the Cockney flower girl who is trained by professor of phonetics, Henry Higgins, to pass as a duchess.

Directed by Emma Harding.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b08rpf0g)
Tim Winton

Mariella Frostrup talks to the award winning novelist Tim Winton about his latest book of essays The Boy Behind The Curtain.

The prolific Australian writer, best known for novels Breath, Cloudstreet and Dirt Music, has remained steadfastly private about his life, lived away from the literary spotlight in a small town north of Perth.

In The Boy Behind The Curtain, Tim Winton explores stories from his formative years which shaped and formed him as a writer; from his father's near fatal accident, to his enduring love for the ocean and riding the waves.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b08rpf0j)
Work

Roger McGough presents a selection of listeners' requests for poems on the theme of work; praising meaningful days, night shifts and tool boxes. Today's programme features poets Liz Berry, William Letford and Caleb Parkin reading their own works, and others from Carolyn Wells, Phillip Levine and U. A Fanthorpe.

Producer: Eliza Lomas.


SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b08r1vls)
Killings in Care Homes

Headlines involving abuse in care homes normally centre on allegations against staff, but is aggression among residents being overlooked?

With homes increasingly taking care of those with more complex needs such as dementia and other mental health disorders, are staff able to cope with some who have challenging behaviour?

File on 4 has found evidence that some residents are suffering serious assaults by others living in the same home. Some have died from their injuries. Allan Urry investigates the unsolved killing of one dementia patient.

Are workers skilled enough to recognise and deal with aggression, before it becomes violent, and should the NHS and local authorities be doing more to support them?

When the perpetrators themselves often have little understanding of what they have done due to the nature of their illness-are they also being let down? The programme reveals failures in the system that could have cost lives.

Reporter: Allan Urry
Producer: Emma Forde
Editor: Gail Champion.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b08rp0gs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08rp2t8)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b08rp2tb)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08rp2td)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b08rp2tg)
Liz Barclay

Broadcasters choose their BBC Radio highlights.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b08rpgjx)

There are some new faces at Home Farm, and Lilian just will not give up.


SUN 19:15 The Vote Now Show (b08rpgjz)
Series 3, 28/05/2017

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present a satirical round-up of election news and comment from comedians, journalists and commentators...

Joining Steve and Hugh for hustings - Jake Yapp, Ellie Taylor, Luke Kempner and Emma Sidi.

Recorded mere hours before transmission, the Now Show team look across the political spectrum, giving their own unique take on the election news and shenanigans.

Produced by Adnan Ahmed
BBC Studios Production.


SUN 19:45 Life at Absolute Zero (b08rpgk1)
Series 2, In Cold(ish) Blood

Lynne Truss observes the inhabitants of Meridian Cliffs, on the south coast of England.

When Hugh Velvey's carpet shop mysteriously burns down, it attracts the attention of rookie reporter, Lauren. A fan of Truman Capote and American crime reportage, she finds herself drawn to the gutted, blackened warehouse in the small, bleak wind-battered town, and dreams of writing her breakthrough piece for a British Sunday supplement.

Then a gruesome discovery is made in a Turkish rug.

Directed by Kate McAll
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b08r320w)
Spies, care homes, and ending sneak peaks

Can security services follow everyone known to them?

The attack on Manchester Arena took place exactly four years since the killing of Drummer Lee Rigby in Woolwich. Back in 2013 we broadcast an interview with the former Head of MI5, Dame Stella Rimmington, about the difficulties of monitoring people who have been flagged up to the services. We are re-visiting that interview.

Chances of ending up in a care home

There are around 11.6 million people over the age of 65 in the UK, but how many need social care services? A listener got in chances to say that he was 72 - what are the chances that he will need social care services in his lifetime? We look at the numbers of people in both residential care and receiving formal care services in the home currently.

Penalty shoot outs update

A few weeks ago we explained UEFA's new procedure for carrying out penalty shoot outs. We bring news of how that system is playing out, and how a loyal listener has spotted a famous pattern in Blur's song, 'Girls and Boys'.

Stop sneak peak access

For years statisticians have been calling for an end to the practice of allowing ministers and officials to see official numbers before everyone else. Why does it matter? We tell the strange tale exploring whether economic data is leaked to City traders before its official publication. Could pre-release access to Government statistics be behind strange movements on financial markets? With help from Mike Bird of the Wall Street Journal, and Alex Kurov of the University of West Virginia, we take a look at the evidence.

Also - a tribute to Sir Roger Moore.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b08r320t)
Brendan Duddy, Nina Lowry, Roger Ailes, Osmund Reynolds, Roger Moore

Andrea Catherwood on
Sir Roger Moore the actor and film star best know for his portrayal of British secret agent 007, James Bond
Brendon Duddy, the businessman from Derry who played a key but unsung role in the Northern Ireland peace process hosting secret talks between MI6 and the IRA.
Osmund Reynolds, a founder of neo-natal medicine who's pioneering work changed the outcome for a generation of premature babies.
Nina Lowry, the first women to become an Old Bailey judge, who helped toughen up sentencing on sex crimes.
Roger Ailes the controversial figure who conceived and ran Rupert Murdoch's Fox News Network for two decades before being ousted over sexual harassment claims.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b08rnz3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b08rp5vz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b08rpgvn)
Engineering the Future

For decades the UK has not produced enough engineers. What's been going wrong? Is education at fault or does engineering have an intractable image problem? Engineering is a very male world. If that changes, might its recruitment problem disappear? Ruth Sunderland visits businesses with innovative schemes aimed at reversing the trend, and meets students, teachers and industry leaders. Who will be the engineers of the future?
Producer: Rosamund Jones

(Image: Ruth Sunderland. Credit: Mark Richards).


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b08rp2tj)

Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b08r1xcn)
David Michod

With Francine Stock

Francine talks to director David Michod about War Machine, his big budget satire on the U.S. military starring Brad Pitt, which is having its premiere on-line. He tells Francine why he really doesn't mind that it's only playing in a handful of cinemas.

The debate about big screen versus small screen raged this year at the Cannes film festival when the logo of an on-line film and TV company was booed at a premiere. Film buyer Clare Binns and critic Tim Robey tell Francine if they joined in the booing.

Rungano Nyoni was born in Zambia and raised in Wales. Her debut feature, I Am Not A Witch, premiered at Cannes, and she reveals what it was like to get the red carpet treatment.

Heavy drinking, existential malaise and deadpan humour characterise the films of director Aki Kaurismaki. Critic Larushka Ivan-Zadeh tells us five things we should know about the Finnish auteur.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b08rp2sk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 29 MAY 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b08rp2wf)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b08r1wy6)
Doctors at war - Wasting GP's time

Doctors at War: a candid account of a trauma surgical team based, for a tour of duty, at a field hospital in Helmand, Afghanistan. Laurie Taylor talks to Mark de Rond, a professor of organizational ethnography at Cambridge University, about the highs and lows of surgical life in a morally ambiguous world in which good people face impossible choices and in which routines designed to normalize experience have the unintended effect of highlighting war's absurdity. The doctor and reporter, Saleyha Ahsan, joins the discussion.

Also, Dr Nadia Llanwarne, Research Fellow at the Department of Primary Care at the University of Cambridge, discusses her study of patient's fears of wasting their GP's time.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b08rp5vv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08rp2wh)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08rp2wm)

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08rp2wp)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b08rp2wr)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08svq78)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rania Hafez, founder director of the professional network 'Muslim Women in Education' and a member of the Muslim institute.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b08rp2wt)
Rural manifesto pledges

Charlotte Smith talks to the agricultural spokespeople of the Green Party and Plaid Cymru, at the start of a week looking at the rural manifesto pledges of the various political parties. What are they promising farmers and rural communities, as election day approaches?

We also hear about the re-opening of a piece of rural heritage in Oxfordshire.

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emma Campbell.


MON 05:56 Weather (b08rp2ww)

The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08rptqt)
David Salmon on the Woodlark

David Salmon of the Slimbridge Wetland Centre on the song of the woodlark.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Miles Warde.


MON 06:00 Today (b08rp2wy)

News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b08rp2x0)
Live from the Hay Festival

Tom Sutcliffe presents Start the Week live from the Hay Festival.

He is joined by award winning authors Colm Tóibín, Sebastian Barry and Meg Rosoff to discuss how they breathe new life into stories from the past, from Greek tragedy to civil war, while the psychologist Jan Kizilhan explains how a history of trauma and genocide has been woven into the story of his Yazidi community.

Producer: Katy Hickman.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b08rptqw)
Farewell to the Horse, Episode 1

The alliance between man and horse lasted 6,000 years, shaping life in town and country. Ulrich Raulff's engaging, brilliantly written and moving discussion of what horses once meant to human civilisation.

The relationship between horses and humans is a profound and complex one. For millennia, horses provided the strength and speed that humans lacked. How we travelled, farmed and fought was dictated by the needs of this extraordinary animal. And then suddenly, in the 20th century, the links were broken and the millions of horses that shared our existence almost vanished, eking out a marginal existence on race-tracks and pony clubs.

Cities, farmland and entire industries were once shaped as much by the needs of horses as humans. The intervention of horses was fundamental in countless historical events. They were sculpted, painted, cherished, admired. They were thrashed, abused and exposed to terrible danger.

From the Roman Empire to the Napoleonic Empire, every world-conqueror needed to be shown on a horse. Tolstoy once reckoned that he had cumulatively spent some nine years of his life on horseback.

Ulrich Raulff's book, a bestseller in Germany, is a superb monument to the endlessly various creature who has so often shared and shaped our fate.

Written by Ulrich Raulff
Translated by Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp
Read by Iain Glen
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08rp2x2)
Passion for Craft

Knitting and embroidery are crafts that have traditionally been done at home by women for centuries, but are still hugely popular today. Hannah Hill and Louise Walker are two young women who have taken these disciplines and applied a modern twist of their own.

Ceramicist Lisa Slinn contacted us to talk about how craft saved her life after tragedy struck.

So what if the craft you enjoy needs some bigger facilities or space? Gym membership style shared studios are a growing phenomenon in the UK, Tallie Maughan is the founder of one that was set up in London and has which just expanded to meet demand.

Chris Oram is a Woman's Hour listener who talks about finding the freedom to make and create, and how it has helped her as she approaches 70.

And if you want to sell your crafts - how is the best way to go about it? Amy Phipps gives some top tips.

Photo credit Sabrina Dallot-Seguro

Producer: Corinna Jones
Editor: Karen Dalziel.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08rptqz)
Bindi Business, Episode 1

Tanika Gupta's comedy drama series about the highs and lows of enterprise, starring Meera Syal. Fresh from her first flush of success, Bindi takes on an exciting new business venture in property development but discovers that Slough just isn't ready for her visionary micro-pods.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b08rptr2)
All Things Must Pass

Corpus Christi Church in Oldham and its parish priest Father Heakin face an uncertain future. The Diocese of Salford proposes to close a quarter of its churches and Corpus Christi is on the shortlist. Due to a shortage of priests and lack of attendance in certain parishes, the Bishop calls it "pruning for growth". The parishioners are fighting the decision.

Father Dermot Heakin (also a windsurfer and a musician) leads a busy parish life. We follow him around the community on his pastoral activities. But as Christmas approaches, apprehension grows as both priest and congregation await the Bishop's final verdict about the future of their church. Grace Dent presents

Producer Neil McCarthy.


MON 11:30 Dot (b08rptr4)
Series 2, Trees

by Ed Harris

Comic adventures with Dot and the gals who are tasked with a top secret mission in the countryside. A German plane crashes nearby, will this be Dot's big chance for promotion?
Producer/Director, Jessica Mitic.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b08rp2x5)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b08lk650)
29 May 1917 - Alice Macknade

On this day in 1917, the national press were allowed to publish the news that Folkestone was the centre of a great air raid, and locally, the first seven funerals for victims took place.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b08rp2x7)
Dementia research; Flood damage; Department stores

Dementia is now the leading cause of death in England and Wales. Alzheimer's Disease is thought to account for 70% of all cases of dementia and is predicted to affect many more of us, as we live longer and healthier lives. But how much understanding do we have of why some people suffer and others don't, and what can be done to prevent it? The neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli has written a book, In Pursuit of Memory, which explores the history of dementia and where we've reached in the quest for a cure.

In early December 2015 Storm Desmond brought severe gales and heavy rainfall to southern Scotland, the north of England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Thousands of flooded homes were evacuated and power was lost across large parts of the north of England. But eighteen months on, some people still haven't been able to return to their homes. We hear one woman's experience as she struggles to make her flood-damaged home habitable. A national charity that supports flood victims tells us that many people have been unable to get the help they need.

For many years the great department stores represented the peak of retailing but now questions are being asked about whether they have a future at all. Last month Debenhams announced they are to close ten stores. Over the next five years Marks and Spencer have said they could potentially close thirty, and earlier this year family owned department store Fenwick closed one of its eleven shops because of competition from online shopping. We examine what the future might hold for the UK's department stores, what they need to do to survive, and what their place could be in the retail landscape of the future.

Presenter: Shari Vahl
Producer: Jonathan Hallewell.


MON 12:57 Weather (b08rp2x9)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b08rp2xd)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


MON 13:45 The Ideas That Make Us (b08mb1fw)
Series 5, Time

How should we best use our time? Bettany Hughes visits a centre of industry, a 98 year old philosopher and a theoretical physicist to find out.

With John Clayson Keeper of Science and Industry at Newcastle's Discovery Museum, Professor for the Public Understanding of Philosophy Angie Hobbs, 98 year old moral philosopher Mary Midgley, and theoretical physicist and author Seven Brief Lessons on Physics Carlo Rovelli.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b08rpgjx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Drama (b08rpy1z)
Floor 13

Ms Sherman is living a life of luxury. She's landed her dream job. Has a beautiful apartment, equipped with her very own maid. She wants for nothing. So why does she feel so terrible? A search for her tower block's missing floor 13 takes Ms Sherman on a strange and sinister journey that might just save her from a life wracked by guilt. But how much is Ms Sherman really prepared to pay to feel better about herself?
A twisted modern fable about first-world problems and middle class guilt by Sam Burns.

Original music composed by Lucy Rivers, performed by Dan Lawrence and Lucy Rivers.

Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production

Sam Burns was shortlisted for the Susan Smith Blackburn award and has worked with Paines Plough, the Bush, Theatre Clwyd, Sherman Theatre and Radio Wales.


MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (b08rpy23)
Series 7, Queen's University Belfast

A funny and dynamic quiz show hosted by Steve Punt - this week from Queen's University Belfast with specialist subjects including History, Medicine and English and questions ranging from Emperor Vespasian to Ed Sheeran via handbags and haematoxylin.

The programme is recorded on location at a different University each week, and it pits three Undergraduates against three of their Professors in an original and fresh take on an academic quiz.

The rounds vary between Specialist Subjects and General Knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students' knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors' awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Justin Bieber. In addition, the Head-to-Head rounds see students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offering plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

Other Universities featured in this series include Roehampton, Hull, Derby, Liverpool and St John's College Cambridge.

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 15:30 Food Programme (b08rpd85)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 The Invisible College (b08rpy25)
Series 2, Episode 2

Dr Cathy FitzGerald presents a second series of lessons in creative writing made from archive recordings of great novelists, poets and playwrights talking about their craft.

In this episode:

Lesson Four - Place
How do we capture the soul of a place in words? Tips from poet laureate Ted Hughes, diarist and novelist Christopher Isherwood, and author of Lolita and Pale Fire, Vladimir Nabokov.

Lesson Five - In Search of a Character with Graham Greene
In this wonderful archive recording, novelist Graham Greene describes his research trip to a leper colony in the Congo in 1959. Hear how the resulting novel, A Burnt-Out Case, takes shape.

Lesson Six - Write and Repeat
Poet and novelist Maya Angelou describes the slow, careful and sometimes excruciating process of sharpening her prose - refining her observations and making her words ever more precise. 'Easy reading,' she says, 'is damn hard writing'.

Presenter and Producer: Cathy FitzGerald.
A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b08rpy27)
Ancestors

Who do we think we are? Ernie Rea and guests discuss our fascination with our ancestors. Is there a contemporary spiritual need that finds an answer in tracing our roots? Ernie is joined by Else Churchill, from the Society of Genealogists: Julian Thomas, Professor of Archaeology at Manchester University; and Douglas Davies, Professor in the Department of Religion and Theology at the University of Durham.

Producer Rosie Dawson.


MON 17:00 PM (b08rp2xh)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08rp2xk)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b08rpy29)
Series 78, 29/05/2017

Just A Minute is 50 years old this year! Nicholas Parsons has been hosting since day one and presides over an all-star panel: Paul Merton, Ross Noble, Fern Britton and Gyles Brandreth.

The panel have to talk on a given subject for sixty seconds without repetition, hesitation or deviation. Can Paul tell us much about sardines? What is Fern's ideal bike ride? How much does Gyles know about Marie Antoinette and how does Ross feel being a fly on the wall?

PLUS one of our panellists talks for a full minute - which one? You'll have to tune in to find out...

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle and it was produced by Matt Stronge.

Just A Minute is a BBC Studios production.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b08rq6dq)

Roy lacks the luck of the draw, and Brian cannot believe his ears.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b08rp2xp)
Sgt. Pepper at 50; Jimmy McGovern; RIBA North

For the bank holiday, Samira is in Liverpool for the art premieres celebrating the 50th anniversary of the release of the album, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. She meets Sean Doran, the co-artistic director of the Sgt. Pepper at 50: Heading for Home arts festival, as he transforms the city into a turntable for the album by commissioning 13 world premieres - one for for each track.

Samira also meets two of the artists commissioned to come up with their interpretation of these classic Beatles songs: singer and performance artist Meow Meow has taken on Lovely Rita and is creating a street procession and a sound installation; and dramatist Keith Saha has written a new play inspired by the themes of She's Leaving Home, which will be performed in private homes in Toxteth.

Distinguished television writer Jimmy McGovern has written a new drama for BBC One, Broken, which looks at the life of a priest, Father Michael Kerrigan, played by Sean Bean, as he struggles to minister to a poor community. Jimmy takes Samira to St Francis Xavier church in Liverpool where much of the new television drama was filmed, and which has long inspired him.

And RIBA North is the new national architectural centre in Liverpool. As it finally prepares to open, Samira pays a visit to the new building on the city's waterfront which itself has been the subject of controversy, and arrives in Liverpool at a time when the city's architectural plans have led to it being placed on UNESCO's World Heritage in Danger list.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Ekene Akalawu.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08rptqz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Breakfast with the Disruptors (b08rq1p2)
Series 1, Finance

Tim Samuels examines the financial services industry as it faces up to technological change.

It was in the late 1990's that a Harvard academic Clay Christensen introduced a buzzword that has now become pervasive. He wanted to capture why established companies get driven out of their industries by young upstarts. It became known as disruptive innovation and has dramatically reshaped our business landscape.

Two-thirds of the companies on the Fortune 500 list in 1980 have disappeared. The balance has shifted from the incumbents to the challengers, from the old economy to the new. For some start-ups, the belief in disruption has taken on a near-religious edge. Forget rules, obligations and regulations - all that disrupts is good, all that stands in the way deserves to fail.

Journalist Tim Samuels investigates three industries facing change - property, finance and death - and invites a disruptor and a disruptee to breakfast.

One hundred years passed without a new bank emerging. Now there are close to 50 new ones in the pipeline. In this second programme of the series, Tim speaks to Tom Blomfield from Monzo, one the UK's newest licensed banks - backed by serious investment and infused with the start-up confidence that they can do better than the current crop, The former boss of Barclays, Antony Jenkins, has his own fintech start-up looking to modernize the back office technology used by banks. But the banks have all the cash and most of the customers. They will not be disrupted easily. Is the threat of fintech hype or reality?

A Reduced Listening production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 20:30 Analysis (b08rq1p4)
Aid: Something to Boast About?

Why is the UK such a generous global aid donor and should it be? The coalition government legislated to ensure Britain spent 0.7% of its national income on international development and it is now one of the very few countries to meet this United Nations target for such spending. With financial pressures on public services at home remaining acute, Jo Coburn asks why most politicians still support the idea, despite public criticism and press campaigns about wasted money. In her quest, she investigates the history of the UK's support for overseas aid and examines what makes so many politicians willing to risk voters' displeasure on the issue.
Producer: Simon Coates.


MON 21:00 In Their Element (b08rfh05)
Series 1, Silicon - The World's Building Block

Silicon is literally everywhere in both the natural and built environment, from the dominance of silicate rocks in the earth crust, to ubiquitous sand in building materials and as the basis for glass.

We've also harnessed silicon's properties as a semiconductor to build the modern electronics industry - without silicon personal computers and smartphones would simply not exist.

Silicon is also found widely across the universe. It is formed in stars, particularly when they explode. And the similarities between how silicon and carbon form chemical bonds has led many to wonder whether there could be silicon based life elsewhere - perhaps in some far flung part of the galaxy where carbon is not as abundant as here on earth.

As well as discussing the potential for silicon based life on other planets Birkbeck University Astrobiologist Dr Louisa Preston considers the varied uses of silicon here on earth, from its dominance in our built environments to its driving role in artificial intelligence and new ways to harness the sun's energy.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b08rp2x0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b08rp2xs)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b08rp2xv)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08rq1p6)
F Scott Fitzgerald: The Lost Stories, Introduction and Thank You for the Light

A selection of stories taken from a new collection of previously unpublished work by F. Scott Fitzgerald, I'D DIE FOR YOU: AND OTHER LOST STORIES.

The series opens with an extract from editor Anne Margaret Daniel's essay and the atmospheric vignette, 'Thank You For The Light'.

Readers Laurel Lefkow and Karen Bartke
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie

Romance, parties, cocktails and glamour - as a young writer in the 1920s F. Scott Fitzgerald gave the magazines what they wanted. He had little choice; short stories were his bread and butter. But as the author matured he yearned to explore darker territory. This desire wasn't cushioned by wealth; The Great Gatsby hadn't sold well and as the Depression crunched in the early 30s, Fitzgerald was hit by large medical bills for both himself and his wife Zelda. Despite the financial pressures he resisted the easy censorship requested by editors, who balked at Fitzgerald's portrayal of confusing generational freedoms, sex before marriage, divorce and working women.

Growing increasingly uncompromising about deletions and sanitisations, Fitzgerald preferred to let these stories lie in wait until their time came.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b08r1vbb)
David Walliams Special

David Walliams talks in depth to Michael Rosen about how he writes his children's books like Mr Stink and The Boy In The Dress and how he switches modes to write comedy like Little Britain. His acute awareness of language developed from a young age, and he was influenced by the books he read then, from Roald Dahl to James Bond, and the comedy scripts he studied, from Monty Python and Rowan Atkinson. He talks about the real-life conversation that inspired Carol Beer, the "computer says no" character from Little Britain, how The Shining was the surprising model for Awful Auntie, and about the boy who originally gave him the idea to start writing for children..
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b0848q83)
Alison Lapper

Alison Lapper is currently co-presenting the documentary series 'No Body's Perfect,' which aims to help people who struggle with body image. It's something she's ideally placed to do - when she was seven months pregnant a naked statute of her sat serenely on top of the fourth plinth in London's Trafalgar Square.

She tells Peter White, in the first of this new series of No Triumph No Tragedy, that when she was born with a rare chromosomal disorder doctors waited for her to die. When she didn't, her Mum was told that she'd have a terrible quality of life and that they should just forget about her. She went to live in a residential home for children with physical and learning disabilities and tells Peter how there was strength in a common bond:

"We survived together because it could be a cruel environment. There were some hideous people who didn't look at us as human beings. They were cruel and unkind and you either survived or you didn't. I saw a lot of people shrink."

Her childhood, she feels has made her stronger: "I always vowed I'd never be anyone's victim and I'd never dwell on what has gone. I don't want it to spoil the rest of my life because my life is really good."

Alison is an artist: she uses photography and digital images to question physical normality and beauty. She paints with her mouth and is constantly challenging expectations around what she can do. This was nowhere more evident than when she was pregnant with her son, Parys. She insisted on changing his nappies and on picking him up: "It's always been such a fight for everything. It's amazing, just because my limbs are missing, how different people think I am."

In the second programme in the series Peter meets the stand-up comedienne, Geri Jewell, who was born with cerebral palsy. She was the first disabled actor to take a lead role in a sitcom and she's gone on to challenge ideas about what is possible. She describes the pressures on her to go into a job suited to her disability and what made her rebel against such restricting expectations.



TUESDAY 30 MAY 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b08rp2zq)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b08rptqw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08rp2zs)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08rp2zv)

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08rp2zx)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b08rp2zz)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08s703g)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rania Hafez, founder director of the professional network 'Muslim Women in Education' and a member of the Muslim institute.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b08rp301)
Labour's rural promises, Cornish Black Bees and Atlantic salmon.

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08rq6db)
Peter Cranswick on the Red-Breasted Goose

Peter Cranswick of the Slimbridge Wetland Centre on the beautiful red breasted goose, and freezing wintry days counting them in fields.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Miles Warde.


TUE 06:00 Today (b08rp303)

News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b08t0d3w)
Tamsin Mather on what volcanic plumes reveal about our planet

To volcanologist Tamsin Mather, volcanoes are more than a natural hazard.

They are 'nature's factories', belching out a rich chemical cocktail of gases. It's these gases or 'plumes' that fascinate her the most. She likes nothing more than crouching on a crater's edge collecting a smouldering mix of ash and gases, a clue to what's brewing deep inside.

As Professor of Earth Sciences at Oxford University, her work is helping to not only predict when a volcano may erupt, but to understand how volcanoes shape our planet both now and over geological time.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.


TUE 09:30 The Listening Project (b08rq6dd)
The Listening Project Goes to the Polls, Things are Changing

How views change with age, with the possibility of engagement for the Traveller community, and in the aftermath of the Manchester attack. Fi Glover presents.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b08rq6dg)
Farewell to the Horse, Episode 2

The alliance between man and horse lasted 6,000 years, shaping life in town and country. Ulrich Raulff's engaging, brilliantly written and moving discussion of what horses once meant to human civilisation.

The relationship between horses and humans is a profound and complex one. For millennia, horses provided the strength and speed that humans lacked. How we travelled, farmed and fought was dictated by the needs of this extraordinary animal. And then suddenly, in the 20th century, the links were broken and the millions of horses that shared our existence almost vanished, eking out a marginal existence on race-tracks and pony clubs.

Cities, farmland and entire industries were once shaped as much by the needs of horses as humans. The intervention of horses was fundamental in countless historical events. They were sculpted, painted, cherished, admired. They were thrashed, abused and exposed to terrible danger.

From the Roman Empire to the Napoleonic Empire, every world-conqueror needed to be shown on a horse. Tolstoy once reckoned that he had cumulatively spent some nine years of his life on horseback.

Ulrich Raulff's book, a bestseller in Germany, is a superb monument to the endlessly various creature who has so often shared and shaped our fate.

Written by Ulrich Raulff
Translated by Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp
Read by Iain Glen
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08rp305)
Jeremy Corbyn; KT Tunstall

Woman's Hour has invited the leaders of seven political parties to talk about their manifestos and what they would do for women - today it's Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.

Two years ago, Scottish singer songwriter KT Tunstall thought she was done with music. She upped and moved to Venice Beach in California, but the urge to make music never went away. And so last year she released a new album, KIN. She's here in the UK touring her new music, and joins Emma Barnett to describe how her new life in Venice Beach inspired her music, and to perform It Took Me So Long To Get Here, But Here I Am, live in the Woman's Hour studio

In 2014 the journalist and writer Reni Eddo-Lodge published a post on her blog titled "Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race". In it she claimed that she could "no longer engage with the gulf of an emotional disconnect that white people display when a person of colour articulates their experience." Reni joins Emma to discuss her new book of the same name and explains why, having decided that she was no longer going to discuss race with white people, she has been doing just that for the past three years.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Producer: Kirsty Starkey.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08rq6dj)
Bindi Business, Episode 2

Tanika Gupta's comedy drama series about the highs and lows of enterprise. Bindi's exciting new business venture in property development isn't going as smoothly as planned and Bindi turns to her brother Bash for help.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


TUE 11:00 Print Me a New Body (b08rq6dl)

Most parts of our bodies - lungs, hearts, knees, faces - can all be replaced by transplant. The world's first full head transplant is mooted for 2018. Or is it a body transplant?

Jolyon Jenkins decides to explore how it's now possible to replace most of his body, by bioprinting, transplant or use of synthetic parts. He works methodically through his own body and interviews scientists at the cutting-edge in each area; and explores our emotional reactions to the idea of replacing different parts of our bodies.

In 2011, the world's first synthetic organ, a windpipe, was grown in a lab and transplanted. Now scientists at UCL's Department of Nanotechnology have come up with another 'world first' - the growth of a nose. There's a lab there known as the "human body parts store", using the patient's own stem cells and synthetic materials to create all many different body parts.

And now comes bioprinting - the process of using 3D printers to form human tissue. It's already been used to print everything from replacement skulls to vaginas, as well as prosthetic arms and legs.

Transplanting, and printing: an entire replacement body may only be a decade away.

There is no doubt that people feel a mixture of horror and hope at the idea that nearly all parts of us can be replaced. But what will that mean for us?

Producer and Presenter: Jolyon Jenkins.


TUE 11:30 The Voices of... (b08rq6dn)
Series 2, Christopher Robson

Countertenor Christopher Robson reflects on his life in music - from playing in a Salvation Army band, via the stage of the Coliseum singing Handel, to working with Damon Albarn.

Christopher Robson found his voice by chance during a singing lesson as a teenager. Up to that point he had proved himself a musical child, playing cornet in a Salvation Army band and singing during services, sometimes reluctantly and often with his brother Nigel. But from the moment he discovered falsetto - the ability to soar above the usual range of the male voice - his ambitions led in a different direction. What followed resembles, at times, the life of a rock star rather than an opera singer.

In this intimate portrait, recorded at the London Coliseum, Christopher looks back on his rocky route into the music business, roles in iconic productions, such as Nicholas Hytner's Xerxes, his life in Germany and collaborating with Damon Albarn on his opera Dr Dee.

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b08rp307)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b08lk65y)
30 May 1917 - Kitty Lumley

On this day in 1917, the death toll from the Folkestone air raid now numbered 72, but for Kitty Lumley, the disaster offers a new start.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b08rp309)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b08rp30c)

The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b08rp30f)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b08rq6dq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Tumanbay (b08rq6ds)
Series 2, Holy Father

Following a series of murders, the Inquisitor Barakat's (Hiran Abeysekera) hold over Tumanbay is complete. Rebel fighter Manel (Aiysha Hart) seeks refuge with co-conspirator Doctor Dorin (Vincent Ebrahim). But can Dorin be trusted and what is "the great project" he is working on with Barakat?

Tumanbay is created by John Dryden and Mike Walker and inspired by the Mamluk slave rulers of Egypt.

Original Music by Sacha Puttnam

Sound Design by Steve Bond
Additional Music by Jon Ouin
Sound Edited by James Morgan and Andreina Gomez
Script Edited by Abigail Youngman
Produced by Emma Hearn, Nadir Khan and John Dryden

Written by John Dryden
Directed by Jeremy Mortimer

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b08rq6dv)
Series 12, Magical Realism

Josie Long presents documentaries where reality takes on a magical aspect - tales of snake-filled American towns, a visit to a shaman and of crashing back down to earth.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b08rq6dx)
James Wong on the World's Toughest Plants

Between 20 and 33% of the world's plant species are currently at risk of global extinction. That's the estimation of recently published studies. So how much will climate change impact on the variety, availability and price of the food on our plates? Botanist James Wong investigates the links between global warming and the rate at which crops are able to adapt and evolve to rapidly changing conditions.

Speaking to farmers, plant breeders and scientists at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and elsewhere he hears about the plant world's likely 'winners' and 'losers'. Having deeper roots and more efficient water-use strategies is a clear bonus, and one that's being addressed by British plant scientists who are developing more drought-resistant wheat varieties by breeding them with ancient antecedents of one of the world's most important crops. That's in the UK, but elsewhere around the world, James Wong learns that many plants are facing extinction before they have been recognised as being at risk, and perhaps in some cases even before they have been discovered.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


TUE 16:00 Clocking On (b08rtldq)

Professor Emma Griffin explores how British workers became tied to the clock.

Before industrialisation, workers were accustomed to a loosely regulated working week, influenced more by daylight hours and the agricultural cycle than by the time on the face of a clock. Indeed, most people didn't own a watch and managed all aspects of their lives without reference to official time.

During the Industrial Revolution, British workers became tied to the clock in a way they never had before. Emma visits Quarry Bank Mill in Cheshire to discover how 19th century factory owners extracted a long and regular working week from a workforce accustomed to a much more loosely regimented working pattern. She examines how the new technologies of the railways, telegraphs and radio gradually extended a new concept of clock-based time to the population at large. And she visits the Royal Observatory at Greenwich to understand how their precision clocks, which for centuries had been specialist scientific equipment of use only to astronomers, were pressed into service as the regulator of the nation's workforce. Finally, Emma sheds light on our ever-changing relationship to time and how new concepts altered the human experience of work and rest.

Humans have always tried to measure time, but the importance of this task stepped up a gear during the 19th century. Now it was about controlling a workforce. And in today's economic climate of zero hours contracts and increasingly casualised employment, Emma argues this fundamental relationship between time and control is as important as ever.

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b08rq6mg)
Series 42, Iain Lee on Andy Kaufman

There were so many hoaxes in Andy Kaufman's brief career that for years his fans believed that he wasn't really dead. Kaufman's best known as Latka Gravas in the American sitcom Taxi, and his life was undoubtedly weird. Performance artist, Elvis impersonator, wrestler - he's difficult to pin down. Nominator Iain Lee believes he was a genius, while Olly Double of the University of Kent school of arts reckons Kaufman didn't really care if his audience laughed or not. Presenter Matthew Parris draws his own conclusions about Kaufman's extraordinary life, later turned into a film starring Jim Carrey called Man on the Moon.
The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde.


TUE 17:00 PM (b08rp30h)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08rp30k)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Small Scenes (b04l0y2l)
Series 2, Episode 1

Small Scenes is back with more excerpts from odd lives. This week, a man uncovers a great Australian conspiracy and a financial advisor starts up a sideline as an assassin's assistant.

Starring Daniel Rigby, Sara Pascoe, Mike Wozniak, Cariad Lloyd and Henry Paker.

Written by Benjamin Partridge, Henry Paker and Mike Wozniak.

Produced by Simon Mayhew-Archer.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b08rq6mj)

Tony will not be easily won over, and Kirsty regrets being impressed.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b08rp30m)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08rq6dj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b08rq745)
Gain Without the Pain: Legal Drugs in Sport

Painkillers in sport: a form of legal doping or an excessive reliance on medication that puts the long-term health of athletes in jeopardy?

With evidence of widespread use of over the counter anti-inflammatories to support performance or recovery at amateur level, File on 4 looks asks if there is enough regulation of painkilling drugs in sport across the ranks.

About half of players competing at the past three World Cups routinely took non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen, according to research carried out by FIFA's former chief medical officer, Prof Jiri Dvorak.

For him, this clearly constitutes the abuse of drugs in football, one which risks player's health and could "potentially" have life-threatening implications.

But is the sports community taking these warnings seriously enough? Professor Dvorak first warned about the long-term implications of players misusing painkillers in 2012 - has anything changed?

Industry insiders their concerns about pain killer use in professional sport - including one former rugby international who says he developed serious long-term health problems as a result.

And with evidence that even paracetamol can have a performance enhancing effect, how can sports regulators control substances that can give a competitive advantage but are widely available over the counter?

With tales of athletes receiving pain relief in order to compete with broken toes or even a fractured bone in their back, we explore the lengths some may go to in order to stay in the game and ask if some sports are risking long-term harm by chasing short-term goals.

Producer: Alys Harte
Reporter: Beth McLeod.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b08rp30p)
Daniel and Michael Smith

Due to a genetic eye condition, identical twins Daniel and Michael Smith both lost their sight when they were 18.
Now, seven years on and following their much published story, the brothers talk to Peter White about the impact their blindness has had on their lives in the intervening years.
They speak candidly about the stress they have experienced working in very visual jobs in the City of London. Michael is about the qualify as a lawyer and Dan is working as an investment banker.
They last appeared on In Touch three years ago and in this programme speak of the changes they have experienced since last meeting Peter.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Cheryl Gabriel.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b08rq747)

Claudia Hammond explores the latest developments in the worlds of psychology, neuroscience and mental health.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b08t0d3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b08rp30r)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08sqr3h)
F Scott Fitzgerald: The Lost Stories, The Couple, Part 1

Finn den Hertog reads 'The Couple', a previously unpublished comic story about the disintegration of a young marriage taken from a new collection of work by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Romance, parties, cocktails and glamour - as a young writer in the 1920s F. Scott Fitzgerald gave the magazines what they wanted. He had little choice; short stories were his bread and butter. But as the author matured he yearned to explore darker territory. This desire wasn't cushioned by wealth; The Great Gatsby hadn't sold well and as the Depression crunched in the early 30s, Fitzgerald was hit by large medical bills for both himself and his wife Zelda. Despite the financial pressures he resisted the easy censorship requested by editors, who balked at Fitzgerald's portrayal of confusing generational freedoms, sex before marriage, divorce and working women.

Growing increasingly uncompromising about deletions and sanitisations, Fitzgerald preferred to let these stories lie in wait until their time came. They are published now in the collection I'D DIE FOR YOU: AND OTHER LOST STORIES.

Producer: Eilidh McCreadie.


TUE 23:00 Alex Edelman's Peer Group (b08rq7jv)
Series 1, Episode 2

The so-called Millennial generation - those born between 1982 and 1994 - has been much maligned in the press for being lazy, entitled, vain, venal, self-involved, easily offended little emperors. But Alex Edelman thinks these criticisms are baseless. So in "Alex Edelman'S Peer Group" he seeks to redress the balance. In this episode he discusses Millennials' attitude to politics and being offended.

Written and presented by Alex Edelman

Producer: Sam Michell

A BBC Studios Production.


TUE 23:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b084tl0g)
Geri Jewell

Geri Jewell was the first disabled actor to take a lead role in a sitcom and she's gone on to challenge ideas about what is possible. She describes the pressures on her to go into a job suited to her disability and what made her rebel against such restricting expectations.



WEDNESDAY 31 MAY 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b08rp32q)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b08rq6dg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08rp32s)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08rp32v)

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08rp32x)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b08rp32z)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08swf51)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rania Hafez, founder director of the professional network 'Muslim Women in Education' and a member of the Muslim institute.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b08rp331)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08rr9g7)
Chris Jones on the Raven

Chris Jones from Worcestershire has been fascinated by the corvid family from childhood. For years he has been rescuing sick and injured birds. Here he tells the story of one of his favourite rescue ravens.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


WED 06:00 Today (b08rp333)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Soul Music (b08rr9g9)
Series 24, Siegfried Idyll

Wagner's peaceful Siegfried Idyll was written to thank his wife after the birth of his son Siegfried. On her birthday, she awoke to find an orchestra on her staircase performing the music for the first time. It is music which celebrates family relationships, and Soul Music hears from people whose lives and relationships have been touched and changed by this remarkable piece.

Cellist Nick Trygstad explains how the music conjures up scenes of domestic life and helped him cope with his homsickness when he arrived in the UK. Karen West recalls a 50th birthday treat - a trip across lake Lucerne with her father, to visit Wagner's villa. For Tim Reynish, the music has a special connection with his son - when William was born he recreated the first performance on the staircase of his Birmingham home; many years later he conducted the music at his son's memorial concert. And Roberto Paternostro recalls an historic performance in Germany, when he took a group of Israeli musicians to perform Wagner's music for the first time at Bayreuth - the opera house built by Wagner, and later frequented by Adolf Hitler.

Produced by Melvin Rickarby.


WED 09:30 John Cleese Presents (b08rr9gc)
Series 1, Episode 4

In today's show John wants to talk about his schooldays, and being a teacher. If only someone would phone in and ask him questions.

Starring John Cleese and Harriet Carmichael, and written by John Cleese and James Peak.

The extracts used in this programme are taken from John's audiobook of his autobiography So Anyway.

Producers: James Peak and Andre Jacquemin
A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b08rr9r6)
Farewell to the Horse, Episode 3

The alliance between man and horse lasted 6,000 years, shaping life in town and country. Ulrich Raulff's engaging, brilliantly written and moving discussion of what horses once meant to human civilisation.

The relationship between horses and humans is a profound and complex one. For millennia, horses provided the strength and speed that humans lacked. How we travelled, farmed and fought was dictated by the needs of this extraordinary animal. And then suddenly, in the 20th century, the links were broken and the millions of horses that shared our existence almost vanished, eking out a marginal existence on race-tracks and pony clubs.

Cities, farmland and entire industries were once shaped as much by the needs of horses as humans. The intervention of horses was fundamental in countless historical events. They were sculpted, painted, cherished, admired. They were thrashed, abused and exposed to terrible danger.

From the Roman Empire to the Napoleonic Empire, every world-conqueror needed to be shown on a horse. Tolstoy once reckoned that he had cumulatively spent some nine years of his life on horseback.

Ulrich Raulff's book, a bestseller in Germany, is a superb monument to the endlessly various creature who has so often shared and shaped our fate.

Written by Ulrich Raulff
Translated by Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp
Read by Iain Glen
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08rp335)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b08rrb43)
Bindi Business, Episode 3

Tanika Gupta's drama series about the highs and lows of enterprise.

Bindi is an unstoppable force of nature and despite the setbacks at the building site, she is determined nothing will get in her way, but then she arrives home to find a surprise visitor.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b08rrb45)
Suzi and Rob - The Seat Crew

A behind the scenes chat between members of the multi-skilled talent who make the show run smoothly at the De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill on Sea. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Breakfast with the Disruptors (b08rq1p2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 It's a Fair Cop (b08rrb47)
Series 3, Barry the Burglar

Serving police officer and stand-up comic Alfie Moore returns with a new series of this hugely popular series in which he asks his audience what decisions they'd have made in a real life case that he has dealt with. After swearing in his audience as police officers for one day only, he takes them through one case as it unfolded and asks them what they'd have done in his shoes. Along the way he spills the beans on what it's really like to be one of Britain's finest, tells us some great anecdotes about law breakers and makers that he's come across and gets his studio audience to divulge secrets about their own, sometimes less than strictly law-abiding lives.

In this first episode, Barry the Burglar, what seems like an open and shut case of breaking, entering and stealing becomes something else entirely.

Presenter Alfie Moore.

Script Editor Will Ing

Producer Alison Vernon-Smith

A BBC Studios Production.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b08rp337)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b08lk68f)
31 May 1917 - Gabriel Graham

On this day in 1917, the War Office met to discuss how to prevent future aeroplane attacks like that on Folkestone, and Gabriel Graham deals with the fallout locally.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b08rp339)

Consumer affairs programme.


WED 12:57 Weather (b08rp33c)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b08rp33f)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b08rq6mj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b06bnq12)
Orpheus and Eurydice

The myth of Orpheus and Eurydice has inspired poets, painters and musicians since ancient times. Poet Simon Armitage and playwright Linda Marshall Griffiths both re-imagine the tragic tale from different perspectives in two distinct but connected dramas for Radio 4.

Orpheus and Eurydice. His Story. By Linda Marshall Griffiths

Grief-stricken, the young singer Orfeo tries to find his way to his dead wife Eurydice. His path is the way of dreams, fractured memories - a journey into the Underworld to bring back his love from the silence. But is love stronger than death if everything can be destroyed by a backward glance?

With music composed by PJ Harvey

Directed by Nadia Molinari

Orpheus and Eurydice by Linda Marshall Griffiths was first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in September 2015 and won the Grand Prix Marulic in 2016.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b08rp33h)
Money Box Live: Releasing Cash from Your Pension or Your Home

Could releasing cash from the value of our homes and pensions be a useful way to pay off a mortgage, get rid of debt, provide a better standard of living - or are we simply creating problems for the future?

How we access our pensions was completely shaken up in April 2015. Instead of using your pension pot to buy an income for life in the form of annuity, you can now take the lot, from the age of 55. The Association of British Insurers say the majority of savers are taking a sensible approach but there are signs a minority may be withdrawing too much too soon and at rates that would see their money run out in a decade or less.

There's also a growing number of people who are transferring out of final salary pension schemes, giving up an income for life in exchange for cash lump sums and the flexibility of other pension products.

Equity Release is another way of freeing up cash. You can take a lump sum or several smaller amounts from the value of your home, paying interest monthly, when you sell the house or when you die. The Equity Release Council say that pensioners took £2.1bn of equity from their homes in 2016.

All of these decisions need careful thought and discussion and on Wednesday's programme Louise Cooper and guests will look at the potential benefits and risks.

Send us your questions and experiences by emailing moneybox@bbc.co.uk now or calling 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3:30pm on Wednesday 31 May. Standard geographic call charges apply.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b08rq747)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b08rrc0k)

Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b08rp33k)

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 17:00 PM (b08rp33m)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08rp33p)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 John Finnemore's Double Acts (b08rrc0m)
Series 2, The Queen's Speech

Victoria is very much hoping to see a conjuror, or at least a parrot. But instead meets Mabel.

Stephanie Cole and Kerry Godliman star in the first of six two-handers written by Cabin Pressure's John Finnemore

Written by John Finnemore
Produced by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b08rrc0p)

Lily gets her way, and Toby gets the wrong idea.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b08rp33r)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08rrb43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 FutureProofing (b08rrc0r)
Small

Series that explores the big ideas that are set to shape our future.


WED 20:45 Electionomics (b08rrc0t)
Electionomics, 31/05/2017

The BBC's business editor Simon Jack and economics editor Kamal Ahmed present the inside track on key economic and business issues behind the 2017 general election.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b08rq6dx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Soul Music (b08rr9g9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b08rp33t)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b08rp33w)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08sqvlr)
F Scott Fitzgerald: The Lost Stories, The Couple, Part 2

A selection of stories taken from a new collection of previously unpublished work by F. Scott Fitzgerald, I'D DIE FOR YOU: AND OTHER LOST STORIES.

Romance, parties, cocktails and glamour - as a young writer in the 1920s F. Scott Fitzgerald gave the magazines what they wanted. He had little choice; short stories were his bread and butter. But as the author matured he yearned to explore darker territory. This desire wasn't cushioned by wealth; The Great Gatsby hadn't sold well and as the Depression crunched in the early 30s, Fitzgerald was hit by large medical bills for both himself and his wife Zelda. Despite the financial pressures he resisted the easy censorship requested by editors, who balked at Fitzgerald's portrayal of confusing generational freedoms, sex before marriage, divorce and working women.

Growing increasingly uncompromising about deletions and sanitisations, Fitzgerald preferred to let these stories lie in wait until their time came.

Producer: Eilidh McCreadie.


WED 23:00 Woof - One Man's Search for a Dog or a Boyfriend (b08rrc21)
Series 1, Episode 1

Richly comic autobiographical meanderings from the pen of Chris Neill - joined on stage by Martin Hyder and Alison Steadman. Suddenly faced with life on his own, Chris is forced to make a decision - will his new companion have two legs, or four?

Producer: Steve Doherty
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Beef and Dairy Network (b08rrc0w)
Series 1, Episode 6

Surreal bovine-themed comedy hosted by Benjamin Partridge.


WED 23:30 Life at LIPA (b083n81k)
The Big Performance

Raising the curtain on a very modern performing arts school, the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts.

In this three-part series, Janice Long follows students during the final year of their degree, through graduation and out into the world as they try to enter the performing arts industry.

Singer-songwriter Katya, dancer Danielle and DJ Dan who is studying entertainment management are hardworking, dedicated students. They are determined to be at the forefront of the performance industries in a few short years. But first they have to hone their craft.

Katya is writing songs for her big final year show and Danielle has been cast to represent LIPA at a national dance convention. Dan has been DJ-ing and working in a radio station. As they prepare for final assignments and performances, they share the ups and downs of their final year as artists-in-training and their hopes for the future.

The Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts was set up by Sir Paul McCartney and BRIT school founder Mark Featherstone-Witty just over twenty years ago. Sir Paul was worried about what they would offer - as he says, "you can't teach them to be John Lennon". As well as performance skills, LIPA claims to teach students the business side of one of the most competitive of industries.

With exclusive and close-up access to life at LIPA, we meet those who want to become arts practitioners of the future and those who are helping to get them there.

Producer: David James
Executive Producer: Rebecca Maxted
A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.



THURSDAY 01 JUNE 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b08rp35v)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b08rr9r6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08rp35x)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08rp35z)

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08rp361)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b08rp363)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08t0njg)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rania Hafez, founder director of the professional network 'Muslim Women in Education' and a member of the Muslim institute.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b08rp365)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08rt9rh)
Joe Harkness on the skylark

Joe Harkness indulges in some bird therapy, rejoicing in the sight and song of the skylark. Joe writes about the benefits of birdwatching towards wellbeing through connecting people with nature.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


THU 06:00 Today (b08rp367)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b08rp369)
Enzymes

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss enzymes, the proteins that control the speed of chemical reactions in living organisms. Without enzymes, these reactions would take place too slowly to keep organisms alive: with their actions as catalysts, changes which might otherwise take millions of years can happen hundreds of times a second. Some enzymes break down large molecules into smaller ones, like the ones in human intestines, while others use small molecules to build up larger, complex ones, such as those that make DNA. Enzymes also help keep cell growth under control, by regulating the time for cells to live and their time to die, and provide a way for cells to communicate with each other.

With

Jim Naismith

Sarah Barry

and

Nigel Richards

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b08rt9rk)
Farewell to the Horse, Episode 4

The alliance between man and horse lasted 6,000 years, shaping life in town and country. Ulrich Raulff's engaging, brilliantly written and moving discussion of what horses once meant to human civilisation.

The relationship between horses and humans is a profound and complex one. For millennia, horses provided the strength and speed that humans lacked. How we travelled, farmed and fought was dictated by the needs of this extraordinary animal. And then suddenly, in the 20th century, the links were broken and the millions of horses that shared our existence almost vanished, eking out a marginal existence on race-tracks and pony clubs.

Cities, farmland and entire industries were once shaped as much by the needs of horses as humans. The intervention of horses was fundamental in countless historical events. They were sculpted, painted, cherished, admired. They were thrashed, abused and exposed to terrible danger.

From the Roman Empire to the Napoleonic Empire, every world-conqueror needed to be shown on a horse. Tolstoy once reckoned that he had cumulatively spent some nine years of his life on horseback.

Ulrich Raulff's book, a bestseller in Germany, is a superb monument to the endlessly various creature who has so often shared and shaped our fate.

Written by Ulrich Raulff
Translated by Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp
Read by Iain Glen
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08rp36c)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08rt9rm)
Bindi Business, Episode 4

Tanika Gupta's drama series about the highs and lows of enterprise.

Bindi's stress levels are rising as pressure from her personal and her business affairs continues to mount but help comes from an unexpected source.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b08rt9rp)

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.


THU 11:30 I Was... (b08rt9rr)
Series 4, I Was Bob Dylan's One-Off Sparring Partner

Daniel 'Catfish' Russ started out as a boxer, trained as a Rabbi and was a stand-up comedian before settling on his chosen profession, advertising. He also plays blues harmonica. But in April 2008 Catfish found himself opposite his idol, Bob Dylan, in a boxing ring in Austin, Texas.

Written and Presented by Andrew McGibbon
Producer: Nick Romero
A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b08rp36f)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b08lk6ck)
1 June 1917 - Jessie Moore

On this day in 1917, funerals were held for another ten victims of the Folkestone air raid, and Jessie Moore confronts her loss.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b08rp36h)

Consumer affairs programme.


THU 12:57 Weather (b08rp36k)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b08rp36m)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b08rrc0p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b08rt9rt)
Slipping Through Time

Ellie Kendrick stars in Louise Monaghan's new play.
Twenty five year old Izzie has epilepsy, which isn't such a big deal. There are drugs and the drugs do work. Until you have a baby and want to breastfeed. Then everything changes. Everyone has an opinion - she should take her drugs - but this is Izzie's body and Izzie's condition and Sophie is the most important thing that has ever happened in her life. Anyway, she hasn't had a seizure in ages. And then she does ...

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale

The play follows the story of a young mum, Izzie. Izzie experienced epileptic seizures as a teenager but they stopped in adult life. However, after having her first baby, her epilepsy comes back. Initially Izzie is in denial and her family struggle with the diagnosis. When Izzie finds her teenage diaries and begins reading them she reconnects with her own story, slipping through time from present to past and eventually comes to terms with her condition. Discovering her teenage diaries gives Izzie a new perspective on her epilepsy but it's not until she puts the words together with a picture of herself having a seizure that it all begins to make sense.

This is Louise's third play for radio and this one has been inspired by Louise's own epilepsy. A febrile convulsion at the age of two and then petit mals during puberty. For a number of years she didn't have one and then suddenly had one five years ago after coming round from an anaesthetic after a minor operation. It has also been inspired by the photo-journal Helen Stephens created with Matt Thompson.


THU 15:00 Ramblings (b08rt9rw)
Series 36, The Nidderdale Way: Gouthwaite to Bewerley

Clare Balding is walking the whole of The Nidderdale Way, a circular fifty three mile walking route in North Yorkshire. In this edition she walks from Heathfield to Bewerley in the company of Robin Hermes and Simon Dunn, two self-styled, grumpy old men. They have been walking together, along with their friend Richard, every month for over thirty-five years and this is the first time they've actually invited anyone to join them. The Ramblings team don't make the most auspicious start by being several minutes late, a sin Robin holds against them right until the end when the joys of the afternoon allow him to forgive and forget!
This section of the walk takes in the site of the disused lead mines at Ashfold Side Beck. Robin and Simon discuss their walking history with Clare, their favourite and least favourite routes and how they score the perfect walk.
The route can be found on OS Explorer 298
Producer Lucy Lunt.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b08rp5vz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b08rpf0g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b08rt9ry)
Wonder Woman

Antonia Quirke talks to director Patty Jenkins about warrior princess Wonder Woman.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b08rp36p)

Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (b08rp36r)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08rp36t)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section (b045bqt6)
Series 3, Cariad Lloyd and Gwyneth Herbert

Music and comedy from host Alex Horne and his 5-piece band, with special guest comedian Cariad Lloyd and singer Gwyneth Herbert. This week's theme is The Tudors versus The Vikings featuring a battle, a huge motivational song and a prequel to a Barry Manilow's Copacabana.

Host... Alex Horne
Band... Joe Auckland, Mark Brown, Will Collier, Ben Reynolds, Ed Sheldrake
Guests... Cariad Lloyd and Gwyneth Herbert
Producer... Charlie Perkins.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b08rt9s0)

Pip has a surprise visitor, and Pat has lots of questions.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b08rp36w)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08rt9rm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Bottom Line (b08rt9s3)
The Bottom Line: Can We Trust Big Business?

Evan Davis presents a special edition of the business magazine programme.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b08rp36p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b08rp369)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b08rp36y)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b08rp370)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08swyvp)
F Scott Fitzgerald: The Lost Stories, The Couple, Part 3

Finn den Hertog reads the conclusion of 'The Couple', a previously unpublished comic story about the disintegration of a young marriage taken from a new collection of work by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Romance, parties, cocktails and glamour - as a young writer in the 1920s F. Scott Fitzgerald gave the magazines what they wanted. He had little choice; short stories were his bread and butter. But as the author matured he yearned to explore darker territory. This desire wasn't cushioned by wealth; The Great Gatsby hadn't sold well and as the Depression crunched in the early 30s, Fitzgerald was hit by large medical bills for both himself and his wife Zelda. Despite the financial pressures he resisted the easy censorship requested by editors, who balked at Fitzgerald's portrayal of confusing generational freedoms, sex before marriage, divorce and working women.

Growing increasingly uncompromising about deletions and sanitisations, Fitzgerald preferred to let these stories lie in wait until their time came. They are published now in the collection I'D DIE FOR YOU: AND OTHER LOST STORIES.

Producer: Eilidh McCreadie.


THU 23:00 Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! (b06ts1kz)
Series 2, Winemaker

When Milton finally decides to empty his bins he accidentally makes both a delicious sparkling wine and a deadly enemy.

Mention Milton Jones to most people and the first thing they think is 'Help!'. Because each week, Milton, and his trusty assistant Anton (played by Milton regular, Tom Goodman-Hill) set out to help people and soon find they're embroiled in a new adventure. Because when you're close to the edge, then Milton can give you a push.

"Milton Jones is one of Britain's best gagsmiths with a flair for creating daft yet perfect one-liners." - The Guardian.

"King of the surreal one-liners." - The Times

"If you haven't caught up with Jones yet - do so!" - The Daily Mail

Written by Milton with James Cary (Bluestone 42, Miranda), and Dan Evans (who co-wrote Milton's Channel 4 show House Of Rooms) the man they call "Britain's funniest Milton", returns to the radio with a fully-working cast and a shipload of new jokes.

The cast includes regulars Tom Goodman-Hill ( Spamalot, Mr. Selfridge) as the ever-faithful Anton, Josie Lawrence and Ben Willbond (Horrible Histories).

With music by Guy Jackson.

Produced and directed by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:30 Life at LIPA (b084bmf1)
Showtime

Raising the curtain on a very modern performing arts school, the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts.

In the second of three programmes, broadcaster Janice Long meets actors Sarah and Connor and sound technician Django during their final year of their performing arts degrees.

Sarah always wanted to be a star. Her parents would proudly show videos of her singing Disney songs as a young child. Sarah's life has changed dramatically since moving from California to Liverpool for the start of her course, three years ago. She is struggling with artistic and personal challenges during her final year of drama school, and is faced with having to leave the UK in a few short months.

Connor's appetite for acting also began as a child, inspired by watching Power Rangers on TV. He was brought up in Mexborough, South Yorkshire where he admits a career in the arts isn't often a first choice for many. Connor is hoping to get an agent to help him launch his acting career after graduation.

Sound technician Django is the popular man on campus to know. He can be found running between recording sessions, theatre performances and gigs and is already mourning the end of his university life.

In audio diaries and interviews, Sarah, Connor and Django share their professional insecurities, artistic triumphs, personal challenges and hopes for the future. With exclusive and close-up access to life at LIPA, we meet the young people who want to become the arts practitioners of the future and those who are trying to get them there.

Producer: Rebecca Maxted
A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.



FRIDAY 02 JUNE 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b08rp38q)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b08rt9rk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08rp38s)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08rp38v)

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08rp38x)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b08rp38z)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08t1xlp)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Rania Hafez, founder director of the professional network 'Muslim Women in Education' and a member of the Muslim institute.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b08rp391)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b08s7jhl)
Paul Brook on the Water Rail

Paul Brooks suffers from depression. He talks about the beneficial effects of bird watching on his mental health and how seeing a water rail one grey day lifted his mood.
Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.


FRI 06:00 Today (b08rp393)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b08rpcqb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b08rtgww)
Farewell to the Horse, Episode 5

The alliance between man and horse lasted 6,000 years, shaping life in town and country. Ulrich Raulff's engaging, brilliantly written and moving discussion of what horses once meant to human civilisation.

The relationship between horses and humans is a profound and complex one. For millennia, horses provided the strength and speed that humans lacked. How we travelled, farmed and fought was dictated by the needs of this extraordinary animal. And then suddenly, in the 20th century, the links were broken and the millions of horses that shared our existence almost vanished, eking out a marginal existence on race-tracks and pony clubs.

Cities, farmland and entire industries were once shaped as much by the needs of horses as humans. The intervention of horses was fundamental in countless historical events. They were sculpted, painted, cherished, admired. They were thrashed, abused and exposed to terrible danger.

From the Roman Empire to the Napoleonic Empire, every world-conqueror needed to be shown on a horse. Tolstoy once reckoned that he had cumulatively spent some nine years of his life on horseback.

Ulrich Raulff's book, a bestseller in Germany, is a superb monument to the endlessly various creature who has so often shared and shaped our fate.

Written by Ulrich Raulff
Translated by Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp
Read by Iain Glen
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08rp395)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08rtgwy)
Bindi Business, Episode 5

Tanika Gupta's comedy drama series about the highs and lows of enterprise.

With her micro-pod development nearly complete Bindi is preparing for the big opening, but she is put to the test when she finds that not everyone shares her vision.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.


FRI 11:00 From Our Home Correspondent (b08rtgx0)

Mishal Husain presents the monthly series that features dispatches from writers and reporters across the UK on all aspects of life in contemporary Britain.


FRI 11:30 The Casebook of Max and Ivan (b05r3w3x)
Different Class

Max and Ivan are private detectives for whom no case is too small......Sorry, for whom no fee is too small. Jessica Hynes joins them as they investigate a spate of sporting injuries at a sink school.

Driven by their love of truth, justice (and the need to pay off their terrifying landlord, Malcolm McMichaelmas), they take on crimes that no-one else would consider. In this case, they investigate a suspicious pattern of injuries affecting a school sports team, days before they are due to meet their bitterest rivals in sporting competition.

Max and Ivan - comedians and actors Max Olesker and Ivan Gonzalez - are a critically acclaimed, award-winning double act who have quickly established themselves as one of the most exciting comedy duos on the circuit. Over the course of the series they are dropped into new worlds, and have to use their skills to penetrate deep into each community. If that means Ivan dressing up as a 14 year old German girl, so be it!

Cast:
Max....................Max Olesker
Ivan...................Ivan Gonzalez
Mrs Sampson.....Jessica Hynes
Malcolm..............Lewis MacLeod
Joculo................David Reed
Receptionist......Jessica Ransom

Produced by Victoria Lloyd
A John Stanley production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b08rp397)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b08lk6gj)
2 June 1917 - Dorothea Winwood

On this day in 1917, Canadian flying ace Billy Bishop shot down three German planes on a solo flight behind enemy lines, and in Folkestone, Dorothea Winwood's on a mission for the truth.

Singers ..... Nancy Cole, Ksynia Loeffler, Stephen Jeffes, Tom Raskin, Charles Gibbs
Organ ..... David Smith
Conductor ..... Sam Evans

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b08rp399)

Consumer news and issues.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b08rp39c)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b08rp39f)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b08rt9s0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b05prkhb)
Mr Reasonable

by Fred D'Aguiar.

John Reasonable is a freed black slave, a skilled silk weaver, engaged by Shakespeare to make costumes for the Rose Theatre but he also has a jealous apprentice.

Director: David Hunter.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08rtjk2)
Suffolk

Eric Robson and the panel visit Suffolk. James Wong, Bob Flowerdew and Bunny Guinness answer the horticultural questions from the audience of local gardeners.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (b08rtjk4)
Series 1, Relic

There's a story about an island off the coast of Ireland. A story about how the old gods tipped the monks living there into the drink. And there's a second story about love and calligraphy, starring a monk and an immortal, a princess no less. And it doesn't end well either. As read by Tadhg Murphy (Guerrilla, Black Sails, Vikings)

Jess Kidd was brought up in London as part of a large family from Mayo. Her debut novel 'Himself' was published in last year to rave reviews and she was recently awarded The 2016 Costa Short Story Award.

Writer ..... Jess Kidd
Reader ..... Tadhg Murphy

Producer ..... Michael Shannon.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b08sl8sg)

Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b08sl5xt)

Investigating the numbers in the news.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b08rtjk6)
Lydia and Tor - A Painful Privilege

Sisters who are both doctors are acutely aware of their responsibility in being the one to tell family members about their loved one. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b08rp39h)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08rp39k)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b08rtjk8)
Series 93, 02/06/2017

Satirical review of the week's news, chaired by Miles Jupp.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b08rtjkb)

Jill feels under attack, and Neil must remain impartial.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b08rp39m)

News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08rtgwy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b08rtkyy)
Paul Nuttall MEP, Keir Starmer, Jo Swinson

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Ormiston Bolingbroke Academy in Runcorn with a panel including the UKIP Leader Paul Nuttall MEP, the Shadow Brexit Secretary Keir Starmer and the former Business Minister and Minister for Women and Equalities in the Coalition Government Jo Swinson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b08rtkz0)
Renouncing Middlemarch

"It's late in the year to be making a resolution I'm probably going to break, but the words have to be spoken" writes Howard Jacobson. "I hereby renounce Middlemarch".

Howard reveals what lies behind his obsession for George Eliot's greatest novel and why he can't stop hymning its praises and quoting chunks of it from memory.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b08lk6hr)
29 May - 2 June 1917

The seventh omnibus of Season 10, Our Daily Bread, set in Folkestone, in the week, in 1917, when the death toll from the Folkestone air raid reached 72.

Cast
Alice Macknade ..... Claire-Louise Cordwell
Kitty Lumley ..... Ami Metcalf
Gabriel Graham ..... Michael Bertenshaw
Jessie Moore ..... Lucy Hutchinson
Dorothea Winwood ..... Rachel Shelley
Anna White ..... Amelia Lowdell
Mildred Manchester ..... Annette Badland
Adam Wilson ..... Billy Kennedy
Bill Macknade ..... Ben Crowe
Soldier ..... Charlie Clements
Mabel ..... Chetna Pandya
Florrie Wilson ..... Claire Rushbrook
Sir Thomas Devitt ..... David Sterne
Albert Wilson ..... Jamie Foreman
Sylvia Graham ..... Joanna David
Walter Hamilton ..... Joseph Kloska
Forsyth ..... John Dougall
Mayor Stephen Penfold ..... John Woodvine
Esme Macknade ..... Katie Angelou
Ruby Tulliver ..... Katie Redford
Isabel Graham ..... Keely Beresford
Juliet Cavendish ..... Lizzie Bourne
Ivy Layton ..... Lizzy Watts
Mrs Riley ..... Lois Chimimba
Claude ..... Luke Newberry
Ralph Winwood ..... Nicholas Murchie
Oscar Hendrickx ..... Pierre Elliot
Archbishop ..... Richard Curnow
Dicky Manchester ..... Roy Hudd
Dennis Monk ..... Sam Swann
Alec Poole ..... Tom Stuart
Cristine de Groot ..... Ysabelle Cooper
Singers ..... Nancy Cole, Ksynia Loeffler, Stephen Jeffes, Tom Raskin, Charles Gibbs
Organ ..... David Smith
Conductor ..... Sam Evans

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole

Story-led by Sarah Daniels
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b08rp39p)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b08rp39r)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08sqwjc)
F Scott Fitzgerald: The Lost Stories, Salute to Lucy and Elsie

Stuart Milligan reads 'Salute to Lucy and Elsie', a previously unpublished story about honour, morals and the gulf between generations taken from a new collection of work by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Romance, parties, cocktails and glamour - as a young writer in the 1920s F. Scott Fitzgerald gave the magazines what they wanted. He had little choice; short stories were his bread and butter. But as the author matured he yearned to explore darker territory. This desire wasn't cushioned by wealth; The Great Gatsby hadn't sold well and as the Depression crunched in the early 30s, Fitzgerald was hit by large medical bills for both himself and his wife Zelda. Despite the financial pressures he resisted the easy censorship requested by editors, who balked at Fitzgerald's portrayal of confusing generational freedoms, sex before marriage, divorce and working women.

Growing increasingly uncompromising about deletions and sanitisations, Fitzgerald preferred to let these stories lie in wait until their time came. They are published now in the collection I'D DIE FOR YOU: AND OTHER LOST STORIES.

Producer: Eilidh McCreadie.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b08rq6mg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:27 Life at LIPA (b084x5mw)
Come Together

It's the curtain call for Janice Long in this last of three programmes following students through their final year at the Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts.

Shannen and Rachael are studying Applied Theatre and Community Drama, training to help community groups create theatre, drama and art with a purpose. For their final projects they are tackling the controversial topics of Islamophobia and immigration, trying to build bridges between communities in Liverpool.

Mature student Lauren is a Theatre and Performance Design student with a successful career in costume design. Now she wants to learn how to do more than make the clothes for film and TV - she wants to build a world. In her final project, she's tackling the themes of life and death.

All three women are trying to build careers in tough environments, where competition is fierce, money is tight, jobs are scarce and, for Shannen and Rachael, people don't always want to hear what they are trying to say.

The Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts was set up by Sir Paul McCartney and Brit School founder Mark Featherstone-Witty over 20 years ago. They wanted to equip students with the skills to navigate one of the toughest industries. For Sir Paul, it's vital to encourage artists who see the world "through another lens".

In this final part of the series, we meet three final year students battling passionately to do exactly that - and make a living from it.

Producer: David James
Series Producer: Rebecca Maxted

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b08rtkz2)
Helen and Laura - Building the Blade

Engineers discuss the industry from a female perspective, and why they moved to Hull to work on the world's longest blade in commercial operation. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b08rptqz)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b08rptqz)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b08rq6dj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b08rq6dj)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b08rrb43)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b08rrb43)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b08rt9rm)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b08rt9rm)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b08rtgwy)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b08rtgwy)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b08r34lz)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b08rtkz0)

Alex Edelman's Peer Group 23:00 TUE (b08rq7jv)

Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section 18:30 THU (b045bqt6)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b08rq747)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b08rq747)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b08rq1p4)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b08qxfz1)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b08r34lx)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b08rtkyy)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b08rp0gv)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b08rp36p)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b08rp36p)

Beef and Dairy Network 23:15 WED (b08rrc0w)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b08rp5vv)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b08rp5vv)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b08rpy27)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b08rq1p6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b08sqr3h)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b08sqvlr)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b08swyvp)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b08sqwjc)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b08rg43m)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b08rptqw)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b08rptqw)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b08rq6dg)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b08rq6dg)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b08rr9r6)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b08rr9r6)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b08rt9rk)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b08rt9rk)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b08rtgww)

Breakfast with the Disruptors 20:00 MON (b08rq1p2)

Breakfast with the Disruptors 11:00 WED (b08rq1p2)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b08rp2sy)

Clocking On 16:00 TUE (b08rtldq)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b08rq6dx)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b08rq6dx)

Costume Drama: The Wonderful World of Cosplay 10:30 SAT (b08rnz3l)

Defoe 14:30 SAT (b07knzdg)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b08rpcqb)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b08rpcqb)

Dot 11:30 MON (b08rptr4)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b07h2v3d)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b08rpdgz)

Drama 14:15 MON (b08rpy1z)

Drama 14:15 WED (b06bnq12)

Drama 14:15 THU (b08rt9rt)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b05prkhb)

Electionomics 20:45 WED (b08rrc0t)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b08qxfyl)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b08rp2wt)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b08rp301)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b08rp331)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b08rp365)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b08rp391)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b08r1vls)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b08rq745)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b08rpd85)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b08rpd85)

From Our Home Correspondent 11:00 FRI (b08rtgx0)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b08qxfys)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b08rt9rp)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b08rp2xp)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b08rp30m)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b08rp33r)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b08rp36w)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b08rp39m)

FutureProofing 22:15 SAT (b08r1wz1)

FutureProofing 20:00 WED (b08rrc0r)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b08r320p)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b08rtjk2)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b08rq6mg)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b08rq6mg)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b08lk6hr)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b08lk650)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b08lk65y)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b08lk68f)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b08lk6ck)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b08lk6gj)

I Was... 11:30 THU (b08rt9rr)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b08rpgvn)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b08rp369)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b08rp369)

In Their Element 21:00 MON (b08rfh05)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b08rp30p)

It's a Fair Cop 11:30 WED (b08rrb47)

John Cleese Presents 09:30 WED (b08rr9gc)

John Finnemore's Double Acts 18:30 WED (b08rrc0m)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b08r1pwp)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b08rpy29)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b08r320t)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b08sl8sg)

Life at Absolute Zero 19:45 SUN (b08rpgk1)

Life at LIPA 23:30 WED (b083n81k)

Life at LIPA 23:30 THU (b084bmf1)

Life at LIPA 23:27 FRI (b084x5mw)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b08qxfzf)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b08qxfy4)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b08rp2rv)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b08rp2wf)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b08rp2zq)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b08rp32q)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b08rp35v)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b08rp38q)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b08rnz3q)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b08rnz3q)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b08rp33h)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b08r320w)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b08sl5xt)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b08qxfyd)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b08rp2s8)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b08rp2wr)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b08rp2zz)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b08rp32z)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b08rp363)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b08rp38z)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b08rp2sf)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b08qxfyv)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b08rp2t2)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b08rp2x5)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b08rp307)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b08rp337)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b08rp36f)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b08rp397)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b08qxfyg)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b08rp2sp)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b08rp2sw)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b08qxfzk)

News 13:00 SAT (b08qxfyz)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 23:30 MON (b0848q83)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 23:30 TUE (b084tl0g)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b08rp5vx)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b08rpf0g)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b08rpf0g)

PM 17:00 SAT (b08qxfz5)

PM 17:00 MON (b08rp2xh)

PM 17:00 TUE (b08rp30h)

PM 17:00 WED (b08rp33m)

PM 17:00 THU (b08rp36r)

PM 17:00 FRI (b08rp39h)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b08rp2tg)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b08qy2yj)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b08rpf0j)

Political Thinking with Nick Robinson 11:00 SAT (b08rnz3n)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b08r39dt)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b08svq78)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b08s703g)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b08swf51)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b08t0njg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b08t1xlp)

Print Me a New Body 11:00 TUE (b08rq6dl)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b08rp0gs)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b08rp0gs)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b08rp0gs)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b08rp5vz)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b08rp5vz)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b08rp5vz)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b08r1xcl)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b08rt9rw)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b08qxfyq)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b08qxfzh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b08qxfy8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b08rp2s4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b08rp2wm)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b08rp2zv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b08rp32v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b08rp35z)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b08rp38v)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b08qxfy6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b08qxfyb)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b08qxfz7)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b08rp2rz)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b08rp2s6)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b08rp2t8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b08rp2wh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b08rp2wp)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b08rp2zs)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b08rp2zx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b08rp32s)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b08rp32x)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b08rp35x)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b08rp361)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b08rp38s)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b08rp38x)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b08rq6dv)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (b08r320r)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (b08rtjk4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b08qxfzc)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b08rp2td)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b08rp2xk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b08rp30k)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b08rp33p)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b08rp36t)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b08rp39k)

Small Scenes 18:30 TUE (b04l0y2l)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b08rp2sk)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b08rp2sk)

Soul Music 09:00 WED (b08rr9g9)

Soul Music 21:30 WED (b08rr9g9)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b08rp2x0)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b08rp2x0)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b08rp5w1)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b08rp2sr)

Thanks a Lot, Milton Jones! 23:00 THU (b06ts1kz)

The 3rd Degree 23:00 SAT (b08r1n6w)

The 3rd Degree 15:00 MON (b08rpy23)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b08rp2t0)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b08rpgjx)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b08rpgjx)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b08rq6dq)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b08rq6dq)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b08rq6mj)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b08rq6mj)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b08rrc0p)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b08rrc0p)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b08rt9s0)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b08rt9s0)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b08rtjkb)

The Bottom Line 20:00 THU (b08rt9s3)

The Casebook of Max and Ivan 11:30 FRI (b05r3w3x)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b08r1xcn)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b08rt9ry)

The Ideas That Make Us 13:45 MON (b08mb1fw)

The Invisible College 16:00 MON (b08rpy25)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b08t0d3w)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b08t0d3w)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b08rpd87)

The Listening Project 09:30 TUE (b08rq6dd)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b08rrb45)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b08rtjk6)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b08rtkz2)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b08rp33k)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b08r3310)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b08rtjk8)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b08rptr2)

The Voices of... 15:30 SAT (b08r1tsz)

The Voices of... 11:30 TUE (b08rq6dn)

The Vote Now Show 19:15 SUN (b08rpgjz)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b08rp2t6)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b08rp2xv)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b08rp30r)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b08rp33w)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b08rp370)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b08rp39r)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b08r1wy6)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b08rrc0k)

Today 07:00 SAT (b08rnz3j)

Today 06:00 MON (b08rp2wy)

Today 06:00 TUE (b08rp303)

Today 06:00 WED (b08rp333)

Today 06:00 THU (b08rp367)

Today 06:00 FRI (b08rp393)

Tumanbay 14:15 TUE (b08rq6ds)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b08r1lj6)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b08rptqt)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b08rq6db)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b08rr9g7)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b08rt9rh)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b08s7jhl)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b08qxfyj)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b08qxfyn)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b08qxfyx)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b08qxfz9)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b08rp2sm)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b08rp2st)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b08rp2t4)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b08rp2tb)

Weather 05:56 MON (b08rp2ww)

Weather 12:57 MON (b08rp2x9)

Weather 21:58 MON (b08rp2xs)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b08rp30c)

Weather 12:57 WED (b08rp33c)

Weather 21:58 WED (b08rp33t)

Weather 12:57 THU (b08rp36k)

Weather 21:58 THU (b08rp36y)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b08rp39c)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b08rp39p)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b08rp2tj)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b08qxfz3)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b08rp2x2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b08rp305)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b08rp335)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b08rp36c)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b08rp395)

Woof - One Man's Search for a Dog or a Boyfriend 23:00 WED (b08rrc21)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b08r1vbb)

World at One 13:00 MON (b08rp2xd)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b08rp30f)

World at One 13:00 WED (b08rp33f)

World at One 13:00 THU (b08rp36m)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b08rp39f)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b08rp2x7)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b08rp309)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b08rp339)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b08rp36h)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b08rp399)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b08r39dw)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b08r39dw)