Radio-Lists Home Now on R4

RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 29 APRIL 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b08n1y96)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody (b08n4hm6)
Series 1, The Day of the Daag

In the final episode of The Odyssey Project, Radio 4's Poet in residence, who has curated and introduced the series, reads his take on Odysseus's homecoming. He takes on the suitors who have been feasting at his expense and pestering his wife for her hand in marriage, so they can take over his land. It's a bloody scene that ends with Odysseus and his man slaying every suitor. In Nagra's poem, his protagonist, Daag, a modern day migrant living in Sheffield, returns to his village home in the Punjab to reclaim his wife. To reclaim his wife from the men of the ruling caste who have exploited the corrupt region by running their own harem and gambling den. Daag is from the knife-cutter caste, he has plenty of blades and, in a Bollywood way, knows how to handle them.

Producer: Julian May.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08n1y98)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08n1y9b)

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08n1y9d)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b08n1y9g)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08n4q6z)

A reading and a reflection to start the day, with George Craig, a retired senior civil servant and a Methodist local preacher in Cardiff.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b08n4q71)
Pressure to be positive

iPM is the news programme that starts with its listeners. Email ipm@bbc.co.uk. Twitter: @BBCiPM. Presented by Luke Jones and Eddie Mair.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b08n1y9j)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b08n1y9l)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b08n46dd)
The Future of Sherwood Forest

Sherwood Forest in Nottinghamshire is home to one of our most enduring legends, that of Robin Hood. David Lindo learns how the man in green tights who stole from the rich and gave to the poor is still important to the people who live within the Sherwood Forest area, and to the many visitors who come here. The truth about the man behind the legend remains in dispute but the ancient oak trees remain. Some, like the Major Oak, are up to one thousand years old and need support to remain standing. They provide precious dead wood habitat for many species and this is one reason why the RSPB are taking over the management of the national nature reserve and building a brand new visitor centre to help people understand how precious this ancient habitat is.

The forest landscape was created and preserved by medieval Kings and David visits King John's Palace in Kings Clipstone to find out how the ruins we see there today could be part of a much bigger story about the real time in which Robin and his Merry Men would have roamed the woods. And Robin Hood is also the inspiration for Sherwood's anti-fracking campaigners, they fear that trees like the Major Oak could be affected if planned seismic surveys in the wider area lead to drilling for shale gas.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b08n1y9n)
Vegan debate

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b08n1y9q)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b08njlm5)

News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b08n1y9s)
Leo Sayer

Extraordinary stories, unusual people and a sideways look at the world.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08njlm7)
Series 16, Chelmsford

Jay Rayner and the panel visit Chelmsford in Essex. Zoe Laughlin, Sue Lawrence, Rachel McCormack and Tim Hayward answer the questions.

This week, the panellists reveal their most successful - and unsuccessful - ventures with toast. They also provide everything you knead to know about flour and have a bubbly conversation about carbonated drinks.

Producer: Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b08njlm9)
Anushka Asthana of the Guardian looks behind the scenes at Westminster

Anushka Asthana of the Guardian looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The editor is Peter Mulligan.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b08n1y9v)
In Search of Happiness

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b08n1y9x)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b08njlmc)
Snap election hits tax plans - which measures are dead, delayed or driving ahead?

The latest news from the world of personal finance.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b08n4lkl)
Series 93, 28/04/2017

Miles is joined by Hugo Rifkind, Katy Brand, Rich Hall and Kiri Pritchard-McLean.

A revisiting of the week in general electioneering as well as some vital learning from grandmas about how to throw a basketball properly.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b08n1y9z)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b08n1yb1)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b08n4pc4)
Lord Falconer, Jeane Freeman MSP, Mark Littlewood, Professor Adam Tomkins MSP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Blantyre Old Parish Church in South Lanarkshire with the Labour peer Lord Falconer, the Minister for Social Security in the Scottish Government Jeane Freeman MSP, Director General of the Institute of Economic Affairs Mark Littlewood and Professor Adam Tomkins MSP Shadow Cabinet Secretary for Communities, Social Security, the Constitution and Equalities.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b08n1yb3)

Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions?. Email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Tweet,#BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.

Presenter Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Eleanor Garland.


SAT 14:30 Drama (b08njn47)
The Rosenthals, Eskimo Day

by Jack Rosenthal
adapted for radio by Amy Rosenthal

1996 and it's interview day at Cambridge University. As well as nerves, hopefuls Pippa from Cheltenham and Neil from Blackburn must also endure the embarrassment of their parents' company. But as the day progresses, it's seems it's not the children who are most in need of help.............

Written by Jack Rosenthal
Adapted for radio by Amy Rosenthal

Produced and directed by Marion Nancarrow

Playwright Amy Rosenthal's father, Jack, was a prolific and much-loved dramatist and this is the first of two linked comedy dramas he wrote in the 1990s ("Cold Enough for Snow" follows next Saturday). Amy has adapted her father's dramas for radio and written a new drama, "Thin Ice", inspired by what happened when she went to University. It follows "Cold Enough for Snow" in the drama slot at 2.15 on Monday 8th May.

A stellar cast includes Ben Miles (Wolf Hall, The Crown), Pooky Quesnel (The A Word), Nicholas Gleaves (Scott & Bailey) and Lucy Robinson (Cold Feet). Real-life father and son, Timothy and Samuel West, guest star as fictional father and son, James and Simon. Simon's a University lecturer trying to juggle interviews and persuade his father to go into a home. But his father is not quite ready to give in yet....
The potential Cambridge students are played by Rosie Day (Outlander; Screen International Star of Tomorrow) and David Moorst (Winner of the Emerging Talent Award at the London Evening Standard Theatre Awards 2015).


SAT 15:30 Ella Fitzgerald: A Glorious Noise (b08n2v2x)

Acclaimed singer and Ella Fitzgerald devotee, Mara Carlyle, examines the life and vocal magnificence of the most beloved of jazz singers - marking the centenary of her birth.

Mara visits Harlem to trace Ella's ascent from humble origins to becoming one of America's greatest stars, exploring the voice that transformed her fortunes and changed the face of jazz forever.

She's joined by a host of singers including opera queen Jessye Norman, Dianne Reeves, Emiliana Torrini, ESKA, and her own aunt, jazz singer Norma Winstone.

Mara examines the magic of Ella's vocal prowess - her pure, clear tone, impeccable phrasing, virtuosic improvisation, and her tender expression of human emotion - that has kept audiences captivated since her auspicious debut at New York's Apollo Theater.

Produced by Zakia Sewell and Tobias Withers
A Cast Iron Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b08njrb0)
Valerie June, the WI opens a branch in prison and are sex robots a danger to human intimacy?

The Tennessee singer-songwriter Valerie June performs a track from her latest album The Order of Time.

Are sex robots a danger to human intimacy? The race in on to develop the first commercial sex robot for the mass market, the journalist Jenny Kleeman describes what they look like and how they work and Dr Kathleen Richardson, Senior Research Fellow in the Ethics of Robotics and Dr Kate Devlin senior lecturer in computing discuss if they are the ultimate in sexual objectification or an opportunity to improve of experience of sex?

The Women's Institute has opened a branch in a women's prison. Countess Bathurst, the former High Sheriff of Gloucestershire, is one of the founders of the group at HMP Eastwood Park. She tells us alongside Jenny Earle, is the Programme Director for reducing women's imprisonment at the Prison Reform Trust, the benefits of such a group in prison.

A 'Please Offer Me a Seat' badge for those less able to stand on public transport is launched. We hear from Amanda, a cervical cancer survivor who still experiences pain following radical surgery and Amy who suffers from Lupus, on the challenges they face on public transport with a hidden illness.

We hear from Rachel Malik on her debut novel Miss Boston and Miss Hargreaves. It tells the story of Rachel's grandmother who abandoned her children, lived as a lesbian and was tried for murder.

What's the impact on grandparents when adult children decide to take their young family and move abroad. We hear from Mary whose son and daughter-in-law are taking their three young children to Auckland and Helen Russell a British mum who now lives in Denmark and clinical psychologist Dr Angharad Rudkin offer some advice.

Lady MacBeth is a film about a women in a loveless marriage set in 19th century rural Northumberland. It stars BAFTA breakthrough Brit actress Florence Pugh who tells us about the role and Alice Birch the screenwriter discusses the appeal of such a dark story.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Erin Riley.


SAT 17:00 PM (b08n1yb7)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b08n4q71)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08n1yb9)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b08n1ybc)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08n1ybf)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b08n1ybh)
Howard Jacobson, Vivienne Acheampong, Joe Boyd, Gaia Vince, Orchestra Baobab, Her's, Emma Freud, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Emma Freud are joined by Howard Jacobson, Joe Boyd, Gaia Vince and Vivienne Acheampong for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Orchestra Baobab and Her's.

Producer: Sukey Firth.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b08njrb2)
Aretha Franklin

Aretha Franklin has won hearts - and 18 Grammy awards - with her astonishing voice. But this week a bust up with another iconic singer revealed her spikier side. Always a sensation on stage, there have been struggles off it. Mark Coles talks to people who grew up with and have worked with the Queen of Soul.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b08n1ybk)
Lady Macbeth, Obsession, See What I Have Done, Whitechapel Gallery, Griefcast

British film Lady Macbeth has been much praised for the central perfomance by Florence Pugh as the intelligent complicated 19th century woman sold into marriage and realising that her soul is being stifled.
Ivo Van Hove's prodiuction of Obsession - an adaptation of The Postman Always Rings Twice stars Jude Law. It should be theatrical gold...
Sarah Schmidt's debut novel See What I Have Done deals with the still-unsolved Lizzie Borden case from 1892: "Lizzie Borden took an axe and gave her mother forty whacks"
London's Whitechapel Gallery has a new exhibition: Iself, bringing together the work of artists exploring their own personal identity
Griefcast - In Cariad Lloyd's podcast she talks with fellow comedians about their own experiences of coping with grieving, mourning and death and mortality. How funny can such a grim subject be?

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Alex Preston, Andrea Rose and Kit Davies. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b08njrb4)
A New Life in Europe Revisited

In the spring of 2015 the Dhnie family embarked on the perilous journey to Europe. They risked their lives in rubber boats and got caught up in riots at border crossings, they slept rough, ran out of money and regularly asked themselves 'Is it worth it?'

In this programme the family answer that question. Award-winning journalist Manveen Rana, who accompanied the Dhnie's over the many months during which they made their way to Europe, visits them in Germany to re-live key moments of their journey, and to find out what's happened to them since. She plays back to them the recordings she made with them, an emotional and compelling soundtrack which became a powerful and multi award-winning documentary. As events are replayed Manveen gathers the family's response to them, eighteen months on.

In this intimate and personal programme, Manveen reveals who has prospered and why some of the family bitterly regret the decision to seek a new life in Europe.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b08n22rp)
The Hours, Episode 2

The radio debut for the Pulitzer winning book by Michael Cunningham inspired by Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway. Starring Rosamund Pike, Fenella Woolgar and Teresa Gallagher.

Three very separate women. They live in different locations and different eras but they are bound by their passion for Virginia Woolf's novel Mrs Dalloway. As they experience life on a Tuesday in June, their thoughts and experiences echo each other and become intertwined.

In Richmond in 1923, Virginia Woolf (Fenella Woolgar) sits down to write a novel calling her heroine Mrs Dalloway. In Los Angeles in 1949, Laura (Teresa Gallagher) sits in bed reading Mrs Dalloway. In New York in the 1990s, Clarissa (Rosamund Pike) goes out to buy flowers for a party mirroring the start of the day for the fictional Mrs Dalloway. The party is for her best friend Richard who long ago dubbed her Mrs Dalloway.

Weaving together themes of bisexuality, mental illness, middle age, the trials of creativity, parental guilt, marital discord, suburban isolation, infertility, friendship and loss - the three stories become one.

In the second and concluding episode, Virginia, Laura and Clarissa all experience conflict between their need to be free and their domestic responsibilities and ties. Virginia Woolf creates a pivotal moment when Mrs Dalloway sees a book in a shop window open at a page with a song from Shakespeare's Cymbeline. It haunts her - and it haunts Laura and Clarissa too. As their stories become interwoven there more and more parallels.

Michael Cunningham's enormously popular and critically successful book won the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and inspired the film starring Nicole Kidman. He called his story The Hours because that was a title that Virginia Woolf had considered. He says Mrs Dalloway was a huge influence on his life because he read the novel as a response to a dare when he was 15 and then decided to be a writer.

Sony Award winning writer Frances Byrnes adapted the book for radio.

Composer: Gene Pritsker
Pianist: Carollyn Eden
Sound Design: Steve Bond

Adapted for radio by Frances Byrnes
Directed by Judith Kampfner and Polly Thomas
Produced by Judith Kampfner
Executive Producer Celia De Wolff

A Corporation For Independent Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b08n1ybm)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Glass Half Full (b08n3wp4)
Series 1, Digital technology is making children's lives richer

Is nostalgia for the past and fear of the future preventing us from recognising the huge benefits of digital technology for children?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists. She asks not only what they think about the effect digital technology has on children, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

Baroness Martha Lane Fox, an invincible optimist and tech entrepreneur, says children are naturally predisposed to learn, and digital technology provides endless opportunities for development. She considers that we romanticise traditional childhoods spent outside in the fresh air but, in reality, children must tap the social and educational potential of tablets and smart phones if they are to be prepared for life in our digital world.

Andrew Keen, an entrepreneur himself as well as being one of the most influential pessimistic commentators on the digital age, takes the opposite view. He believes our children are immersed in digital media before they can walk, stunting their development, damaging their health, and making them less able to interact with real-life people. He says the internet monetises every aspect of our children's lives, their personal data harvested for the use of governments and corporations.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - Professor Sugata Mitra, educationalist Sue Palmer, and technology expert and presenter Julia Hardy.

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b08n2f3h)
Semi-Final 2, 2017

(14/17)
In a North-South semi-final contest this week, two of the competitors are from Surrey and two from Cumbria. They all either won their heat over the past three months of the 2017 tournament, or narrowly missed out as a high-scoring runner-up. The standard promises to be high today, with another place in the Final at stake.

As ever, the 'Beat the Brains' feature also offers a listener the chance to have his or her question suggestions put to the panel, to see if their combined knowledge is up to the challenge.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 The Echo Chamber (b08n22rt)
Series 9, Zaffar Kunial

Ground-truthing poetry - Paul Farley hears new poems by Zaffar Kunial in the English Midland places they were made. Producer: Tim Dee.



SUNDAY 30 APRIL 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b08njt6q)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Short Works (b08n4lkb)
Series 1, On the Beach

David Park is one of Northern Ireland's most acclaimed novelists. He has won the Authors' Club First Novel Award, the Bass Ireland Arts Award for Literature, the Ewart-Biggs Memorial Prize, the American Ireland Fund Literary Award and the University of Ulster's McCrea Literary Award, three times. In 2014 he was longlisted for the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award. His novel 'The Truth Commissioner' was also recently adapted into a feature film starring Roger Allam.

Producer ..... Michael Shannon.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08njt6s)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08njt6v)

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08njt6x)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b08njt6z)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b08njwtn)
St Mary the Virgin, Chislet

This week's Bells on Sunday, comes from St. Mary the Virgin, Chislet in Kent. The tower has a ring of 6 bells. The tenor, cast in 1729, is tuned to E flat and weighs 15 hundredweight. We hear them now ringing a touch of Stedman Doubles.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b08njrb2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b08njt71)

The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b08njt73)
Preaching

Mark Tully evaluates a range of preaching and considers what makes a good or a bad sermon.

The Dominican Friars are known as the Order of Preachers, and Mark speaks with former Master of the Order, Brother Timothy Radcliffe, about how the balance of preaching has changed on the whole from hellfire and damnation to Good News.

Mark's copy of Webster's dictionary defines a sermon as, "a serious reproof or exultation expressed at tedious length," but Brother Timothy believes preachers must not climb into the pulpit and preach down at their congregation. He says, "They can, and should, lead listeners to have life and to have it abundantly."

Produced by Adam Fowler
A 7digital production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b08njwtq)
Dartmoor Sheep

22 year old Lewis Steer has quadrupled the size of his sheep flock in a matter of months. He says he's the only farmer in the UK to keep all three of Dartmoor's native breeds together. Everything except the 'baa' is sold directly to the customer - meat, knitting wool, and sheepskins. Sarah Swadling meets Lewis as he prepares his flock for a business milestone, moving them to a large block of land he's renting for the first time.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b08njt75)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b08njt77)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b08njt79)
Jehovah's Witnesses abuse allegations, Pope in Egypt, Reformation music

Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b08njwts)
Mentor UK

Professor Susan Greenfield makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Mentor UK.

Registered Charity Number 1112339
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Mentor'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Mentor'.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b08njt7c)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b08njt7f)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b08njwtv)
To Disagree Well

In the 1930s, delegations of British intellectuals travelled to Germany to find out more about the rise of National Socialism, engaging in debates with German academics and clergymen, Nazi leaders and young people. At the head of these delegations was a remarkable woman, Amy Buller, who wanted to understand and challenge the horrors of what she came to regard as a false extremist religion.

With the support of the King and Queen, Buller went on to establish an educational foundation at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park. Seventy years on, this institution continues to promote constructive dialogue and to challenge social divisions.

In a service broadcast live from Holy Trinity, Windsor, Canon Dr Edmund Newell, Principal of Cumberland Lodge, explores the importance of learning to 'disagree well' and celebrates the life and work of Amy Buller to mark the 70th anniversary of the educational foundation she established. The preacher is Sandra Cobbin, an experienced mediator who was one of the facilitators for the Church of England's 'Shared Conversations on Human Sexuality' and is also a Training Partner with Bridge Builders Ministries. The music is led by The Choir of Royal Holloway, University of London.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b08n4pc6)
Trust in Voices

A L Kennedy commends paying attention to voices as a way to discern truth telling.

"Listening to our media, our public voices, as if we're listening to people in our everyday lives, holding them to that standard and not their own can help us to know when we're being driven towards the sound of a faked emotion or spun a tale."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp38)
Puffin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Puffin. Far better-known for its comical looks than its calls, the puffin is a bird that that is recognised by many and has earned the nickname "sea-parrot" or "clown of the sea".


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b08njt7h)

Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b08njt7k)

David and Ruth reach a decision, and Ambridge Hall is invaded.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b08njzh0)
Climbie Inquiry

Sue MacGregor meets people involved in the Victoria Climbie Inquiry, the catalyst for widespread reforms to child protection.

Victoria Climbie was just eight years old when she died in February 2000, after months of abuse at the hands of her Great Aunt. A pathologist recorded 128 separate injuries to her body, saying it was the worst case of deliberate harm he had ever dealt with.

Pictures of the smiling little girl from the Ivory Coast filled the newspapers. She had been sent to Britain for a better life. How could such appalling torture have gone unnoticed? What made the tragedy worse was the number of missed opportunities to save her. In the eleven months that Victoria lived in Britain, she came into contact with three housing authorities, four social services departments, two police child protection teams and the NSPCC, and was admitted to two different hospitals.

The government ordered an inquiry to examine what went wrong and consider how such a tragedy could be prevented from happening in the future. Its 108 recommendations prompted widespread reforms to child protection and social worker training.

Among Sue MacGregor's guests recalling the inquiry and its impact are its Chair, Lord Laming, and Neil Garnham, Counsel to the Inquiry and now a High Court Judge.

Presenter: Sue MacGregor
Producer: Deborah Dudgeon
Series Producer: David Prest

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b08njt7m)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (b08n2gjl)
Series 18, Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

David O'Doherty, Richard Osman, Zoe Lyons and Marcus Brigstocke are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as colour, vegetables, pizza and carpets.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b08njzh2)
Out Like a Lamb

Lamb. Long a staple of the UK dinner table. But one glance at the statistics and it's obvious that 'Generation Y' aren't inspired. Estimates suggest under 30s are buying just 15g of lamb a week. That's just over 10 lamb chops in a year and less than half the UK average.

In this programme Sheila Dillon asks young butchers, food entrepreneurs and a 3rd generation sheep farmer in his thirties whether there's any saving shepherd's pie, lamb shanks and Irish stew. She gets a lesson in Iranian midweek lamb cooking from cook and author of 'The Saffron Tales' Yasmin Khan. And Ben Ebbrell and Barry Taylor from SORTEDfood share the lamb recipes which excite their 1.7 million Youtube subscribers.

Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced in Bristol by Clare Salisbury.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b08njt7p)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b08njt7r)

Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 From Our Home Correspondent (b08njzh4)

In the latest programme, Mishal Husain introduces dispatches from journalists and writers around the United Kingdom that reflect the range of contemporary life in the country. This month: Ian McMillan unveils his campaign for Yorkshire pudding to secure UNESCO intangible heritage status; Carly Appleby reveals the dramatic effect of an unexpected medical diagnosis; Travis Elborough meets the 87 year-old behind an improbable retail success story in Brighton; Rebecca Ford discovers how Blackpool is reinventing itself - with a little help from China; and Mihir Bose ponders what allotments have to teach the managers of our leading football clubs.

Producer Simon Coates.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08n4lk8)
Cirencester

This week, the team are answering questions from the audience in Cirencester. Joining Eric Robson on the panel are Bob Flowerdew, Anne Swithinbank and Chris Beardshaw.

The panellists offer their thoughts on growing stronger Delphiniums, the best Autumn bulbs and how to deal with Lesser Celandine. They also analyse the efficacy of human hair as a rabbit deterrent.

And Peter Gibbs dissects the new RHS guide on climate change.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b08njzh6)
Omnibus - The Wisdom of Youth

Fi Glover introduces conversations between young people with valuable insights into recognising others' needs, listening to their opinions, and seeing beyond first impressions in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b08njzh8)
Tsar, Catherine the Great: Husbands, Lovers and Sons

Did the young Catherine foresee the consequences of staging a coup d'état against her husband the Tsar? Or did she want him dead from the start? Mike Walker's epic chronicle of the Russian Tsars continues with the story of Catherine The Great, who came to Russia as a young 15-year-old girl from Prussia and became one of Russia's most renowned monarchs, transforming the country into one of the great powers of Europe.

Director: Sasha Yevtushenko

As we approach the centenary of the Russian Revolution in October 2017, Radio 4 has an ambitious chronicle of Russian leaders; set over 11 plays, in three seasons - it began with Ivan the Terrible, contemporary of Elizabeth I, and ends with Russia's current Premier - Vladimir Putin. TSAR continues the full-blooded, rich 'more is more' tradition forged by the team that made Plantagenet and The Stuarts for Radio 4.

Series One covered the reigns of Ivan IV (aka The Terrible), Boris Godunov and Peter The Great.

Series Two (Spring 2017) chronicles the reigns of Catherine the Great; Alexander I and the Napoleonic Wars; and Alexander II and the emancipation of the serfs.

Series Three (Autumn 2017) takes in Nicholas II and the Revolution, the Soviets, and Putin.

The dramas are produced by Alison Hindell and Sasha Yevtushenko.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b08njzhb)
Paula Hawkins

Paula Hawkins' thriller The Girl On The Train smashed all kinds of literary records, and has sold nearly twenty million copies worldwide. She talks to Mariella Frostrup about following up such incredible success and writing her new book, Into The Water.

I'd Die for You and Other Lost Stories is a collection of the last remaining unpublished short stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald. The book's editor Anne Margaret Daniel joins Mariella to discuss the stories written during the latter years of his life.

Novelist Richard T Kelly observes that although money is often at the centre of our lives, it's very rarely at the centre of fiction we read. And as Donald Trump celebrates his first 100 days in office, this month's guest editor recommends White Trash: The 400 Year Untold History of Class in America which looks at the roots of popular political opinion.


SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b08njzhd)
Robert Lowell and the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry

Roger McGough celebrates the centenary of American poet Robert Lowell, and other winners of the the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, including Robert Frost, Sharon Olds and Rita Dove. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUN 17:00 The Self-Employment Paradox (b08n2wcx)

Self-employment is the fastest rising sector of the UK labour market; one in seven workers are now their own boss - 4.7 million in total. A majority say they are happier than they would be in conventional employment. And yet many complain of being overworked and of receiving too little support from the State. They are also less well-paid.

Whilst many are "Dragon's Den" - style entrepreneurs trying to develop successful commercial ideas which will make their fortune or"hipsters in hubs," earning a living from the gig economy while developing their own commercial profile, an increasing number are required to be self-employed by their employers as a condition of being offered work. And yet forced self-employment alone, doesn't explain the rise in self-employment.

Further examination reveals a number of other "tribes" going it alone: young workers taking up self-employment due to a lack of conventional career jobs; the 2012 population boom and a rise in parents taking the opportunity to opt out of the rigours of corporate culture to be "present" parents; established career professionals escaping unhappy jobs, especially in the public sector, to work less and earn more per hour as consultants, locums, inspectors, supply teachers; and retired workers "keeping their hand in" to supplement their pension.

Presenter Gavin Kelly speaks to these "new" self employed, analysing their motivation, needs and likelihood of continuing in this mode. And examines the challenge posed to policy makers as they try to bear down on dishonest self-employment while encouraging its honest counterpart.

Presenter: Gavin Kelly, Chief Executive of the Resolution Trust
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Andrew Smith.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b08njrb2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08njt7t)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b08njt7w)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08njt7y)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b08njt80)
Mark Steel

Mark Steel chooses his BBC Radio highlights.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b08nk599)

Brookfield tightens its belt, while Grange Farm holds off an eager visitor.


SUN 19:15 Hal (b08nk59c)
Series 2, Actors

The second series of the sitcom with Hal Cruttenden finds the hapless house husband still trying to cope with his mid-life crisis and doubting his every move.

His wife Sam (Kerry Godliman) is still a highly successful business woman, his two daughters Lily and Molly continue to grow into teenagers and find their dad just a little annoying, his bitter and embittered sister Pippa (Abigail Cruttenden) has inconveniently decided to stay with Hal alongside her angry teenage son Oberon, racist neighbour Penny (Ronni Ancona) proves to be a major thorn in Hal's side and best mates Fergus (Ed Byrne) and Barry (Gavin Webster) hinder rather than help Hal's goal of finding himself.

In this final episode of the series, after a challenging few weeks, Hal Cruttenden tries to calm things down by hosting a dinner party with Sam to show off their new basement - with wholly unexpected results.

Written by Hal Cruttenden and Dominic Holland
Produced by Paul Russell

An Open Mike production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Life at Absolute Zero (b08nk59f)
Series 2, The Limit

Lynne Truss observes the inhabitants Meridian Cliffs, a small wind-battered town on the south coast of England.

Carpet fitter Jack has always been a bit obsessive about rules. So living next to a road with a 20 mph limit, which is routinely ignored by every other motorist apart from himself, is particularly testing. But when someone keeps littering the grass verge opposite his house with empty pre-mixed gin and tonic cans, one per day, it threatens to tip him over the edge.

Directed by Kate McAll
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b08n4lkg)
Fact-checking Boris Johnson

The foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, appeared on Today this week, where he fired off a salvo of highly questionable statistics. We examine them. Also in the programme: are three million school kids at risk of going hungry this summer? We put this bold claim to the test. William Sitwell, Lord Woolton's biographer, explains how this working-class boy from Salford became a war hero (and President of the Royal Statistical Society). As the General Election campaign gets underway, we look into claims that education spending is at "record" levels. And just how big is the "mother of all bombs"?

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Charlotte McDonald.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b08n4lkd)
Jonathan Demme, Robert Taylor, Cathy Hopkins, Peter Farrer, Dorothy Torry

Matthew Bannister on

The film director Jonathan Demme - best known for the multi Oscar winning films Silence of the Lambs and Philadelphia.

Robert Taylor who helped to develop the first networked computers - a forerunner of the internet - and inspired the creation of modern personal computers.

Cathy Hopkins who campaigned for the residents of St Helena to get back their British citizenship.

Peter Farrer, the Liverpool tax inspector who enjoyed cross dressing and became an expert on the history of women's costume.

And Dorothy Torry, secretary to six BBC Directors General, including Lord Reith.

Producer: Neil George.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b08njlmc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b08njwts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b08n4db3)
The Big Fat Greek Struggle

How have private businesses fared in Greece since the crisis began? The economy has shrunk by nearly a third and unemployment has soared. So what have companies had to do to survive? And have any managed to actually thrive? Louise Cooper meets hopeful entrepreneurs, embattled importers, and a few small companies going underground in a bid to avoid rising costs and disappearing demand. Can Greece ever return to growth?

Producer: Rosamund Jones.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b08njt84)

Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.


SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b08n46dg)
Lady Macbeth

With Francine Stock

Writer/director David Leland revisits Worthing, the setting of his classic drama Wish You Were Here, which immortalised the phrase "up your bum".

William Oldroyd discusses his acclaimed low budget drama Lady Macbeth and why it plays with the conventions of how female characters behave in costume dramas.

Heal The Living director Kattell Quillevere explains how a change in the medical definition of death has had an emotional impact on bereaved families, which is often overlooked.


SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b08njt73)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]



MONDAY 01 MAY 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b08njthw)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b08n3wnk)
Drugs in warfare

DRUGS IN WARFARE: Laurie Taylor talks to Lukasz Kamienski, Lecturer in Political Science at at Jagiellonian University, Poland, and author of a book which examines how intoxicants have been put to the service of states, empires and their armies throughout history. They were prescribed by military authorities but there's also been widespread unauthorised use by soldiers from the American Civil War to the Vietnam War and the rebel militias of contemporary Africa. Whether to improve stamina, increase fighting spirit or deal with shattered nerves, drugs turn out to have been a 'secret weapon' in warfare.
Also, the writer, Norman Ohler discusses his study into the overwhelming role of drug-taking in the Third Reich. According to his research, Nazi Germany was permeated with cocaine, heroin, morphine and, most of all, methamphetamines, or crystal meth, and crucial to troops' resilience.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b08njwtn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08njthy)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08njtj0)

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08njtj2)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b08njtj4)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08pmln8)

A reading and a reflection to start the day, with George Craig, a retired senior civil servant and a Methodist local preacher in Cardiff.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b08njtj6)
Mike Tucker - Badminton, broadcasting and beef breeding

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (b08njtj8)

The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01s8mng)
Swift

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Swift. Swifts live in the sky, feeding, mating and sleeping on the wing. Their feet are so reduced they cannot stand particularly well on land, only the near vertical surfaces on which they build their nest.


MON 06:00 Today (b08njtjd)

News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b08njtjg)
Wendell Berry: The Natural World

On Start the Week Andrew Marr talks to the American writer, poet and farmer Wendell Berry. In his latest collection of essays, The World-Ending Fire, Berry speaks out against the degradation of the earth and the violence and greed of unbridled consumerism, while evoking the awe he feels as he walks the land in his native Kentucky.

His challenge to the false call of progress and the American Dream is echoed in the writing of Paul Kingsnorth, whose book Confessions of a Recovering Environmentalist eschews the grand narrative of a global green movement to focus on what matters - the small plot of land beneath his feet.

Kate Raworth calls herself a renegade economist and, like Berry and Kingsnorth, challenges orthodox thinking, as she points to new ways to understand the global economy which take into consideration human prosperity and ecological sustainability.

Producer: Katy Hickman

Image: Wendell Berry Photographer: James Baker Hall.


MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b08nkrc6)
Balancing Acts: Behind the Scenes at the National Theatre, Episode 1

The inside story of twelve years at the helm of Britain's greatest theatre. It is a story of lunatic failures and spectacular successes such as The History Boys, War Horse and One Man, Two Guvnors; of opening the doors of the National Theatre to a broader audience than ever before, and changing the public's perception of what theatre is for.

It is about probing Shakespeare from every angle and reinventing the classics. About fostering new talent and directing some of the most celebrated actors of our times. Its cast includes the likes of Alan Bennett, Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon and Helen Mirren.

Intimate, candid and insightful, Balancing Acts is a passionate exploration of the art and alchemy of making theatre.

Today Hynter describes his typical day as the theatre's Director.

Written and read by Nicholas Hytner
Produced by Simon Richardson.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08njtjj)
Women and bikes

We celebrate women and cycling at the London Bike Kitchen.

Rochelle Gilmore, Commonwealth gold medalist and former professional cyclist, is now owner and manager of the Wiggle High5 Pro Cycling team. She's joined by one of her riders British cyclist Grace Garner to discuss women's road racing today.

Mountainbiker, Tracy Moseley talks to Jane Garvey about the thrill of racing downhill.

Podcaster and blogger Sarah Connolly explains how social media is changing the way women's competitive cycling is being covered.

Astrid Swenson, senior lecturer in European History at Brunel University, tells us about the role of bikes in women's emancipation.

Dr Jane Sterling, consultant dermatologist at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge explains how she's been advising the elite world of British Cycling on vulval health.

And Jenni Gwiasdowski teaches Jane how to mend a puncture.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Jane Thurlow.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08nkrnj)
How Does That Make You Feel?, Episode 1

In the 8th series of 'How Does That Make You Feel?' Martha's clients have made few changes to their circumstances.

On a trip to Newcastle, which to his surprise is even further north than Leeds, Richard Fallon finds that his newly acquired Twitter account has been hacked and embarrassingly compromised causing the Chief Whip to comedown on Richard like a ton of bricks. Again.

Shelagh Stephenson is the author of Radio 4's 'A Short History of Longing' and 'Guests Are Like Fish'. She is an Olivier Award winner for her play 'The Memory of Water' and has won Sony and Writer's Guild awards for her plays 'Darling Peidi' and 'Five Kinds of Silence'.

Richard Fallon ..... Roger Allam
Martha ..... Frances Tomelty

Writer ..... Shelagh Stephenson
Director ..... Eoin O'Callaghan
Producer ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


MON 11:00 The Untold (b08nks7c)
Doctor Doctor

Can Duncan and Sian, a doctor husband and wife team, save their surgery from closure?

Duncan and Sian Shaw are both GPs. They live in Bournemouth with their young family and, for fourteen years, have been based at the same surgery, working hard for the thousands of patients on their list. But, like the situation facing many GP surgeries in the country, things have become critical: in the last three years, several doctors have resigned and Duncan and Sian have not been able to recruit new ones.

When they started at the surgery it had eight doctors; now it has five, and soon there will be just three. It's no longer viable. They are at crisis point. Can they save the surgery? Or will they have to sell up and walk away, leaving 10,000 patients to find another GP?

Producer in Bristol: Karen Gregor.


MON 11:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b05zktnk)
Series 6, Saint Anne, Alderney, the Channel Islands

Mark Steel's In Town - Saint Anne - Alderney.

"Alderney. So close, so different"

Mark Steel returns to Radio 4 for a sixth series of the award winning show that travels around the country, researching the history, heritage and culture of six towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness, and performs a bespoke evening of comedy for the local residents.

For the final episode Mark Steel visits Alderney in the Channel Islands. After a terrifying ride in a tiny yellow plane called Joey, Mark spends his first day on the island trying to buy new trousers (there is no causal connection between these two events). It's not the easiest place to buy trousers, he eventually gets a pair with zips on from a bicycle shop.

Mark meets an organic pic farmer who is also a radiologist, gets lost on a guided nature walk and visits an a old Nazi bunker which is now an Aussie BBQ hang out. Blond Hedgehogs, seven species of dragonfly, beaches, bird life and tax bonuses. What a strange place. Lovely though, and worth the effort to get to.

Written and performed by ... Mark Steel
Additional material by ... Pete Sinclair
Production co-ordinator ... Hayley Sterling
Producer ... Carl Cooper
It was a BBC Radio Comedy Production.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b08njtjm)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b08lhs99)
1 May 1917 - Kitty Lumley

On this day in 1917, the Bishop of London demanded the Church "do more than talk and preach about the need for more men for the army", while in Folkestone, Kitty Lumley must keep her own counsel.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b08njtjq)
Garden centres, Caribbean holiday nightmare, Buying fine art online

Garden Centres have seen sales rise every year for the last five years, why are we spending money on our gardens at a time when we're spending less on food and clothes? We visit Barton Grange, an independent garden centre in the North West to find out who their customers are, and what plans they have to attract a younger consumer.
It's nearly a year since the second largest garden centre chain, Dobbies, was sold by Tesco. We speak to the new CEO Nicholas Marshall about his plans for the company. How can the gardening industry respond to changes in the way we live? The number of people renting in the private sector has doubled in the last ten years, and analysis by the accounts Price Waterhouse Cooper suggests a quarter of all households will be private renters by 2025. How can garden centres attract a customer who doesn't own their garden? The RHS Chatsworth Show will have a garden made for renters this summer, we meet the gardener who designed it.
If you book a holiday and your travel company knows there's building work going on at your resort, you should be told about it. Travel companies that fail to do this can be fined by the Association of British Travel Agents, ABTA. We hear from a listener who spent over six thousand pounds on a dream Caribbean holiday only to find it was a building site.
According to the Hiscox Online Art Market report 2017, online sales now make up over 8% of the international art market. Last year saw a 15% increase in the number of art sales that took place online. So who is buying fine art without seeing it first? We speak to Paul Liss, whose gallery that went online only five years ago and Louisa Buck, The Art Newspaper's Contemporary Art Correspondent.

Presented by Winifred Robinson
Produced by Beatrice Pickup.


MON 12:57 Weather (b08njtjw)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b08njtk8)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


MON 13:45 Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious (b08nl6c1)
Series 1, A Serpent in the Garden

Can a huge global brand look beyond profit and leverage its huge turnover to do genuine good - beyond a catchy song and a pretty advert? Rory Sutherland explores how marketing plays upon questions of faith and idealism: from Coca-Cola's iconic "Hilltop" advertisement of 1971 to contemporary Islamic branding. Are big brands' moves to cater for the beliefs of its consumers really about doing genuine good for humanity - or exploiting social and moral issues to make a fast buck?

Shelina Janmohamed - writer and vice-president of Ogilvy Noor, the world's first Islamic branding consultancy - outlines the emergence of "Generation M": the world's 1 billion Muslims under the age of 30, of whom 90% say their faith informs their consumer decisions.

Meanwhile, senior ad creative Steve Henry and composer Roger Greenaway tell the story of perhaps the most famous "message" advertisement in history: Coca-Cola's "Hilltop" ad of 1971, which gave the world the song "I'd Like To Teach The World To Sing".

Producer: Steven Rajam

---

Why do certain marketing campaigns - from Nike's "Just Do It" to the MND Ice Bucket Challenge - cast such a spell over us? Rory Sutherland explores the story - and the psychology - behind ten of the most influential campaigns in history - with first-hand accounts from the creative minds that conceived them, and contributions from the worlds of evolutionary biology, behavioural psychology, socio-economics and anthropology.

Marketing. It's come to be one of the most misunderstood - and maligned - disciplines of our age: perceived variously as the Emperor's New Clothes, an emblem of the ills of capitalism, a shadowy dark art designed to steal away our hard-earned money and make us do (or buy, or vote for) things we don't want.

Yet marketing is undeniably a key part of contemporary culture. It's a science that's fundamentally about human behaviour - marketers, to some extent, understand us better than we know ourselves - and in the most successful campaigns we find our deepest emotions and urges, from altruism to shame, hope to bravado, systematically tapped into and drawn upon.

But what are these primal behaviours that the best campaigns evoke in us - and how do they harness them? Is marketing purely about commercial gain or can it underpin real common good and societal progress? And does the discipline manipulate our subconscious instincts and emotions - or simply hold a mirror to them?

Over ten episodes, senior advertising creative and Spectator writer Rory Sutherland unravels the story of some of the most powerful, brilliant and influential campaigns of our age. Set alongside personal testimonies from the brilliant minds that created them, we'll hear from a host of experts - from biologists to philosophers, novelists to economists - about how these campaigns got under our skin and proved to be so influential.

Contributors include: writer and former copywriter Fay Weldon; social behaviourist and expert on altruism Nicola Raihani; Alexander Nix, CEO of big data analysts Cambridge Analytica; philosopher Andy Martin; writer on Islamic issues and advisor to the world's first Islamic branding consultancy, Shelina Janmohamed; and evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miler.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b08nk599)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Original British Dramatists 2015 (b05xqbmb)
Triple Word Score

Original British Dramatists.

Ben Tagoe's warm-hearted drama set in the high octane world of competitive Scrabble set in Nigeria.

When Yomi travels from his native Scotland to his father's homeland to try out for the national Scrabble team, he has a lot more to learn than strategic two letter words.

Produced/directed by Gaynor Macfarlane

Ben Tagoe is a Scottish Ghanaian writer who writes for continuing drama on tv and for the theatre. This is his first radio drama.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b08npnh2)
Semi-Final 3, 2017

(15/17)
With another of the four places in the 2017 Final up for grabs, today's contest once again pits three heat winners from earlier in the series against one contestant who only narrowly lost out as a high-scoring runner-up. It could be anyone's game, as the semi-finalists wrestle for every point they can pick up.

If the periodic table of the elements were listed in alphabetical order, which would come first? What are the Latin mottoes on the masthead of the Times newspaper? And which novel that caused a literary sensation in 1991 has a protagonist named Patrick Bateman? If the competitors can answer these questions they may be in with a strong chance of a place in the Final - and within sight of the 64th BBC Brain of Britain title.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 Food Programme (b08njzh2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b08npnh4)
Terry Christian

TV presenter Terry Christian presents his favourite and funniest writing - read by comedian Andew Maxwell and actress Sally Lindsay - to the audience at the BBC Radio Theatre. Confessions of an Irish Rebel by Brendan Behan brings his Dublin-born dad's voice back to him, and memories of growing up in Manchester with Irish parents. John Cooper Clarke's poetry, Billy Liar by Keith Waterhouse and The Big Man by William McIlvanney also mean a lot to him. His lifelong love of reading was originally sparked by Just William by Richmal Crompton - against the odds..
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b08npnh6)
Series 11, Echo

There is an old joke that talking to yourself is first sign of madness but we now know its an essential mental tool . So how much of what we do online is that same inner speech?


MON 17:00 PM (b08njtkm)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08njtl1)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b08npnh8)
Series 18, Episode 5

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Frankie Boyle, Holly Walsh, Elis James and Mark Steel are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as ducks, words, Oliver Cromwell and astronauts.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b08npnhb)

Adam considers his future at Home Farm, and Lilian is at a loose end.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b08njtlh)
Oliver Beer, Nicola LeFanu, Grace Evangeline Mason, May Day poems

The composer and artist Oliver Beer discusses his new acoustics project in which he explores the resonant frequencies of the empty spaces of buildings and everyday vessels.

To mark her 70th birthday the composer Nicola LeFanu talks about her career in the world of contemporary classical music, from her childhood making music for the plays she wrote to the recent premiere at the Barbican of her latest large-scale work, The Crimson Bird.

On 17 July 1717 George Frideric Handel premiered his Water Music for King George I, and to mark the 300th anniversary of this musical landmark Front Row has commissioned a new piece by Grace Evangeline Mason, the 2013 winner of the BBC Proms Inspire Young Composer Competition. Before beginning work on the piece she came in to meet John and discuss her early ideas.

To celebrate May Day, poet Alison Brackenbury discusses the joy of spring in verse and reads a section of John Clare's The Shepherd's Calendar and her own poem May Day, 1972.

Presenter: John Wilson
Producer: Hannah Robins.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08nkrnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 The Invention of... (b08npnhd)
The USA, 'It'll never work!'

The United States of America is an invention. Before it existed, it needed to be created. Where would its borders be? Who was going to live there? How would it be run? As America's new president approaches his first hundred day, Misha Glenny follows up acclaimed programmes on Germany, Brazil, and France with a timely investigation of the USA.

To build a country you need a system of power, but independence from Britain immediately set up a clash - the politicians of the north against the slave owning south. When the Founding Fathers gathered in the capital Philadelphia, which sat half way between the two, they knew that there was going to be a fight. Donald Trump loves to quote the Founding Fathers but what did they actually say? Misha Glenny travels from New York to Philly and on to Washington in pursuit of the origins of the constitution, and discovers few people imagined it would last more than ten years.

Featuring contributions from double Pulitzer winner Alan Taylor; novelist Zoe Heller; Kathleen Burk, author of Old World, New World; Philly native Joe Queenan; and Carol Berkin, author of A Brilliant Solution.Future programmes focus on the history of the Mexican border; plus the peoples of America - who do you let in, who do you keep out?

Misha Glenny is the BBC's former Central Europe correspondent.
The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b08n404n)
Wives Wanted in the Faroes

Men in the Faroe Islands are having to look far beyond their shores for marriage. The remote, windswept archipelago between Norway and Iceland, with close ties to Denmark, has seen an influx of women from South-East Asia who have come to marry Faroese men. In recent years the islands have been experiencing a declining population. Young women in particular have been leaving the islands, often for education, and not returning. One complaint from them is that their close-knit community has too conservative and masculine a culture where sheep farming, hunting and fishing are still dominant. For some women Faroese society is simply too small, too constraining. There are now approximately 2,000 fewer women of marriageable age in the total population of 50,000. In response, some men have been looking elsewhere for partners, from countries like Thailand and the Philippines. For Crossing Continents, Tim Ecott meets these foreign women adjusting to life in this isolated group of islands where the elements are harsh and the language impenetrable.

John Murphy producing.


MON 21:00 In Their Element (b08n2ltx)
Series 1, Mercury - Chemistry's Jekyll and Hyde

The most beautiful and shimmering of the elements, the weirdest, and yet the most reviled.

Chemist Andrea Sella tell the story of Mercury, explaining the significance of this element not just for chemistry, but also the development of modern civilisation.

It's been a a source of wonder for thousands of years - why is this metal a liquid? and what is its contribution to art, from the Stone Age to the Renaissance?

We look at how Mercury is integral to hundreds of years of scientific discoveries, from weather forecasting to steam engines and the detection of atomic particles it has a key role.

However Mercury is highly toxic in certain forms and ironically the industrial processes it helped create have led to global pollution which now threatens fish, wildlife and ourselves.

We ask is it time to say goodbye to Mercury?


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b08njtjg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b08njtlk)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b08njtlm)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08npnhg)
Into the Water, Episode 1

The author of the global phenomenon 'The Girl on the Train' returns with 'Into the Water', her addictive new novel of psychological suspense.

A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged.

Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother's sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from-a place to which she vowed she'd never return.

Beware a calm surface-you never know what lies beneath.

Cast: Siân Brooke, Lily Loveless, Arthur Darvill, Lynda Baron, Bryan Dick, Elizabeth Berrington, Natasha Little, Sarah Ridgeway, Kai Alexander and Sean Baker.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b08n2wcn)
Jacqueline Wilson talks to Michael Rosen about language

Writer Jacqueline Wilson talks to Michael Rosen about her love of language and how she came up with the idea of Tracy Beaker. She describes her imaginative life as a child, walking along telling stories to herself under her breath, fascinated by words. She can trace her interest in writing real and believable children to the books that she loved as a child, from Little Women to Lolita..
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 The Muhammadan Bean: The Secret History of Islam and Coffee (b07tq8cd)

Journalist Abdul-Rehman Malik has always been captivated by coffee. Recently he uncovered a little known story about its Islamic roots and how this delicious brew came to change the world.

He had to know more.

In this programme, Abdul leads us on a journey to Turkey as he investigates the forgotten history of his beloved beverage. He discovers that coffee was popularised by Sufi mystics in the Yemen who used the drink as a way of energising themselves during their nocturnal devotions.

Abdul discovers that coffee was drunk in the Sacred Mosque of Mecca itself, until the religious authorities issued a fatwa against it in the 16th century.

With no pubs and inns in sight, coffeehouses would bring about a social revolution within the Islamic world. They were the very first spaces where people of all social classes could come together to discuss news and gossip. Consequently, the drink was persecuted by those in authority.

Back in London, Abdul scours the city backstreets, coming upon the site of London's very first coffee house. He hears how coffee took the capital by storm, leading to a backlash from those who despised the drink they labelled an "abominable, heathenish liquid" and a "bitter Muhammedan gruel".

Originating in Ethiopia, finding its spiritual home in the Yemen, evading zealots and Sultans from Mecca to Constantinople, defying prejudice from Vienna to London - coffee made its mark wherever it went, facilitating radical new forms of social exchange. This programme is a celebration of a drink Abdul describes as "a universal libation, a liquid Esperanto."

Presenter: Abdul-Rehman Malik
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.



TUESDAY 02 MAY 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b08njtp0)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b08nkrc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08njtp2)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08njtp4)

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08njtp8)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b08njtpb)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08pnckh)

A reading and a reflection to start the day, with George Craig, a retired senior civil servant and a Methodist local preacher in Cardiff.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b08njtpd)
British pork, Scottish seaweed, Pillar 2

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvryl)
Common Buzzard

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the common buzzard. Common buzzards are stocky birds of prey which often soar on upturned wings. In Scotland they're sometimes called the tourists' eagle because of many golden eagles claimed by hopeful visitors. Common buzzards are increasing their range and numbers and range in the UK and their soaring flight over their territories is now a regular sight nearly everywhere.


TUE 06:00 Today (b08njtpg)

News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b08npns2)
Ann Clarke on The Frozen Ark

Tiny tree dwelling snails, partula, were so abundant across French Polynesia that garlands of partula shells would be presented to visitors to the islands. But when immunologist Dr Ann Clarke joined her husband, the late evolutionary biologist Professor Bryan Clarke, on expeditions to research the unique way this species had developed, a study in speciation turned, before their eyes, into a study of extinction.
Ann witnessed first-hand the terrifying speed that biological controls, another mollusc introduced to kill a different, larger predatory snail, instead turned on Partula, and within a few short years, drove them to extinction in the wild.
The subsequent scramble to save the species resulted in the launch of a global effort called The Frozen Ark to save the genetic resources of all animals which, like partula, face obliteration.
The Frozen Ark was founded by Ann, her husband and the late Professor Ann MacLaren and with consortium members around the world, tissue and genetic material from threatened fauna is preserved as an ultimate animal conservation back-up. More than 48,000 samples have been collected by Frozen Ark members in zoos and natural history museums around the world from more than 5,500 different species. Frozen samples inform multiple captive breeding programmes, including at London Zoo, where descendants of partula rescued from extinction, are being bred ready for re-introduction back to their home in French Polynesia.
And all this wasn't Ann's main career!
As well as admitting to Jim that she was read bedtime stories as a child by the great JR Tolkien and that in her first ever job as a lab technician she helped Nobel Prize winner Sir John Gurdon with his nuclear transfer experiments, Ann also had a long and successful career as an immunologist and embryologist, fuelled by a life long interest in embryonic tolerance and immunity.


TUE 09:30 Whodunnit? (b0853mrb)
The Pregnant Teen Vanishes, Whodunnit?

Half of England's pregnant teenagers have vanished. They didn't go missing, they just never conceived. And the teenage pregnancy rate plummeted. A real-life Whodunnit. Everyone wants to crack the case and keep rates dropping.

Michael Blastland is closing in but getting caught endlessly in an intricate spider web of causation as he tries to find the explanation for one of the most dramatic societal changes England has ever seen. He's picking off the culprits and puncturing presumptions about causation and its implications for policy making.

Encountering red-herrings, false accusations, Government conspiracy, and hack journalism, finding out whodunnit in the case of a 50% reduction in teenage pregnancy has given him sleepless nights.

At its heart may lie a Government desire to prevent under 18 conception - a well-meaning intention, backed up by some strong evidence that socio-economic disadvantage can be both a cause and a consequence of teenage motherhood. But what makes huge swathes of teenagers change their behaviour?

Whodunnit? is a new series and a new kind of investigation. It owes its style to detective storytelling. But the cases are unequivocally real. These are societal mysteries - true-life changes in the pattern of our lives, changes that might even feature some of us.

Presenter: Michael Blastland
Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b08ns9sm)
Balancing Acts: Behind the Scenes at the National Theatre, Episode 2

The inside story of twelve years at the helm of Britain's greatest theatre. It is a story of lunatic failures and spectacular successes such as The History Boys, War Horse and One Man, Two Guvnors; of opening the doors of the National Theatre to a broader audience than ever before, and changing the public's perception of what theatre is for.

It is about probing Shakespeare from every angle and reinventing the classics. About fostering new talent and directing some of the most celebrated actors of our times. Its cast includes the likes of Alan Bennett, Maggie Smith, Mike Leigh, Daniel Day-Lewis, Michael Gambon and Helen Mirren.

Intimate, candid and insightful, Balancing Acts is a passionate exploration of the art and alchemy of making theatre.

Today Hynter recalls his first production of Shakespeare at The National Theatre - Henry V, starring Adrian Lester.

Written and read by Nicholas Hytner
Produced by Simon Richardson.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08njtpj)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08npns4)
How Does That Make You Feel?, Episode 2

In the 8th series of 'How Does That Make You Feel?' Martha's clients have made few changes to their circumstances.

Tony's Bishop's plans to launch The Men's Equality Party have foundered with his fellow drinkers' refusal to pay their subscriptions. But a new plan to enter and win Masterchef: The Professionals seems a sure-fire way to get the attention of his estranged wife, until Martha points out his fatal strategic flaw; he's not a professional chef.

Shelagh Stephenson is the author of Radio 4's 'A Short History of Longing' and 'Guests Are Like Fish'. She is an Olivier Award winner for her play 'The Memory of Water' and has won Sony and Writer's Guild awards for her plays 'Darling Peidi' and 'Five Kinds of Silence'.

Tony ..... Tim McInnerny
Martha ..... Frances Tomelty

Writer ..... Shelagh Stephenson
Director ..... Eoin O'Callaghan
Producer ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


TUE 11:00 In Their Element (b08npns6)
Series 1, Oxygen: The Breath of Life

Oxygen appeared on earth over 2 billion years ago, and life took off. Now it makes up just over a fifth of the air. Trevor Cox tells the story of oxygen on earth and in space.


TUE 11:30 Tales From the Stave (b08npns8)
Series 15, La Traviata

Frances Fyfield is joined by the Soprano Irina Lungu and the musicologist and conductor Nigel Simeone to explore the Manuscript of Verdi's enduringly successful Opera La Traviata. The handwritten score telling the tale of Violetta's noble humility amidst the conventions and hypocrisy of 19th century Paris is held by the Ricordi Archive in Milan. With the kind permission of the Archive and their leading expert Gabriele Dotto, the team get to see the precision and brilliance of a score that contains some of the most familiar music ever to grace an Opera stage. There are also surprising omissions and examples of the striving of a perfectionist.

Producer: Tom Alban.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b08njtpl)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b08lhs9w)
2 May 1917 - Ralph Winwood

On this day in 1917, the Archbishop of Canterbury warned, "the Christian Judgement of England is that when we come out of this war, we mean to come out with clean hands", while at St Jude's, Ralph Winwood is still doing penance.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b08njtpn)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b08njtpr)

The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b08njtpx)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


TUE 13:45 Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious (b08nq5wq)
Series 1, The Allure of Altruism

When we donate, who are we really benefiting? And does it really matter?

Rory Sutherland explores perhaps the most influential and successful charitable campaign of recent times: the Motor Neurone Disease / ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Spread virally by social media, yet decried by some as mere vanity and "slacktivism", the campaign nevertheless proved hugely valuable to both the fight against disease, and understanding attitudes to altruism in the age of Facebook.

We hear powerful testimonies from the families who created it, with insights into our attitudes to giving unravelled by experimental psychologist Nichola Raihani, one of the UK's leading experts in altruism.

Producer: Steven Rajam

---

Why do certain marketing campaigns - from Nike's "Just Do It" to the MND Ice Bucket Challenge - cast such a spell over us? Rory Sutherland explores the story - and the psychology - behind ten of the most influential campaigns in history - with first-hand accounts from the creative minds that conceived them, and contributions from the worlds of evolutionary biology, behavioural psychology, socio-economics and anthropology.

Marketing. It's come to be one of the most misunderstood - and maligned - disciplines of our age: perceived variously as the Emperor's New Clothes, an emblem of the ills of capitalism, a shadowy dark art designed to steal away our hard-earned money and make us do (or buy, or vote for) things we don't want.

Yet marketing is undeniably a key part of contemporary culture. It's a science that's fundamentally about human behaviour - marketers, to some extent, understand us better than we know ourselves - and in the most successful campaigns we find our deepest emotions and urges, from altruism to shame, hope to bravado, systematically tapped into and drawn upon.

But what are these primal behaviours that the best campaigns evoke in us - and how do they harness them? Is marketing purely about commercial gain or can it underpin real common good and societal progress? And does the discipline manipulate our subconscious instincts and emotions - or simply hold a mirror to them?

Over ten episodes, senior advertising creative and Spectator writer Rory Sutherland unravels the story of some of the most powerful, brilliant and influential campaigns of our age. Set alongside personal testimonies from the brilliant minds that created them, we'll hear from a host of experts - from biologists to philosophers, novelists to economists - about how these campaigns got under our skin and proved to be so influential.

Contributors include: writer and former copywriter Fay Weldon; social behaviourist and expert on altruism Nicola Raihani; Alexander Nix, CEO of big data analysts Cambridge Analytica; philosopher Andy Martin; writer on Islamic issues and advisor to the world's first Islamic branding consultancy, Shelina Janmohamed; and evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miler.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b08npnhb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Tumanbay (b08nq5x1)
Series 2, The Kill

Under the brutal rule of the puritanical followers of Maya, Tumanbay, once the most powerful and wealthy city on earth, has become a place of fear and suspicion. While Gregor (Rufus Wright) attempts to survive the regime by collaborating and demonstrating his loyalty, his niece Manel (Aiysha Hart) is drawn to the rebel cause.

Both are playing a deadly game.

Tumanbay is created by John Dryden and Mike Walker and inspired by the Mamluk slave rulers of Egypt.

Original Music by Sacha Puttnam and Jon Ouin

Sound Design by Steve Bond
Sound Edited by James Morgan and Andreina Gomez
Script Edited by Abigail Youngman

Produced by Emma Hearn, Nadir Khan and John Dryden

Written by Mike Walker
Directed by John Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08njlm7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b08nq5x3)
Made to Last?

How long do you reasonably expect your electronic gadgets and clothes to last? Has the cheapening of products meant we're too ready to let them go when they break and buy new? Jheni Osman is sick of things breaking and the energy and resources that went to making them going to waste. She meets those who are fighting back and lengthening the lifecycle of their goods. Around the country those who lack the skills or know-how to fix things are learning how in community parties and online. But some products are now being built so they're difficult or costly to repair. She meets the campaigners who are calling for companies to be upfront about the life expectation of a product alongside the price tag and learns how some companies are offering a 'lifetime product' with repairs and replacements offered if the items break. Is this the way more companies will go or is it commercial suicide?
Can the fulfilment of fixing a laptop or amp transfer to clothing? We hear why we'll only go a certain way to 'make do and mend' but how even retailers, who've been part of the fast fashion fad, are pioneering new techniques to reuse clothes, find new fabrics and make them last longer. Can the new frock feelgood factor translate to making clothes last longer.
Presented by Jheni Osman and Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b08nq5x5)
Cucks, snowflakes and virtue signalling: the new US political lexicon

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright interview the eminent US linguist George Lakoff about the new political words coming out of the US right now, mainly from the alt-right, and the effectiveness of Trump's use of language. George Lakoff is the former Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Science and Linguistics at the University of California at Berkeley. His thesis is that people's lives are significantly influenced by the central metaphors they use, whatever their political beliefs, and that how information is framed is crucial in how it is received.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b08nq5x7)
Series 42, Peaches Golding on Shirley Chisholm

The American born Peaches Golding OBE, Bristol's new Lord Lieutenant and first black female High Sheriff chooses the African American politician Shirley Chisholm who ran unsuccessfully for President in 1972 to discuss with Matthew Parris and the historian Dr. Kate Dossett. Chisholm never expected to win but felt strongly that as a woman, and secondly as an African American, it was her duty to enter the Presidential race.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.


TUE 17:00 PM (b08njtq1)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08njtq3)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Rob Newman's Neuropolis (b08nq5x9)
Series 1, Robot New Man (or Attack of the Killer Sci-Fi)

One of Britain's finest comedians, Rob Newman, is our guide on a unique audio odyssey of the brain, taking in everything from love and guilt to robot co-workers and the unlikely importance of prehistoric trousers.

It's a witty, fact-packed series mixing stand-up and sketches, challenging notions of neuroscience with a new theory that's equal parts enlightening and hilarious.

Rob offers an alternative to some of the more bizarre claims in modern popular science, as well as rejigging theories of our brains in light of what we know about nature, artificial intelligence and Belinda Carlisle.

Created by the award-winning team behind Robert Newman's Entirely Accurate Encyclopaedia of Evolution.

Written by and starring Rob Newman
Co-starring Claire Price and Richard McCabe

Producer: Jon Harvey
Executive Producer: Richard Wilson
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b08nq5xc)

Ed's prospects take a hit, and Emma finds an ally.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b08njtq5)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08npns4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 The Organ Beauty Pageant (b08nq6fh)

Is it fair to find your own kidney donor on the internet? UK patients who need new organs are using social media to advertise their plight and appeal directly for a Good Samaritan who's willing to share their spare kidney with a stranger.

As Lesley Curwen discovers, the development of such appeals on social media has caused consternation among some in the transplant community. They fear a competition to attract donors amounts to an unsavoury beauty contest, in which only the most plugged-in and tech-savvy can participate.

But for Nicola Pietrzyk from Leicester, turning to social media and Facebook was a no-brainer. Her 11 year old son, Matthew had been spending 12 hours a day on dialysis, waiting for years for a possible donor from the NHS list. She's convinced that if she hadn't launched A Million Likes for a Kidney for Matthew, a kind-hearted stranger would never have offered her son a new kidney, potentially saving his life.

The campaign prompted several prospective donors who weren't a match for Matthew to go on to donate to others and Alison Thornhill tells Lesley Curwen why she went on to do just that.

But the likelihood that individuals, motivated by a particular story on social media, will in fact be a match for their intended recipient is slim, and Lesley hears from transplant teams frustrated that NHS resources are sucked up by high profile campaigns that attract many volunteers, all of whom need to be tested, most of whom won't turn out to be a possible match for the recipient.

Dr Adnan Sharif, consultant nephrologist at Birmingham's Queen Elizabeth Hospital, was closely involved with several high profile media campaigns and he admits that he and his team were at times completely overwhelmed by the demands that multiple volunteers, each offering to donate a kidney to a named individual, placed on the unit.

While he acknowledges that such social media campaigns are legal and after the guidelines were changed, were accepted by the transplant community, he admits to mixed feelings about the outcome. He and his team are delighted for the individual who has a new kidney, but uncomfortable about diverting resources from patients who are waiting for an organ through the traditional routes, from deceased donors or through the NHS Living Donor Scheme where altruistic donors place their trust in the transplant authorities to pick the best match for the kidney they've donated.

So the transplant community in the UK has come to terms with social media campaigns for organs from strangers, even though there's a clear preference for the NHS altruistic donor scheme. But Lesley discovers another internet innovation: websites that allow kidney patients to advertise for a prospective donor, have been frozen out as clinical teams have voted with their feet and refused to deal with them.

An American website, matchingdonors.com, launched in the UK in 2012 and sent policy makers and clinicians in the organ transplant field into multiple huddles.
The final ruling was that websites like this could operate as long as no fees were paid (matchingdonors.com didn't charge UK kidney patients a fee but they do charge $595 to USA patients for a lifetime membership). Over 100 UK patients and over 300 UK donors were registered at the site.

But as Lesley finds out, in five years, not one transplant has happened through this website. Patients told her their transplant teams simply refused to deal with it, and the former chair of the ethics committee of the British Transplantation Society, Professor Vassilios Papalois, argues that clinicians have autonomy and if they're not comfortable with the idea of a matching organ website, they're under no obligation to proceed. He finds the idea of a matching website ethically objectionable, he tells Lesley, and he wouldn't personally sanction it either.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b08njtq7)

News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b08nq6fp)

Claudia Hammond explores the latest developments in the worlds of psychology, neuroscience and mental health.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b08npns2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b08njtqf)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08p1szt)
Into the Water, Episode 2

The author of the global phenomenon 'The Girl on the Train' returns with 'Into the Water', her addictive new novel of psychological suspense.

A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged.

Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother's sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from-a place to which she vowed she'd never return.

Beware a calm surface-you never know what lies beneath.

Cast: Siân Brooke, Lily Loveless, Arthur Darvill, Lynda Baron, Bryan Dick, Elizabeth Berrington, Natasha Little, Sarah Ridgeway, Kai Alexander and Sean Baker.


TUE 23:00 Kevin Eldon Will See You Now (b08nq6ft)
Series 3, The Haunted Ghost of the Scary Studio of Terror

Comedy's best kept secret ingredient returns with another series of his own sketch show. In this episode, Kevin Eldon and his all-important cast return with sketches about bunnies, Beethoven, Dylan Thomas and olives. And we finally discover a use for avant-garde German film director Werner Herzog

Kevin Eldon is a comedy phenomenon. He's been in virtually every major comedy show in the last fifteen years, but not content with working with the likes of Chris Morris, Steve Coogan, Armando Iannucci, Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse, Stewart Lee, Julia Davis and Graham Linehan, he's also created his own comedy series for BBC Radio 4.

After all the waiting - Kevin Eldon Will See You Now.

Also starring Amelia Bullmore (I'm Alan Partridge, Scott & Bailey), Julia Davis (Nighty Night), Paul Putner (Little Britain), Justin Edwards (The Thick Of It), David Reed (The Penny Dreadfuls) and Rosie Cavaliero (Alan Partridge, Harry and Paul).

Written by Kevin Eldon with additional material by Jason Hazeley and Joel Morris (A Touch Of Cloth and, yes, those modern Ladybird books)

Original music by Martin Bird
Produced and directed by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b07sxttj)
Clarence Adoo

Clarence was a promising trumpet player who was paralysed after a car accident as he drove to his brother's stag do. He has kept his musical career alive thanks to advances in technology. A special head-set allows him to select notes via an on-screen cursor and a twist of the neck, while blowing into a tube plays the note and tilting his head varies the volume. Adoo was able to make music again - and in 2012 became one of the founder members of the British Paraorchestra.

In this special edition of No Triumph, No Tragedy, Peter White talks to him about his early years in foster care and the coronet he was given as a six year old in church. He loved music from the off and made a successful career as a trumpet player before his accident. London 2012 marked just how far he had come since his accident and as all eyes turn to the Rio Paralympics he reflects on his own development and his hopes for the future as the Games get under-way.



WEDNESDAY 03 MAY 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b08njv1h)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b08ns9sm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08njv1k)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08njv1m)

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08njv1q)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b08njv24)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08pqv59)

A reading and a reflection to start the day, with George Craig, a retired senior civil servant and a Methodist local preacher in Cardiff.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b08njv26)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sby02)
Nightingale

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the extraordinary duet between cellist Beatrice Harrison and a nightingale recorded live as an outside broadcast and the first broadcast of any wild animal not in captivity.


WED 06:00 Today (b08njv28)

News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather, Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Only Artists (b08nq7t1)
Series 1, 03/05/2017

The cultural conversation continues as another pair of artists shoot the artistic breeze.


WED 09:30 Everything You Think About Sport Is Wrong (b085gwll)
Nationalism

In the final episode of his series challenging conventional thinking about sport, Simon Barnes argues that it is not about nationalism, or indeed tribalism of any kind. Instead, Simon welcomes you to join him as a member, or at least a visitor, to the nation of excellence.

Simon talks to Martina Navratilova about the modern shift towards supporting a national champion, and why this matters in sport; he laments the loss of second rate British teams at the Olympics; and maintains that excellence on the level of Usain Bolt's sprinting, Fu Mingxia's diving or Federer's otherworldly tennis can touch us profoundly.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b08ns9tt)
Balancing Acts: Behind the Scenes at the National Theatre, Episode 3

The inside story of twelve years at the helm of Britain's greatest theatre. It is a story of lunatic failures and spectacular successes such as The History Boys, War Horse and One Man, Two Guvnors; of opening the doors of the National Theatre to a broader audience than ever before, and changing the public's perception of what theatre is for.

It is about probing Shakespeare from every angle and reinventing the classics. About fostering new talent and directing some of the most celebrated actors of our times. Its cast includes the likes of Alan Bennett, Maggie Smith, Mike Leigh, Daniel Day-Lewis, Michael Gambon and Helen Mirren.

Intimate, candid and insightful, Balancing Acts is a passionate exploration of the art and alchemy of making theatre.

Today Hynter describes his fecund creative relationship with Alan Bennett. How they came to meet and the incredible performances they created together. He remembers fondly their highly successful play 'The History Boys', and how it was brought to life.

Written and read by Nicholas Hytner
Produced by Simon Richardson.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08njv2b)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b08nq7t3)
How Does That Make You Feel?, Episode 3

In the 8th series of 'How Does That Make You Feel?' Martha's clients have made few changes to their circumstances.

Caroline is mildly relieved that her husband has finally left the house for good. But although her motivational and dietary blog is going well, she is feeling a gap in her life.

Shelagh Stephenson is the author of Radio 4's 'A Short History of Longing' and 'Guests Are Like Fish'. She is an Olivier Award winner for her play 'The Memory of Water' and has won Sony and Writer's Guild awards for her plays 'Darling Peidi' and 'Five Kinds of Silence'.

Writer ..... Shelagh Stephenson
Producer ..... Eoin O'Callaghan
Director ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b08nq7t5)
Seamus and Asha - Love Isn't Just Feelings

Asha and her adoptive father consider how her Indian roots affect her identification with family and community. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 The Invention of... (b08npnhd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Shush! (b08nq9wk)
Series 2, Dewey Decimal

When an International Librarians' Conference looms, Alice and Snoo have to resort to some rather unconventional methods to get hold of a passport - methods that include a thousand hummingbirds, some over-tight jeans and a hilarious anagram.

Meet Alice (Rebecca Front) - a former child prodigy who won a place at Oxford aged 9 but, because Daddy went too, she never needed to have any friends. She's scared of everything. Everything that is except libraries and Snoo (Morwenna Banks) - a slightly confused individual with a have-a-go attitude to life, marriage, haircuts and reality. Snoo loves books, and fully intends to read one one day.

And forever popping into the library is Dr Cadogan (Michael Fenton-Stevens) - celebrity doctor to the stars and a man with his finger in every pie. Charming, indiscreet and quite possibly wanted by Interpol, if you want a discrete nip and tuck and then photos of it accidentally left on the photocopier, Dr Cadogan is your man.

Their happy life is interrupted by the arrival of Simon Nielson (Ben Willbond), a man with a mission - a mission to close down inefficient libraries. Fortunately, he hates his mission. What he really wants to do is once - just once - get even with his inexhaustible supply of high-achieving brothers.

Written by Morwenna Banks and Rebecca Front
Based on an idea developed with Armando Iannucci

Produced by David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b08njv2d)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b08lhsb5)
3 May 1917 - Howard Argent

On this day in 1917, ace British pilot Leefe Robinson was captured, and in Folkestone, Howard Argent happily surrenders.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b08njv2g)

Consumer affairs programme.


WED 12:57 Weather (b08njv2j)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b08njv2l)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


WED 13:45 Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious (b08nq9wm)
Series 1, A Campaign for 'Real' Women?

Rory Sutherland looks at advertising's often harmful portrayal of women, and explores how the aspiration to show "real beauty" can be reconciled with real profit.

In 2004, Unilever unveiled a marketing campaign that went against every received norm of the beauty industry. Instead of images of skinny, retouched, fashion models, the "Dove Campaign For Real Beauty" showcased women of every age, colour, shape and size - acknowledging the artifice, and psychological harm, of generations of fashion and cosmetics ads.

But can a campaign that empowers women's "real beauty" be trusted: when its ultimate aim is to sell you more stuff? Rory discusses how and why the industry represents women the way it does with writer and comedian Sara Pascoe, with contributions from evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller, and marketing executive Daryl Fielding, who helped mastermind the original Dove campaign.

Producer: Steven Rajam

---

Why do certain marketing campaigns - from Nike's "Just Do It" to the MND Ice Bucket Challenge - cast such a spell over us? Rory Sutherland explores the story - and the psychology - behind ten of the most influential campaigns in history - with first-hand accounts from the creative minds that conceived them, and contributions from the worlds of evolutionary biology, behavioural psychology, socio-economics and anthropology.

Marketing. It's come to be one of the most misunderstood - and maligned - disciplines of our age: perceived variously as the Emperor's New Clothes, an emblem of the ills of capitalism, a shadowy dark art designed to steal away our hard-earned money and make us do (or buy, or vote for) things we don't want.

Yet marketing is undeniably a key part of contemporary culture. It's a science that's fundamentally about human behaviour - marketers, to some extent, understand us better than we know ourselves - and in the most successful campaigns we find our deepest emotions and urges, from altruism to shame, hope to bravado, systematically tapped into and drawn upon.

But what are these primal behaviours that the best campaigns evoke in us - and how do they harness them? Is marketing purely about commercial gain or can it underpin real common good and societal progress? And does the discipline manipulate our subconscious instincts and emotions - or simply hold a mirror to them?

Over ten episodes, senior advertising creative and Spectator writer Rory Sutherland unravels the story of some of the most powerful, brilliant and influential campaigns of our age. Set alongside personal testimonies from the brilliant minds that created them, we'll hear from a host of experts - from biologists to philosophers, novelists to economists - about how these campaigns got under our skin and proved to be so influential.

Contributors include: writer and former copywriter Fay Weldon; social behaviourist and expert on altruism Nicola Raihani; Alexander Nix, CEO of big data analysts Cambridge Analytica; philosopher Andy Martin; writer on Islamic issues and advisor to the world's first Islamic branding consultancy, Shelina Janmohamed; and evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miler.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b08nq5xc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b08npnh0)
Byron and the Curse of Sintra

Lord Byron is holed up in a ramshackle guesthouse in Sintra, Portugal, hiding from jealous Venetian husbands and waiting for more funds to arrive from England. He is determined to live frugally and resist the promptings of Venus for a month at least.

His impertinent Australian valet Collins is his only companion - until he meets an Englishman, young Lord Squeaky and his buxom but irritating sister Melinda. Byron's mathematician ex-wife turns up, intent on escorting him back to England and having a hole bored in his head (a contemporary treatment for errant husbands deemed to be insane).

While fending off his ex at every turn, Byron cultivates the acquaintance of the Squeakys and, through them, he is invited to the Royal Court, where he falls violently in love with the Infanta Elsanta. The Infanta Elsanta has a reputation for piety but Byron plans to rescue her from the dismal destiny of a nunnery by practicing his famous fascination techniques and ultimately eloping.

A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b08njv2n)
Money Box Live: Energy pricing

Financial phone-in.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b08nq6fp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b08nqb18)

Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b08njv2q)

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 17:00 PM (b08njv2s)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08njv2v)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 Rum Bunch (b08nqkrp)
Series 1, World's End on Sea

Justin Edwards, Mel Giedroyc and Dave Mounfield have been invited by the Mayor of seaside town World's End on Sea to perform a hair raising tribute to Houdini.

Justin has invited the "nicest woman in showbiz", Rebecca Front, to join them. Little does he know of the history between Mel and Rebecca, dating back to an appearance they both made on Celebrity Supermarket Sweep.

It turns out that Justin also doesn't know much about Houdini - believing him to be an Italian woman. Luckily Dave, fearing the show may be a disaster causing him to miss out on the free lighter promised by the Mayor, is on hand to rewrite the play.

Mel persuades Rebecca to perform a radio first, a recreation of one of Houdini's most daring stunts. But will the truth of what really happened on Supermarket Sweep ever be revealed? Will the show restore the fortunes of the once fashionable seaside town? Will Dave get his free lighter?

The Rum Bunch is Justin Edwards (The Consultants, The Odd Half Hour, Newsjack, Sorry I've Got No Head, The Thick of It), Mel Giedroyc (Mel and Sue, Bake Off, Let It Shine) and Dave Mounfield (Count Arthur Strong, This Is Jinsy).

The house band is Jason Hazeley and David Reed - The Penny Dreadfuls.

Produced by Jim North
A Top Dog production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b08nqb2t)

Eddie worries about being found out, and Matt's advice falls on deaf ears.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b08njv2x)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08nq7t3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 FutureProofing (b08nqc4j)
The Future of the Future

Does the accelerating pace of technology change the way we think about the future?

It's said that science fiction writers now spend more time telling stories about today than about tomorrow, because the potential of existing technology to change our world is so rich that there is no need to imagine the future - it's already here. Does this mean the future is dead? Or that we are experiencing a profound shift in our understanding of what the future means to us, how it arrives, and what forces will shape it?

Presenters Timandra Harkness and Leo Johnson explore how our evolving understanding of time and the potential of technological change are transforming the way we think about the future.

Producer: Jonathan Brunert.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b08nqc4n)
Captain Trouble

Richard Gillis explains how a mistake at the 2014 Ryder Cup explains a trend across our society.

Richard is a sports and business writer who believes that the leadership industry is bolstered by ideas about what it means to be in charge garnered from and popularised by sport.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b08nq5x3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Only Artists (b08nq7t1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b08njv2z)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b08njv31)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08p1t2k)
Into the Water, Episode 3

The author of the global phenomenon 'The Girl on the Train' returns with 'Into the Water', her addictive new novel of psychological suspense.

A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged.

Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother's sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from-a place to which she vowed she'd never return.

Beware a calm surface-you never know what lies beneath.

Cast: Siân Brooke, Lily Loveless, Arthur Darvill, Lynda Baron, Bryan Dick, Elizabeth Berrington, Natasha Little, Sarah Ridgeway, Kai Alexander and Sean Baker.


WED 23:00 Cracking Up (b08nqmpc)
Series 1, Let's Talk About Sex

Psychotherapist Spencer finds an uncomfortable conversation with daughter Tilly leads him to an inappropriate outburst outside the school gates. Meanwhile, ex-wife Tina is struggling to get teenager Dylan out of the door in the absence of his lucky pants.

Spencer has an awkward moment with a man on a tube train and decides to make himself feel better by taking Tilly (and bagfuls of his clothes) to a charity shop. Unfortunately, there's a misunderstanding with the owner that results in Spencer shouting a lot about cancer and smashing a door down - but Police eventually let him off with a caution.

Tina's boyfriend Owen's motorbike has been vandalised with a magic marker and Tilly's curious as to why Spencer's hands have got ink all over them.

A Big Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:15 Beef and Dairy Network (b08nrmjj)
Series 1, Episode 2

The number one podcast for those involved or just interested in the production of beef animals and dairy herds.

In this episode, we interview the bovine poet laureate, Michael Banyan, about his latest collection, Crab Of The Land, and hear your letters about how looking into a cow's eye makes you feel.

The original Beef And Dairy Network Podcast series can be found at www.maximumfun.org

Performed by Benjamin Partridge, Henry Paker and Beth Eyre
Written by Benjamin Partridge and Henry Paker
Produced by Benjamin Partridge.


WED 23:30 Punt PI (b07m43rb)
Series 9, The Suspicious Death of Emile Zola

Steve Punt returns as Radio 4's very own private detective.

Punt travels to Paris to investigate the suspicious death of celebrated writer Émile Zola. Zola died in 1902 from carbon monoxide poisoning caused by a blocked chimney. At the time, the authorities reached a verdict of accidental death. Subsequently, evidence has emerged that Zola's death may have been murder.

Certainly Zola's role in France's notorious Dreyfus Affair made him many enemies. But as Punt discovers, the case is far from clear cut. For one thing, carbon monoxide is a very unusual way of murdering someone. Punt summons the experts and weighs up the evidence.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.



THURSDAY 04 MAY 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b08njv5k)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b08ns9tt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08njv5m)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08njv5p)

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08njv5r)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b08njv5t)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08pr5vv)

A reading and a reflection to start the day, with George Craig, a retired senior civil servant and a Methodist local preacher in Cardiff.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b08njv5w)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378xmn)
Common Tern

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachan presents the common tern. The Common Tern is the most widespread of our breeding terns and is very graceful. It has long slender wings and a deeply forked tail with the outer feathers extended into long streamers. These features give the bird its other name, sea swallow, by which terns are often called.


THU 06:00 Today (b08njv5y)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b08njv60)
The Battle of Lincoln 1217

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss The Battle of Lincoln on 20th May 1217, when two armies fought to keep, or to win, the English crown. This was a struggle between the Angevin and Capetian dynasties, one that followed Capetian successes over the Angevins in France. The forces of the new boy-king, Henry III, attacked those of Louis of France, the claimant backed by rebel Barons. Henry's regent, William Marshal, was almost seventy when he led the charge on Lincoln that day, and his victory confirmed his reputation as England's greatest knight. Louis sent to France for reinforcements but in August these, too, were defeated at sea, at the Battle of Sandwich. As part of the peace deal, Henry reissued Magna Carta, which King John had granted in 1215 but soon withdrawn, and Louis went home, leaving England's Anglo-French rulers more Anglo and less French than he had planned.

The image above is by Matthew Paris (c1200-1259) from his Chronica Majora (MS 16, f. 55v) and appears with the kind permission of the Master and Fellows of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge

With

Louise Wilkinson
Professor of Medieval History at Canterbury Christ Church University

Stephen Church
Professor of Medieval History at the University of East Anglia

and

Thomas Asbridge
Reader in Medieval History at Queen Mary, University of London

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b08ns9p5)
Balancing Acts: Behind the Scenes at the National Theatre, Episode 4

The inside story of twelve years at the helm of Britain's greatest theatre. It is a story of lunatic failures and spectacular successes such as The History Boys, War Horse and One Man, Two Guvnors; of opening the doors of the National Theatre to a broader audience than ever before, and changing the public's perception of what theatre is for.

It is about probing Shakespeare from every angle and reinventing the classics. About fostering new talent and directing some of the most celebrated actors of our times. Its cast includes the likes of Alan Bennett, Maggie Smith, Mike Leigh, Daniel Day-Lewis, Michael Gambon and Helen Mirren.

Intimate, candid and insightful, Balancing Acts is a passionate exploration of the art and alchemy of making theatre.

Today Hynter shows us how the seemingly impossible can become the most magical when it comes to putting animals on stage, through his productions of Philip Pullman's Dark Materials and War Horse.

Written and read by Nicholas Hytner
Produced by Simon Richardson.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08njv62)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08nrslj)
How Does That Make You Feel?, Episode 4

In the 8th series of 'How Does That Make You Feel?' Martha's clients have made few changes to their circumstances.

Philip's mum has gone to Lanzarote for a holiday leaving Philip amazed at how much the old girl did around the house. And although his new job demonstrating kitchen appliances is providing a certain satisfaction, his ex-wife Rose's success is poisoning his happiness.

Shelagh Stephenson is the author of Radio 4's 'A Short History of Longing' and 'Guests Are Like Fish'. She is an Olivier Award winner for her play 'The Memory of Water' and has won Sony and Writer's Guild awards for her plays 'Darling Peidi' and 'Five Kinds of Silence'.

Tony ..... Tim McInnerny
Martha ..... Frances Tomelty

Writer ..... Shelagh Stephenson
Producer ..... Eoin O'Callaghan
Director ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b08nrsll)
Living with the Dead

Reports from around the world.


THU 11:30 From Rags to Riches (b08nrsln)
Series 1, Episode 1

When are old clothes merely second hand and when are they vintage? Fashion historian Amber Butchart explores how our perception of cast off clothing has dramatically changed over the past hundred years.

In the first of two programmes, Amber visits shops, markets, museums and fashion houses in a quest to track how second hand clothes have gone from being simple hand-me-downs, only found in jumble sales and charity shops, to featuring in the pages of glossy fashion magazines and for sale at high prices in auction houses.

Producer: Phill Brown
An Alfi Media production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b08njv64)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b08lhsbl)
4 May 1917 - Nancy Parker

On this day in 1917, the French captured the village of Craonne, the site of a vicious battle, while in Folkestone, Nancy Parker's kitchen is invaded.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b08njv66)

Consumer affairs programme.


THU 12:57 Weather (b08njv68)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b08njv6b)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


THU 13:45 Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious (b08nrslq)
Series 1, Diamonds and the Peacock's Tail

Ethics, biology, love and economics collide in the story of perhaps the most controversial and successful four words in advertising.

Rory Sutherland explores how a single ad slogan - De Beers' "A Diamond Is Forever" - changed our attitudes to relationships, weddings and what constitutes "value" forever. Dreamed up in 1947 by the pioneering female copywriter Frances Gerety - who never married - it's thought to be the longest-serving piece of copy still running today, and was voted "Greatest Slogan of the 20th Century" by the influential industry publication Ad Age. Yet underpinning its success are evolutionary principles and behaviours that hark back to the dawn of humanity.

Frances Gerety's remarkable story is told by American author J. Courtney Sullivan, author of the acclaimed novel "The Engagements", with contributions from evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller.

Producer: Steven Rajam

---

Why do certain marketing campaigns - from Nike's "Just Do It" to the MND Ice Bucket Challenge - cast such a spell over us? Rory Sutherland explores the story - and the psychology - behind ten of the most influential campaigns in history - with first-hand accounts from the creative minds that conceived them, and contributions from the worlds of evolutionary biology, behavioural psychology, socio-economics and anthropology.

Marketing. It's come to be one of the most misunderstood - and maligned - disciplines of our age: perceived variously as the Emperor's New Clothes, an emblem of the ills of capitalism, a shadowy dark art designed to steal away our hard-earned money and make us do (or buy, or vote for) things we don't want.

Yet marketing is undeniably a key part of contemporary culture. It's a science that's fundamentally about human behaviour - marketers, to some extent, understand us better than we know ourselves - and in the most successful campaigns we find our deepest emotions and urges, from altruism to shame, hope to bravado, systematically tapped into and drawn upon.

But what are these primal behaviours that the best campaigns evoke in us - and how do they harness them? Is marketing purely about commercial gain or can it underpin real common good and societal progress? And does the discipline manipulate our subconscious instincts and emotions - or simply hold a mirror to them?

Over ten episodes, senior advertising creative and Spectator writer Rory Sutherland unravels the story of some of the most powerful, brilliant and influential campaigns of our age. Set alongside personal testimonies from the brilliant minds that created them, we'll hear from a host of experts - from biologists to philosophers, novelists to economists - about how these campaigns got under our skin and proved to be so influential.

Contributors include: writer and former copywriter Fay Weldon; social behaviourist and expert on altruism Nicola Raihani; Alexander Nix, CEO of big data analysts Cambridge Analytica; philosopher Andy Martin; writer on Islamic issues and advisor to the world's first Islamic branding consultancy, Shelina Janmohamed; and evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miler.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b08nqb2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b08nrsls)
Foxes

With Jim Norton and Eugene O'Hare

A tense Irish psychodrama. Instead of attending his father's funeral, Neil sits alone in the back room of a Mayo pub. He's waiting for his girlfriend Grace, to beg forgiveness for an infidelity. Instead a family friend arrives with a letter that will change their lives forever.

Written by..... Padraic Walsh
Director ..... Peter Kavanagh

An engrossing Irish psychodrama by first-time-writer-for-radio Padraic Walsh.

Neil (EUGENE O'HARE) has been damaged by his father's departure when he was a boy. As a result Neil has had a lifetime of petty-criminality, wasted talent, and now a disastrous infidelity to his partner Grace, the mother of his young son.

Now he waits for Grace to join him in the pub's back room, desperately hoping she'll take him back.

Sean (JIM NORTON) an old family friend, drops over, to see how Neil is and perhaps talk him into coming with him to the lunch. But the real motive for Sean's visit is much darker.

Soon the tension will crank up with revelation upon revelation, threatening disaster as Grace is due at any moment for the life-changing meeting.

JIM NORTON rose to prominence with his performance in Conor McPherson's 'The Weir' Jim has starred in many stage plays and films in the UK and America.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b08nrwp6)
Blencathra: The People's Mountain

Terry Abraham could be likened to Alfred Wainwright in his love of the Lakeland fells. Blencathra was known by Wainwright as the 'mountaineers mountain' and he devoted more pages to this fell than any other in his pictorial guides. However, since the proposed sale of the mountain in 2014 it has become known as the 'Peoples Mountain'. The owner, the 8th Earl of Lonsdale, put the mountain up for sale at a price of £1.75 million and a community group called Friends of Blencathra was set up in a bid to raise enough money to buy the mountain. In 2015, the mountain was taken off the market but the sense of ownership felt by the local community remains. Helen Mark meets Terry and the local people who live within the shadow of this iconic peak.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b08njwts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b08njzhb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b08nrwpn)

Cinema magazine programme.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b08njv6d)

Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (b08njv6g)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08njv6j)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section (b042jhzs)
Series 3, Episode 1

For the first show in the new series stand-up Alex Horne and his band explore the theme of technology through live music and comedy, with songs about a record player, hoover and a teasmaid amongst others. They're joined by guest comedians Sara Pascoe and James Acaster.

Host...Alex Horne
Band...Joe Auckland, Mark Brown, Will Collier, Ben Reynolds, Ed Sheldrake
Guest... Tom Basden
Producer... Julia McKenzie.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b08nrx7y)

Shula thinks she has the answer, and Harrison has a tough decision.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b08njv6l)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08nrslj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b08nrx80)

Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.


THU 20:30 In Business (b08nrx82)
Rebooting Rural Russia

The Kremlin has been flexing economic and political muscles on the world stage but the Russian economy is struggling to keep up. Plunging oil prices, U.S. and European sanctions over Ukraine and military operations in Syria have all taken their toll. People across the country are feeling the pinch but rural areas are the hardest hit - much of the countryside is empty and dying. Almost 36,000 villages, or one in four, have 10 residents or fewer. Another 20,000 are abandoned, according to the latest census. Young people left long ago for cities and towns - the collective farms which once would have employed them disappeared along with the USSR.

It's a bleak picture but some young businessmen and women are trying to revive Russia's dying villages with a mixture of traditional craftsmanship, social enterprise and shrewd marketing.

In the impoverished Pskov Region, Kirill Vasilev employs 15 villagers to make Valenki -felt boots made from dried sheep's wool, the footwear of peasants and tsars for centuries. Traditionally, valenki come in brown, black, gray and white, but Vasilev produces versions in a variety of bright colours which he sells in a fashionable part of his native St Petersburg. Now he has plans to expand to London and New York. He is inspired by the world-famous UGG boots and Crocs, which also had their origins in ethnic footwear for Australian and Dutch farmers.

Will he succeed and what difference could it make to the village of Dolostsy on the Belarusian border?

Lucy Ash visits Kirill Vasilev at his Valenki workshop, meets his employees and finds out more about the challenges facing small businesses in Russia.

Produced and presented by Lucy Ash.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b08njv6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b08njv60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b08njv6n)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b08njv6q)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08p1t5m)
Into the Water, Episode 4

The author of the global phenomenon 'The Girl on the Train' returns with 'Into the Water', her addictive new novel of psychological suspense.

A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged.

Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother's sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from-a place to which she vowed she'd never return.

Beware a calm surface-you never know what lies beneath.

Cast: Siân Brooke, Lily Loveless, Arthur Darvill, Lynda Baron, Bryan Dick, Elizabeth Berrington, Natasha Little, Sarah Ridgeway, Kai Alexander and Sean Baker.


THU 23:00 Start/Stop (b04v2z6p)
Series 2, Date Night

Hit comedy about three marriages in various states of disrepair. Starring Jack Docherty, Kerry Godliman, John Thomson, Fiona Allen, Charlie Higson and Sally Bretton.
This week the three couples end up on a 'date night' together and Evan is a surprise convert to French cinema. Meanwhile Barney tries to get his smartphone to answer some of life's big questions.

Producer ..... Claire Jones.


THU 23:30 Punt PI (b07mvbtw)
Series 9, The Reclusive Skeleton of Fingringhoe

Steve Punt continues his investigations as Radio 4's very own private detective.

In 1939, just before the outbreak of World War II, the reclusive actress Ada Constance Kent disappeared from the village of Fingringhoe in rural Essex. Despite her cottage being searched on several occasions in the intervening years, her skeleton was only discovered in the bedroom in 1949. Was it her... where had she been in the intervening years... and was she really the person everyone thought she was?

Steve Punt interrogates the witnesses and assesses the evidence.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.



FRIDAY 05 MAY 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b08njv8q)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b08ns9p5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08njv8s)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Election Night Live (b08qmgp6)

James Naughtie and Carolyn Quinn present coverage of the local election results.


FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08njv8x)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b08njv8z)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08pqb9n)

A reading and a reflection to start the day, with George Craig, a retired senior civil servant and a Methodist local preacher in Cardiff.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b08njv93)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcq9)
Fulmar

Series of stories about British birds, inspired by their calls and songs. Kate Humble presents the fulmar.


FRI 06:00 Today (b08njv95)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b08njzh0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b08ns9wl)
Balancing Acts: Behind the Scenes at the National Theatre, Episode 5

The inside story of twelve years at the helm of Britain's greatest theatre. It is a story of lunatic failures and spectacular successes such as The History Boys, War Horse and One Man, Two Guvnors; of opening the doors of the National Theatre to a broader audience than ever before, and changing the public's perception of what theatre is for.

It is about probing Shakespeare from every angle and reinventing the classics. About fostering new talent and directing some of the most celebrated actors of our times. Its cast includes the likes of Alan Bennett, Maggie Smith, Mike Leigh, Daniel Day-Lewis, Michael Gambon and Helen Mirren.

Intimate, candid and insightful, Balancing Acts is a passionate exploration of the art and alchemy of making theatre.

Today Hynter looks back at the birth of NT Live and recalls The National's 50th Anniversary commemorations.

Written and read by Nicholas Hytner
Produced by Simon Richardson.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08njv97)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08nrzpp)
How Does That Make You Feel?, Episode 5

In the 8th series of 'How Does That Make You Feel?' Martha's clients have made few changes to their circumstances.

Richard Fallon M.P. has recovered from having his Twitter account catastrophically hijacked and has been dabbling with dating websites with little success. But when his son Toby points out that his whole life philosophy is based upon a lie, Richard is forced to ask if his life has any purpose whatsoever.

Shelagh Stephenson is the author of Radio 4's 'A Short History of Longing' and 'Guests Are Like Fish'. She is an Olivier Award winner for her play 'The Memory of Water' and has won Sony and Writer's Guild awards for her plays 'Darling Peidi' and 'Five Kinds of Silence'.

Richard Fallon ..... Roger Allam
Martha ..... Frances Tomelty

Writer ..... Shelagh Stephenson
Director ..... Eoin O'Callaghan
Producer ..... Eoin O'Callaghan.


FRI 11:00 Passports Please (b08nrzpr)

Katy Long tells the extraordinary story of what Bertolt Brecht called 'the most distinguished part of man's anatomy': the passport.

Katy shows how out of step today's modern, biometric, highly securitized and nationalized idea of a passport is with the document's origins, and how it came to be this way. She reveals a document which was once merely to demonstrate personal identity, how in the 18th century many British citizens travelled on French passports because they were cheaper; while after the French revolution, French citizens were often issued British passports. Not only were passports personal, and optional, but Katy shows how they were also intended to be temporary, and how Britain was the greatest opponent of the system.

As so often, it was the First World War which changed everything, and Katy travels to Geneva to the archives of the League of Nations which, tasked with abolishing passports, instead laid down the rules for a new international passport system which still largely operates today.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


FRI 11:30 Gloomsbury (b08nrzpt)
Series 4, The Celtic Cringe

At Sizzlinghurst, Mrs Gosling is on the point of divorce - which is seriously affecting her cooking. Henry has had enough and is on the verge of firing the Goslings, so Vera embarks on a mission to get Mrs Gosling to forgive her husband and bring harmony back bFeeling ostracised by Vera's relationship with Hilda Matthewson and slighted over the lack of thanks for her Aeolian Harp, Ginny decides it is time to end her relationship with Vera and sever the tie forever. But, just as she is leaving London to give Vera a piece of her mind, an unexpected visitor drops in. The poet WB Yikes and his wife Georgie arrive at the Foxes' house in Tavistock Square looking for a precious thing.

When WB Yikes meets Ginny he announces that he has found it and declares that she is his muse. Ginny sets off for Sizzlinghurst with WB Yikes and his wife in tow in better spirits.

Meanwhile WB Yikes gives Lionel and Henry a rejuvenating pill designed to cure writer's block in Henry and give Lionel a younger outlook on life. But the pill has unfortunate side effects.

A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4
elow-stairs.

Meanwhile, in an attempt to win back Vera's affection (which Vera has given to Hilda), Ginny secretly installs an Aeolian Harp in the gardens at Sizzlinghurst in the hope that its sweet sound will captivate Vera. But things backfire when the painter Augustus Dong and his Biblical beard turn up to propose the setting up of a pantisocracy with Vera and Henry.

A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b08njv99)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b08lhsdg)
5 May 1917 - Cynthia Hamilton

On this day in 1917, Russian anti-war protests, led by Lenin, were reported in Britain as 'some trouble caused by soldiers and workmen', while at St Stephen's vicarage, the repairs are nearly complete.

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b08njv9c)

Consumer news and issues.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b08njv9f)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b08njv9h)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


FRI 13:45 Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious (b08ns0km)
Series 1, From Ads to Art

Can a piece of marketing ever truly be considered art? From Hank Williams' song "Pan-American" to 1980s print ads for Benson and Hedges and Silk Cut, to Haydn's symphonies for Prince Eserhazy: works of real aesthetic beauty are often created in the service of marketing a product, a monarch, or an experience.

Rory Sutherland investigates the overlap between commerce and art, as he tells the story of Guinness's iconic ad "Surfer". Featuring an extended discussion with literary grand dame and former advertising copywriter, Fay Weldon.

Producer: Steven Rajam

---

Why do certain marketing campaigns - from Nike's "Just Do It" to the MND Ice Bucket Challenge - cast such a spell over us? Rory Sutherland explores the story - and the psychology - behind ten of the most influential campaigns in history - with first-hand accounts from the creative minds that conceived them, and contributions from the worlds of evolutionary biology, behavioural psychology, socio-economics and anthropology.

Marketing. It's come to be one of the most misunderstood - and maligned - disciplines of our age: perceived variously as the Emperor's New Clothes, an emblem of the ills of capitalism, a shadowy dark art designed to steal away our hard-earned money and make us do (or buy, or vote for) things we don't want.

Yet marketing is undeniably a key part of contemporary culture. It's a science that's fundamentally about human behaviour - marketers, to some extent, understand us better than we know ourselves - and in the most successful campaigns we find our deepest emotions and urges, from altruism to shame, hope to bravado, systematically tapped into and drawn upon.

But what are these primal behaviours that the best campaigns evoke in us - and how do they harness them? Is marketing purely about commercial gain or can it underpin real common good and societal progress? And does the discipline manipulate our subconscious instincts and emotions - or simply hold a mirror to them?

Over ten episodes, senior advertising creative and Spectator writer Rory Sutherland unravels the story of some of the most powerful, brilliant and influential campaigns of our age. Set alongside personal testimonies from the brilliant minds that created them, we'll hear from a host of experts - from biologists to philosophers, novelists to economists - about how these campaigns got under our skin and proved to be so influential.

Contributors include: writer and former copywriter Fay Weldon; social behaviourist and expert on altruism Nicola Raihani; Alexander Nix, CEO of big data analysts Cambridge Analytica; philosopher Andy Martin; writer on Islamic issues and advisor to the world's first Islamic branding consultancy, Shelina Janmohamed; and evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller.

Producer: Steven Rajam.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b08nrx7y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b05n1mhm)
Frankie Takes a Trip

Frankie Takes a Trip.
Comedy Drama by Martyn Hesford.
During his long showbiz career, Frankie Howerd had quite a few ups and downs. It was during one of these 'down' periods, in 1962, that Frankie decided to take a trip. Not to Clacton - but to the other side of his consciousness as he tried to deal with his depression through the controversial, though legal, use of LSD.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08ns0kq)
Snape, Suffolk

Peter Gibbs and his panel of experts visit Snape in Suffolk. James Wong, Bob Flowerdew and Bunny Guinness answer this week's horticultural questions.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (b08ns2lr)
Series 1, Roots and Wings

Roots and Wings by Carys Bray. A specially-commissioned story by the author of Sweet Home, A Song For Issy Bradley and The Museum Of You.

While painting sunflowers on the coffin she has pre-emptively bought, Edna's friend Pearl makes a throwaway comment that leads Edna to reflect on a past holiday and the essential unknowability of other people.

Carys Bray was awarded the Scott Prize for her debut short-story collection, Sweet Home. Her first novel, A Song for Issy Bradley, was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award and winner of the Authors' Club Best First Novel Award 2015. She lives in Southport with her husband and four children.

Writer: Carys Bray
Reader: Susan Jameson
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b08ns2lt)

Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b08ns2lw)

Investigating the numbers in the news.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b08ns2ly)
Swazi and Khushbir - Our Team

A mother and son contemplate how the adoption of a younger brother has changed things at home. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b08njv9k)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08njv9m)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b08ns2m0)
Series 93, 05/05/2017

This week Miles's panel takes the form of Jeremy Hardy, Angela Barnes, Sarah Kendall and Danny Finkelstein.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b08ns2m2)

Pip wants to pay her penance, and Toby wants to make things better.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b08njv9p)

News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08nrzpp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b08ns2m4)
Nigel Farage, Sarah Olney, Emily Thornberry

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Hurstpierpoint Village Hall in West Sussex with a panel including the UKIP MEP Nigel Farage, Liberal Democrat Sarah Olney and Shadow Foreign Secretary Emily Thornberry.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b08ns2m6)

A reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b08lhsdj)
1-5 May 1917

The third omnibus of Season 10, Our Daily Bread, set in Folkestone, in the week, in 1917, when the Archbishop of Canterbury warned, "when we come out of this war, we mean to come out with clean hands".

Written by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole

Story-led by Sarah Daniels
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b08njv9r)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b08njv9t)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08p1t6s)
Into the Water, Episode 5

The author of the global phenomenon 'The Girl on the Train' returns with 'Into the Water', her addictive new novel of psychological suspense.

A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged.

Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother's sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from-a place to which she vowed she'd never return.

Beware a calm surface-you never know what lies beneath.

Cast: Siân Brooke, Lily Loveless, Arthur Darvill, Lynda Baron, Bryan Dick, Elizabeth Berrington, Natasha Little, Sarah Ridgeway, Kai Alexander and Sean Baker.


FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b08nq5x7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]


FRI 23:27 Punt PI (b07nmqtq)
Series 9, There's A Kind of Hum

What is it?

The sounds generated by mating fish? The US government? Or even the evolution of humans to hear electromagnetic waves... Steve Punt, BBC Radio 4's Mulder and Scully combined, turns his analytical ears to The Hum - heard by people, all over the world, tonight.

For some of those who hear it, it's unpleasant, even distressing, for others simply mysterious.

The Hum has been reported as far back as the 1960's, when people in Bristol first brought it to the attention of the local council. They never found out what caused it.
Many have tried to work out the source of the Hum... so there is no real reason to expect Radio 4's gumshoe to solve it in half an hour... but Punt PI will investigate some intriguing possibilities.

From Surrey to the ionosphere, he examines afresh some of the most common theories - with leading experts: is it the sounds created by fish, as recorded by neurobiologist Dr Andrew Bass; or the noise of seismic waves as discussed with expert Dr Lucia Gualtieri of Columbia University, New York; might it be a whole range of potential ear problems as suggested by Mark Williams at the Tinnitus Clinic; tall buildings - given short shrift by South Leeds Life editor, Jeremy Morton; electromagnetism - considered by science expert Roland Pease; and last, but definitely most 'X-files' of all, HAARP, a US military research station, now run by Bob McCoy of the University of Alaska - a theory poo-pooed by national security journalist Sharon Weinberger.

He also touches base with the creator of the World Hum website, Dr Glen MacPherson, who is trying to keep an online record of this phenomenon - most commonly described as a diesel engine in the distance.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

Music sourcing: Danny Webb.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b08ns4jr)
Peter and Sophie - Constant Performance Appraisal

A father who was adopted relishes the fact that he shares DNA with his daughter, while giving her fiancé a qualified welcome to the family. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b08nkrnj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b08nkrnj)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b08npns4)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b08npns4)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b08nq7t3)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b08nq7t3)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b08nrslj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b08nrslj)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b08nrzpp)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b08nrzpp)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b08n4pc6)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b08ns2m6)

Alex Horne Presents The Horne Section 18:30 THU (b042jhzs)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b08nq6fp)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b08nq6fp)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b08n1yb3)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b08n4pc4)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b08ns2m4)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b08njrb4)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b08njv6d)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b08njv6d)

Beef and Dairy Network 23:15 WED (b08nrmjj)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b08njwtn)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b08njwtn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b08npnhg)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b08p1szt)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b08p1t2k)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b08p1t5m)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b08p1t6s)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b08nkrc6)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b08nkrc6)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b08ns9sm)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b08ns9sm)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b08ns9tt)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b08ns9tt)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b08ns9p5)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b08ns9p5)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b08ns9wl)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b08n2f3h)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b08npnh2)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b08njt7h)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b08nq5x3)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b08nq5x3)

Cracking Up 23:00 WED (b08nqmpc)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b08n404n)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b08nrsll)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b08njn47)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b08n22rp)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b08njzh8)

Drama 14:15 WED (b08npnh0)

Drama 14:15 THU (b08nrsls)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b05n1mhm)

Election Night Live 01:00 FRI (b08qmgp6)

Ella Fitzgerald: A Glorious Noise 15:30 SAT (b08n2v2x)

Everything You Think About Sport Is Wrong 09:30 WED (b085gwll)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b08n1y9n)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b08njtj6)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b08njtpd)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b08njv26)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b08njv5w)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b08njv93)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b08njzh2)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b08njzh2)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b08nqc4n)

From Our Home Correspondent 13:30 SUN (b08njzh4)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b08n1y9v)

From Rags to Riches 11:30 THU (b08nrsln)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b08njtlh)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b08njtq5)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b08njv2x)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b08njv6l)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b08njv9p)

FutureProofing 20:00 WED (b08nqc4j)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b08n4lk8)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b08ns0kq)

Glass Half Full 22:15 SAT (b08n3wp4)

Gloomsbury 11:30 FRI (b08nrzpt)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b08nq5x7)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b08nq5x7)

Hal 19:15 SUN (b08nk59c)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b08lhsdj)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b08lhs99)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b08lhs9w)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b08lhsb5)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b08lhsbl)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b08lhsdg)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b08n4db3)

In Business 20:30 THU (b08nrx82)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b08njv60)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b08njv60)

In Their Element 21:00 MON (b08n2ltx)

In Their Element 11:00 TUE (b08npns6)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b08njtq7)

Kevin Eldon Will See You Now 23:00 TUE (b08nq6ft)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b08n4lkd)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b08ns2lt)

Life at Absolute Zero 19:45 SUN (b08nk59f)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b08n1ybh)

Mark Steel's in Town 11:30 MON (b05zktnk)

Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious 13:45 MON (b08nl6c1)

Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious 13:45 TUE (b08nq5wq)

Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious 13:45 WED (b08nq9wm)

Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious 13:45 THU (b08nrslq)

Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious 13:45 FRI (b08ns0km)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b08n1y96)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b08njt6q)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b08njthw)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b08njtp0)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b08njv1h)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b08njv5k)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b08njv8q)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b08njlmc)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b08njlmc)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b08njv2n)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b08n4lkg)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b08ns2lw)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b08n1y9g)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b08njt6z)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b08njtj4)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b08njtpb)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b08njv24)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b08njv5t)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b08njv8z)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b08njt71)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b08n1y9x)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b08njt7m)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b08njtjm)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b08njtpl)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b08njv2d)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b08njv64)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b08njv99)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b08n1y9j)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b08njt77)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b08njt7f)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b08n1ybm)

News 13:00 SAT (b08n1yb1)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 23:30 TUE (b07sxttj)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b08njwtq)

Only Artists 09:00 WED (b08nq7t1)

Only Artists 21:30 WED (b08nq7t1)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b08njzhb)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b08njzhb)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b08n46dd)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b08nrwp6)

Original British Dramatists 2015 14:15 MON (b05xqbmb)

PM 17:00 SAT (b08n1yb7)

PM 17:00 MON (b08njtkm)

PM 17:00 TUE (b08njtq1)

PM 17:00 WED (b08njv2s)

PM 17:00 THU (b08njv6g)

PM 17:00 FRI (b08njv9k)

Passports Please 11:00 FRI (b08nrzpr)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b08njt80)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b08njzhd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b08n4q6z)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b08pmln8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b08pnckh)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b08pqv59)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b08pr5vv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b08pqb9n)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b08njrb2)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b08njrb2)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b08njrb2)

Punt PI 23:30 WED (b07m43rb)

Punt PI 23:30 THU (b07mvbtw)

Punt PI 23:27 FRI (b07nmqtq)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b08njwts)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b08njwts)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b08njwts)

Rob Newman's Neuropolis 18:30 TUE (b08nq5x9)

Rum Bunch 18:30 WED (b08nqkrp)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b08n1y9s)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b08n1ybk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b08n1y9b)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b08njt6v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b08njtj0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b08njtp4)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b08njv1m)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b08njv5p)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b08n1y98)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b08n1y9d)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b08n1yb9)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b08njt6s)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b08njt6x)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b08njt7t)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b08njthy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b08njtj2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b08njtp2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b08njtp8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b08njv1k)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b08njv1q)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b08njv5m)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b08njv5r)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b08njv8s)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b08njv8x)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (b08n4lkb)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (b08ns2lr)

Shush! 11:30 WED (b08nq9wk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b08n1ybf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b08njt7y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b08njtl1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b08njtq3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b08njv2v)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b08njv6j)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b08njv9m)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b08njt73)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b08njt73)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b08njtjg)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b08njtjg)

Start/Stop 23:00 THU (b04v2z6p)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b08njwtv)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b08njt79)

Tales From the Stave 11:30 TUE (b08npns8)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b08njt7k)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b08nk599)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b08nk599)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b08npnhb)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b08npnhb)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b08nq5xc)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b08nq5xc)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b08nqb2t)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b08nqb2t)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b08nrx7y)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b08nrx7y)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b08ns2m2)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b08nrx80)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b08npnh6)

The Echo Chamber 23:30 SAT (b08n22rt)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b08n46dg)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b08nrwpn)

The Invention of... 20:00 MON (b08npnhd)

The Invention of... 11:00 WED (b08npnhd)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b08njlm7)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b08njlm7)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b08npns2)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b08npns2)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b08njzh6)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b08nq7t5)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b08ns2ly)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b08ns4jr)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b08njv2q)

The Muhammadan Bean: The Secret History of Islam and Coffee 23:30 MON (b07tq8cd)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b08n4lkl)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b08ns2m0)

The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody 00:30 SAT (b08n4hm6)

The Organ Beauty Pageant 20:00 TUE (b08nq6fh)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b08njzh0)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b08njzh0)

The Self-Employment Paradox 17:00 SUN (b08n2wcx)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (b08n2gjl)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b08npnh8)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b08nks7c)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b08njt7r)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b08njtlm)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b08njtqf)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b08njv31)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b08njv6q)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b08njv9t)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b08n3wnk)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b08nqb18)

Today 07:00 SAT (b08njlm5)

Today 06:00 MON (b08njtjd)

Today 06:00 TUE (b08njtpg)

Today 06:00 WED (b08njv28)

Today 06:00 THU (b08njv5y)

Today 06:00 FRI (b08njv95)

Tumanbay 14:15 TUE (b08nq5x1)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b020tp38)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b01s8mng)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b02tvryl)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b01sby02)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b0378xmn)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03zrcq9)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b08n1y9l)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b08n1y9q)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b08n1y9z)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b08n1ybc)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b08njt75)

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With Great Pleasure 16:00 MON (b08npnh4)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b08njrb0)

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You and Yours 12:15 MON (b08njtjq)

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iPM 05:45 SAT (b08n4q71)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b08n4q71)