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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 22 APRIL 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b08m8z9h)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SAT 00:30 The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody (b08mqv1n)
Series 1, Night Shift

In The Odyssey there is a moving episode in which Odysseus goes into the Underworld to meet the shades of dead luminaries. He also sees his mother, and realises she has died since he left home. He tries repeatedly to embrace her, but as she is a spirit, cannot.

In McCarthy Woolf's poem, written throughout in rhyming couplets, the story takes place in a portacabin in a port, and in a minicab. Here the mother, Cleo, who died soon after giving birth to her son, Valentine, is trying to make contact with him. Valentine is a cabbie on a night shift, and his controller on the radio has godlike power. But there is strange interference, on the radio and even his passenger's mobile phone.

Karen McCarthy Woolf is Cleo; Samuel James is Angel and Valentine and Maeve Bluebell Wells plays the Passenger.

Producer: Julian May.


SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08m8z9k)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08m8z9m)

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08m8z9p)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b08m8z9r)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08mdl8p)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Roger Hutchings.


SAT 05:45 iPM (b08mdl8r)
Mind the gap

Finding love when she was 37 and he was 17.

iPM is the news programme that starts with its listeners. Email ipm@bbc.co.uk. Twitter: @BBCiPM. Presented by Luke Jones and Eddie Mair. Produced by Emma Close.


SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b08m8z9t)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SAT 06:04 Weather (b08m8z9w)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 06:07 Open Country (b08md98n)
Stonehenge and Mental Health

Helen Mark asks whether time creatively spent in Stonehenge's prehistoric landscapes can help Wiltshire residents with long term mental health problems. It's called the Human Henge project, and for one day a week for ten weeks the participants have been given the opportunity to get an insight into the lives of ancestors lived long ago. Helen accompanies the group on the final day when they're able to enter the inner circle of Stonehenge, the culmination of their work together.

Helen hears how the idea for the project began with the Restoration Trust, a charity that links heritage sites with mental health in what it describes as 'culture therapy'. English Heritage who operate Stonehenge have supported the project, as has a leading expert on Stonehenge, the archaeologist Professor Tim Darvill of Bournemouth University. Tim argues that the site may well have had a healing function in the past as a focus for rituals and ceremonies, and is glad to explore that aspect of it today.

The participants themselves describe how they've benefitted from being out of doors, from getting to know each other and having a focus besides indoor drop-in support groups. More than one participant says what's helped her is being treated as someone with a brain, glad to learn something new about her locality and its ancient past.

Producer: Mark Smalley.


SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b08m8z9y)
Farming Today This Week: New Zealand

New Zealand has a fearsome reputation as a top exporter of lamb, beef, dairy produce, fruit, wool and wine - and a great deal of other produce. And it's all done without paying farmers subsidies or being part of a union of countries like the single market.

So, how do they do it?

Nancy Nicolson reports from one of New Zealand's top agricultural shows where she gets a flavour of the political arena in which the industry operates; the attitude marketeers are taking to the opportunities offered by Brexit; and how farmers feel about working in an unsubsidised world.

She meets the Prime Minister, Bill English, industry leaders and working farmers.

Producer: Nancy Nicolson.


SAT 06:57 Weather (b08m8zb0)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 07:00 Today (b08n19jd)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b08m8zb2)
Roy Hudd

Entertainer Roy Hudd, singer Imelda May, dog and duck man Stuart Barnes and stand-up comic Ayesha Hazarika join the Rev Richard Coles and Kate Singleton for a chat.


SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08n1f87)
Series 16, Paris

Jay Rayner whisks his panel off to Paris for a special 100th episode celebration. Answering the questions are Annie Gray, Tim Anderson and Andi Oliver.

The panellists take great delight in reminiscing over favourite memories of eating in Paris, they help audience members with queries about steak and missing ingredients, and there's a whole lot of patisserie to be enjoyed too!

Producer: Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b08n1f89)

Steve Richards and fellow presenters of the Week In Westminster, George Parker of the Financial Times, Helen Lewis of the New Statesman, and Tom Newton Dunn of the Sun discuss Teresa May's surprise decision to hold a general election on June 8th.


SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b08m8zb4)
Getting Out

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.


SAT 12:00 News Summary (b08m8zb6)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 12:04 Money Box (b08n1f8c)
Why is Joan trapped in her home?

Joan was among thousands of people who took out shared appreciation mortgages in the late 1990s. Older borrowers used them to release cash worth up to 25 percent of the value of their homes. On the sale of the home the bank would get the loan amount back plus 75 percent of any increase in property value. Years later Joan is in her eighties with mobility problems and her home has risen sharply in value. She tells Money Box she can't sell up to downsize because the amount owed to her banks won't leave enough to buy a suitable property in her area.

The Prime Minister's call for a snap general election raises questions about the future course of pension policy. Tom McPhail, Head of Policy at Hargreaves Lansdown and Steve Webb, former pensions minister now Royal London's Director of Policy, discuss what it might mean for pensions tax relief, the triple lock and the state pension age.

This week shadow chancellor John McDonnell defined rich people as those earning above £70,000 to £80,000 a year, during an interview where he suggested that they could be asked to pay more tax under a Labour government. Professor Donald Hirsch, Director of the Centre for Research in Social Policy at Loughborough University, shares insights on people with that level of income, including where they're likely to be found.

Plans which would have seen increases of up to 20 thousand pounds for a charge that's payable for sorting out the affairs of someone who has died have been halted. From May probate fees in England and Wales were due to rise from a flat fee of £155 or £215 to a sliding scale which would charge up to £20,000 for estates worth over 2 million pounds. The general election means there's not enough time for the legislation to go through parliament.


SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b08mdjyb)
Series 93, 21/04/2017

Jeremy Hardy, Andy Hamilton, Helen Lewis and Susan Calman are Miles' guests for the first episode in the series.

It's the first episode of series 93 of the News Quiz and the whole country is talking about only one thing. And it's not the rise in the urban fox population in Bournemouth... although that does get a mention.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.


SAT 12:57 Weather (b08m8zb8)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 13:00 News (b08m8zbb)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b08mdjyg)
Lord Ashdown, Thangam Debbonaire MP, George Eustice MP, Ann Widdecombe.

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Truro High School in Cornwall with a panel including the President of the European Movement and Liberal Democrat peer Lord Ashdown, Labour Whip Thangam Debbonaire MP, Farming and Fisheries Minister George Eustice MP and the Express columnist and commentator Ann Widdecombe.


SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b08m8zbd)

Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?


SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01kr71s)
Betrayal

Harold Pinter's acclaimed drama about a love affair and the intricate nature of deceit which is told in reverse time from its poignant ending to its thrilling first kiss.

Emma ..... Olivia Colman
Jerry ..... Andrew Scott
Robert ..... Charles Edwards
Waiter ..... Gerard McDermott

Produced/directed by Gaynor Macfarlane

Harold Pinter was born in London in 1930. His writing career spanned over 50 years and produced 29 original stage plays, 27 screenplays, many dramatic sketches, radio and TV plays, poetry, one novel, short fiction, essays, speeches, and letters. In 2005 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature and, in the same year, the Wilfred Owen Award for Poetry and the Franz Kafka Award (Prague). In 2006 he was awarded the Europe Theatre Prize and, in 2007, the highest French honour, the Légion d'honneur. He died in December 2008.

Andrew Scott recently won the BAFTA for Best Supporting Actor.


SAT 15:45 Drama (b08n4qq5)
Keeping in Touch

Keeping In Touch

A woman, happily married and with children, considers whether her settled life leaves her free to make her own choices. Written by Joan Bakewell in response to Harold Pinter's 1978 play Betrayal and based on their 1960's affair, the drama throws a new light on how it came about.

Written by Joan Bakewell
Produced by Charlotte Riches.


SAT 16:15 Woman's Hour (b08m8zbg)
Megan Mullally, Being Jane, The impact of TV show Girls

The two time Emmy Award winning US star Megan Mullally known best for her role as Karen in the American sitcom Will and Grace talks about her musical collaboration Nancy and Beth.

We talk about names. How do famous and young women feel about being called Jane? Dr Jane Pilcher Associate Professor at the University of Leicester, Jane Brodie an art director and the actor Jane Asher discuss.

How should embryos remaining after IVF treatment be dealt with and who should make the decision about what to do with them? Kate and Becky both had IVF and discuss their experience and Juliet Tizzard director of the National Fertility and Embryology Association discusses the medical and ethical considerations.

Last Sunday Turkey voted in a referendum. The result was extremely close but President Erdogan's victory has increased his power. He is known for his conservative views about women's rights. Emma Sinclair Webb is a senior Turkey researcher with Human Rights Watch and Elif Shafak is a novelist who lives in the UK discuss impact his rise have on women in Turkey.

The last ever episode of the American comedy drama Girls aired on British television this week. But what impact did the show have on young women? We hear from Girls fans, journalists Pandora Sykes and Simran Hans.

Maintaining dignity when you're receiving hospital treatment can be difficult but we hear how important it is to remain active as part of your general recovery in hospital. Claire Robinson Co-founder of INGA Wellbeing has designed gowns for people who need regular hospital treatment and Professor Brian Dolan who is behind the End Pyjama Paralysis Campaign.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.


SAT 17:00 PM (b08m8zbj)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.


SAT 17:30 iPM (b08mdl8r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]


SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08m8zbl)

The latest shipping forecast.


SAT 17:57 Weather (b08m8zbn)

The latest weather forecast.


SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08m8zbq)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b08m8zbs)
Mica Paris, Stephen Mangan, John Grant, Sophie Okonedo, Joe Goddard, Nikki Bedi, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Nikki Bedi are joined by Sophie Okonedo, Mica Paris, Stephen Mangan and John Grant for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Mica Paris and Joe Goddard.

Producer: Debbie Kibride.


SAT 19:00 Profile (b08n1hnf)
Sam Warburton

Series of profiles of people who are currently making headlines.


SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b08m8zbv)

Gemma Arterton and Bill Nighy star in in Their Finest; a new film about the vital role of movies in Britain during The War.
A revival of Christopher Hampton's 1970 play The Philanthropist has opened in London. It features a glittering array of actors best known for their TV work. How well do their skills transfer to the stage?
Lisa McInerny won The Bailey's Prize 's for her first novel The Glorious Heresies. Her latest, The Blood Miracles, continues that story with same characters many years older and a little wiser
Ashley Bickerton is a painter and sculptor whose work is much admired (and collected) by Damien Hirst, among others. A new exhibition at Hirst's Newport Gallery includes work from throughout Bickertion's career
The Hours is a new radio dramatization of Michael Cunningham's Pulitzer winning book inspired by Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway. Starring Rosamund Pike it has the tricky job of maintaining three simultaneous plotlines set in different eras

Viv Groskop's guests are Emma Jane Unsworth, Ryan Gilbey and Ekow Eshun. The producer is Oliver Jones.


SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b08n1hnh)
The 90s: A Holiday from History

Jonathan Freedland re-examines the 1990s from a new angle - recalling it as a rare period of peace and prosperity. But could it also be the decade which ultimately led to Trump and Brexit?

Sandwiched between the end of the Cold War and the war on terror, the 1990s now look like an oasis of calm. The decade witnessed the end of apartheid in South Africa, the fall of the Soviet Union and peace in Northern Ireland. As a result, people became preoccupied by more domestic dramas. Just as the UK was gripped by the saga of Charles and Diana's marriage, the Americans were hooked on the OJ Simpson trial.

Jonathan unearths a rich selection of archive and hears from MPs John Redwood and Harriet Harman about their perspectives on this most unusual decade. But he also argues that some of the forces unleashed in that decade would only start to manifest themselves in the middle of the 2010s - with the rise of Donald Trump and the UK's decision to leave the EU.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


SAT 21:00 Drama (b08m98ql)
The Hours, Episode 1

New dramatisation of the Pulitzer winning book by Michael Cunningham inspired by Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway. Starring Rosamund Pike, Fenella Woolgar and Teresa Gallagher.

Three very separate women. They live in different locations and different eras but they are bound by their passion for Virginia Woolf's novel Mrs Dalloway. As they experience life on a Tuesday in June, their thoughts and experiences echo each other and become intertwined.

In Richmond in 1923, Virginia Woolf (Fenella Woolgar) sits down to write a novel calling her heroine Mrs Dalloway. In Los Angeles in 1949, Laura (Teresa Gallagher) sits in bed reading Mrs Dalloway. In New York in the 1990s, Clarissa (Rosamund Pike) goes out to buy flowers for a party mirroring the start of the day for the fictional Mrs Dalloway. The party is for her best friend Richard who long ago dubbed her Mrs Dalloway.

Weaving together themes of bisexuality, mental illness, middle age, the trials of creativity, parental guilt, marital discord, suburban isolation, infertility, friendship and loss - the three stories become one.

In the first episode, the women go about their day. Virginia is struggling to write in Richmond where she feels banished but is cheered by a visit from her sister. Laura has domestic tasks and a small son to look after but all she wants to do is read, and Clarissa struggles to prepare for a huge party in honour of her friend Richard but she's worried that he is so sick. Each finds a way to make it through to the afternoon of the same day in June.

Michael Cunningham's enormously popular and critically successful book won the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and inspired the film starring Nicole Kidman. He called his story The Hours because that was a title that Virginia Woolf had considered. He says Mrs Dalloway was a huge influence on his life because he read the novel as a response to a dare when he was 15 and then decided to be a writer.

Sony Award winning writer Frances Byrnes adapted the book for radio.

Composer: Gene Pritsker
Pianist: Carollyn Eden
Sound Design: Steve Bond

Adapted for radio by Frances Byrnes
Directed by Judith Kampfner and Polly Thomas
Produced by Judith Kampfner
Executive Producer Celia De Wolff

A Corporation For Independent Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b08m8zbx)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.


SAT 22:15 Glass Half Full (b08mbjqm)
Series 1, A global population of nine billion is sustainable

Should we stop worrying about our growing global population and look forward to an age of abundance and prosperity?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists She asks not only what they think about population growth, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

Best-selling author and documentary maker Johan Norberg is an optimist, seeing positives wherever he looks. Population growth has coincided with a huge increase in prosperity and education levels, setting free our natural instinct to innovate. He believes technological advances will allow us to feed the extra mouths and clean up the planet.

Robin Maynard, a veteran campaigner and strategist and now chief executive of the charity Population Matters, has a very different view. He considers that even the current population is unsustainable, using one-and-a-half times the planet's resource limit, and adding billions more people will cause disastrous damage to the Earth's ecosystems.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - statistician Professor David Spiegelhalter, Philosophy Professor Sarah Conly, and Joel Kibazo (former Director of the African development Bank).

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b08m9kvg)
Semi-Final 1, 2017

(13/17)
The first semi-final of the 2017 season features three of the winners from the past three months of heats, plus a top-scoring runner-up. There's no such thing as an easy victory at this stage in the contest, with a place in the Final at stake.

Will the contenders know who staged an attempt to steal the Crown Jewels in 1671, or the temperature at which the Fahrenheit and Celsius scales coincide? Will their trigger fingers be quick enough to give them the chance to answer, even if they do?

As always, the contest features a chance for a Brain of Britain listener to win a prize by stumping the competitors with ingenious quiz questions of his or her own devising.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


SAT 23:30 The Echo Chamber (b08m99f7)
Series 9, Who's There, by Greta Stoddart

Paul Farley hears a new radio poem, Greta Stoddart's Who's There, a sequence set in a Dorset care home. With music by Jon Nicholls. Producer: Tim Dee.



SUNDAY 23 APRIL 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b08n1xmf)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


SUN 00:30 Short Works (b08mdc9f)
Series 1, Tonight, for the First Time

A new story by Zoe Strachan, inspired by a piece of music.
Northern Soul and a crumbling modernist ruin come together in a story of missed chances and lasting love.
Written by Zoe Strachan
Read by Ann Louise Ross
Music: 'Long After Tonight Is All Over' performed by Jimmy Radcliffe
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie.


SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08n1xmh)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08n1xmk)

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08n1xmm)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b08n1xmp)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b08n1zyh)
St Clement Danes

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from the central church of the Royal Air Force on London's Strand, St. Clement Danes. The tower has a ring of ten bells with a tenor weighing 21 and a half hundredweight. It's said that the tenth bell was added to enable the tune 'Oranges and Lemons' to be sounded, these no doubt being 'the bells of St Clements' alluded to in the song. We hear them ringing now, 'London Surprise Royal'.


SUN 05:45 Profile (b08n1hnf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b08n1xmr)

The latest national and international news.


SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b08n1xmt)
Forms of Memory

Rabbi Shoshana Boyd Gelfand examines our differing forms of memory, collective and individual.

Citing the work of neuroscientist Steven Rose, who states "lose your memory and you, as you, cease to exist", Shoshana discusses the identity crisis sparked by memory failure resulting from medical conditions.

We hear the words of Oliver Sacks who described a patient with a memory span of five minutes. We also hear Shoshana emotionally recounting the story of how her father, once a radiologist, now sits at home reading his own scans which document the slow deterioration of his brain due to Alzheimer's.

While individual memory is clearly vital to the construction of identity, there is another deeper collective memory available to us. Shoshana argues that, in addition to our personal history, we can seemingly tap into larger shared narratives of love, faith, art and spirit.

Collective memory underlies many of the rituals that we use to transmit our shared values through the generations. One of the best examples of this is the Passover Seder, a dramatic retelling of the Exodus story. Every year on the eve of Passover, Jews gather to re-enact the very first Passover when the Jewish people fled from Ancient Egypt.

The Exodus is only one of many expressions of collective remembering in religious tradition. Christians remember the resurrection on Easter Day, Muslims re-enact Mohammed's journey when they go on pilgrimage to Mecca, Hindus recall the victory of light over darkness on Diwali. Shoshana argues that one of the great powers of religious traditions is that they allow us to access these collective memories.

Presenter: Shoshana Boyd Gelfand
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b08n1zyk)
London Vineyard

We meet the volunteers of Forty Hall Vineyard - a 10 acre organic vineyard in north London just within the M25. The vineyard is the first commercial scale vineyard in London since the middle ages, and is run and managed by the local community. They planted the first vines in 2009 and are now producing their own English still and sparkling wines. Forty Hall is also a local food project and provides volunteering opportunities and health and well-being benefits to a wide range of local people. Philippa Hall visits the vineyard at the peak of Spring pruning to hear about how the project got off the ground.

Producer: Sophie Anton.


SUN 06:57 Weather (b08n1xmw)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b08n1xmy)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 07:10 Sunday (b08n1xn0)
Faith and mental health; The 'lost' archbishops; Kirk may allow gay marriages

French voters take part in the first round of the Presidential elections on Sunday. Dr Charles Devellennes from the University of Kent explains why religion, once a taboo in French politics, has grown in importance in political discourse.

Pope Francis' trip to Egypt later this week is his first to a Muslim majority country. Fawaz Gerges, Professor of International Relations at the LSE and Bishop Angaelos, head of the Coptic Orthodox Church in the UK discuss with Edward Stourton the significance of the visit for Muslims and Christians in Egypt.

An influential report by the Church of Scotland's Theological Forum says the Kirk should allow ministers to conduct same-sex marriages. Journalist Rosemary Goring tells Edward about the proposals.

The remains of five Archbishops of Canterbury have been found beneath a medieval parish church next to Lambeth Palace. Trevor Barnes investigates why their remains appear to have been mislaid.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry are leading the Heads Together campaign to end stigma around mental health. It's the official charity of the London Marathon. Edward hears from Dan Dark, an RE teacher who is running to support his wife who has struggled with anorexia. Later, Edward explores how churches are changing their approach to mental health. The Archbishop of Canterbury's daughter Katharine Welby-Roberts talks about her depression with Dr Kate Middleton a Director of Mind And Soul.

'Islands' is a new play that commemorates the 350th Anniversary of the 1667 Treaty of Breda in which the Dutch ceded Manhattan to the English in exchange for the tiny spice island of Rhun. Rosie Dawson has been to rehearsals.

Producers: David Cook & Carmel Lonergan

Series Producer: Amanda Hancox

Photo Credit: Craig Dick.


SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b08n1zyn)
Advantage Africa

Jon Snow makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Advantage Africa.

Registered Charity Number 1092719
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Advantage Africa'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Advantage Africa'.

Photo credit: Dai Baker.


SUN 07:57 Weather (b08n1xn2)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b08n1xn4)

The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.


SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b08n1zyq)
Infused with God's Love

A service marking the tenth anniversary of the 'Equipping, Calling, Going' festival, a five day all-age celebration of prayer, worship and teaching which takes place throughout Easter week in Scarborough. It is led by Miriam Swaffield, Student Mission Leader at Fusion UK. The preacher is the Revd Dr Calvin Samuel, Principal of the London School of Theology. Producer Andrew Earis.


SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b08mdjyj)
The Past in the Present

A L Kennedy reflects on the way our past shapes our present and our future.

"As groups we get trapped in our pasts, not quite repeating them, but sometimes forcing our futures out of shape for the sake of their ghosts."

Producer: Sheila Cook.


SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zqzsv)
Curlew (Spring)

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the curlew. The haunting song of the curlew instantly summons the spirit of wild places. By April, most curlews have left their winter refuge on estuaries and marshes and have returned to their territories on moorland or upland pastures. Wherever they breed you'll hear the male birds singing and displaying. It's often called the bubbling song.


SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b08n1xn6)

Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.


SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b08n1xn8)

Lilian has a spring in her step, and Ruth wants to keep a low profile.


SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b08lg8wl)
The Challenger Disaster

Sue MacGregor brings together four people who were profoundly affected by the Challenger disaster, when NASA's space shuttle exploded just after lift-off.

On January 28, 1986, people watched in horror as Challenger, one of America's four space shuttles, erupted into a ball of flames just over a minute after lift off, killing everyone on board. "Flight controllers here are looking very carefully at the situation. Obviously a major malfunction," reported the NASA launch commentator as television screens showed a cloud of smoke and water vapour where Challenger had been, along with debris falling into the Atlantic Ocean.

At Mission Control, the doors were immediately locked and the phones disconnected as flight controllers, following protocol, began backing up the flight data. In the stands near the launch site there were heartbreaking scenes as the astronauts' friends and families reacted with disbelief and shock.

Challenger's crew of seven was led by led by Dick Scobee and included Christa McAuliffe, a 37-year-old social science teacher from New Hampshire, who had been chosen from over 11,000 applicants to become America's first civilian astronaut. Salvage crews spent several weeks bringing up pieces of the shuttle and carefully recovering the remains of the seven astronauts.

A special commission appointed by then President Ronald Reagan to investigate the accident identified a failure in a solid rocket booster joint as the cause for explosion, but also the pointed the finger at problems in NASA's organisational culture and decision-making processes.

Joining Sue MacGregor round the table to look back on one of NASA's darkest tragedies are June Scobee Rodgers, the widow of Challenger Space Shuttle Commander Richard "Dick" Scobee; Steve Nesbitt, NASA Chief Commentator; astronaut Norman Thagard; and Allan McDonald, former Morton Thiokol Director of the Space Shuttle Rocket Booster Project.

Presenter: Sue MacGregor
Producer: Emily Williams
Series Producer: David Prest

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:00 News Summary (b08n1xnb)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (b08m9kvp)
Series 18, Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

David O'Doherty, Richard Osman, Zoe Lyons and Marcus Brigstocke are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as bicycles, wine, trees and chocolate.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b08n20k3)
The Potato

Sheila Dillon digs up the remarkable story of how potatoes changed the world, offer a whole spectrum of flavour, and might shape our food future.

With Sheila are cook and food writer Anna Jones, Charles C. Mann - author of '1493 - How Europe's Discovery of the Americas Revolutionized Trade, Ecology and Life on Earth', and the potato revolutionary and agronomist Alan Wilson.

Presenter: Sheila Dillon
Producer: Rich Ward.


SUN 12:57 Weather (b08n1xnd)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b08n1xng)

Global news and analysis.


SUN 13:30 Recycled Radio (b082kbyt)
Series 5, Love and Marriage

Cartoonist Gerald Scarfe recycles and mashes the BBC's archive on Love and Marriage.

Love: life's great mystery. We reveal it in all its facets by the powerful slicing of leading romantic figures. Love at first sight, patriotism, the love that dare not speak its name, true love. As discussed by Barbara Cartland, Aristophanes, Michael Portillo, Charlotte Green and Tony Blair.

A sensual trapeze act of a programme. Fun, silly, thoughtful radio ... recycled.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.


SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08mdc3m)
The Savill Garden, Windsor Great Park - Correspondence Edition

Peter Gibbs and the panel answer listener correspondence from The Savill Garden, Windsor. Anne Swithinbank, Pippa Greenwood and Bunny Guinness delve into the postbag.

The panellists offer advice on what could be eating a Szechuan Pepper, suggest alternatives to Foxgloves and provide tips on what to grow in an unheated greenhouse.

Also, Peter Gibbs visits Ascension Island in the Atlantic to investigate hydroponic gardening.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b08n22rm)
Omnibus - The Passage of Time

Fi Glover introduces three conversations between friends in - or close to - retirement, about their shared memories of work and childhood in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.


SUN 15:00 Drama (b08n22rp)
The Hours, Episode 2

The radio debut for the Pulitzer winning book by Michael Cunningham inspired by Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway. Starring Rosamund Pike, Fenella Woolgar and Teresa Gallagher.

Three very separate women. They live in different locations and different eras but they are bound by their passion for Virginia Woolf's novel Mrs Dalloway. As they experience life on a Tuesday in June, their thoughts and experiences echo each other and become intertwined.

In Richmond in 1923, Virginia Woolf (Fenella Woolgar) sits down to write a novel calling her heroine Mrs Dalloway. In Los Angeles in 1949, Laura (Teresa Gallagher) sits in bed reading Mrs Dalloway. In New York in the 1990s, Clarissa (Rosamund Pike) goes out to buy flowers for a party mirroring the start of the day for the fictional Mrs Dalloway. The party is for her best friend Richard who long ago dubbed her Mrs Dalloway.

Weaving together themes of bisexuality, mental illness, middle age, the trials of creativity, parental guilt, marital discord, suburban isolation, infertility, friendship and loss - the three stories become one.

In the second and concluding episode, Virginia, Laura and Clarissa all experience conflict between their need to be free and their domestic responsibilities and ties. Virginia Woolf creates a pivotal moment when Mrs Dalloway sees a book in a shop window open at a page with a song from Shakespeare's Cymbeline. It haunts her - and it haunts Laura and Clarissa too. As their stories become interwoven there more and more parallels.

Michael Cunningham's enormously popular and critically successful book won the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and inspired the film starring Nicole Kidman. He called his story The Hours because that was a title that Virginia Woolf had considered. He says Mrs Dalloway was a huge influence on his life because he read the novel as a response to a dare when he was 15 and then decided to be a writer.

Sony Award winning writer Frances Byrnes adapted the book for radio.

Composer: Gene Pritsker
Pianist: Carollyn Eden
Sound Design: Steve Bond

Adapted for radio by Frances Byrnes
Directed by Judith Kampfner and Polly Thomas
Produced by Judith Kampfner
Executive Producer Celia De Wolff

A Corporation For Independent Media production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 16:00 Open Book (b08n22rr)
Lisa McInerney

Lisa McInerney won both the Baileys and Desmond Elliott prizes for her first novel. Her second, The Blood Miracles, is again set in Cork. It's a violent, gritty tale of a young drug dealer at the mercy of rival gangs.
Also on the programme, an exploration of regional writing and some great books about Singapore.


SUN 16:30 The Echo Chamber (b08n22rt)
Series 9, Zaffar Kunial

Ground-truthing poetry - Paul Farley hears new poems by Zaffar Kunial in the English Midland places they were made. Producer: Tim Dee.


SUN 17:00 Trump at Studio 54 (b08mb1gb)

Frances Stonor-Saunders explores how the young Donald Trump stormed into Manhattan from the outer boroughs in the late 1970s and headed straight for New York's most outrageous nightclub. He didn't dance, didn't drink, and didn't take drugs. So what was he doing in the cocaine-fuelled hothouse of the Disco revolution? And what was the link to Roy Cohn, infamous attack dog of the McCarthy era, go-to Attorney for the Mob and the man Trump was happy to call his mentor?

Producer: Fiona Leach
Research: Serena Tarling.


SUN 17:40 Profile (b08n1hnf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]


SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08n1xnj)

The latest shipping forecast.


SUN 17:57 Weather (b08n1xnl)

The latest weather forecast.


SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08n1xnn)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b08n1xnq)
Sheila McClennon

This week more uses for transparent wood than you can shake a see through stick at thanks to the comic genius of Kevin Eldon.
There's music from Carole King, Jake Thackray, Peter Skellern and a Honky Tonk Nun.
Joan Bakewell gets her chance to tell her side of the Harold Pinter Betrayal story
and fifty years after the doomed Soyuz1 space mission a drama imagines the final moments of Cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov. It is utterly brilliant and unbearably sad.
Join Sheila McClennon for her picks of the week.


SUN 19:00 The Archers (b08n22rw)

Toby reaches the end of the road, and Emma comes under fire.


SUN 19:15 Hal (b08n22ry)
Series 2, Exes

The second series of the sitcom with Hal Cruttenden finds the hapless house husband still trying to cope with his mid-life crisis and doubting his every move.

His wife Sam (Kerry Godliman) is still a highly successful business woman, his two daughters Lily and Molly continue to grow into teenagers and find their dad just a little annoying, his bitter and embittered sister Pippa (Abigail Cruttenden) has inconveniently decided to stay with Hal alongside her angry teenage son Oberon, racist neighbour Penny (Ronni Ancona) proves to be a major thorn in Hal's side and best mates Fergus (Ed Byrne) and Barry (Gavin Webster) hinder rather than help Hal's goal of finding himself.

In this third episode, Hal's vision of himself as a romantic partner are confounded as Sam reveals she's catching up with a 'blast from the past'. And refugee housemate Mahmoud causes a stir.

Written by Hal Cruttenden and Dominic Holland
Produced by Paul Russell

An Open Mike production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 19:45 Life at Absolute Zero (b08n233n)
Series 2, Houseroom

Lynne Truss observes the inhabitants of Meridian Cliffs, a small wind-battered town on the south coast of England.

Retired driving instructor Terry lives alone with his elderly Jack Russell, Thelonius, and his large collection of jazz records. When daytime TV's Got Any Stuff? comes to town looking for people with unwanted items to take part in the show, it provokes Terry into doing something he's been putting off. His mother died a while ago and her belongings are piled up in his garage. In among the ancient tea towels and assorted plastic ash trays, Terry finds a battered yellow suitcase whose contents take him by surprise.

Directed by Kate McAll
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


SUN 20:00 More or Less (b08mdcj0)
Living standards and Kate Bush maths

Jeremy Corbyn said this week that living standards are falling. This was one of the points he made in response to Theresa May's announcement of a snap General Election. It isn't the first time he has made this claim and so we decided to check it out. Tim Harford finds out from Senior Economist Jonathan Cribb at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, that there have been some interesting twists and turns to living standards.

A recent Guardian front page suggested that sexual harassment at British universities is at 'epidemic levels'. We looked at the data cited and we are not so sure the evidence backs that up.

Maths teacher and performer Kyle Evans takes us on a mathematical journey of some of his favourite songs. He checks the Beatles, Bob Dylan and Kate Bush for the accuracy of their lyrics.

Do the Conservatives really have a 20 point lead over Labour in the opinion polls? We have been sceptical in the past of the accuracy of polling. We speak to Matt Singh about whether we need to be worried again now.

Recent headlines suggested that returning to blue passports once we leave the EU may cost half a billion pounds. We discover this is not at all what it seems.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Charlotte McDonald.


SUN 20:30 Last Word (b08mdchy)
Michael Bogdanov, Louis Sarno, Sheila Abdus Salaam, Dick Potts, Don Rickles

Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.


SUN 21:00 Money Box (b08n1f8c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]


SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b08n1zyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]


SUN 21:30 In Business (b08md991)
From Ex-Offender to Entrepreneur

The number of women in prison globally is rapidly increasing. The Institute for Criminal Policy Research has calculated that between 2000 and 2015, the female prison population around the world grew by 50%, compared with an 18% rise in male prisoners over the same period. Re-offending rates are high, and overcoming the stigma of a prison sentence makes finding a job extremely tough. But can entrepreneurship break the cycle? Caroline Bayley speaks to six former women prisoners across three continents. They were convicted under different circumstances and of different crimes - but they're united in their passion for business, enterprise and self-employment which has allowed them to turn their lives around on the outside.

Producer: Alex Burton.


SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b08n1xns)

Carolyn Quinn and guests preview the week ahead at Westminster, plus Political Thinking with Nick Robinson - in-depth discussion on the big political themes shaping our world.


SUN 23:00 TED Radio Hour (b08mk2mp)
Series 4, Headspace

Guy Raz explores the powerful feelings of stress, depression and despair, with people who challenge assumptions about emotion.

A journey through fascinating ideas based on talks by riveting speakers on the TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) stage.


SUN 23:50 A Point of View (b08mdjyj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]



MONDAY 24 APRIL 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b08n1xqt)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b08mbjqh)
Elite education

ELITE EDUCATION: Laurie Taylor explores the ways in which the most prestigious schools and universities around the world sustain inequality. Debbie Epstein, Professor of Cultural Studies in Education at Roehampton University, talks about a far reaching study looking at the origins and costs of the 'export' of the British public school to other countries including Hong Kong and South Africa. Also, Natasha K. Warikoo, Associate Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education consider how elite students in America and Britain think about merit, race and privilege having gained admittance to one of the world's top universities.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.


MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b08n1zyh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]


MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08n1xqw)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08n1xqy)

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08n1xr0)

The latest shipping forecast.


MON 05:30 News Briefing (b08n1xr2)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08p5zg2)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Roger Hutchings.


MON 05:45 Farming Today (b08n1xr4)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


MON 05:56 Weather (b08n1xr6)

The latest weather forecast for farmers.


MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp38)
Puffin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Puffin. Far better-known for its comical looks than its calls, the puffin is a bird that that is recognised by many and has earned the nickname "sea-parrot" or "clown of the sea".


MON 06:00 Today (b08n1xr8)

News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


MON 09:00 Start the Week (b08n1xrb)
Eliza Carthy and Nicholas Hytner: Art for All

On Start the Week Kirsty Wark asks whether it's possible to produce art for all. She's joined by the former Director of the National Theatre Nicholas Hytner who looks at the balancing act between art and show business but argues for the power of a national theatre to become part of the cultural bloodstream. The designer Lucienne Day made the link between mass production and fine art, and the curator of an exhibition of her fabrics, Jennifer Harris, says her abstract designs could be seen in households across the country. Singer-songwriter Eliza Carthy is a member of one of British folk's great dynasties, and has helped popularise folk music for new generations, combining tradition with innovation. Nietzsche suggested that 'art raises its head where religions decline' and the philosopher Jules Evans who studies human ecstasy, asks whether art galleries and theatres can really help us come together, lose control and connect with something beyond ourselves.
Producer: Katy Hickman

Image: Eliza Carthy and The Wayward Band
Photographer: Steve Gullick.


MON 09:45 The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody (b08n29mk)
Series 1, Circe

Inua Ellam, who was born in Nigeria, begins the second week of responses by 10 contemporary poets, all refugees, exiles, migrants or their offspring, to Homer's Odyssey, which is full of parallels with the world today. Ellams's poem is inspired by the episode where the temptress, the witch Circe, turns Odysseus' men into pigs. As Odysseus goes to rescue his men, he's advised by the god Hermes that he should eat a certain herb to protect himself. In Ellam's update, all street rhythms and rhymes, Odysseus's ship is a broken-down bus, Circe's palace a warehouse club and Hermes is as much a dealer as a god.

With Inua Ellams himself, Maeve Bluebell Wells as Circe and Tom Forrister, Hermes.

Producer: Julian May.


MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08n1xrd)
General Election 2017 and women at Westminster, Lady Macbeth

What impact is the snap Election having on the selection of female candidates? With less than 7 weeks to go some parties are changing the way they're choosing who'll contest seats. Will women win or lose out on better representation at Westminster? Joining Jane, Conservative MP Maria Miller who chairs parliament's Women and Equalities Committee, Labour MP and former frontbencher Rachel Reeves, Lib Dem MP Sarah Olney, Angela Crawley MP and SNP shadow spokesperson on equalities, women and children, UKIP deputy chair Suzanne Evans, and Sarah Childs, Professor of Politics and Gender, University of Bristol.

Set in 19th century rural Northumberland, Lady Macbeth is about a woman in a loveless marriage who embarks on an affair and stops at nothing to get what she wants. The film stars BAFTA breakthrough Brit actress Florence Pugh. Florence and Alice Birch the writer of the film joins Jane to discuss.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Anne Peacock.


MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08n2dh6)
I Confess, Miranda

New drama from award-winning writer E V Crowe about one man's investigation into himself. Police officers Henry and Anna are getting married, but their engagement party hasn't gone as planned...

Writer ...... E V Crowe
Director ..... Abigail le Fleming

THE WRITER
E V Crowe won the Imison Award for the best debut radio drama in 2015 with HOW TO SAY GOODBYE PROPERLY, about a girl growing up in an army family. Her first play KIN was nominated for the Most Promising Playwright at the Evening Standard Awards, her second Royal Court play, 'Hero' was part of the Olivier Award winning Season in the Theatre Upstairs. Her most recent outing at The Royal Court was with THE SEWING GROUP in 2016. Other theatre work includes plays for Cardboard Citizens, the RSC and The Unicorn. TV includes GLUE for E4 and COMING UP for Channel 4.


MON 11:00 The Skin Trade (b08n2dh8)

Children are being lured into online gambling - not done with real money, but with the accessories that go with certain online games. Sometimes these are "skins" (cosmetic enhancements for in-game weapons), sometimes "coins". In some cases, the skins are worth tens of thousands of pounds, and can be bought and sold on third party websites. As a result they've become an alternative currency, easily accessible to children - although their parents probably know nothing about it. Some children have run up serious debts. It's a business worth billions of pounds a year.

The gambling sites are unlicenced, illegal, and make no attempt to check the age of the people gambling. In some cases the sites have been set up by Youtube stars who have millions of young followers; but in some of the worst cases, the Youtubers have not revealed that they actually own the sites they have been pushing. In other cases, Youtubers have been paid to make promotional videos where the odds have been fixed to make it look as though it's easy to make money.

In February this year, two British men, one of them a popular Youtuber, were convicted of running an illegal site which invited children to gamble "coins" in the FIFA game. But the site is still operational, and there are clone copies of it running across Europe. Other people who have run hugely lucrative unlicenced gambling sites seem to have got away with it and are still idolised by their young fans. Are the authorities willing or able to put a stop to this business?

Presenter/producer: Jolyon Jenkins.


MON 11:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b05xxkqt)
Series 6, Paisley

"Keep an eye on Paisley..." Benjamin Disraeli

Mark Steel returns to Radio 4 for a sixth series of the award winning show that travels around the country, researching the history, heritage and culture of six towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness, and performs a bespoke evening of comedy for the local residents.

In the penultimate episode Mark Steel visits the Renfrewshire town of Paisley, in Scotland, but definitely not in Glasgow. The largest town in Scotland, Paisley has a rich history; being at the centre of the weaving industry it gave its name to the famous Paisley pattern, as well as being the site of a landmark legal battle involving a snail in a bottle of ginger beer which led to a change in consumer law. More recently, Paisley elected Mhairi Black, the youngest MP since 1832.

Whilst in town Mark visits a 'Car Park In The Sky', has a wander round a 12th century Abbey with alien gargoyles and ends up having a game of pool with a dog called Murphy.

Written and performed by ... Mark Steel
Additional material by ... Pete Sinclair
Production co-ordinator ... Hayley Sterling
Producer ... Carl Cooper
It was a BBC Radio Comedy Production.


MON 12:00 News Summary (b08n1xrg)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 12:04 Home Front (b08lhs52)
24 April 1917 - Kitty Lumley

On this day in 1917, a funeral was held in Dover for the 7 British and 28 German casualties of the 2nd Battle of Dover Straits, while in Folkestone, there's a new start for Kitty.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


MON 12:15 You and Yours (b08n1xrj)
Noisy Europe, Dead cheap funerals, Alternative medicine

What can be done to limit noise pollution; and more people are choosing the 'David Bowie' option - eschewing funerals in favour of cremation only - what do you think?


MON 12:57 Weather (b08n1xrl)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 13:00 World at One (b08n1xrn)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


MON 13:45 One to One (b04581jc)
Rachel Johnson meets AL Kennedy

Rachel Johnson is struggling with writing her latest novel and talks to writer A.L. Kennedy. They compare distraction techniques, discuss setting rules on how many words you write before checking the Internet, and the benefits of having a special chair to do your writing. They also talk about how to make time to write, when the writing itself doesn't earn your living.
Producer: Sara Conkey.


MON 14:00 The Archers (b08n22rw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]


MON 14:15 Tommies (b08n2dmn)
24 April 1917

Night falls on a race to the Macedonian front, in this story by Jonathan Ruffle.

If they hadn't been too late to save Serbia, there would never have been 160,000 British troops stationed near Salonika, in what is now Northern Greece.

And if it weren't for one deserting Bulgarian soldier, Celestine de Tullio would be on her way home to England today, in widow's weeds.

But the British troops in Salonika have done so much digging in, and so little actual fighting, that they're universally mocked as 'The Gardeners of Salonika'.

So Celestine's need for action can only help them. Can't it?

Meticulously based on unit war diaries and eye-witness accounts, each episode of TOMMIES traces one real day at war, exactly 100 years ago.

And through it all, we'll follow the fortunes of Mickey Bliss and his fellow signallers, from the Lahore Division of the British Indian Army. They are the cogs in an immense machine, one which connects situations across the whole theatre of the war, over four long years.

Series created by Jonathan Ruffle
Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: Jonquil Panting.


MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b08n2f3h)
Semi-Final 2, 2017

(14/17)
In a North-South semi-final contest this week, two of the competitors are from Surrey and two from Cumbria. They all either won their heat over the past three months of the 2017 tournament, or narrowly missed out as a high-scoring runner-up. The standard promises to be high today, with another place in the Final at stake.

As ever, the 'Beat the Brains' feature also offers a listener the chance to have his or her question suggestions put to the panel, to see if their combined knowledge is up to the challenge.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.


MON 15:30 Food Programme (b08n20k3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]


MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b08n2gj4)
Charlotte Church

Charlotte Church presents a selection of the writing that means the most to her, from the books of Roald Dahl, Mark Twain and Carl Sagan to the lyrics of Jill Scott and Sam Beam (Iron and Wine). She talks about being in the spotlight from a young age, about her love of physics, about testifying at the Leveson Inquiry and becoming a feminist. She's joined on stage by her friends - the singer and actress Carys Eleri and musician Jonathan Powell - to read and sing her choices.

This episode of With Great Pleasure was recorded in front of an audience at The Norwegian Church in Charlotte's home town of Cardiff.

Producer: Mair Bosworth
Readers/Musicians: Carys Eleri and Jonathan Powell.


MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b08n2gj8)
Series 11, Subconscious

How much of our interaction with technology occurs out of our awareness, even when we have the illusion of control? Aleks Krotoski investigates.


MON 17:00 PM (b08n1xrq)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08n1xrs)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b08n2gjl)
Series 18, Episode 4

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

David O'Doherty, Richard Osman, Zoe Lyons and Marcus Brigstocke are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as colour, vegetables, pizza and carpets.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 19:00 The Archers (b08n2j9z)

David and Ruth reach a decision, while Brian has reason to celebrate.


MON 19:15 Front Row (b08n1xrv)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08n2dh6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


MON 20:00 Culture, Class and Marine Le Pen (b08n2jb1)

With the French elections fast approaching, and Marine le Pen continuing to prove popular in the polls, many commentators are suggesting that if she does win, or come close, it will be thanks to a disillusioned working class shifting its allegiance wholesale behind the Front National. Professor Andrew Hussey argues in this programme that such a reading is far too simplistic. While it's true many people will give le Pen their vote, he says that there are many more who will not, partly thanks to generational allegiance to the left, but also more interestingly because of the power of 'la culture populaire'. He visits the north of the country, the area where much of its industry has been traditionally based, and the setting for not only Edouard Louis' powerful recent novel 'The End of Eddy', but also the film 'Chez Nous' about a nurse who becomes a Front National representative. Andrew speaks to its star, Emilie Dequenne, about the reason people are tempted by le Pen's message, and hears from its director Lucas Belvaux and producer David Frenkel about the power of culture as a political weapon. Andrew then returns to Paris, to talk about not just the influence of music, comedy and TV, but also the lived culture in the markets and the streets of his own arrondissement just inside the southern Périphérique. The rich diversity and mixture of the people and the lives being lived here offer, he argues, a different and compelling narrative of France that is troubled, certainly, but for the most part functioning and powerful enough to withstand the advances of the far right.

Presenter: Andrew Hussey
Producer: Geoff Bird.


MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b08md6w5)
Cuba's Cancer Revolution

Lung cancer is America's biggest cancer killer. But there is hope: the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has sanctioned trials of CimaVax - a treatment created in Cuba that has extended the lives of hundreds of patients on the island. This is the first time a Cuban drug has been tested in the US.

American cancer patients got wind of CimaVax five years ago. Patients like Judy Ingels - an American with a stage 4 lung cancer diagnosis - arrive regularly in Havana, hoping for a miracle. It's traffic that's increased since the US / Cuba thaw.

The creation of Cuba's biotech industry was Fidel Castro's idea back in the 1980s. Today it employs 22,000 people, and sells drugs all over the world - excluding the US. When Presidents Obama and Castro made their momentous move to end hostilities, doctors and patients on both sides of the Florida Straits hoped everyone might benefit from an exchange of life-saving treatments. Now there's deep anxiety. Will President Trump re-freeze the thaw, and jeopardise a revolutionary collaboration?

For Crossing Continents, Linda Pressly explores Cuba's bio-tech industry. How has this small Caribbean nation been able to develop world-class drugs with its limited resources?


MON 21:00 The Shock (b08mb1fr)

Jude Rogers' father died suddenly when she was five, and she remembers every, vivid detail of the morning before she found out: the book she was reading in school, her walk through the school hall to meet her grandmother, the sun in her hair.

What happens when we go into shock? Anyone who has undergone a trauma remembers the strange mental and physical feelings such a moment brings, unlike any other. It may be triggered by an accident, a loss, death, devastating news, or lost love.

The feelings that came over us, the way the world changed shape, speed and sometimes colour, the superhuman strength we can feel, the incidental, insignificant details we notice and remember for years to come. What are the evolutionary reasons for this, and how do our brains change as a consequence?

In 'The Shock', writer Jude explores what happens when our brains go into survival mode during and after traumatic events.

War correspondent for The Times, Anthony Loyd, recalls the pin sharp focus of his senses which helped him escape his kidnappers, even after a severe punishment beating. John Samuel recalls the moment when he discovered he had 2 sisters, and a half brother, he never knew about (a good shock!) And Guardian columnist Suzanne Moore recalls the moment of discovering her daughters faced life threatening trauma.

Professor Sarah Garfinkle of Brighton and Sussex Medical School, explains the way the brain changes size and shape following trauma; Dr Gillian Forrester of Birkbeck University gives the evolutionary explanation for our instinctive reactions, and Jude heads out to an Essex airfield to meet 'flying trauma doctor' Simon Keane, at Essex & Herts Air Ambulance, who has to deal both with his own shock, and that of patients on a daily basis. Marc Wittman, psychologist and author, helps Jude understand why time speeds up, or slows down when we have a shock.

Science combined with powerful storytelling.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

Music sourced by Danny Webb.


MON 21:30 Start the Week (b08n1xrb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


MON 21:58 Weather (b08n1xrx)

The latest weather forecast.


MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b08n1xrz)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08n2jb3)
Rabbit, Run, Episode 6

The post-war novel that summed up middle-class white America and established John Updike as the major American author of his generation. Rabbit, Run is the first in a virtuoso Pullitzer Prize-wining quintet featuring hapless Harry Angstrom, whom we meet as a 26 year old former high school basketball star and suburban paragon in the midst of a personal crisis.

Episode 6 (of 10):
Ruth is furious when Harry learns that his wife Janice is in labour and rushes off, arriving at the hospital full of fear - only to fall head over heels for his new baby daughter.

Rabbit, Run established Updike as one of the major American novelists of his generation. In the New York Times he was praised for his "artful and supple" style in his "tender and discerning study of the desperate and the hungering in our midst's".

Radio 4 plans to broadcast all five novels in the series over the next few years.

Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b08mb1g2)
How Countries Got Their Names

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright find out how countries - including this one - got their names, and what they mean. Why isn't Greenland green? How is Venezuela like a Little Venice? And what's the only state in the world named after a woman? With Professor Richard Coates.
Producer Beth O'Dea.


MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08n2jb5)

Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



TUESDAY 25 APRIL 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b08n1xvf)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


TUE 00:30 The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody (b08n29mk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]


TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08n1xvh)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08n1xvk)

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08n1xvm)

The latest shipping forecast.


TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b08n1xvp)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08p645r)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Roger Hutchings.


TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b08n1xvr)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378x0n)
Rock Pipit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachan presents the rock pipit. The sight of a greyish bird no bigger than a sparrow, at home on the highest cliffs and feeding within reach of breaking waves can come as a surprise. In spring and early summer, the male Pipits become wonderful extroverts and perform to attract a female, during which they sing loudly to compete with the sea-wash.


TUE 06:00 Today (b08n1xvt)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b08n2ltq)
Graham MacGregor on tackling the demons in our diet

The food we eat is the greatest cause of death and illness worldwide. The main culprits - salt, sugar and fat - are now so embedded in our diet, in the form of processed foods, that most of us consume far too much.

Yet Professor Graham MacGregor doesn't believe it's up to us to reverse this situation. It's up to the food industry, he says, who manufacture the processed foods, to take the 'rubbish' out.

Now Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Wolfson Institute of Preventative Medicine, Graham MacGregor has spent much of his career campaigning tirelessly to persuade the food industry to do just that - to reduce these demons in our diet - firstly salt, and now sugar.

And he's had remarkable success. As a nation we now eat thirty thousand tonnes less salt each year than we did fifteen years ago, saving the NHS a staggering £1.5 billion per year.

Blood pressure lies at the heart of this huge saving and, as Graham explains to Jim al-Khalili, blood pressure is not a natural consequence of ageing. High blood pressure is simply a consequence of too much salt.

Producer: Beth Eastwood.


TUE 09:30 Whodunnit? (b0853n4n)
The Pregnant Teen Vanishes, The Mouse Trap

Half of England's pregnant teenagers have vanished. They didn't go missing, they just never conceived. And the teenage pregnancy rate plummeted. It's one of the greatest societal mysteries we've seen. A real-life Whodunnit. Everyone wants to crack the case and keep rates dropping.

In today's penultimate chapter, we look for the means by which teenage pregnancy rates fell off a cliff in 2008. Is it down to contraceptive technology?

Michael Blastland is on the case in this non-fiction investigation, unravelling the causes at the root of the biggest trends. These are true-life mysteries that creep up on us until the pattern of our lives is altered. He examines the culprits and punctures presumptions about causation and its implications for policy making.

Encountering red-herrings, false accusations, Government conspiracy, and hack journalism, finding out whodunnit in the case of a 50% reduction in teenage pregnancy is not going to be easy.

At its heart may lie a Government desire to prevent under 18 conception - a well-meaning intention, backed up by some strong evidence that socio-economic disadvantage can be both a cause and a consequence of teenage motherhood. But what makes huge swathes of teenagers change their behaviour?

Whodunnit? is a new series and a new kind of investigation. It owes its style to detective storytelling. But the cases are unequivocally real. These are societal mysteries - true-life changes in the pattern of our lives, changes that might even feature some of us.

Presenter: Michael Blastland
Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 09:45 The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody (b08n2lts)
Series 1, A Bag of Winds

In The Odyssey Aeolus, the god of winds, loves listening to Odysseus tell stories. He rewards him with a bag containing all the winds except the one that will blow him safely home to Ithaca. But his crew think the bag is full of treasure that Odysseus is concealing from them. When they are almost home they open it, the winds escape, and blow the ship back to Aeolus's island.

Zaffar Kunial's father comes from Kashmir, but in his poetic response to Homer he explores the more mysterious story of his mother's family. Kunial finds a place name on the map of Orkney that is the same as his grandmother's and unravels the odyssey of an ancestor who was blown about the world, from Egypt to Orkney in the Napoleonic Wars. And, like Odysseus, he was a soldier and storyteller. His family also wandered, crossing the sea to an island. The place they were trying to get to, then were ripped from, was home.

Producer: Julian May.


TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08n1xvw)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08n2ltv)
I Confess, Gemma

New drama from award-winning writer E V Crowe about one man's investigation into himself.

Four important people didn't turn up to Henry and Anna's engagement party, and Anna has sent Henry to find out why.

After a bruising encounter with his ex-wife, Miranda, Henry has reached his daughter Gemma's flat.

Writer ...... E V Crowe
Director ..... Abigail le Fleming

THE WRITER
E V Crowe won the Imison Award for the best debut radio drama in 2015 with HOW TO SAY GOODBYE PROPERLY, about a girl growing up in an army family. Her first play 'Kin' was nominated for the Most Promising Playwright at the Evening Standard Awards, her second Royal Court play, 'Hero' was part of the Olivier Award winning Season in the Theatre Upstairs. Her most recent outing at The Royal Court was with THE SEWING GROUP in 2016. Other theatre work includes plays for Cardboard Citizens, the RSC and The Unicorn. TV includes GLUE for E4 and COMING UP for Channel 4.


TUE 11:00 In Their Element (b08n2ltx)
Series 1, Mercury - Chemistry's Jekyll and Hyde

The most beautiful and shimmering of the elements, the weirdest, and yet the most reviled.

Chemist Andrea Sella tell the story of Mercury, explaining the significance of this element not just for chemistry, but also the development of modern civilisation.

It's been a a source of wonder for thousands of years - why is this metal a liquid? and what is its contribution to art, from the Stone Age to the Renaissance?

We look at how Mercury in integral to hundreds of years of scientific discoveries, from weather forecasting to steam engines and the detection of atomic particles it has a key role.

However Mercury is highly toxic in certain forms and ironically the industrial processes it helped create have led to global pollution which now threatens fish, wildlife and ourselves.

We ask is it time to say goodbye to Mercury?


TUE 11:30 Ella Fitzgerald: A Glorious Noise (b08n2v2x)

Acclaimed singer and Ella Fitzgerald devotee, Mara Carlyle, examines the life and vocal magnificence of the most beloved of jazz singers - marking the centenary of her birth.

Mara visits Harlem to trace Ella's ascent from humble origins to becoming one of America's greatest stars, exploring the voice that transformed her fortunes and changed the face of jazz forever.

She's joined by a host of singers including opera queen Jessye Norman, Dianne Reeves, Emiliana Torrini, ESKA, and her own aunt, jazz singer Norma Winstone.

Mara examines the magic of Ella's vocal prowess - her pure, clear tone, impeccable phrasing, virtuosic improvisation, and her tender expression of human emotion - that has kept audiences captivated since her auspicious debut at New York's Apollo Theater.

Produced by Zakia Sewell and Tobias Withers
A Cast Iron Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:00 News Summary (b08n1xvy)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 12:04 Home Front (b08lhs5l)
25 April 1917 - Walter Hamilton

On this day in 1917, there were protests in Plymouth against the light treatment of conscientious objectors, while in Folkestone, Reverend Hamilton is feeling less lenient.

Singers ..... Nancy Cole, Ksynia Loeffler, Stephen Jeffes, Tom Raskin, Charles Gibbs

Written by Shaun McKenna
Singers conducted by Sam Evans
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b08n1xw0)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.


TUE 12:57 Weather (b08n1xw2)

The latest weather forecast.


TUE 13:00 World at One (b08n1xw4)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


TUE 13:45 One to One (b045z8wd)
Rachel Johnson meets Michael Frayn

In the second of two programmes about the art of writing, Rachel Johnson confesses to struggling with her latest book which is 'supposed to be funny'. In this programme, she meets novelist and playwright Michael Frayn to find out how he organises his writing day, how he gets an audience laughing, and his thoughts on the art of writing farce.
Producer: Sara Conkey.


TUE 14:00 The Archers (b08n2j9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]


TUE 14:15 Tumanbay (b08n3mjm)
Series 2, The Last Boat

Tumanbay, the wealthiest city on earth, has been conquered by a brutal religious regime, the followers of Maya. Responsible for rooting out heretics is Barakat (Hiran Abeysekera), a ruthless and uncompromising zealot.

As refugees scramble to escape the city, Gregor (Rufus Wright), previously Master of the Palace Guard, has sworn an oath to the new rulers and struggles to survive as the new regime sets about dismantling the city of everything of value.

Tumanbay is created by John Dryden and Mike Walker and inspired by the Mamluk slave rulers of Egypt.

Orignal Music by Sacha Puttnam and Jon Ouin

Sound Design by Steve Bond
Sound Edited by James Morgan and Andreina Gomez
Script Edited by Abigail Youngman

Produced by Emma Hearn, Nadir Khan and John Dryden
Written and Directed by John Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08n1f87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]


TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b08n2v3f)
Insulation for the Nation

Our homes are responsible for 25% of our carbon emissions in the UK. Tom Heap asks if we can retrofit our homes to fight climate change.


TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b08n2wcn)
Jacqueline Wilson talks to Michael Rosen about language

Writer Jacqueline Wilson talks to Michael Rosen about her love of language and how she came up with the idea of Tracy Beaker. She describes her imaginative life as a child, walking along telling stories to herself under her breath, fascinated by words. She can trace her interest in writing real and believable children to the books that she loved as a child, from Little Women to Lolita..
Producer Beth O'Dea.


TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b08n2wcq)
Series 42, Anton du Beke on Arnold Palmer

Biographical series presented by Matthew Parris.


TUE 17:00 PM (b08n1xw6)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08n1xw8)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


TUE 18:30 Rob Newman's Neuropolis (b08n2wcs)
Series 1, When You're Snarling

One of Britain's finest comedians, Rob Newman, is our guide on a unique audio odyssey of the brain, taking in everything from love and guilt to robot co-workers and the unlikely importance of prehistoric trousers.

It's a witty, fact-packed series mixing stand-up and sketches, challenging notions of neuroscience with a new theory that's equal parts enlightening and hilarious.

Rob offers an alternative to some of the more bizarre claims in modern popular science, as well as rejigging theories of our brains in light of what we know about nature, artificial intelligence and Belinda Carlisle.

Created by the award-winning team behind Robert Newman's Entirely Accurate Encyclopaedia of Evolution.

Written by and starring Rob Newman
Co-starring Claire Price and Richard McCabe

Producer: Jon Harvey
Executive Producer: Richard Wilson
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 19:00 The Archers (b08phncg)

Ambridge Hall is invaded, and Tom angles for a better deal.


TUE 19:15 Front Row (b08n1xwb)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08n2ltv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


TUE 20:00 The Self Employment Paradox (b08n2wcx)

Radio 4 documentary.


TUE 20:40 In Touch (b08n1xwd)

News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.


TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b08n2wcz)

Claudia Hammond explores the latest developments in the worlds of psychology, neuroscience, and mental health.


TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b08n2ltq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b08n1xwg)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08n2wt2)
Rabbit, Run, Episode 7

The post-war novel that summed up middle-class white America and established John Updike as the major American author of his generation. Rabbit, Run is the first in a virtuoso Pullitzer Prize-wining quintet featuring hapless Harry Angstrom, whom we meet as a 26 year old former high school basketball star and suburban paragon in the midst of a personal crisis.

Episode 7 (of 10):
Rabbit is reunited with his wife, his old basketball coach and his in-laws, and turns over a new leaf. Yet he can't help wondering if the minister's wife Lucy is flirting with him.

Rabbit, Run established Updike as one of the major American novelists of his generation. In the New York Times he was praised for his "artful and supple" style in his "tender and discerning study of the desperate and the hungering in our midst's".

Radio 4 plans to broadcast all five novels in the series over the next few years.

Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:00 Kevin Eldon Will See You Now (b08n2wt4)
Series 3, Some Owls Were Harmed During the Making of This Programme

Comedy's best kept secret ingredient returns with another series of his own sketch show. In this episode, a love song, a dead scarecrow, a Jiffy Bag and Kylie Minogue. Some owls were harmed during the making of this programme.

Kevin Eldon is a comedy phenomenon. He's been in virtually every major comedy show in the last fifteen years, but not content with working with the likes of Chris Morris, Steve Coogan, Armando Iannucci, Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse, Stewart Lee, Julia Davis and Graham Linehan, he's also created his own comedy series for BBC Radio 4.

After all the waiting - Kevin Eldon Will See You Now.

Also starring Amelia Bullmore (I'm Alan Partridge, Scott & Bailey), Julia Davis (Nighty Night), Paul Putner (Little Britain), Justin Edwards (The Thick Of It), David Reed (The Penny Dreadfuls) and Rosie Cavaliero (Alan Partridge, Harry and Paul).

Written by Kevin Eldon with additional material by Jason Hazeley and Joel Morris (A Touch Of Cloth and, yes, those modern Ladybird books)

Original music by Martin Bird
Produced and directed by David Tyler

A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4.


TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08n1xwj)

News from Westminster.



WEDNESDAY 26 APRIL 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b08n1xyp)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


WED 00:30 The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody (b08n2lts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]


WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08n1xyr)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08n1xyt)

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08n1xyw)

The latest shipping forecast.


WED 05:30 News Briefing (b08n1xyy)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08p4tv4)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Roger Hutchings.


WED 05:45 Farming Today (b08n1xz0)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tpqx)
Gannet

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Gannet. The North Atlantic is the international stronghold for this impressive seabird - with its wingspan of nearly 2 metres, remorseless expression and dagger-like bill.


WED 06:00 Today (b08n1xz2)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


WED 09:00 Only Artists (b08n2y3b)
Series 1, Yinka Shonibare and David Adjaye

Series in which two artists discuss creative questions. The artist Yinka Shonibare meets international architect Sir David Adjaye.


WED 09:30 Everything You Think About Sport Is Wrong (b085gs4k)
The Novel

Simon Barnes continues his series challenging conventional thinking about sport, and argues that sport produces narratives worthy of a novel.

Simon argues that sport is as much a novel as Ulysses or Tristram Shandy, with a cast of characters as rich as villains Lance Armstrong, Hansie Cronje and the 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Hydrant,' Tiger Woods, and tragedies as profound as that of Oscar Pistorius. He draws parallels between Andrew Flintoff's legendary performance in the 2005 Ashes and Lord of the Rings, and he discusses the amazing - and amazing variety of - narratives in sport with David Maraniss, associate editor at the Washington Post, himself addicted to sport stories.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 09:45 The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody (b08n2y3d)
Series 1, Telemachus

In China today many children are left in rural villages with grandparents while their parents work vast distances away in the coastal cities. Odysseus, similarly, abandons his son Telemachus and goes to war. Sarah Howe, winner of the T. S.Eliot Award, was born in Hong Kong. In her response to Homer Telemachus is a Chinese girl left in the countryside. She wants to leave, but for reasons more complicated than to look for her father.

Producer: Julian May.


WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08n1xz4)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b08n2y3g)
I Confess, Joe

New drama from award-winning writer E V Crowe about one man's investigation into himself.

Four important people didn't turn up to Henry and Anna's engagement party, and Anna has sent Henry to find out why.

After difficult encounters with his ex-wife and his daughter, Henry is hoping for some comfort from his best friend, Joe.

Writer ...... E V Crowe
Director ..... Abigail le Fleming

THE WRITER
E V Crowe won the Imison Award for the best debut radio drama in 2015 with HOW TO SAY GOODBYE PROPERLY, about a girl growing up in an army family. Her first play 'Kin' was nominated for the Most Promising Playwright at the Evening Standard Awards, her second Royal Court play, 'Hero' was part of the Olivier Award winning Season in the Theatre Upstairs. Her most recent outing at The Royal Court was with THE SEWING GROUP in 2016. Other theatre work includes plays for Cardboard Citizens, the RSC and The Unicorn. TV includes GLUE for E4 and COMING UP for Channel 4.


WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b08n2yhc)
Jacqueline and Seren - Family Comes First

A granddaughter who changed school and friends to make her mother's life easier shares her philosophy of life with her grandmother. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


WED 11:00 Culture, Class and Marine Le Pen (b08n2jb1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]


WED 11:30 Believe It! (b08n2yhf)
Series 3, Legacy

The third series of writer Jon Canter's version of Richard Wilson's autobiography. Will you believe any of it?

After a recent brush with death, Richard considers the legacy he will leave behind. So he ponders the best way to bequeath something to the next generation.

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:00 News Summary (b08n1xz6)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 12:04 Home Front (b08lhs6l)
26 April 1917 - Jessie Moore

On this day in 1917, On this day in 1917, the YMCA appealed for workers in their base camps in France, and Jessie Moore would rather be anywhere than here.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


WED 12:15 You and Yours (b08n1xz8)

Consumer affairs programme.


WED 12:57 Weather (b08n1xzb)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 13:00 World at One (b08n1xzd)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


WED 13:45 One to One (b038c5ql)
Frank Gardner talks to Dr Stuart Butchart

In 2004 , the BBC's Security Correspondent Frank Gardner was shot several times by terrorists while reporting in Saudi Arabia, some of those bullets hit the core of his body and damaged his spinal nerve which means that he can no longer use his legs and is in a wheelchair for the rest of his life. This was for him a catastrophic life changing injury. But while he was in hospital he received an email from someone who too had been shot in the back and said- 'I've got some advice and tips on how to cope'. In this first of three programmes for the series 'One to One' Frank Gardner explores how one copes with a life changing injury and begins by talking to Dr Stuart Butchart who gave Frank hope.

Presenter : Frank Gardner
Producer : Perminder Khatkar.


WED 14:00 The Archers (b08phncg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]


WED 14:15 Drama (b08n3lxs)
The Progress of the Soul of Lizzie Calvin

THE PROGRESS OF THE SOUL OF LIZZIE CALVIN

In poet John Donne's great unfinished work of the same name , he plays with the ancient idea of the transmigration of souls, that a spirit might be reincarnated in many different lives. For contemporary poet Michael Symmons Roberts, the idea of making a new 'Progress of the Soul' has long been an ambition. Both poets have serious fun with this idea, imagining a soul passing, dissatisfied with each successive form of life, through a fantastical range of insects, plants, fish, animals and on, trying to reach its ultimate fulfilment as a human being.
The soul , played by Glenda Jackson is the driving voice of the drama - key narrator and storyteller. Beginning in the body of Lizzie Calvin, a minister in waiting , the soul journeys through different forms of life, from a flea on a dogs back to a mandrake . This is a new radio poem that is irreverent and serious, lyrical and disturbing, witty and heart breaking . It ultimately questions the idea of the soul, what its relevance is in contemporary society .

Written by Michael Symmons Roberts
Sound producer Steve Brooke
Directed in Salford by Susan Roberts.


WED 15:00 Money Box (b08n1xzg)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.


WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b08n2wcz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]


WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b08n3wnk)

Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.


WED 16:30 The Media Show (b08n1xzj)

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.


WED 17:00 PM (b08n1xzl)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08n1xzn)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


WED 18:30 The New Blur Album (b04jj113)

You always remember where you were when you first heard certain pieces of music, watched films that were important to you, were told of big news events. Sometimes when you hear a song you are transported back to the first time you heard it, you remember everything: where you were, who you were with, what was going on in your life that means it was so important to you.

If you were growing up in the nineties it is likely you can chart your life by where you were as each new Blur album was released. This is the story of a Blur fan, who looks back on his life remembering where he was the first time he heard 'the new Blur album; from their first in 1992, to seventh and most recent release in 2003. From being at school, to his first jobs and relationships, this is John's story of life, love, friendship and growing older, with the new Blur album as a constant backdrop.


WED 19:00 The Archers (b08n3wnx)

Matt lays it on thick, and Usha lends an ear.


WED 19:15 Front Row (b08n1xzq)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08n2y3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]


WED 20:00 Glass Half Full (b08n3wp4)
Series 1, Digital technology is making children's lives richer

Is nostalgia for the past and fear of the future preventing us from recognising the huge benefits of digital technology for children?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists. She asks not only what they think about the effect digital technology has on children, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

Baroness Martha Lane Fox, an invincible optimist and tech entrepreneur, says children are naturally predisposed to learn, and digital technology provides endless opportunities for development. She considers that we romanticise traditional childhoods spent outside in the fresh air but, in reality, children must tap the social and educational potential of tablets and smart phones if they are to be prepared for life in our digital world.

Andrew Keen, an entrepreneur himself as well as being one of the most influential pessimistic commentators on the digital age, takes the opposite view. He believes our children are immersed in digital media before they can walk, stunting their development, damaging their health, and making them less able to interact with real-life people. He says the internet monetises every aspect of our children's lives, their personal data harvested for the use of governments and corporations.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - Professor Sugata Mitra, educationalist Sue Palmer, and technology expert and presenter Julia Hardy.

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 20:45 Four Thought (b08n3wpd)
Football for Good

Andrea Cooper argues that football is an 'electric currency', and explains why she believes it can change the world for the better.

Andrea is Head of the Liverpool Football Club Foundation, and in this talk she describes watching young people listening intently to their favourite footballers, and how her foundation now hopes to work with the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in the developing world. She hopes to use the deep wellspring of affection amongst Liverpool Football Club's immense global fanbase to encourage young fans to pay more attention to healthcare messages. It could, she says, tilt the world on its axis, and prove a concept which would work elsewhere.

Producer: Giles Edwards.


WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b08n2v3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]


WED 21:30 Only Artists (b08n2y3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


WED 21:58 Weather (b08n1xzs)

The latest weather forecast.


WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b08n1xzv)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08n3wpq)
Rabbit, Run, Episode 8

The post-war novel that summed up middle-class white America and established John Updike as the major American author of his generation. Rabbit, Run is the first in a virtuoso Pullitzer Prize-wining quintet featuring hapless Harry Angstrom, whom we meet as a 26 year old former high school basketball star and suburban paragon in the midst of a personal crisis.

Episode 8 (of 10):
Janice brings the new baby home from hospital and Harry is overjoyed - until he is thwarted in his desires and decides to run again, at least for a night, with tragic consequences.

Rabbit, Run established Updike as one of the major American novelists of his generation. In the New York Times he was praised for his "artful and supple" style in his "tender and discerning study of the desperate and the hungering in our midst's".

Radio 4 plans to broadcast all five novels in the series over the next few years.

Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


WED 23:00 Tom Parry's Fancy Dressed Life (b08n3wps)
Series 1, Texas

Episode 4: Texas. It's the final party of the year and Tom is off to a wedding. Can a sweepstake, some cowboy boots and a little bit of line dancing end Tom's fancy dressed year on a high?

Tom Parry is an award winning comedian, writer and actor whose credits include Miranda, Phone Shop and Drunk History among many others. As a stand up, he most recently gained critical acclaim and an Edinburgh Comedy Award Best Newcomer nomination for his debut hour 'Yellow T-Shirt'. For more than a decade he has been part of the multi-award winning sketch team Pappy's. Together they have performed 6 sell out shows at the Edinburgh Fringe, completed 4 national tours, gigged all over the world, and created, written and starred in the sitcom 'Badults' for BBC3.

Cast: Tom Parry, Ben Clarke, Celeste Dring, Gareth Pierce
Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.


WED 23:15 Beef and Dairy Network (b08n3xgg)
Series 1, Episode 1

The number one podcast for those involved or just interested in the production of beef animals and dairy herds.

In this episode, we interview Dr David Pin from the European Space Agency about the possibility of cows on Mars, and hear your letters about getting too attached to meat beasts.

The original Beef And Dairy Network Podcast series can be found at www.maximumfun.org

Written and performed by Benjamin Partridge and Mike Wozniak
Produced by Benjamin Partridge.


WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08n1xzx)

Sean Curran reports from Westminster.



THURSDAY 27 APRIL 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b08n1y2d)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


THU 00:30 The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody (b08n2y3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]


THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08n1y2g)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08n1y2j)

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08n1y2l)

The latest shipping forecast.


THU 05:30 News Briefing (b08n1y2n)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08pj7vw)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Roger Hutchings.


THU 05:45 Farming Today (b08n1y2q)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sbyh9)
Shag

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Shag. Perhaps the least vocal of all British birds they hiss and belch to warn off interlopers getting too close to their nest. They are seabirds and their name comes from the shaggy crest on the top of their head.


THU 06:00 Today (b08n1y2s)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


THU 09:00 In Our Time (b08n1y2v)
The Egyptian Book of the Dead

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the text and context of The Book of the Dead, also known as the Book of Coming Forth by Day, the ancient Egyptian collections of spells which were intended to help the recently deceased navigate the underworld. They flourished under the New Kingdom from C16th BC until the end of the Ptolemaic era in C1st BC, and drew on much earlier traditions from the walls of pyramids and on coffin cases. Almost 200 spells survive, though no one collection contains all of them, and one of the best known surrounds the weighing of the heart, the gods' final judgement of the deceased's life.

With

John Taylor

Kate Spence

and

Richard Bruce Parkinson

Producer: Simon Tillotson.


THU 09:45 The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody (b08n3z6q)
Series 1, Odysseus in Kabul

Reza Mohammadi was born in Kandahar and is one of the leading poets writing in Persian today. In his poem Odysseus, returning from war, somehow winds up in Kabul and cannot escape it. Here 'the capital of stone', he is doomed to witness murder and decapitation of humans and gods alike. Even the topography of the Afghan capital parallels Homer, and all is soured by war. The mountain where Apollo resides is where the Scud missiles were fired from. The Tora Bora complex is like Polyphemus, the Cyclops's, cave. One of the holiest places in the city is where, now, addicts go to smoke opium. Nick Laird, the poet from Northern Ireland, worked with Mohammadi to render his poem into English. It is a work of astonishing, disturbing images, and yet is compellingly beautiful.

The Afghan musician Milad Yousofi plays specially composed music on the rubab.

Producer: Julian May.


THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08n1y2x)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08n3z6t)
I Confess, Karen

New drama from award-winning writer E V Crowe about one man's investigation into himself.

Four important people didn't turn up to Henry and Anna's engagement party, and Anna has sent Henry to find out why.

Henry's come to see his colleague Karen, the final name on the list. But his party is the last thing on her mind: Vicky Cranshaw, the victim of a domestic violence case she and Henry worked on, has been murdered.

Writer ...... E V Crowe
Director ..... Abigail le Fleming

THE WRITER
E V Crowe won the Imison Award for the best debut radio drama in 2015 with HOW TO SAY GOODBYE PROPERLY, about a girl growing up in an army family. Her first play 'Kin' was nominated for the Most Promising Playwright at the Evening Standard Awards, her second Royal Court play, 'Hero' was part of the Olivier Award winning Season in the Theatre Upstairs. Her most recent outing at The Royal Court was with THE SEWING GROUP in 2016. Other theatre work includes plays for Cardboard Citizens, the RSC and The Unicorn. TV includes GLUE for E4 and COMING UP for Channel 4.


THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b08n404n)
Wives Wanted in the Faroes

Men in the Faroe Islands are having to look far beyond their shores for marriage. The remote, windswept archipelago between Norway and Iceland, with close ties to Denmark, has seen an influx of women from South-East Asia who have come to marry Faroese men. In recent years the islands have been experiencing a declining population. Young women in particular have been leaving the islands, often for education, and not returning. One complaint from them is that their close-knit community has too conservative and masculine a culture where sheep farming, hunting and fishing are still dominant. For some women Faroese society is simply too small, too constraining. There are now approximately 2,000 fewer women of marriageable age in the total population of 50,000. In response, some men have been looking elsewhere for partners, from countries like Thailand and the Philippines. For Crossing Continents, Tim Ecott meets these foreign women adjusting to life in this isolated group of islands where the elements are harsh and the language impenetrable.

John Murphy producing.


THU 11:30 Mirrored (b08n404q)

A chronological journey through life - from childhood to old age - via a series of interviews recorded with people as they confront their reflection in the mirror.

What do they see? How has their face changed? What stories lie behind the wrinkles and scars?

We hear the initial wonder of the small child give way to the embarrassment of the teenager and the acceptance of later-life.

Created by multi-award-winning documentary-maker, Cathy FitzGerald, this moving programme hops from home to home in contemporary Britain, catching its subjects in bedrooms and bathrooms and lounges, in order to hold up a mirror to the ageing process itself.

A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:00 News Summary (b08n1y2z)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 12:04 Home Front (b08lhs7q)
27 April 1917 - Hilary Pearce

On this day in 1917, a Liverpool captain was sentenced to nearly two years in prison for helping people avoid conscription, while in Folkestone, Hilary gets his call up papers.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


THU 12:15 You and Yours (b08n1y31)

Consumer affairs programme.


THU 12:57 Weather (b08n1y33)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 13:00 World at One (b08n1y35)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


THU 13:45 One to One (b07428bm)
Sathnam Sanghera talks to Janice Turner

Sathnam Sanghera explores class. As the son of an illiterate factory worker who ended up going to Cambridge and working for The Times, he now regards himself as firmly middle class.
In the first of his two programmes for One to One, he interviews Janice Turner, a fellow journalist from The Times, at her home in South London. She had a similar journey to Sathnam; she moved from working class Doncaster to the London media establishment, but she feels very differently about which class she belongs to.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.


THU 14:00 The Archers (b08n3wnx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]


THU 14:15 Drama (b06tr5tf)
Where This Service Will Terminate

By Katherine Jakeways

Suzie's never been to Cornwall before, but somehow she finds herself on the Cornish Riviera Express, hurtling from Paddington to Penzance. She sits next to David and over the course of an eventful five hour journey an intense relationship develops.

A romantic comedy from writer Katherine Jakeways. The Radio Times has described Katherine as 'new Victoria Wood' saying "her character comedy is so acutely observed and so sharp that it's in danger of causing permanent injury." Starring Rosie Cavaliero (Prey) and Justin Edwards (The Thick of It).

And you can find out what happens next tomorrow with Where this Service will Continue.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


THU 15:00 Open Country (b08n46dd)
The Future of Sherwood Forest

Sherwood Forest in Nottinghamshire is home to one of our most enduring legends, that of Robin Hood. David Lindo learns how the man in green tights who stole from the rich and gave to the poor is still important to the people who live within the Sherwood Forest area, and to the many visitors who come here. The truth about the man behind the legend remains in dispute but the ancient oak trees remain. Some, like the Major Oak, are up to one thousand years old and need support to remain standing. They provide precious dead wood habitat for many species and this is one reason why the RSPB are taking over the management of the national nature reserve and building a brand new visitor centre to help people understand how precious this ancient habitat is.

The forest landscape was created and preserved by medieval Kings and David visits King John's Palace in Kings Clipstone to find out how the ruins we see there today could be part of a much bigger story about the real time in which Robin and his Merry Men would have roamed the woods. And Robin Hood is also the inspiration for Sherwood's anti-fracking campaigners, they fear that trees like the Major Oak could be affected if planned seismic surveys in the wider area lead to drilling for shale gas.


THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b08n1zyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]


THU 15:30 Open Book (b08n22rr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]


THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b08n46dg)
Wish You Were Here

With Francine Stock

Writer/director David Leland revisits Worthing, the setting of his classic comedy drama Wish You Were Here, on its 30th anniversary.

William Oldroyd discusses his acclaimed low budget drama Lady Macbeth.


THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b08n1y37)

Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.


THU 17:00 PM (b08n1y39)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08n1y3c)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


THU 18:30 Reluctant Persuaders (b08n46dj)
Series 2, Think Different

Starring Nigel Havers, Mathew Baynton and Josie Lawrence. Welcome back to Hardacre's, the worst advertising agency in London, for the second series of Edward Rowett's award-winning sitcom.

This week, things are looking up for Hardacre's. They're pitching for the biggest account of their lives - the cutting edge new smartphone, the Cosmos X10.

It's the day of the big pitch and Hardacre (Nigel Havers), Joe (Mathew Baynton), Teddy (Kieran Hodgson), Amanda (Josie Lawrence), and Laura (Olivia Nixon) are waiting to be called in. They may be waiting rather a long time, in fact, as they appear to have turned up six hours early.

As the day unfolds and the wait continues, it emerges that some of the team may have something to hide. Is there more at stake than meets the eye? And what does it have to do with Charles Blackwell (guest star Martin Jarvis), Hardacre's oldest and dearest nemesis?

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 19:00 The Archers (b08n46dl)

Pip finds the comfort she needs, and Justin cannot be calmed.


THU 19:15 Front Row (b08n1y3f)

Arts news, interviews and reviews.


THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08n3z6t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b08n46dn)

Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.


THU 20:30 In Business (b08n4db3)
The Big Fat Greek Struggle

How have private businesses fared in Greece since the crisis began? The economy has shrunk by nearly a third and unemployment has soared. So what have companies had to do to survive? And have any managed to actually thrive? Louise Cooper meets hopeful entrepreneurs, embattled importers, and a few small companies going underground in a bid to avoid rising costs and disappearing demand. Can Greece ever return to growth?

Producer: Rosamund Jones.


THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b08n1y37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]


THU 21:30 In Our Time (b08n1y2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]


THU 21:58 Weather (b08n1y3h)

The latest weather forecast.


THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b08n1y3k)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08n4db5)
Rabbit, Run, Episode 9

The post-war novel that summed up middle-class white America and established John Updike as the major American author of his generation. Rabbit, Run is the first in a virtuoso Pullitzer Prize-wining quintet featuring hapless Harry Angstrom, whom we meet as a 26 year old former high school basketball star and suburban paragon in the midst of a personal crisis.

Episode 9 (of 10):
Harry learns terrible news of his daughter, Rebecca. He becomes convinced, for the moment, that these are the wages of his sin.

Rabbit, Run established Updike as one of the major American novelists of his generation. In the New York Times he was praised for his "artful and supple" style in his "tender and discerning study of the desperate and the hungering in our midst's".

Radio 4 plans to broadcast all five novels in the series over the next few years.

Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


THU 23:00 Start/Stop (b04th9fg)
Series 2, Glastonbury

Hit comedy about three marriages in various states of disrepair. Starring Jack Docherty, Kerry Godliman, John Thomson, Fiona Allen, Charlie Higson and Sally Bretton.
This week the three couples have tickets for Glastonbury. But the festival dates clash with Cathy's dad's birthday. Barney fears he will be marooned in a care home while his friends have the time of their lives at the music festival.
At the festival Alice tries to lose David, Evan tries to get David to loosen his tie, and Fiona tries to get Alice to lose her inhibitions and talk about Barney.
Meanwhile in the care home Barney is losing the will to live while being made to sing 'If You're Happy And You Know It Clap Your Hands'.

Producer ..... Claire Jones.


THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08n1y3m)

Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.



FRIDAY 28 APRIL 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b08n1y5m)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.


FRI 00:30 The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody (b08n3z6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]


FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08n1y5p)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08n1y5r)

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08n1y5t)

The latest shipping forecast.


FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b08n1y5w)

The latest news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08p2fz7)

A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Roger Hutchings.


FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b08n1y5y)

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.


FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tvnnw)
Sandwich Tern

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Steve Backshall presents the sandwich tern. Sandwich terns are the UK's largest breeding terns and have shaggy black crests and a black bill with a yellow tip. They live in colonies on shingle or sandy beaches and were first described from birds seen in Sandwich in the 1780s by William Boys, a Kentish surgeon.


FRI 06:00 Today (b08n1y60)

Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.


FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b08lg8wl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]


FRI 09:45 The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody (b08n4hm6)
Series 1, The Day of the Daag

In the final episode of The Odyssey Project, Radio 4's Poet in residence, who has curated and introduced the series, reads his take on Odysseus's homecoming. He takes on the suitors who have been feasting at his expense and pestering his wife for her hand in marriage, so they can take over his land. It's a bloody scene that ends with Odysseus and his man slaying every suitor. In Nagra's poem, his protagonist, Daag, a modern day migrant living in Sheffield, returns to his village home in the Punjab to reclaim his wife. To reclaim his wife from the men of the ruling caste who have exploited the corrupt region by running their own harem and gambling den. Daag is from the knife-cutter caste, he has plenty of blades and, in a Bollywood way, knows how to handle them.

Producer: Julian May.


FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08n1y62)

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.


FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08n4hmc)
I Confess, Anna

New drama from award-winning writer E V Crowe about one man's investigation into himself.

Four important people didn't turn up to Henry and Anna's engagement party, and Henry's been to see them all, as Anna wanted him to. They've blamed the way he's treated them in the past, but he swears he's changed. However on his return home Anna, filled with misgivings and unnecessarily worried about an important exam, has told Henry that she doesn't want to marry him anymore.

It's time for Henry to choose who he wants to be...

Writer ...... E V Crowe
Director ..... Abigail le Fleming

THE WRITER
E V Crowe won the Imison Award for the best debut radio drama in 2015 with HOW TO SAY GOODBYE PROPERLY, about a girl growing up in an army family. Her first play 'Kin' was nominated for the Most Promising Playwright at the Evening Standard Awards, her second Royal Court play, 'Hero' was part of the Olivier Award winning Season in the Theatre Upstairs. Her most recent outing at The Royal Court was with THE SEWING GROUP in 2016. Other theatre work includes plays for Cardboard Citizens, the RSC and The Unicorn. TV includes GLUE for E4 and COMING UP for Channel 4.


FRI 11:00 The Lost Cockney Voice (b08n4hmh)

What does the way we speak say about us? Why do we still judge each other that way? And why do so many of us still feel the need to "improve" our accent to fit in?

Cole Moreton did that as a teenager, trying to escape the East End, but now he goes back to understand where he came from - and to search for the unique but vanishing voice of his late grandmother's generation.

They grew up during and after wartime listening to posh announcers on the wireless and sounded half Cockney, half like the Queen. Can there be any women like that left in the same place today, transformed as it is by immigration and gentrification?

The East Enders have left for Essex and Kent and experts say true Cockney will die out within a couple of decades. Meanwhile a new accent is emerging on the old streets - Multicultural London English. Cole meets modern grandmothers of all backgrounds in the East End today, as he searches in vain for the voice of his Nan.

The real Queen sounds more like a Cockney than she used to - but she's not available for interview. Dame Vera Lynn sings him a bedtime lullaby. June Brown, who plays Dot Cotton, says they don't talk proper Cockney on EastEnders any more - it's all "lazy talk" now.

But finally, Cole finds Beryl, a formidable force in Forest Gate at the age of 91, who sounds exactly like his Nan.

Presenter: Cole Moreton
Producer: Jonathan Mayo
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 11:30 Gloomsbury (b08n4hmk)
Series 4, Bosom Chums

At Sizzlinghurst, Mrs Gosling is on the point of divorce - which is seriously affecting her cooking. Henry has had enough and is on the verge of firing the Goslings, so Vera embarks on a mission to get Mrs Gosling to forgive her husband and bring harmony back below-stairs.

Meanwhile, in an attempt to win back Vera's affection (which Vera has given to Hilda), Ginny secretly installs an Aeolian Harp in the gardens at Sizzlinghurst in the hope that its sweet sound will captivate Vera. But things backfire when the painter Augustus Dong and his Biblical beard turn up to propose the setting up of a pantisocracy with Vera and Henry.

A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:00 News Summary (b08n1y64)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 12:04 Home Front (b08lhs8j)
28 April 1917 - Ralph Winwood

On this day in 1917, the Food Controller's Wheat, Rye and Rice Restriction Order came into effect, and the Winwoods host a dinner party.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.


FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b08n1y66)

Consumer news and issues.


FRI 12:57 Weather (b08n1y68)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 13:00 World at One (b08n1y6b)

Analysis of news and current affairs.


FRI 13:45 One to One (b074x31b)
Sathnam Sanghera speaks to Alpesh Chauhan

Sathnam Sanghera feels he has come a long way from his working class Wolverhampton background and now regards himself as firmly middle class.
In this second programme for One to One, he meets Alpesh Chauhan, an Asian Brummie from a working class background, who has become an Assistant Conductor with the CBSO (City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra).
As someone who has broken through so many social barriers, has Alpesh's ethnic background proved to be a bigger hurdle than his social class?
Producer: Perminder Khatkar.


FRI 14:00 The Archers (b08n46dl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]


FRI 14:15 Drama (b08n4lk6)
Where This Service Will Continue

By Katherine Jakeways

Fifteen months after they met on a train, David has come to find Suzie. Part two of the romantic comedy.

Suzie has a busy day planned - she needs to pick up the dog from the groomers, go to the chiropodists and make a trifle. But her plans are torpedoed by the arrival of David. Fifteen months ago Suzie and David sat next to each other on a train journey from London to Penzance; both married, they shared an intense and unforgettable five and a half hours. Now, out of the blue, David's landed in Suzie's life again.

A romantic comedy from writer Katherine Jakeways. The Radio Times described Katherine as the 'new Victoria Wood' saying "her character comedy is so acutely observed and so sharp that it's in danger of causing permanent injury." Starring Rosie Cavaliero (Prey) and Justin Edwards (The Thick of It).

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.


FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08n4lk8)
Cirencester

This week, the team are answering questions from the audience in Cirencester.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 15:45 Short Works (b08n4lkb)
Series 1, On the Beach

David Park is one of Northern Ireland's most acclaimed novelists. He has won the Authors' Club First Novel Award, the Bass Ireland Arts Award for Literature, the Ewart-Biggs Memorial Prize, the American Ireland Fund Literary Award and the University of Ulster's McCrea Literary Award, three times. In 2014 he was longlisted for the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award. His novel 'The Truth Commissioner' was also recently adapted into a feature film starring Roger Allam.

Producer ..... Michael Shannon.


FRI 16:00 Last Word (b08n4lkd)

Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.


FRI 16:30 More or Less (b08n4lkg)

Investigating the numbers in the news.


FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b08n4lkj)
Eedie and Bethan - It's Debatable

Friends who are members of their primary school's debating team reflect on what they've learned from listening to other people's opinions. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.


FRI 17:00 PM (b08n1y6d)

Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.


FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08n1y6g)

The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.


FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b08n4lkl)
Series 93, 28/04/2017

Miles is joined by Hugo Rifkind, Katy Brand, Rich Hall and Kiri Pritchard-McLean.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.


FRI 19:00 The Archers (b08n4hmm)

Brookfield needs to dig deeper, and Kenton strikes a deal.


FRI 19:15 Front Row (b08n1y6j)

News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.


FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08n4hmc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]


FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b08n4pc4)
Kezia Dugdale MSP, Jeane Freeman MSP, Fraser Nelson

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Blantyre Old Parish Church in South Lanarkshire with the leader of Scottish Labour Kezia Dugdale MSP, Minister for Social Security in the Scottish Government Jeane Freeman MSP, and the Editor of The Spectator magazine Fraser Nelson.


FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b08n4pc6)

A reflection on a topical issue.


FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b08lhs8l)
24-28 April 1917

The second omnibus of Season 10, Our Daily Bread, set in Folkestone, in the week, in 1917, when the Food Controller's Wheat, Rye and Rice Restriction Order came into effect.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

Story-led by Sarah Daniels
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.


FRI 21:58 Weather (b08n1y6l)

The latest weather forecast.


FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b08n1y6n)

In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.


FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08n4pc8)
Rabbit, Run, Episode 10

The post-war novel that summed up middle-class white America and established John Updike as the major American author of his generation. Rabbit, Run is the first in a virtuoso Pullitzer Prize-wining quintet featuring hapless Harry Angstrom, whom we meet as a 26 year old former high school basketball star and suburban paragon in the midst of a personal crisis.

Episode 10 (of 10):
Harry prays for his daughter, but then returns to form - abusing his wife, horrifying his family, and running to Ruth who finally reveals her secret.

Rabbit, Run established Updike as one of the major American novelists of his generation. In the New York Times he was praised for his "artful and supple" style in his "tender and discerning study of the desperate and the hungering in our midst's".

Radio 4 plans to broadcast all five novels in the series over the next few years.

Read by Toby Jones
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.


FRI 23:00 Woman's Hour (b08n4pcb)
Late Night Woman's Hour: Activism

What does it mean to be an activist? From Greenham Common, to the Miner's Strike, to the Women's March, female activists have always had the power to shape the course of public debate. For many, activism has been a bridge to education, political awareness and influence but it can also bring personal risk and demand tough choices.

This month on Late Night Woman's Hour Lauren Laverne and guests discuss the joys and pressures of activism.


FRI 23:30 A Good Read (b074x9ph)
Russell Kane and Peter Lord

Aardman animations co-founder Peter Lord and comedian Russell Kane talk about their favourite books with Harriett Gilbert. Russell chooses Susan Pinker's The Village Effect, Peter Lord's favourite read is Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban, and Harriett's choice is Miss Lonelyhearts by Nathaniel West. Producer Sally Heaven.


FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b08n4pkv)
Brenda and Joan - The Retired PE Teachers' Home

Friends recall their Facebook post which asked people to look beyond the headscarf to see their similarities, instead of focusing on their differences. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b08n2dh6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b08n2dh6)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b08n2ltv)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b08n2ltv)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b08n2y3g)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b08n2y3g)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b08n3z6t)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b08n3z6t)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b08n4hmc)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b08n4hmc)

A Good Read 23:30 FRI (b074x9ph)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b08mdjyj)

A Point of View 23:50 SUN (b08mdjyj)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b08n4pc6)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b08n2wcz)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b08n2wcz)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b08m8zbd)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b08mdjyg)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b08n4pc4)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b08n1hnh)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b08n1y37)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b08n1y37)

Beef and Dairy Network 23:15 WED (b08n3xgg)

Believe It! 11:30 WED (b08n2yhf)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b08n1zyh)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b08n1zyh)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b08n2jb3)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b08n2wt2)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b08n3wpq)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b08n4db5)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b08n4pc8)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b08m9kvg)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b08n2f3h)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b08n1xn6)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b08n2v3f)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b08n2v3f)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b08md6w5)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b08n404n)

Culture, Class and Marine Le Pen 20:00 MON (b08n2jb1)

Culture, Class and Marine Le Pen 11:00 WED (b08n2jb1)

Drama 15:45 SAT (b08n4qq5)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b08m98ql)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b08n22rp)

Drama 14:15 WED (b08n3lxs)

Drama 14:15 THU (b06tr5tf)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b08n4lk6)

Ella Fitzgerald: A Glorious Noise 11:30 TUE (b08n2v2x)

Everything You Think About Sport Is Wrong 09:30 WED (b085gs4k)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b08m8z9y)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b08n1xr4)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b08n1xvr)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b08n1xz0)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b08n1y2q)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b08n1y5y)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b08n20k3)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b08n20k3)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b08n3wpd)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b08m8zb4)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b08n1xrv)

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Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b08mdc3m)

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Glass Half Full 22:15 SAT (b08mbjqm)

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Gloomsbury 11:30 FRI (b08n4hmk)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b08n2wcq)

Hal 19:15 SUN (b08n22ry)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b08lhs8l)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b08lhs52)

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In Business 21:30 SUN (b08md991)

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In Our Time 09:00 THU (b08n1y2v)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b08n1y2v)

In Their Element 11:00 TUE (b08n2ltx)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b08n1xwd)

Kevin Eldon Will See You Now 23:00 TUE (b08n2wt4)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b08mdchy)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b08n4lkd)

Life at Absolute Zero 19:45 SUN (b08n233n)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b08m8zbs)

Mark Steel's in Town 11:30 MON (b05xxkqt)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b08m8z9h)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b08n1xmf)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b08n1xqt)

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Mirrored 11:30 THU (b08n404q)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b08n1f8c)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b08n1f8c)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b08n1xzg)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b08mdcj0)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b08n4lkg)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b08m8z9r)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b08n1xmp)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b08n1xr2)

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News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b08n1xmr)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b08m8zb6)

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News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b08m8z9t)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b08n1xmy)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b08n1xn4)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b08m8zbx)

News 13:00 SAT (b08m8zbb)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b08n1zyk)

One to One 13:45 MON (b04581jc)

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One to One 13:45 THU (b07428bm)

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Only Artists 09:00 WED (b08n2y3b)

Only Artists 21:30 WED (b08n2y3b)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b08n22rr)

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Open Country 06:07 SAT (b08md98n)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b08n46dd)

PM 17:00 SAT (b08m8zbj)

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Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b08n1xnq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b08mdl8p)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b08p5zg2)

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Profile 19:00 SAT (b08n1hnf)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b08n1hnf)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b08n1hnf)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b08n1zyn)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b08n1zyn)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b08n1zyn)

Recycled Radio 13:30 SUN (b082kbyt)

Reluctant Persuaders 18:30 THU (b08n46dj)

Rob Newman's Neuropolis 18:30 TUE (b08n2wcs)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01kr71s)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b08m8zb2)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b08m8zbv)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b08m8z9m)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b08n1xmk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b08n1xqy)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b08n1xvk)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b08n1xyt)

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Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b08m8z9k)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b08m8z9p)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b08m8zbl)

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Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b08n1xmm)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b08n1xnj)

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Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b08n1xr0)

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Short Works 00:30 SUN (b08mdc9f)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (b08n4lkb)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b08m8zbq)

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Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b08n1xmt)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b08n1xrb)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b08n1xrb)

Start/Stop 23:00 THU (b04th9fg)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b08n1zyq)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b08n1xn0)

TED Radio Hour 23:00 SUN (b08mk2mp)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b08n1xn8)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b08n22rw)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b08n22rw)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b08n2j9z)

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The Archers 19:00 TUE (b08phncg)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b08phncg)

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The Archers 19:00 THU (b08n46dl)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b08n46dl)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b08n4hmm)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b08n46dn)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b08n2gj8)

The Echo Chamber 23:30 SAT (b08m99f7)

The Echo Chamber 16:30 SUN (b08n22rt)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b08n46dg)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b08n1f87)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b08n1f87)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b08n2ltq)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b08n2ltq)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b08n22rm)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b08n2yhc)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b08n4lkj)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b08n4pkv)

The Lost Cockney Voice 11:00 FRI (b08n4hmh)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b08n1xzj)

The New Blur Album 18:30 WED (b04jj113)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b08mdjyb)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b08n4lkl)

The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody 00:30 SAT (b08mqv1n)

The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody 09:45 MON (b08n29mk)

The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody 00:30 TUE (b08n29mk)

The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody 09:45 TUE (b08n2lts)

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The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody 09:45 WED (b08n2y3d)

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The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody 09:45 THU (b08n3z6q)

The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody 00:30 FRI (b08n3z6q)

The Odyssey Project: My Name Is Nobody 09:45 FRI (b08n4hm6)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b08lg8wl)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b08lg8wl)

The Self Employment Paradox 20:00 TUE (b08n2wcx)

The Shock 21:00 MON (b08mb1fr)

The Skin Trade 11:00 MON (b08n2dh8)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (b08m9kvp)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b08n2gjl)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b08n1xng)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b08n1xrz)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b08n1xwg)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b08n1xzv)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b08n1y3k)

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Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b08mbjqh)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b08n3wnk)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b08n2jb5)

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Today 07:00 SAT (b08n19jd)

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Today 06:00 THU (b08n1y2s)

Today 06:00 FRI (b08n1y60)

Tom Parry's Fancy Dressed Life 23:00 WED (b08n3wps)

Tommies 14:15 MON (b08n2dmn)

Trump at Studio 54 17:00 SUN (b08mb1gb)

Tumanbay 14:15 TUE (b08n3mjm)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03zqzsv)

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Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b08n1f89)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b08n1xns)

Whodunnit? 09:30 TUE (b0853n4n)

With Great Pleasure 16:00 MON (b08n2gj4)

Woman's Hour 16:15 SAT (b08m8zbg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b08n1xrd)

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Woman's Hour 23:00 FRI (b08n4pcb)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b08mb1g2)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b08n2wcn)

World at One 13:00 MON (b08n1xrn)

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You and Yours 12:15 MON (b08n1xrj)

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iPM 05:45 SAT (b08mdl8r)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b08mdl8r)