Radio-Lists Home Now on R4

RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 08 APRIL 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b08kscn2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b08l78gf)
And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief as Photos, Episode 5

Simon McBurney - a close friend of the late art critic and writer who died in January - reads John Berger's most personal book: part essay, part poetry collection, part memoir & love letter. McBurney also shares memories of Berger and the house and landscape that inspired the book in the early 1980s. Harriet Walter reads Berger's poetry.

Today Berger explores the work of his favourite painter, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio.

Abridged and produced by Simon Richardson.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08kscn4)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08kscn6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08kscn8)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b08kscnb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08kypw9)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tom Wright, Professor of New Testament, St Andrews.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b08kypz2)
I didn't know my flat was a brothel

iPM is the news programme that starts with its listeners. Email ipm@bbc.co.uk. Twitter: @BBCiPM. Presented by Luke Jones and Eddie Mair.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b08kscnd)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b08kscng)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Open Country (b08kxykx)
Learning from the Wild in Dartington

Helen Mark travels to south-east Devon, to the Dartington Estate.

This 14th century estate was reinvented by an off-shoot of the Bloomsbury set in the mid-1920s as a centre for personal growth, innovative education and rural regeneration, inspired by the environment. It still has the arts, ecology, sustainability and social justice at its heart and aims to be 'a laboratory for living and learning with the purpose of pioneering deep personal and societal change'.

Helen Mark finds out about the extraordinary history, present and future of a movement and community inspired by the landscape of Dartington.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b08kscnj)
Energy Crop Debate

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b08kscnl)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b08lfbgg)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b08kscnn)
Christopher Biggins

The actor and TV personality Christopher Biggins joins Aasmah Mir and the Rev. Richard Coles. Best known for his performances as Lukewarm in the BBC series of Porridge, Emperor Nero in I Claudius, and as Rev. Ossie Whitworth the wicked vicar in Poldark. He's one of the Great Dames of British Pantomime and was crowned 'King of the Jungle'. He talks about his career and latest work on the comedy album Wit & Whimsy.

Horologist, Steven Fletcher, is the third generation of clockmakers in his family. He's worked on many important timepieces - some dating back to the 17th century, and the clocks at Chequers.

Retired rugby flanker Maggie Alphonsi took 74 caps for England and 7 Six Nations titles during her international career. She discusses her career, her role in commentating and inspiring the next generation.

JP Devlin meets Saturday Live listener Anne Watson. She tells the story of losing her sight, learning to ice stake and finding love.

The comedian Russell Kane chooses his Inheritance Tracks: Can't Get Enough of Your Love by Barry White and The Waves by Einaudi.

Dixe Wills is an author, travel writer and regular winter camper. He describes how he travels around by train and bike in his quest to discover Britain's tiniest curiosities - from stations to islands, churches and tiny campsites.

The comedy album Wit & Whimsy is out now. A live show featuring performances of songs from the album is being staged at The Hippodrome in London's West End on Sunday 30 April, 2017.
Tiny Campsites by Dixe Wills is out now.
Russell Kane is on tour with his show 'Right Man, Wrong Age'.

Producer: Louise Corley
Editor: Anne Peacock.

SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08lfbgj)
Series 16, Coventry

Jay Rayner and his culinary panel are in Coventry. Zoe Laughlin, Paula McIntyre, Tim Hayward and Tim Anderson answer the audience questions.

The panel discuss their 'must have' kitchen appliances, offer advice on how to use sumac, and swap marinating tips.

Coventry's culinary connections to Two Tone music are also up for discussion, and Zoe Laughlin reveals an unusual method for popping corn.

Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett
Producer: Miranda Hinkley

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b08lfbgl)
A look behind the scenes at Westminster.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b08kscnq)
Excitement and Disgust

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b08kscns)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b08lfbgn)
Personal debt, Making tax digital, Bereavement support payments, Probate fees

Personal debt: Bank of England figures show consumer credit up by 10.5% in a year to £196bn. The Financial Policy Committee (of the Bank of England) will review the standards banks that apply when lending money to individuals. The Financial Conduct Authority says 3.3 million people are in persistent debt on their credit cards, half of them for three years. And the debt charity StepChange says the number of people seeking help has reached a record high and the amount they each owe has risen again. So how bad is the personal debt problem and what can be done about it?

Making Tax Digital: Detailed clauses published in the Finance Bill make it clear that when the former Chancellor George Osborne promised the end of the annual self-assessment tax return he forgot to mention it would be replaced by as many as six returns for each tax year. The change is aimed at making tax digital and will affect every self-employed person or small business with a turnover above £10,000.

Bereavement support payments: From this week most widows and widowers with children will get a lot less benefit. Instead of weekly payments that could last up to 20 years, they will get a lower payment for just 18 months. The Government says when it runs out they should claim means-tested benefits. One terminal cancer sufferer tells us of his concerns for his wife and children after he dies.

Probate fees: The fee for getting probate on an estate is due to rise in May from £215 to a sliding scale of up to £20,000. But a committee of MPs and peers warned this week that such a fee was actually a tax and could be beyond the powers of the Lord Chancellor to introduce. We hear details.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Paul Waters
Editor:Andrew Smith.

SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b08kylww)
Series 50, 07/04/2017

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Ivo Graham, Daliso Chaponda, Pippa Evans and Luke Kempner to present the week in news through stand-up and sketches.

Malawian stand-up Daliso Chaponda explores Kim Jong Un's aversion to jibes about his weight. Ivo Graham offers his take on Pepsi's much maligned new advertising campaign. Pippa Evans sings an ode to Deliveroo's corporate speech and in the wake of Cadbury and Pepsi's PR disasters this week Public Relations Guru Trevor Morris talks to Steve and Hugh about what they could have done differently.

Produced by Joe Nunnery
A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b08kscnv)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b08kscnx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b08kylx0)
Jonathan Arnott MEP, Barry Gardiner MP, Margot James MP, Leanne Wood AM

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from the Royal Agricultural University in Cirencester, Gloucestershire, with UKIP's General Secretary Jonathan Arnott MEP, Shadow International Trade Secretary Barry Gardiner MP, Small Business Minister Margot James MP and the Leader of Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood AM.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b08kscnz)
Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

SAT 14:30 Drama (b08lfbh5)
The Dark Earth and the Light Sky

A moving account of the years leading up to the death of the poet Edward Thomas. Nick Dear's play explores Thomas' relationships with the American poet Robert Frost, who became his mentor and close friend, and British author and poet Eleanor Farjeon, with whom he shared a mutual adoration.

We also journey into his somewhat uneasy marriage with Helen Thomas who suffered at the hands of both these relationships as well as having to suffer the affects of Thomas' regular bouts of grim depression.

We eventually discover that Thomas' great passion for nature and the countryside was the real reason for him signing up to go to War - his overwhelming need to protect The Dark Earth and The Light Sky.

Originally produced by the Almeida Theatre Company

Directed by Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b08kscp1)
Freida Pinto on Guerrilla, Easter crafts with kids

Freida Pinto shot to fame in the film Slumdog Millionaire. Her next project is Guerrilla where she plays Jas a politically active woman who forms a radical underground cell.

We hear from you about what it's been like to grow up the child of a single parent. Carol, Tom, Phil and Victoria share their stories with us.

We hear from the first woman to win the Wisden cricket book of the year - Emma John. She tells us where her passion of the game came from.

In a new series looking at text messages that have changed people's lives, the comedian London Hughes describes how a text led her to honeytrap her boyfriend.

The gardener and writer Alys Fowler tells us how exploring the Birmingham canals in an inflatable kayak helped her to come to terms with leaving her husband and embarking on a new relationship with a woman.

Discarded Daughters is a film which investigates the rise of female infanticide in Pakistan. The reporter Maheen Sadiq of TV Channel Viceland tells us about making the film and the work of the Edhi Foundation which works to recover the bodies of dead babies and give homes to abandoned female children.

We look at some crafting ideas you can do with your children over the Easter break. The costume designer Sarah and her daughter Rosie tell us about their craft projects and Christine Leech who has a blog SewYeah tells us about projects using pomp poms.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.

SAT 17:00 PM (b08kscp3)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 iPM (b08kypz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08kscp5)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b08kscp7)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08kscp9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b08kscpc)
Kathryn Hunter, Le Gateau Chocolat, Vika Bull, Kiri Pritchard-McClean, Kevin Morby, Nikki Bedi, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Nikki Bedi are joined by Kathryn Hunter, Vika Bull, Le Gateau Chocolat and Kiri Pritchard-McClean for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Kevin Morby, Vika Bull and Le Gateau Chocolat.

Producer: Sukey Firth.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b08lfbh7)
Gibraltar

Series of profiles of people who are currently making headlines.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b08kscpf)
Consent, A Quiet Passion, Jon McGregor, Tate St Ives, Car Share and Bucket

Nina Raine's new play Consent at London's National Theatre explores the tricky intertwining of modern relationships and legal niceties
The life of American poet Emily Dickinson is dramatised in Terence Davies' new film A Quiet Passion. Does enough happen to make it dramatically interesting?
Jon McGregor's newest novel Reservoir 13 looks at a community exploring the loss of one family, as life goes on for everyone else
Tate St Ives is reopening after many months of closure for development. The first exhibition is The Studio and The Sea
We look at a couple of car-based TV comedies; Peter Kaye in Car Share + Miriam Margolyes in Bucket
And in the podcast, our guests reveal what they enjoy in the world of arts when they're not reviewing it for us

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Katie Puckrick, Alex Clark and Kevin Jackson. The producer is Oliver Jones.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b08lfbh9)
Long Road to Change

In an age when technology has made organising protest movements easier than ever before, journalist Zoe Williams asks why we aren't seeing long-term results. She looks back on the global history of activism to discover the pre-conditions needed for concrete change.

Recent years have seen an explosion of protest movements to secure equality, protect immigrants, and demand justice. But often these movements are doomed to short-term impact. Does today's activism overlook the benefits of doing things the hard way?

By digging into the archives, Zoe looks back to the most impactful protest movements of the 20th century that permanently changed history. By analysing what key elements are needed for success, she will construct new rules of modern-day activism for future generations.

Zoe speaks to former civil rights organiser Marshall Ganz, and considers whether social media can work with traditional methods of protesting by speaking with a co-founder of UK Uncut and digital activists who studied the unprecedented success of Euromaidan in Ukraine.

Some activists believe the issue lies in how we measure the success of movements. Co-founder of the global Occupy protests, Micah White, explains how the failure of his movement showed him how activism needs to be redefined.

Finally, Zoe investigates how to overcome the obstacles that stand in the way of any protest - from radicals that disrupt non-violent marches to handling media coverage - and how government bodies may manipulate protests to their own advantage.

Produced by Anishka Sharma
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b08ktmz9)
King Solomon's Mines, Episode 1

Extraordinary tales from the golden age of adventure.

Tim McInnerny stars as intrepid explorer Allan Quatermain in this classic Victorian story - the impossible quest for the fabled King Solomon's diamond mines, set in a mythical African interior. This gripping story is a treasure hunt, a mystery, a psychological drama, and a kaleidoscope of sound.

Hunter Allan Quatermain is asked by Sir Henry Curtis to join in the search for his brother George, who disappeared a year ago on a quest to find the legendary diamond mines of King Solomon, in an uncharted part of Africa. Quatermain regards this as a suicidal mission but, fatalistic and wishing to provide for his son Harry, he finally agrees to go and keeps a journal for his son of the trip from which he never expects to return. Quatermain, Sir Henry, his friend Captain John Good and their bearers set off into the unknown ... on a challenging and near fatal journey, eventually encountering the fierce Kukuana tribe led by Chief Infadoos who agrees to take them to the town of Loo near the fabled King Solomon's Mines.

Written by Rider Haggard

Dramatised by Chris Harrald

Directed by Liz Webb

Adapter Chris Harrald's previous adaptations for Radio 4 include M.R. James' ghost stories, four series of the Edwardian detective series The Rivals and several Classic Serials, including The Lost World and Three Men in a Boat.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b08kscph)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Glass Half Full (b08kvpvz)
Series 1, We can look forward to a healthier future

Are we heading towards a golden age of medicine, or is public health a ticking time bomb?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of both pessimists and optimists. She asks not only what they think about the future of health, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

We are all healthier and living longer and new technology will empower us and bring about a new healthcare revolution. So claims optimist Professor Tony Young, a practising surgeon who leads innovation for NHS England.

Pessimist Dr Richard Smith, former editor of the British Medical Journal, counters that sedentary lifestyles, poor diets and over-medication are damaging our health. Obesity and dementia are soaring and caring for these patients may be beyond our capabilities.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - Dr Helen Stokes-Lampard (Chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners), Professor Kevin Fenton (Public Health England National Director for Health and Wellbeing), and Vivienne Parry (broadcaster and Head of Engagement at Genomics England).

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b08kttsr)
Heat 11, 2017

Russell Davies chairs the nationwide general knowledge quiz.

SAT 23:30 The Echo Chamber (b08ktmzf)
Series 9, Simon Armitage and Ted Hughes's Paper Round

Yorkshire works! Paul Farley hears new poems from Simon Armitage in Marsden and helps Steve Ely and Dominic Somers restage Ted Hughes' boyhood paper-round in Mexborough. Producer: Tim Dee.


SUNDAY 09 APRIL 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b08lfbtm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Short Works (b08lg8rs)
Series 1, The Liquid You by Ben Norris

What becomes of a place once you leave it and move on? And what about the people we leave behind, or who leave us? Is it memory we carry, or myth? The Liquid You is a new short work for radio written and performed by Ben Norris. It's a poetic monologue about home and history, death and departures, and how sometimes it's easier to love an idea than reality.

Ben Norris is a poet, playwright and actor, originally from Nottingham. This is his Radio 4 debut.

Ben was the UK All-Star Poetry Slam Champion 2013 and has since performed his spoken-word across the country, from Latitude Festival to the Proms at the Royal Albert Hall. His first poetry pamphlet was published in 2014 and his debut solo show, 'The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Family', won the 2015 IdeasTap Underbelly Award at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival before touring the UK extensively in autumn 2016, finishing with a sell-out run at Southbank Centre. He hosts 'Cadence,' a monthly poetry and music night in East London, and in March 2016 he launched PAW - his attempt to record and publish a Poem A Week on Youtube for a year. His debut short film was produced by Channel 4, for which Ben was nominated for Best New Talent at the 2016 Royal Television Society Awards.

As an actor he has performed with the National Theatre, Frantic Assembly, Birmingham Rep, Nottingham Playhouse, RSC, and National Theatre Wales, and his writing for the stage has been performed at Theatr Clwyd, Leicester Curve, Theatre 503 and the Royal Court. He trained at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama, before which he studied English with Creative Writing at the University of Birmingham.

Written and performed by Ben Norris
Produced by Mair Bosworth.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08lfbtp)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08lfbtr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08lfbtt)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b08lfbtw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b08lg8rv)
St Peter's, South Petherton

Church bells from St Peter's, South Petherton.

SUN 05:45 Lent Talks (b08kvpw1)
Professor Christine Done - Destiny and the Cosmos

Christine Done, professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Durham University, talks about the ultimate destiny of the universe.
Producer: Phil Pegum.

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b08lfbty)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b08lfbv0)
On Palm Sunday, Mark Tully assesses one of the principle characters of Holy Week, Pontius Pilate. Was he a coward for washing his hands of the crucifixion of Jesus, or a servant of God?

Drawing from poetry by Carol Ann Duffy and J Barrie Shepherd, and music by Arvo Part and Johann Sebastian Bach, Mark considers a range of opinions about Pilate - from compassionate and remorseful, to cold hearted and callous.

He also considers the modern relevance of Pontius Pilate's decision to put the fate of Jesus in the hands of the crowd, and to bow to public opinion rather than take responsibility himself.

Producer: Adam Fowler
A 7Digital production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b08lg8rx)
Getting to Grips with Glyphosate

Glyphosate is the world's most widely used herbicide and it provokes strong opinions from both those who argue it's crucial for productive farming - and from those who fear its impact on both human health and the environment and want it banned.

A brief encounter on social media prompted Lincolnshire arable farmer Andrew Ward to invite Yorkshire Dales hill farmer Neil Heseltine to visit his farm to see it in action. Andrew grows sugar beet, wheat and oilseed rape and says banning glyphosate would be as harmful to his business as getting rid of tractors. Neil farms belted galloway cattle and sheep and tries to keep his farm free from chemicals. He wonders why glyphosate is so vital now when farmers have cultivated the land without it for hundreds of years. He takes up Andrew's offer and travels to Lincolnshire to discuss the pros and cons of this controversial herbicide. Caz Graham hitches a lift and umpires.

Producer: Caz Graham.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b08lfbv2)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b08lfbv4)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b08lfbv6)
Life after death survey, Workplace chaplains, Jorvik Viking centre.

After the Jorvick Viking Centre was damaged by floods in December 2015 the attraction used the rebuilding opportunity to tell visitors more about the city's Viking history. As Kevin Bocquet discovers, the exhibition now demonstrates how Christianity and traditional Norse pagan beliefs overlapped in Viking-age York.

Exactly two weeks after the terror attack in Westminster, four British Imam's travelled to Rome for a private audience with Pope Francis. Although planned long before Khalid Masood's attack, it was the latest effort at improving interfaith dialogue between the Roman Catholic Church and Islam. The BBC's Religious Affairs Correspondent Martin Bashir travelled with the Imams and reports on how the meeting went.

In a week of government trips abroad with Theresa May in Saudi Arabia and Liam Fox in the Philippines, Sunday asks whether post Brexit we will still be able to afford ethical foreign and trade policies? Dr Philip Cunliffe Senior Lecturer in International Conflict at the University of Kent and Professor Scott Lucas from The University of Birmingham discuss where lines should be drawn.

Ministers from the Church of England, Methodist and Catholic Church have begun offering Chaplaincy services to staff at Sports Direct headquarters in Shirebrook. Edward talks to the new chaplain Rev Karen Bradley.

The Bishop of Manchester, David Walker and Professor Douglas Davies, Director of Durham University's Centre for Death and Life Studies take a look at the findings of a new ComRes poll on belief in the resurrection and life after death.

Producers
Carmel Lonergan
Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

Editor
Amanda Hancox.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b08lg8rz)
Child Rescue Nepal

Joanna Lumley makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Child Rescue Nepal.

Registered Charity Number 1078187.
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Child Rescue Nepal'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Child Rescue Nepal'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b08lfbv8)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b08lfbvb)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b08lg8s1)
The Pearl of Great Value

The Rector of All Souls Langham Place by London's Broadcasting House, preaches this Palm Sunday in the last of Radio 4's services for Lent. With the All Souls Choir and orchestra directed by Noel Tredinnick. A link to resources for individuals and small groups based on the Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book is available on the Sunday Worship web pages. Producer: Katharine Longworth.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b08kylx2)
Bad News is Good Business

AL Kennedy says we should reject the media outlets that peddle only bad news whether real or fake in ever shriller voices, depicting a world of unremitting awfulness.

"Fake facts - let's just call them lies - and deceptively selective coverage have to be peddled with greater than average outrage and shock just to keep their frailty from being examined too closely."

Producer: Sheila Cook.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zr1zj)
Common Whitethroat

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the common whitethroat. Whitethroats are warblers which winter in the Sahel region south of the Sahara desert and spend spring and summer in Europe. When they arrive in April the males establish a territory by singing that scratchy song from hedgerow perches or by launching themselves into the air.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b08lfbvd)
News presented by Paddy O'Connell. Reviewing the Sunday newspapers: Independent MEP Janice Atkinson, Australian diplomat Alexander Downer and broadcaster Shelagh Fogarty.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b08lfbvg)
David's plan backfires, and Emma takes matters into her own hands.

SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b08lzdv7)
Libyan Embassy Siege

Sue MacGregor reunites five people who were at the centre of the dramatic events outside the Libyan Embassy in central London in 1984.

At 5' 2", Yvonne Fletcher battled to fulfil a childhood ambition to become a police officer. Superfletch, as she was dubbed by colleagues, achieved her dream as a community officer with the Metropolitan Police and, in doing so, became the shortest police officer in Britain. She was due to marry a fellow officer.

On a spring morning in April 1984, she was sent to man an anti-Gaddafi demonstration outside the Libyan Embassy in London. She was gunned down during the protest and pronounced dead several hours later on the operating table.

The Embassy had recently been taken over by the Committee of Revolutionary Students and renamed the Libyan People's Bureau. They were fiercely loyal to their leader, the notorious "mad dog of the Middle East", Colonel Gaddafi, and targeted Libyan dissidents in the UK.

Sue and her guests look back on what, at the time, was the longest police siege in British history.

Oliver Miles was only a few months into his new post as British Ambassador in Tripoli.
PC John Murray was working alongside WPC Fletcher and travelled in the ambulance with her as she was dying.
Detective Superintendent Colin Reeve stepped up to run the police command centre, working 12 hours a day throughout the 11-day siege.
Adel Mansouri was a Libyan student who travelled from Manchester to what he believed would be a peaceful demonstration. He was also shot.

They discuss why warnings about threatened violence weren't passed to police on the ground, why the so-called Embassy still enjoyed diplomatic status, and whether Yvonne Fletcher's death could have been avoided.

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b08lfbvj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (b08kttsw)
Series 18, Episode 1

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

John Finnemore, Henning Wehn, Lou Sanders and Miles Jupp are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as sheep, islands, Steve Jobs and beans.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b08lgbwt)
Food Stories from Venezuela: Eating in a Failed State.

Venezuela is seeing its worst economic crisis in living memory. As some of the most basic ingredients become unavailable or unaffordable Dan Saladino tells the food story.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b08lfbvl)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b08lfbvn)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Recycled Radio (b0801l05)
Series 5, Europeland

"I'm sketching a map of Europe as it used to be, not just pre-referendum but a long, long time earlier than that. And let me tell you, it's a bewildering place!"

Cartoonist Gerald Scarfe introduces a Recycled special on the place that has obsessed us all summer long, so buckle up as we find out what is so different about Us and Them. With journeys to the continent and back to Westminster again combined with the powerful slicing of leading voices in the European debate - Tony Benn and Margaret Thatcher from 1975; Boris, Nigel and Dave from 2016. Plus the voices of leading historians, and comedians, attempting to make sense of the great European divide. Exhilarating radio you'll not hear anywhere else.
The producer is Miles Warde.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08ky656)
70th Anniversary Special

Eric Robson, Pippa Greenwood, Anne Swithinbank and Bob Flowerdew delve into the archives to celebrate GQT's 70th Birthday in this very special edition.

As Gardeners' Question Time moves into its 8th decade, Eric and the panel revisit some of the finest moments in the programme's history. From humble beginnings with gardeners at the Broadoak Hotel, Ashton-under-lyne in April 1947, we hear how GQT grew to become a staple for amateur gardeners lasting 70 years. There's a visit to a nudist colony, a mash-up with The Archers, and questions from a young Esther Rantzen and John Humphries.

Eric and the team examine the ebb and flow of horticultural trends and challenges throughout the programme's history - and announce the location for a special Anniversary Garden Party later this year.

You can also find the first-ever episode of GQT from 1947 to listen to in full on the GQT pages of the BBC Radio 4 website.

Produced by Dan Cocker
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b08lgbww)
Omnibus - Lists

Fi Glover introduces three conversations dealing with lists: to tick off over a lifetime or within a year, or to steer clear of forever, because of allergies, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b08lgbwy)
King Solomon's Mines, Episode 2

Extraordinary tales from the golden age of adventure

Tim McInnerny stars as intrepid explorer Allan Quatermain in the second episode of this classic Victorian story - the impossible quest for the fabled King Solomon's Mines, set in a mythical African interior. This gripping story is a treasure hunt, a mystery, a psychological drama, and a kaleidoscope of sound.

Allan Quatermain is writing a journal for his son Harry as he believes he will never return from accompanying Sir Henry Curtis on his mission to find the fabled King Solomon's Mines, in order to find out what has happened to Sir Henry's younger brother George who set out on the same quest the year before. Quatermain, Sir Henry, Captain Good and their bearer Umbopa are being escorted to the town of Loo by Chief Infadoos to meet the blood-thirsty King Twala of the Kukuana and his witch-finder Gagool. The adventurers watch the terrifying night of the great witch hunt when countless Kukuana perish. Their mysterious bearer Umbopa is not what he seems and may be their only hope of survival and of finally finding King Solomon's Mines.

Written by Rider Haggard

Dramatised by Chris Harrald

Directed by Liz Webb

Adapter Chris Harrald's previous adaptations for Radio 4 include M.R. James' ghost stories, four series of the Edwardian detective series The Rivals and several Classic Serials, including The Lost World and Three Men in a Boat.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (b08lgbx0)
Jon McGregor

Mariella Frostrup talks to Jon McGregor about his new novel Reservoir 13, a haunting exploration of the impact of a missing child on a Derbyshire community.

Polly Clark explains why she decided to fictionalize a less well known period in W H Auden's life when, as a young man, he worked as a school master in Scotland. Mariella is also joined by another devotee of Auden, writer Alexander McCall Smith, to discuss the poet's timeless appeal.

We discusses the novel behind the film 'What's Eating Gilbert Grape?' which is being re-released.

And Wendy Holden tells us about the Book She'd Never Lend.

SUN 16:30 The Echo Chamber (b08lgbx2)
Series 9, Crude Poems: Making Poetry after the Torrey Canyon

Paul Farley in Cornwall hears new and old poetry of oil spills fifty years after the Torrey Canyon. How might a poet write an environmental disaster? With Jos Smith, Jane Darke, and Richard Pearce. Producer: Tim Dee.

SUN 17:00 A Degree of Fraud (b08kv5fd)
Ellie Cawthorne investigates the multimillion pound online trade in fake essays and dissertations, hearing from cheating students and the people who write them.

Hundreds of websites - often called essay mills - are selling coursework to students across the UK. "Contract cheating" is where a student commissions a third party to produce academic work on their behalf. It's difficult for universities to detect this form of plagiarism, as students are submitting original work that slips through plagiarism checks, and it's posing an enormous threat to academic integrity.

It's estimated 20,000 students a year are buying their coursework and the problem is growing. Custom-written course work of every level, from GCSEs to PHDs, is available online to purchase. In recent years, contract cheating has also spread into professional degrees such as nursing.

Ellie meets Daniel Dennehy from Nottingham-based UK Essays. The company claims to have sold 16,000 pieces of work in 2016 - completely legally. In its Fair Use Policy, UK Essays forbids students from submitting essays purchased from their site, claiming they are sold only as study aids, to serve as guides. But how plausible is this and are staff doing enough to ensure students don't submit these essays as their own?

Lord Storey, a Liberal Democrat peer, is campaigning in parliament to outlaw the practice of buying, selling and advertising bespoke essays and writing services. But will this be enough to avert a potential crisis in British higher education?

Producer: Paul Smith
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b08lfbh7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08lfbvq)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b08lfbvs)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08lfbvv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b08lfbvx)
John Waite

Broadcasters chooses their BBC Radio highlights.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b08lgc78)
Lilian hopes to get things over quickly, and Kirsty tries something new.

SUN 19:15 Hal (b08lgdpn)
Series 2, Teenagers

The second series of the sitcom with Hal Cruttenden finds the hapless house husband still trying to cope with his mid-life crisis and doubting his every move.

His wife Sam (Kerry Godliman) is still a highly successful business woman, his two daughters Lily and Molly continue to grow into teenagers and find their dad just a little annoying, his bitter and embittered sister Pippa (Abigail Cruttenden) has inconveniently decided to stay with Hal alongside her angry teenage son Oberon, racist neighbour Penny (Ronni Ancona) proves to be a major thorn in Hal's side and best mates Fergus (Ed Byrne) and Barry (Gavin Webster) hinder rather than help Hal's goal of finding himself.

In this first episode, eldest daughter Lily is about to introduce the family to her new hip boyfriend, Bazman, and Hal's need to re-kindle his own romantic past leads to unforeseen challenges. Hal's sister Pippa has also come to stay unexpectedly after her husband decided to experiment with his sexuality.

Written by Hal Cruttenden and Dominic Holland
Produced by Paul Russell

An Open Mike production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 19:45 Life at Absolute Zero (b08lgf1f)
Series 2, Pavlovian

Lynne Truss observes the inhabitants Meridian Cliffs, a small wind-battered town on the south coast of England. Ashley, the professional dog walker, is fond of pointing out that dogs live only in the present and that's why they're happy.

It's a skill she could use herself.

Distraught at being betrayed by her boyfriend six months ago, Ashley is firmly stuck in the past. She takes her band of Brighton pooches out onto the scrubby land behind the town - but has to marshal all her resources when Peter the Tibetan terrier goes missing.

Directed by Kate McAll
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:00 Feedback (b08kylwr)
Balancing Brexit, Libby Purves, A youthful Moral Maze

Now Article 50 has been triggered, Roger Bolton speaks to BBC News Editor James Stephenson about whether the BBC can move on from broadly balancing remain and leave sentiment in its discussion of the Brexit process.

With Radio 4's Midweek programme at an end after 35 years, presenter Libby Purves is Roger Bolton's latest guest for our Open Mic interviews about the careers of some of your favourite radio broadcasters.

Also, can young panellists teach old hands some new tricks on Moral Maze? Listeners praise The thoughtful sixth formers who took over from the regular panel in the latest edition are praised by the audience for listening closely and politely challenging witnesses - and each other.

Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b08kylwp)
Darcus Howe, Andy Coogan, Dr Sylvia Moody, Yevgeny Yevtushenko, Peter Shotton

Matthew Bannister on

the Black Power activist and journalist Darcus Howe. He was a leading campaigner for equal rights in the 1970s and 80s.

Athletics coach Andy Coogan who spent three and a half years as a prisoner of the Japanese during the second world war.

Dr Sylvia Moody, the clinical psychologist who pioneered greater understanding of dyslexia in adults.

The Russian poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko who became a star in the West during the 1960s.

Peter Shotton - who was at school with John Lennon, played the washboard in the Quarrymen and made his fortune from a chain of American-style diners.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b08lfbgn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b08lg8rz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 In Business (b08ky3xp)
Why are the French so productive?

Productivity, or the lack of it, is one of the great puzzles of the British economy at the moment.

Productivity is not about how hard we work, but how much value we get for each hour of graft. And the French seem to be better at that than the British.

Jonty Bloom explores how workers in France can put in shorter hours and take longer holidays and yet still have productivity levels close to those seen in Germany and the United States.

And he asks whether high productivity always makes for a better economy.

Producer: Ruth Alexander.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b08lfbvz)
Carolyn Quinn and guests preview the political week ahead. Plus, in a special feature - 'Political Thinking with Nick Robinson' - Nick presents a half-hour discussion exploring one of the big themes shaping our politics at a time of immense flux. This week, Nick asks whether globalisation is in retreat. He's joined by the former Shadow Chancellor, Ed Balls; the economist Ann Pettifor - who's an adviser to the current Labour leader; the Conservative peer and former newspaper editor, Patience Wheatcroft; and Professor Ted Malloch of the Henley Business School, an adviser to Donald Trump. They debate the pros and cons of globalisation, and whether governments can or should do anything to control it.

SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b08kxykz)
Raw

With Francine Stock.

Julia Ducournau discusses her French cannibal movie Raw, which reportedly had audience members passing out in the aisles at a screening in the Toronto Film Festival.

The life of Pablo Neruda - communist, womaniser and poet - is explored in a surreal detective story simply called Neruda. The film's director Pablo Larrain explains why there's never been a poet quite like the former Chilean politician, who was possibly murdered in his bed.

In a week when two bio-pics about poets are released, Ian McMillan presents Daffodils 2, his poetic response to the more annoying cliches of poets in movies.

The Film Programme's A to Z Of Directors arrives at F this week. Critics Catherine Bray and Sophie Monks Kaufman try to persuade Francine to the very different pleasures of David Fincher and Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b08lfbv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]


MONDAY 10 APRIL 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b08lfbxw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b08kvnfl)
A special programme devoted to the BSA/Thinking Allowed Ethnography Shortlist

A special programme devoted to the BSA and Thinking Allowed Ethnography Award Shortlist for 2017.
Thinking Allowed, in association with the British Sociological Association, presents a special programme devoted to the academic research which has been short listed for our fourth annual award for a study that has made a significant contribution to ethnography, the in-depth analysis of the everyday life of a culture or sub culture. Laurie Taylor is joined by the 3 other judges; Sarah Neal , Professor of Sociology at the University of Sheffield, Shane Blackman, Professor of Cultural Studies at Canterbury Christ Church University and Alpa Shah , Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the LSE.
Producer:Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b08lg8rv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08lfbxy)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08lfby0)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08lfby2)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b08lfby4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08mfmn5)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tom Wright, Professor of New Testament, St Andrews.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b08lfby6)
Pollution, Livestock markets, Taste of Scilly

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

MON 05:56 Weather (b08lfby8)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378x87)
Yellow Wagtail

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachan presents the yellow wagtail. Arriving in April, Yellow Wagtails are summer visitors to the UK, breeding mostly in the south and east. The Yellow Wagtail has several different races which all winter south of the Sahara and all look slightly different. The birds which breed in the UK are the yellowest of all.

MON 06:00 Today (b08lfbyb)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (b08lfbyd)
Christianity: Luther's Legacy

On Start the Week Andrew Marr looks back 500 years to the moment Martin Luther challenged the power and authority of the Catholic Church. Peter Stanford brings to light the character of this lowly born German monk in a new biography. Prior to Luther, for a thousand years the Catholic Church had been one of the greatest powers on earth, but in her study of the Italian Renaissance the writer Sarah Dunant reveals how bloated, corrupt and complacent it had become. Dunant also explores the role of the Church in the home, in a new exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Madonnas and Miracles, before the Reformation swept away such iconography. The historian Alec Ryrie charts the rise of the Protestant faith from its rebellious beginnings to the present day, while the sociologist Linda Woodhead asks whether the defining characteristics of Protestant Britain, such as the freedom of the individual, national pride and a strong work ethic are still relevant today.

Producer: Katy Hickman

Image: Boy falling from a window, 1592 (c) Museo degli ex voto del santuario di Madonna dell'Arco.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b08lglt1)
David Jones: Engraver, Soldier, Painter, Poet, Beginnings

Thomas Dilworth's biography of the visual artist and poet, David Jones, illuminates the life and work of one of the great but lost Modernists. His epic war poem, In Parenthesis, based on his experiences in the trenches was heralded by WH Auden as' the greatest book about the First World War'. His paintings, the watercolours in particular, reveal an extraordinary talent, and his engravings and inscriptions were inventive and critically acclaimed. This biography not only examines his work, it also shines a light on his personal life, examining his Catholic faith, his deep interest in his Welsh roots, and also the psychological damage resulting from his experiences on the front during the Great War.

Thomas Dilworth is an authority on David Jones and his work, and has written extensively about him. Commissioned in 1987 David Jones: Engraver, Soldier, Painter has been a labour of love for some thirty years.

Abridged by Sara Davies
Read by Nicholas Farrell
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08lfbyg)
Laura Mvula, Co-housing for older women

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08lglt3)
The Amateur Marriage, 1941, Iodine and Bandages

By Anne Tyler dramatised by Rebecca Lenkiewicz.

Episode one - 1941, Iodine and Bandages

An unexpected romantic encounter over first aid between Michael and Pauline is the beginning of this story of a turbulent partnership.

Director: David Hunter.

MON 11:00 Kevin Bacon's Game of Fame (b085h73f)
At the age of 26 Kevin Bacon rocketed to stardom but it was a long slow steady decline after that with a string of box office flops. By the time Kevin reached thirty he suffered terrible anxiety and hit rock bottom. Around this time three college students created the game Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon which asserts that the Hollywood star can be connected to any celebrity in six or less steps. Kevin admits that he was initially horrified by it and thought it was a joke at his expense. But as the concept hung around he realised that it wasn't going away and so he decided to embrace it and start his foundation the Sixdegrees.org, which tries to arrange celebrity drop in's to charity events to bolster the efforts of people who run them and give them exposure on social media.

The Six Degrees Game put him at the centre of the Hollywood Universe but is that really a position he deserves?

We join Kevin as he visits a charity event because twenty years ago his name was put to a game. Gaining access to Bacon he gives an interesting insight into his own philosophy and first-hand experience of fame. Having won it lost and claimed it back to some degree.

Produced by Kate Bissell.

MON 11:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b05vy6ps)
Series 6, Melton Mowbray

'Melton Mowbray - Rural Capital of Food'

Mark Steel returns to Radio 4 for a sixth series of the award winning show that travels around the country, researching the history, heritage and culture of six towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness, and performs a bespoke evening of comedy for the local residents.

In the second episode Mark visits the Leicestershire Town of Melton Mowbray where he discovers that as well as being the home of the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie and Stilton Cheese, it has also coincidentally, been officially ranked the most obese area of Leicestershire. He looks at the history of fox hunting in the area, meets several eccentric local residents including a crime fighting milk man and he tries to get to the bottom of who and what is the Melton Mowbray Town Estate, a mysterious organisation established in 1549.

Written and performed by ... Mark Steel
Additional material by ... Pete Sinclair
Production co-ordinator ... Hayley Stirling
Producer ... Carl Cooper.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b08lfbyk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 The Listening Project (b08lglt5)
The Listening Project One Thousand, A Record of the People

The most shared conversation in our British Library archive features when Professor Tim Luckhurst illustrates the value of this non-journospeak collection to Fi Glover. Part of a celebration of the delivery of the thousandth conversation to the British Library and examination of the value of this unique archive from the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen, now and in the future.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b08lfbym)
Consumer affairs programme.

MON 12:57 Weather (b08lfbyp)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b08lfbyr)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 Owning Colour (b08lgmt3)
Series 1, Red

Designer Wayne Hemingway looks at five colours that have been at the centre of ownership and trademark battles, revealing the complex status of colours in our society - their artistic, commercial and cultural impact.

He explores our response to colour - whether it's the red soles of designer shoes, the blue strip of a football team or the purple of a chocolate bar wrapper - interviewing those involved in branding, advertising and IP, as well as the psychologists, scientists , colour gurus, artists and those creating the colours of tomorrow using Nanotechnology.

Programme 1 - Red
In 1980s, a company in America became the first to successfully trademark a colour. It was also the decade when Wayne Hemingway launched his fashion label Red or Dead, illustrated by a logo in a particular shade of red. Now he hopes scientists can re-create that colour in a paint laboratory in Slough, where they make trademarked colours such as Red Stallion and Roasted Red. Wayne explores the beginnings of colour ownership through a colour with two sides - love and passion or blood and aggression.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b08lgc78)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Tommies (b08lgpr3)
10 April 1917

In the tunnels underneath Vimy Ridge, the Canadian Corps are re-writing the rules of war, in this story by Avin Shah.

Mickey Bliss has taken a shine to the can-do Canadians. Particularly since yesterday, when they made a momentous advance here on the Western Front, together with British forces. But when Mickey meets a young Canadian journalist, here to write up the story for his home paper - can they agree on what really happened?

Meticulously based on unit war diaries and eye-witness accounts, each episode of TOMMIES traces one real day at war, exactly 100 years ago.

And through it all, we'll follow the fortunes of Mickey Bliss and his fellow signallers, from the Lahore Division of the British Indian Army. They are the cogs in an immense machine, one which connects situations across the whole theatre of the war, over four long years.

Series created by Jonathan Ruffle
Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: Jonquil Panting.

MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b08lgpr5)
Heat 12, 2017

(12/17)
In the last of the 2017 Brain of Britain heats the competitors are from Northwich in Cheshire, Bingley in West Yorkshire, Wigton in Cheshire and Hilton in Derbyshire. The winner will go through to the semi-finals, and it's also the last chance for a runner-up to notch up a high enough score to qualify. Russell Davies, the competitors and the audience are the guests of the UTC at Media City UK in Salford.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b08lgbwt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 BACH: Man of Passion (b08lgpr7)
Johann Sebastian Bach has long been called "the fifth evangelist", his music displaying a sense of fervent devotion to the biblical texts he set. His ambition to compose vast cycles of sacred music for every feast in the church year, has left us with over 200 cantatas as well as magnificent choral works including the St. John and St. Matthew Passion, Christmas Oratorio and B Minor Mass. He is heralded as one of the greatest composers of all time, his music finding a place within the hearts and souls of all those who experience it.

But who was the man behind the music? What did he think, feel and believe? What inspired him and what drove him to write such ground-breaking compositions?

Professor John Butt, Bach scholar and director of the Dunedin Consort explores Bach's life and work. He considers the composer's motivation and his character speaking to composers and musicians in order to delve into Bach's personality and purpose. Gathering together the evidence available to us today, he attempts to reconstruct something of this musical great in all his complexity; this man who revolutionised the music of his time but, all the while, looked beyond, dedicating each composition "to the glory of God alone".

Producer: Katharine Longworth

MUSIC:

Ei! wie schmeckt der Coffee süße
JS Bach: Coffee Cantata, BWV 211
Christopher Hogwood
The Academy of Ancient Music
Soprano: Emma Kirkby

C Major Prelude
JS Bach: The Well-Tempered Clavier Book 1

Badinerie
JS Bach: Suite No.2 in B Minor
Sir Neville Marriner
Academy Of St Martin-in-the-Fields

Aus Liebe
JS Bach: St Matthew Passion, BWV 244
Jeffrey Thomas
American Bach Soloists
Soprano: Catherine Bott

Erbarme dich mein Gott
JS Bach: St Matthew Passion, BWV 244
Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Concentus musicus Wien
Alto: Bernarda Fink

Das Wort sie sollen lassen stahn
JS Bach: Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott, BWV 80
Masaaki Suzuki
Bach Collegium Japan

Herr, dein Mitleid, dein Erbarmen
JS Bach: Christmas Oratorio, BWV 248
Stephen Layton
Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment
Trinity College Choir Cambridge
Soprano: Katherine Watson
Bass: Matthew Brook

Bereite dich, Zion, mit zärtlichen Trieben
JS Bach: Christmas Oratorio, BWV 248
Stephen Layton
Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment
Trinity College Choir Cambridge
Countertenor: Iestyn Davies

Prelude
JS Bach: Cello Suite No. 1 in G Major, BWV 1007

Oeffne dich
JS Bach: Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland, BWV 61
City Bach Collective
Soprano: Nicola Corbishley
Organ: Simon Lloyd

Herr, unser Herrscher,dessen Ruhm
JS Bach: St. John Passion BWV 245
Masaaki Suzuki
Bach Collegium Japan

Kyrie Eleison
JS Bach: Mass in B Minor, BWV 232
John Butt
Dunedin Consort and Players

Wir setzen uns mit Tränen nieder
JS Bach: St Matthew Passion, BWV 244
John Butt
Dunedin Consort & Players

Badinerie
JS Bach: Suite No. 2 in B Minor
The Swingle Singers.

MON 16:30 The Digital Human (b08lgq9g)
Series 11, Anger

We seem to be living in a world of polarised opinions giving rise to increasingly angry exchanges on television, print and of course social media. Aleks Krotoski asks how online anger works and is it a symptom or the cause of the problem.

An enormous Chinese study demonstrated that angry content is the most shared across the web while US researchers have asserted that while we might not be any angrier than in the past we encounter much more angering content than ever before and that anger lingers priming us for the net encounter.

Aleks makes the comparison with another increasingly congested space that of our roads; an environment where similar mechanisms of anonymity and depersonalisation are at play. She concludes by discussing the social role of anger and why so many groups have begun to rely on it to get their way.

MON 17:00 PM (b08lfbyt)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08lfbyw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b08lgq9j)
Series 18, Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

John Finnemore, Henning Wehn, Lou Sanders and Miles Jupp the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as names, Germany, secrets and nudity.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b08lgq9l)
Brian struggles to keep his cool, and David wants to take the blame.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b08lfbyy)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08lglt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 The Rise and Fall of the Meritocracy (b08lgq9n)
The populist movements that swept Britain and America last year in which angry, often working class, voters rejected the political hegemony of highly-educated, liberal elites were uncannily like the one imagined in The Rise of the Meritocracy - a dystopian satire written almost sixty years ago that imagined a modern society much like our own that collapses after an anti-Establishment revolt in 2034.

That satire was written by Michael Young - a pioneering sociologist as well as a lifelong socialist, author of the 1945 Labour manifesto, creator of the Open University and Which? Magazine and, towards the end of his life, a member of the House of Lords.

Michael Young's son Toby, a journalist for the Spectator, asks if his father's dark prophesy is correct and whether the Brexit and Trump votes signal the death knell for the popular political vision of a modern meritocracy.

An SPG production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b08kxykq)
Hong Kong's Secret Dwellings

Last summer the emergency services rescued two children from an out-of-control fire in an old industrial building in the commercial area of Hong Kong. It was discovered that a number of people were living in the building. For Assignment, Charlotte McDonald explores the reasons which would drive a family in one of the wealthiest cities in the world to live illegally in a place not fit for human habitation. It's estimated that around 10,000 people live in industrial buildings - although the true number is not known due to the very fact it is not legal. Hong Kong consistently ranks as one of the most expensive places to rent or buy in the world. Already around 200,000 have been forced to rent in what are known as subdivided flats. But now attention has turned to those in even more dire conditions in industrial blocks. From poor government planning, the loss of industry to mainland China and exploitative landlords, we uncover why people are choosing to live in secrecy in neglected buildings.

Charlotte McDonald reporting
Alex Burton producing

Photo credit: SCMP.

MON 21:00 Keep Digging (b08kv3y6)
Mary-Ann Ochota asks why scientists have managed to send probes to interstellar space, but haven't yet managed to reach the Earth's mantle, which lies just a few miles beneath us.

Sixty years ago, a plan was hatched to drill into the Earth's mantle - the layer of silicate rock and minerals that makes up around 84% of our planet's volume. This mission coincided with the start of the space race but, while the space programme quickly captured the public's imagination, the exploration of our own planet's interior soon stalled.

Yet, for a brief moment, it was an equally exciting quest.

For Henry Dick, from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, we are stood on top of "the world's most incredible library with 250 million years of the Earth's history waiting to be revealed". Professor Damon Teagle from the National Oceanography Centre believes that "pristine mantle would be a geochemical treasure trove equivalent to the Apollo lunar rocks".

The cost of completing this six-decade mission has been estimated at $1 billion - a fraction of Nasa's annual budget - and yet a breakthrough remains some way off.

For some reason - scientific, technical or political - humans have ventured more than 248,000 miles up from the Earth's surface, but can't drill more than eight miles into its crust. Mary-Ann Ochota meets some of the scientists who believe we need to keep drilling down.

Presenter: Mary-Ann Ochota
Producer: Nick Minter

An Unusual production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 21:30 Start the Week (b08lfbyd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b08lfbz0)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b08lfbz2)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08lgq9q)
The Essex Serpent, Episode 6

Sarah Perry's award-winning novel, set at the end of the nineteenth century and inspired by true events.

Moving between Essex and London, myth and modernity, Cora Seaborne's spirited search for the Essex Serpent encourages all around her to test their allegiance to faith or reason in an age of rapid scientific advancement. At the same time, the novel explores the boundaries of love and friendship and the allegiances that we have to one another. The depth of feeling that the inhabitants of Aldwinter share are matched by their city counterparts as they strive to find the courage to express and understand their deepest desires, and strongest fears.

Episode Six
Cora seeks help from her London friend, Dr Luke Garrett. Her friendship with Will is tested. Meanwhile, the summer heat seems to banish all thoughts of the Essex Serpent.

Sarah Perry was born in Essex in 1979. She has a PhD in creative writing at Royal Holloway which she completed under the supervision of Andrew Motion. She has been writer in residence at the Gladstone Library and is the winner of a Shiva Naipaul award for travel writing. Her first novel, After Me Comes The Flood won the East Anglian Book of the Year Award in 2014. The Essex Serpent was Waterstone's Book Of The Year in 2016 and was short-listed for the Costa Novel Award 2016. She lives in Norwich.

Writer: Sarah Perry
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Ruth Gemmell
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 23:00 A Journey Through English (b07rgybq)
How do accents and dialects change on the longest continuous train journey in Britain? In A Journey We jump on board in Aberdeen in the early morning and arrive late in the evening in Penzance over 600 miles away.

En route, we tune in to the distinctive regional voices of the passengers and staff as they talk about their voices and the impact they have on their lives - both positive and negative. Jonnie Robinson, the British Library's Lead Curator of Spoken English, is on board to uncover the political, geographic and societal aspects of regional English.

The route cuts through several of the UK's major dialect regions via Scotland, the North East, Yorkshire, the Midlands and the West Country. A Journey Through English covers, in just under half an hour, a train journey that in reality takes more than thirteen hours travelling from north-east Scotland to the tip of Cornwall.

Producer: Jane French
A Soundscape production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 23:30 Short Cuts (b07z414x)
Series 10, The Deep End

Josie Long hears short documentaries and true stories from people who have fallen in the deep end.

From the man who sets out to scam the con artists trying to exploit him, to the hypnotist who finds himself face to face with Uday Hussein, we hear true tales of falling down the rabbit hole into unsettling situations - including the moment when the poet Ross Sutherland accidentally crossed the boundary between fiction and reality and found himself being dragged into a wrestling match.

Wrestling With Fiction
Featuring Heresy and Ross Sutherland

Scamming the Scammers
Featuring Don Mullan
Produced by Claire Crofton

Larry and Uday
Featuring Larry Garrett
Produced by Sarah Geis

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUESDAY 11 APRIL 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b08lfc0s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b08lglt1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08lfc0v)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08lfc0x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08lfc0z)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b08lfc11)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08mfhnb)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tom Wright, Professor of New Testament, St Andrews.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b08lfc13)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02twpwl)
Kingfisher

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the kingfisher.

The Ancient Greeks knew the kingfisher as Halcyon and believed that the female built her nest on the waves calming the seas while she brooded her eggs: hence the expression, Halcyon days which we use now for periods of tranquillity.

Kingfishers can bring in over 100 fish a day to their large broods and the resulting collection of bones and offal produces a stench that doesn't match the bird's attractive appearance.

TUE 06:00 Today (b08lfc15)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b08lh5yp)
Nick Fraser on Triassic reptiles

Nick Fraser regularly travels back in time (at least in his mind) to the Triassic, a crazily inventive period in our evolutionary history that started 250 million years ago. Wherever there are ancient Triassic creatures buried underground, Nick is never far behind; and his 'fossil first' approach to life has been richly rewarded. In 2002, he unearthed a new species of gliding reptile in Virginia, USA. Last year in southern China, he identified the remains of a creature so utterly odd that the paleontologists who studied this species before him had got it all wrong. And earlier this year he was part of a tiny but hugely exciting discovery much closer to home, hidden in the Scottish borders in rocks that are over 350 million years old: an ancient amphibian, imaginatively named Tiny, that is the earliest known example of an animal with a backbone to live on land. It may even have had five fingers.

Producer: Anna Buckley.

TUE 09:30 Whodunnit? (b0851jgq)
The Pregnant Teen Vanishes, Conspiracy to Commit

Half of England's pregnant teenagers have vanished. They didn't go missing, they just never conceived. And the teenage pregnancy rate plummeted. It's one of the greatest societal mysteries we've seen. A real-life Whodunnit. Everyone wants to crack the case and keep rates dropping.

In Chapter 2, a complex piece of Government social policy may be the answer. But does the timing fit?

Michael Blastland is on the case in this non-fiction investigation, unravelling the causes at the root of the biggest trends. These are true-life mysteries that creep up on us until the pattern of our lives is altered. He examines the culprits and punctures presumptions about causation and its implications for policy making.

Encountering red-herrings, false accusations, Government conspiracy, and hack journalism, finding out whodunnit in the case of a 50% reduction in teenage pregnancy is not going to be easy.

At its heart may lie a Government desire to prevent under 18 conception - a well-meaning intention, backed up by some strong evidence that socio-economic disadvantage can be both a cause and a consequence of teenage motherhood. But what makes huge swathes of teenagers change their behaviour?

Whodunnit? is a new series and a new kind of investigation. It owes its style to detective storytelling. But the cases are unequivocally real. These are societal mysteries - true-life changes in the pattern of our lives, changes that might even feature some of us.

Presenter: Michael Blastland
Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b08lh5yr)
David Jones: Engraver, Soldier, Painter, Poet, The Great War

Thomas Dilworth's biography illuminates the life of the admired but neglected visual artist and poet, David Jones. Today, reflections on the Modernist's disquieting experiences in the trenches, and the influence they had on his work in later years.

Read by Nicholas Farrell
Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08lfc17)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08lh5yt)
The Amateur Marriage, 1943, Once Upon a Time

By Anne Tyler dramatised by Rebecca Lenkiewicz.

Episode Two - 1943, Once Upon a Time

Pauline's patience with Michael, motherhood and living in a cramped apartment above the grocery store is wearing thin.

Director: David Hunter.

TUE 11:00 Playing Tennis in a Coma (b08588cp)
How do you know if someone is conscious if they can't show it? We follow the researchers trying to detect consciousness in patients with brain injuries and talk to the families affected.

Patients like 23 year old Chris and 75 year old John used to be thought of as unconscious. Following a car crash and a virus respectively, they both now reside in a care home in Hertfordshire living in a vegetative state. They sleep and wake but show no other signs of awareness of the world around them.

But ten years ago a ground-breaking study gave hope to the families of patients like Chris and John. Researched placed patients with disorders of consciousness in an MRI scanner and tracked the activity in their brains when they were asked to imagine playing tennis. It turned the field on its head when it revealed many of these so-called unconscious patients could react to instructions.

Today, up to forty per-cent of patients in a vegetative state are estimated to have some hidden level of consciousness - but new technology is required to expand diagnostic techniques. It's difficult to transfer vulnerable patients to hospital for brain scans, so scientists are working on bringing the tests to their bedside.

In this programme, we follow one brand new study being undertaken by researchers at Cambridge University, investigating how the technology can reveal the patterns of consciousness produced by the brain, meeting the families affected, and understanding the delicate ethical line researchers need to tread to balance expectation and reality.

Producer: Kate Lamble
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 11:30 A Passion for Bach (b08lh5z0)
The music of Baroque master JS Bach occupies a special place in the lives of many music lovers. This programme explores the particular and personal experience of Bach by talking to those who find that his music expresses something that no other music quite captures.

Featuring: Veronica Franklin Gould, Seckou Keita, Steven Isserlis, Marcus du Sautoy.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b08lfc19)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 The Listening Project (b08lh5z2)
The Listening Project One Thousand, The Health of the Nation

Our conversations about health issues are useful, Dr Helen Morant of the BMJ tells Fi Glover, to show medics what can be gained by listening to a patient. A celebration of the delivery of the thousandth conversation to the British Library and examination of the value of this unique archive from the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen, now and in the future.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b08lfc1c)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b08lfc1f)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b08lfc1h)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 Owning Colour (b08lh65s)
Series 1, Blue

Designer Wayne Hemingway looks at five colours that have been at the centre of ownership and trademark battles, revealing the complex status of colours in our society - their artistic, commercial and cultural impact.

He explores our response to colour - whether it's the red soles of designer shoes, the blue strip of a football team or the purple of a chocolate bar wrapper - interviewing those involved in branding, advertising and IP, as well as the psychologists, scientists , colour gurus, artists and those creating the colours of tomorrow using Nanotechnology.

Programme 2 - Blue
Blue is the world's favourite colour - we live on a blue planet. It's also the colour of Blackburn Rovers - Wayne Hemingway's home football team. It's associated not only with the beautiful game, but also with the town itself through a blue check for which Blackburn was famous. Wayne is in the stands to cheer his team on in a match against Manchester United - in red. He considers the importance of owning colour both in the commercial and artistic worlds.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b08lgq9l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Drama (b055jpnh)
Big Sky

Thriller by Anna Maloney. Ambitious Australian lawyer, Lindsey Regan, wants to get her client out of Guantanamo prison and back to his family in Australia. He claims he was beaten and tortured somewhere abroad until he confessed to a terrorism plot. He also claims he briefly escaped his captors during a refuelling stopover at a Scottish airport.

Other parts played by the cast.
Producer/ director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland.

TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08lfbgj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]

TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b08lh6qz)
Reasons to Be Cheerful?

The Skoll World Forum was set up by eBay founder, Jeff Skoll to pursue his optimistic vision of a sustainable world of peace and prosperity. But can the world's most pressing problems be solved by investing in, connecting, and celebrating social entrepreneurs and innovators?

This year the forum will be attended by key speakers such as Bono, Atul Gawunde, Michael Porter and Don Henley. Tom Heap will be reporting from Oxford to ask whether there are reasons for optimism in poverty, health and conservation as we face fresh challenges from climate change and political uncertainty.

Producer: Helen Lennard.

TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b08lh6r1)
Frenchified: The Influence of French on English

Michael Rosen & Dr Laura Wright find out how much of our language comes from French roots, from Anglo-Norman onwards. A Sunday lunch menu from The Ritz is food for thought, and Dr Richard Ashdowne explains the surprising history behind many words we think of as English, with the help of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b08lh6r3)
Series 42, Germaine Greer on Dame Elizabeth Frink

This week's great life has been rather neglected by many; making the case that she deserves better is Germaine Greer.

Dame Elizabeth Frink was best known for striking sculptures ranging from horses and goats to wild eagles and disembodied heads. As a female sculptor working in a man's world, Elisabeth Frink found it hard to establish herself in the 1950s.

To help tell the story of her hero, Germaine Greer is joined by Frink's son Lin Jammet and art critic Richard Cork.

The presenter is Matthew Parris and the producer is Perminder Khatkar.

TUE 17:00 Shipping Forecast (b08lfc1k)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08lfc1m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 The Missing Hancocks (b08lh7dg)
The Three Sons

The Missing Hancocks recreates those episodes of the classic Radio Show Hancock's Half Hour that have been wiped or lost from the archive. Not heard since then, this is a real piece of comedy history.

The first modern sitcom, Hancock's Half Hour made stars of Tony Hancock, Sid James and Kenneth Williams and launched Ray Galton and Alan Simpson on one of the most successful comedy-writing partnerships in history. But 20 episodes of the show are missing from the BBC archives. Now, after two highly successful series, another five of those episodes have been lovingly re-recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC Radio Theatre.

Tonight's episode: The Three Sons. This modern morality tale tells the story of old Ebidiah Hancock and his three sons, all of whom are played by Hancock

Written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, and with the classic score newly recorded by the BBC Concert Orchestra, the show stars Andy Secombe, Kevin Eldon, Simon Greenall, Robin Sebastian and Susy Kane. The Three Sons was first broadcast on the 21st June, 1955.

Produced by Neil Pearson & Paul Sheehan.

Written by Ray Galton & Simpson

Music recorded by the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Levon Parikian.

A BBC Studios Production.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b08lh7dj)
Emma adjusts to a new routine, and Ed gets a talking to.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b08lfc1p)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08lh5yt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 Adventures in Social Mobility (b08lh7gf)
What are the unwritten rules you must learn to get a top job? Hashi Mohamed came to the UK aged nine, as an unaccompanied child refugee, with hardly any English. His academic achievements at school were far from stellar. Yet he now works as a barrister - and so is a member of one of the elite professions that have traditionally been very difficult for people from poor backgrounds to crack. So how did he do it? In a personal take on social mobility, we meet his mentors. These are the people who gave him a few lucky breaks and showed him how to fit in to a world he could barely imagine. But how many people can follow that path? And why should they have to?
Producer: Rosamund Jones

(Image: Hashi Mohamed. Credit: Shaista Chishty).

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b08lfc1r)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Document (b07jysdv)
Knowing Jurgen Kuczynski

When Anne McElvoy met and wrote about the East German Economist Jurgen Kuczynski back in the 1980s she was aware of his reputation as a fringe player in the collection of Soviet spies operating in Britain in the years leading up to the 2nd World War. Now, with the help of recently released documents from MI5 and the intelligence services in both the US and Germany, Anne pieces together a fuller story of Kuczynski, his family and their role in the Atomic bomb spy scandals that rocked the British in the years after the second World War. She talks to academics who have been exploring the way the Kuczynski family were able to operate in spite of a full and detailed operation by MI5 intended to keep them under surveillance and she talks to surviving members of the family about Jurgen and his sister Ruth, better known as the soviet spy Sonya, and why they never felt any need to excuse the work they did in allowing a Stalinist regime in Moscow to dramatically accelerate their development of Nuclear Weapons.

Producer: Tom Alban.

TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b08lh5yp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b08lfc1t)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08lh7v1)
The Essex Serpent, Episode 7

Sarah Perry's award-winning novel, set at the end of the nineteenth century and inspired by true events.

Moving between Essex and London, myth and modernity, Cora Seaborne's spirited search for the Essex Serpent encourages all around her to test their allegiance to faith or reason in an age of rapid scientific advancement. At the same time, the novel explores the boundaries of love and friendship and the allegiances that we have to one another. The depth of feeling that the inhabitants of Aldwinter share are matched by their city counterparts as they strive to find the courage to express and understand their deepest desires, and strongest fears.

Episode Seven
Cora hosts a midsummer party at her Aldwinter house. Her connection with Will deepens. Stella Ransome's mysterious illness gets worse, prompting a visit to London with her husband.

Sarah Perry was born in Essex in 1979. She has a PhD in creative writing at Royal Holloway which she completed under the supervision of Andrew Motion. She has been writer in residence at the Gladstone Library and is the winner of a Shiva Naipaul award for travel writing. Her first novel, After Me Comes The Flood won the East Anglian Book of the Year Award in 2014. The Essex Serpent was Waterstone's Book Of The Year in 2016 and was short-listed for the Costa Novel Award 2016. She lives in Norwich.

Writer: Sarah Perry
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Ruth Gemmell
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 23:00 Bridget Christie Minds the Gap (b050bhnq)
Series 2, Episode 4

Bridget Christie returns in another series of her multi-award winning series about modern feminism.

Bridget thought that she'd be able to put her feet up after her last Radio 4 series, she expected it to bomb. Sadly it was a huge success and she's had to bang on about feminism ever since, perform two sell-out runs at the Edinburgh festival and win lots of awards.

But she hasn't managed to single-handedly eradicate sexism so she's made a whole new four-part series about it for Radio 4.

In this final episode, she talks about why she's not grateful Russell Brand has stopped being a sexist, what happens when you wear an end FGM badge on a popular TV show and why politics has a women problem.

She's assisted in this by the series' token man, Fred MacAulay.

The series is written and performed by Bridget Christie and the producers are Alexandra Smith and Alison Vernon Smith.

TUE 23:30 Short Cuts (b07zyhq0)
Series 10, Wild Youth

Falling in love, losing yourself and vicious sibling rivalries - Josie Long presents tales of wild youth. We hear the writer Joe Dunthorne and his sister Leah try to unpick old family scars and a story of attempted teen rebellion from Mae Martin.

Rivals
Featuring Joe and Leah Dunthorne

Wild Youth
Featuring Mae Martin

Julius and Moses
Featuring Julius Matovu and Moses Walumsimbi
Produced by Andrea Rangecroft

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


WEDNESDAY 12 APRIL 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b08lfc3q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b08lh5yr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08lfc3s)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08lfc3v)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08lfc3x)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b08lfc3z)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08msgqd)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tom Wright, Professor of New Testament, St Andrews.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b08lfc41)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0423ctf)
Reed Bunting

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the reed bunting. The reed bunting makes up for its lack of musicality with striking good looks. Male birds have jet black heads and a white moustache and look stunning on a spring day as they sit on shrubs or sway on reed stems, flicking their tales nervously and chanting a simple refrain.

WED 06:00 Today (b08lfc43)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Only Artists (b08lh879)
Series 1, Naomi Alderman and Chi-chi Nwanoku

Novelist and writer Naomi Alderman asks classical double-bassist Chi-chi Nwanoku what it's like to create your art live on stage, rather than nicely tucked up with a laptop.

Only Artists is a new series which takes its title from the first two sentences of The Story of Art by the renowned art historian E. H. Gombrich: 'There really is no such thing as art. There are only artists.' There is no presenter, just two artists - from different disciplines - discussing creative questions, processes or decisions. It's up to them.

WED 09:30 Everything You Think About Sport Is Wrong (b085gplp)
Beauty

Continuing his series challenging how we think about sport, Simon Barnes makes the case for beauty in sport.

Simon asks how an appreciation of beauty can translate into a love for football and how Roger Federer achieves art in the pursuit of victory on the tennis court. He explores the complex relationship between victory and beauty, and talks to Permi Jhooti, Britain's first Asian professional footballer, about her work as an artist depicting beauty in sport, and hears why she thinks sport offers her a unique ability to show the depth of her feeling.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b08lh8nw)
David Jones: Engraver, Soldier, Painter, Poet, The Art of Engraving

Thomas Dilworth's biography of the visual artist and poet, David Jones, illuminates the life and work of a great but neglected Modernist. Today, an introduction to the artist Eric Gill leads to profound reflections on Roman Catholicism, a first encounter with the art of engraving, and romance.

Read by Nicholas Farrell
Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08lfc45)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b08lh8ny)
The Amateur Marriage, 1950, Elmview Acres

By Anne Tyler dramatised by Rebecca Lenkiewicz.

Episode Three - 1950, Elmview Acres

Pauline finds she is a different sort of woman talking to the recently abandoned Alex - somebody slangy and athletic.

Director: David Hunter.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b08lh8qb)
Keren and Mike - Rekindling Passion

After 25 years of marriage she still needs to feel wanted, but his treatment for prostate cancer is having an impact. Fi Glover presents. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 The Rise and Fall of the Meritocracy (b08lgq9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Believe It! (b08lhg9p)
Series 3, Knight Fever

The third series of Jon Canter's not quite true autobiography of Richard Wilson. Believe what you like!

Richard was unwell last year. He had a heart attack. But now he's recovered and is fighting fit. With a new lease of life - he considers those things most likely to make him happy in the future. What's on his bucket list? Get a Knighthood of course!

Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b08lfc47)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 The Listening Project (b08lhg9s)
The Listening Project One Thousand, An Ethical Digital Cafe

For writers the archive provides a resource for characterisation and speech patterns; Neil Buckland tells Fi Glover about the conversations that have inspired his fiction. A celebration of the delivery of the thousandth conversation to the British Library and examination of the value of this unique archive from the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen, now and in the future.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b08lfc49)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b08lfc4c)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b08lfc4f)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 Owning Colour (b08lhg9v)
Series 1, Green

Designer Wayne Hemingway looks at five colours that have been at the centre of ownership and trademark battles, revealing the complex status of colours in our society - their artistic, commercial and cultural impact.

He explores our response to colour - whether it's the red soles of designer shoes, the blue strip of a football team or the purple of a chocolate bar wrapper - interviewing those involved in branding, advertising and IP, as well as the psychologists, scientists , colour gurus, artists and those creating the colours of tomorrow using Nanotechnology.

Programme 3 - Green
Green is so ubiquitous that even the word has environmental, political and health meanings. It's used without limitation to boost the environmental credentials of businesses such as energy companies - notably BP. It's part of what some environmentalists calls "green-washing", as green symbolises vegetation - grass, fields, farmlands. A current Royal Horticultural Society campaign, Greening of the Grey, aims to bring more green spaces to our towns and cities. Wayne visits RHS Wisley to meet Science Director Alistair Griffiths, gardeners and visitors to discover more about the power of green.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b08lh7dj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Drama (b08ljmll)
In Here

By Eileen Horne

A tense hostage drama.

When a hostage situation develops at a London gym, Ruby hides in the changing room. Then when her mobile starts ringing, she realises that information from her will be vital to the police operation. Is it worth the risk?

Directed by Gaynor Macfarlane.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b08lfc4h)
Money Box Live: Care Home Costs for Dad

Paying for a care home for Dad, we hear the very personal story of Money Box listener Susannah as she arranges care for her father who has dementia. What does a nursing home cost and what happens when the family can no longer afford to pay?

Presenter Louise Cooper.
Producer: Diane Richardson.
Editor: Andrew Smith.

WED 15:30 Why Become a Doctor? (b07pgw3m)
Junior Doctors: All Work and No Play?

In the second programme in the series hospital consultant Dr Kevin Fong looks in detail at the work and training of junior doctors today. The industrial dispute over contracts - which led to strike action - has now been going on for two years, We look at the workloads of junior doctors today, and examine the conflict between the amount of time available to spend on medicine versus that spent on administration, paperwork and form filling, the record keeping now required.

While there is no doubt medicine has advanced dramatically in recent years, the nature of the job for those delivering it has also changed, with a move to evidence based medicine and less reliance on passing down knowledge through the generations. For many in training this has led to a feeling of isolation, and a loss of support structures through separation from experienced colleagues.

Kevin Fong also asks what a greater focus on the wishes of patients means for the delivery of treatment. And doctors discuss the conflict between the need to see many patients in a short time period and yet provide them with full and rounded care.

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b08ljfxg)
Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b08lfc4k)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b08lfc4m)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08lfc4p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing (b04jm36p)
Series 3, About Bad Boys

ABOUT BAD BOYS

In a mix of stand-up and re-enacted family life - Nathan Caton tries to be a good role model for his younger brother Tyree.

Written by Nathan Caton and James Kettle
Producer: Katie Tyrrell

Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing is a series about young, up-and-coming comedian Nathan Caton, who after becoming the first in his family to graduate from University, opted not to use his architecture degree but instead to try his hand at being a full-time stand-up comedian, much to his family's horror and disgust. They desperately want him to get a 'proper job.'

Each episode illustrates the criticism, interference and rollercoaster ride that Nathan endures from his disapproving family as he tries to prove himself.

The series is a mix of Nathan's stand-up intercut with scenes from his family life.

Janet a.k.a. Mum is probably the kindest and most lenient of the disappointed family members. At the end of the day she just wants the best for her son. However, she'd also love to brag and show her son off to her friends, but with Nathan only telling jokes for a living that's kind of hard to do.

Martin a.k.a. Dad works in the construction industry and was looking forward to his son getting a degree so the two of them could work together in the same field. But now Nathan has blown that dream out of the window. Martin is clumsy and hard-headed and leaves running the house to his wife (she wouldn't allow it to be any other way).

Shirley a.k.a. Grandma cannot believe Nathan turned down architecture for comedy. She can't believe she left the paradise in the West Indies and came to the freezing United Kingdom for a better life so that years later her grandson could 'tell jokes!' How can her grandson go on stage and use foul language and filthy material... it's not the good Christian way!

So with all this going on in the household what will Nathan do? Will he persevere and follow his dreams? Or will he give in to his family's interference? Or will he finally leave home?!

WED 19:00 The Archers (b08ljmlr)
Harrison offers an olive branch, and Tom thinks it is too late to play nice.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b08lfc4r)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08lh8ny)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Glass Half Full (b08ljmlv)
Series 1, Gender equality is within reach

Is ingrained negativity preventing us from seeing that full gender equality is just around the corner?

In a debate recorded in front of an audience at the Women of the World festival at the Southbank Centre, Fi Glover examines the thoughts of pessimists and optimists. She asks not only what they think about gender equality, but also how their views are informed by their contrasting mindsets. Where does their optimism or pessimism come from?

We have made extraordinary strides towards gender equality - the pay gap is shrinking, female representation in parliament and in business is growing and, all over the world, legislation is coming into force that safeguards women's rights. These are the views of optimist and best-selling sociologist Dr Michael Kimmel.

On the other hand, violence against women is on the rise in the UK, men still dominate politics and the judiciary and there are still more CEOs called John leading FTSE 100 companies than women! Historian Hannah Dawson brings us back down to earth.

Three expert witnesses are called to give evidence - MP Harriet Harman, best-selling Turkish author Elif Shafak, and sociologist Catherine Hakim.

The pessimist and the optimist cross-examine the witnesses and, to conclude, the audience votes. Is the glass half empty or half full?

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 20:45 Lent Talks (b08ljmlz)
Richard Harries - Destiny and Old Age

In the last in the series former bishop Lord Richard Harries, who is 80 this year, talks about confronting destiny in old age. Jonathan Keeble reads Sailing to Byzantium by WB Yeats
Producer: Phil Pegum.

WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b08lh6qz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]

WED 21:30 Only Artists (b08lh879)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b08lfc4t)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b08lfc4w)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08ljqcp)
The Essex Serpent, Episode 8

Sarah Perry's award-winning novel, set at the end of the nineteenth century and inspired by true events.

Moving between Essex and London, myth and modernity, Cora Seaborne's spirited search for the Essex Serpent encourages all around her to test their allegiance to faith or reason in an age of rapid scientific advancement. At the same time, the novel explores the boundaries of love and friendship and the allegiances that we have to one another. The depth of feeling that the inhabitants of Aldwinter share are matched by their city counterparts as they strive to find the courage to express and understand their deepest desires, and strongest fears.

Episode Eight
In Aldwinter, the mystery of the Essex Serpent appears to be solved. But there is shocking news from London for Cora.

Sarah Perry was born in Essex in 1979. She has a PhD in creative writing at Royal Holloway which she completed under the supervision of Andrew Motion. She has been writer in residence at the Gladstone Library and is the winner of a Shiva Naipaul award for travel writing. Her first novel, After Me Comes The Flood won the East Anglian Book of the Year Award in 2014. The Essex Serpent was Waterstone's Book Of The Year in 2016 and was short-listed for the Costa Novel Award 2016. She lives in Norwich.

Writer: Sarah Perry
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Ruth Gemmell
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:00 Tom Parry's Fancy Dressed Life (b08mqtgg)
Series 1, Max

Episode 2: Max. It's the annual Parry family party and, as if you needed reminding, it's Fancy Dress. Tom is rather pleased with his typically obscure nay gloriously inaccessible choice of costume but some unhelpfully nightmarish flashbacks to his university days threaten to spoil his enjoyment of the day.

Tom Parry is an award winning comedian, writer and actor whose credits include Miranda, Phone Shop and Drunk History among many others. As a stand up, he most recently gained critical acclaim and an Edinburgh Comedy Award Best Newcomer nomination for his debut hour 'Yellow T-Shirt'. For more than a decade he has been part of the multi-award winning sketch team Pappy's. Together they have performed 6 sell out shows at the Edinburgh Fringe, completed 4 national tours, gigged all over the world, and created, written and starred in the sitcom 'Badults' for BBC3.

Cast: Tom Parry, Ben Clarke, Celeste Dring, Gareth Pierce
Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

WED 23:15 Litter from America (b08ljqct)
Series 1, Maysoon Zayid

US Comedian Maysoon Zayid reflects on putting her Muslim culture and disability to work in life and acclaimed stand-up comedy.

Maysoon Zayid founded the Arab-American comedy festival and gave one of the most watched TED talks on the past few years on her life as a raucously funny and clever stand-up comedian, and a Muslim woman with cerebral palsy living in New Jersey.

Over the past year, she has been forced to employ personal security for some of her gigs because of specific threats. Here, she gives a hilarious tongue-lashing to the culture of prejudice, riffing on the fact that nearly all disabled roles on American TV and Film are played by able-bodied actors.

Maysoon grew up in New Jersey, but spent every summer with her grandparents in the Palestinian territories watching a tatty-but-loved version of Sesame Street and Arab soap-operas. Her dream was to be a New York daytime soap actress but, after hovering in the background as an extra for eighteen months, realised that her type of people were stand-up comedians, not actors. She's currently working on her own online family comedy series set during Ramadan.

A Foghorn Company production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:30 Short Cuts (b081ldd6)
Series 10, Losing Yourself

Josie Long hears stories of what can be found as we lose ourselves - from disappearing into anonymous environments to confronting existential threats.

Found
Featuring Penny Rimbaud

Lost
Featuring Laura Barton

Losing Yourself
Originally featured on Scene on Radio
http://podcast.cdsporch.org/episode-12-losing-yourself/
Produced by Ibby Caputo

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


THURSDAY 13 APRIL 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b08lfc6s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b08lh8nw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08lfc6v)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08lfc6x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08lfc6z)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b08lfc71)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08mtbwj)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tom Wright, Professor of New Testament, St Andrews.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b08lfc73)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tx41n)
Sparrowhawk

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the sparrowhawk.

A garden visit from a sparrowhawk can be an exciting affair. They're smash-and grab raiders, using bushes, hedgerows and fences as cover to take their victims by surprise. Males are blue-grey above, with a striking rusty-orange chest and are smaller than the brown females - this allows the pair to take a wide range of prey.

THU 06:00 Today (b08lfc75)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 In Our Time (b08lfc77)
Rosa Luxemburg

Melvyn Bragg discusses the life and times of Rosa Luxemburg (1871-1919), 'Red Rosa', who was born in Poland under the Russian Empire and became one of the leading revolutionaries in an age of revolution. She was jailed for agitation and for her campaign against the Great War which, she argued, pitted workers against each other for the sake of capitalism. With Karl Liebknecht and other radicals, she founded the Spartacus League in the hope of ending the war through revolution. She founded the German Communist Party with Liebknecht; with the violence that followed the German Revolution of 1918, her opponents condemned her as Bloody Rosa. She and Liebknecht were seen as ringleaders in the Spartacus Revolt of 1919 and, on 15th January 1919, the Freikorps militia arrested and murdered them. While Luxemburg has faced opposition for her actions and ideas from many quarters, she went on to become an iconic figure in East Germany under the Cold War and a focal point for opposition to the Soviet-backed leadership.

With

Jacqueline Rose

Mark Jones

and

Nadine Rossol

Producer: Simon Tillotson.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b08ljx83)
David Jones: Engraver, Soldier, Painter, Poet, Art, Poetry and Patronage

Thomas Dilworth's biography of the visual artist and poet, David Jones, illuminates the life and work of a great but neglected Modernist. Today, difficult times lie ahead, but first the beginnings of an epic poem, an evolution in watercolours, and a new patron.

Read by Nicholas Farrell
Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08lfc79)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08ljx8p)
The Amateur Marriage, 1960, Lindy Is Missing

by Anne Tyler dramatised by Rebecca Lenkiewicz.

Episode Four - 1960, Lindy is Missing.

Eldest daughter Lindy is a problem teenager and a further source of tension for Pauline and Michael's marriage.

Director: David Hunter.

THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b08ljx91)
Coming Out of the Shadows in Kenya

For generations those who, for biological reasons, don't fit the usual male/female categories have faced violence and stigma in Kenya. Intersex people - as they are commonly known in Kenya - were traditionally seen as a bad omen bringing a curse upon their family and neighbours. Most were kept in hiding and many were killed at birth. But now a new generation of home-grown activists and medical experts are helping intersex people to come out into the open. They're rejecting the old idea that intersex people must choose a gender and stick to it and are calling on the government to instead grant them legal recognition. The BBC's Africa Health Correspondent Anne Soy meets some of the rural families struggling to find acceptance for their intersex children and witnesses the efforts health workers and village elders are making to promote understanding of the condition. She also meets a successful gospel singer who recently came out as intersex and hears from those who see the campaign for inter-sex recognition as part of a wider attack on the traditional Kenyan family.

Helen Grady producing.

THU 11:30 Printing a Nation (b08ljx97)
Series 1, Knowledge

Dr. Anindita Ghosh from the University of Manchester explores the impact of the printing press on India and argues that print, much more than railways as is commonly understood, gave birth to the Indian nation that was born in 1947.

In her first programme, Anindita explores the 'Renaissance' that came about through the medium of print in India. She travels to Kolkata, formerly the capital of the British Raj, to explore the tremendous explosion of printed material in nineteenth century Bengal, following the setting up of the first presses by missionaries in India.

The colonial government needed English speaking Indians to work its administrative apparatus and a proliferation of English printed material followed. But this was not a passive process. Indians in turn participated in the intellectual revolution to form their own thoughts on society. The search for a putative 'Indian' identity that followed, known today as the Bengal Renaissance, was very much shaped through an exchange of ideas via printed texts.

A sea of Indian-run presses, printing in local languages, furthered the cacophonous print revolution and, by the end of the nineteenth century, more titles were produced in India than in France during the Age of Enlightenment. By carrying the printed word to more popular levels of readership and extending the networks of the reading community, Anindita argues, these were connections that were to prove vital for the formation of the nation in 20th century India.

With Professor Swapan Chakravorty (Presidency University, Kolkata), Professor Rosinka Chaudhuri (Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta), Graham Shaw (British Library) and Professor Partha Mitter (University of Sussex).

Producer: Melissa FitzGerald
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b08lfc7c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 The Listening Project (b08ljx9p)
The Listening Project One Thousand, Not Your Usual Oral History

Our one thousand conversations sit in the British Library's oral history archive yet they are unique. Holly Gilbert, who catalogues them for the BL, explains why to Fi GLover. Part of a celebration of the delivery of the thousandth conversation to the British Library and examination of the value of this unique archive from the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen, now and in the future.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b08lfc7f)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b08lfc7h)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b08lfc7k)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 Owning Colour (b08ljxb3)
Series 1, Purple

Designer Wayne Hemingway looks at five colours that have been at the centre of ownership and trademark battles, revealing the complex status of colours in our society - their artistic, commercial and cultural impact.

He explores our response to colour - whether it's the red soles of designer shoes, the blue strip of a football team or the purple of a chocolate bar wrapper - interviewing those involved in branding, advertising and IP, as well as the psychologists, scientists , colour gurus, artists and those creating the colours of tomorrow using Nanotechnology.

Programme 4 - Purple
From music to chocolate, purple has created its own brands. It appears the least in nature and its scarcity in everyday life led humans to link it with luxury and quality. Traditionally the chosen colour of royalty, dark purple has been fought over in the most famous of colour battles - Nestle vs Cadburys. The dispute over Pantone 2865c, the colour chosen by Cadburys over 100 years ago has been in and out of the courts for over a decade. Wayne uncovers our relationship to purple which, while being popular with teenagers, is also linked to death and mourning.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b08ljmlr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Drama (b08ljxbb)
Hard Stop

Presenter Paul Lewis

Repeated on 09:04:2017 21:02:00
________________________________________
Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Amend16:02:00 16:02:00 Weekend Woman's HourWeekend Woman's HourFreida Pinto on Guerrilla & Easter crafts with kids

Short Desc
Freida Pinto on her new project Guerrilla
Deletion(s):
Change(s):
Before: Highlights from the Woman's Hour week.
After: Freida Pinto on her new project Guerrilla

Medium Desc
Freida Pinto on her latest project Guerrilla, growing up with a single parent, Easter crafts with the kids
Deletion(s):
Change(s):
Before: Highlights from the Woman's Hour week.
After: Freida Pinto on her latest project Guerrilla, growing up with a single parent, Easter crafts with the kids

Long Desc
Freida Pinto shot to fame in the film Slumdog Millionaire. Her next project is Guerrilla where she plays Jas a politically active woman who forms a radical underground cell.

We hear from you about what it's been like to grow up the child of a single parent. Carol, Tom, Phil and Victoria share their stories with us.

We hear from the first woman to win the Wisden cricket book of the year - Emma John. She tells us where her passion of the game came from.

In a new series looking at text messages that have changed people's lives, the comedian London Hughes describes how a text led her to honeytrap her boyfriend.

The gardener and writer Alys Fowler tells us how exploring the Birmingham canals in an inflatable kayak helped her to come to terms with leaving her husband and embarking on a new relationship with a woman.

Discarded Daughters is a film which investigates the rise of female infanticide in Pakistan. The reporter Maheen Sadiq of TV Channel Viceland tells us about making the film and the work of the Edhi Foundation which works to recover the bodies of dead babies and give homes to abandoned female children.

We look at some crafting ideas you can do with your children over the Easter break. The costume designer Sarah and her daughter Rosie tell us about their craft projects and Christine Leech who has a blog SewYeah tells us about projects using pomp poms.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow
Addition(s):
Change(s):
Before: Highlights from the Woman's Hour week.
After: Freida Pinto shot to fame in the film Slumdog Millionaire.

ProducerRabeka Nurmahomed

Presenter Jane Garvey

________________________________________
Sunday 09:04:2017
Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Amend21:02:00 21:02:00 Money BoxMoney BoxPersonal debt, Making Tax Digital, bereavement support payments & probate fees

Presenter Paul Lewis

Repeat of 08:04:2017 12:04:00
________________________________________
Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Amend23:02:00 23:02:00 The Film ProgrammeThe Film ProgrammeRaw

Short Desc
Raw

Medium Desc
Raw

Long Desc
With Francine Stock.

Julia Ducournau discusses her French cannibal movie Raw, which reportedly had audience members passing out in the aisles at a screening in the Toronto Film Festival.

The life of Pablo Neruda - communist, womaniser and poet - is explored in a surreal detective story simply called Neruda. The film's director Pablo Larrain explains why there's never been a poet quite like the former Chilean politician, who was possibly murdered in his bed.

In a week when two bio-pics about poets are released, Ian McMillan presents Daffodils 2, his poetic response to the more annoying cliches of poets in movies.

The Film Programme's A to Z Of Directors arrives at F this week. Critics Catherine Bray and Sophie Monks Kaufman try to persuade Francine to the very different pleasures of David Fincher and Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

ProducerStephen Hughes

Presenter Francine Stock

Repeat of 06:04:2017 16:02:00
________________________________________
Thursday 13:04:2017
Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Insert06:07:00 06:07:00 Weather ForecastWeather Forecast

________________________________________
Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Insert06:25:00 06:25:00 Sports DeskSports Desk

________________________________________
Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Insert06:57:00 06:57:00 Weather ForecastWeather Forecast

________________________________________
Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Insert07:25:00 07:25:00 Sports DeskSports Desk

________________________________________
Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Insert07:48:00 07:48:00 Thought for the DayThought for the Day

Short Desc
Thought for the Day with The Reverend Lucy Winkett

Medium Desc
Thought for the Day with The Reverend Lucy Winkett

Long Desc
Thought for the Day with The Reverend Lucy Winkett

ProducerChristine Morgan

________________________________________
Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Insert07:57:00 07:57:00 Weather ForecastWeather Forecast

________________________________________
Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. T

THU 15:00 Open Country (b08ljxbs)
Skiving at Poverty Bottom, Newhaven

Ian Marchant travels back to Newhaven in East Sussex, to learn to see a familiar landscape through fresh eyes. He grew up round here, bunking off school with his mates on the South Downs and the derelict Newhaven Fort (now beautifully restored).

There's a weird mix of things to look at in panorama here: a glimpse of the iconic Seven Sisters (white cliffs, anyone?), stereotypically English rolling green hills, the industrial business of the ferry port to Dieppe and a new and massive biomass incinerator that upset local residents when it was built. But it's all potentially beautiful, depending on how you look at it.

While his friends the Bugman, the Starman and the Painter were all busy looking at bugs, stars and landscape, what was Ian doing? Since he left the town, the South Downs has become a National Park and the air above it is now an International Dark Skies Reserve.

It's time for Ian to return to the birthplace of Wreckless Eric to find out.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b08lg8rz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (b08lgbx0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b08ljxc9)
Sarah Waters on The Handmaiden

Sarah Waters tells Francine Stock what she thinks of the Korean adaptation of her novel Fingersmith.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b08lfc7m)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b08lfc7p)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08lfc7r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 Reluctant Persuaders (b08ljxcc)
Series 2, Just Do It

Starring Nigel Havers, Mathew Baynton and Josie Lawrence. Welcome back to Hardacre's, the worst advertising agency in London, for the second series of Edward Rowett's award-winning sitcom.

This week, the team are unexpectedly in demand. The marketing manager of nutrition company Protein Team (guest star Richard Goulding) enlists their services for a huge poster campaign, aimed at selling protein shakes to women.

Yet no sooner is their ad up - featuring a slender woman, and an even more slender bikini - than Hardacre's find themselves at the centre of a media storm over misogyny, body-shaming, and the evils of advertising.

Wracked with guilt and determined to make amends, Joe (Mathew Baynton) clashes with his older and more cynical creative director Rupert Hardacre (Nigel Havers) and accounts manager Amanda (Josie Lawrence), who are convinced that sex sells and all publicity is good publicity. But in an age of Twitter storms and third-wave feminism, are they behind the times?

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b08ljxcq)
Justin gets an unexpected offer, and it is a busy evening at nets.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b08lfc7t)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08ljx8p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b08ljxcy)
Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.

THU 20:30 In Business (b08ljz9v)
Northern Ireland and Brexit

What are the economic and business prospects for Northern Ireland after Brexit?
It's the only part of the UK sharing a land border with an EU country - the Republic of Ireland. The border throws up many challenges.
And amid concerns about investment, profit and talent, Matthew Gwyther also hears business leaders worry about the future of peace.

Producer: Penny Murphy.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b08lfc7m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 In Our Time (b08lfc77)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b08lfc7w)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b08lfc7y)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08ljz9x)
The Essex Serpent, Episode 9

Sarah Perry's award-winning novel, set at the end of the nineteenth century and inspired by true events.

Moving between Essex and London, myth and modernity, Cora Seaborne's spirited search for the Essex Serpent encourages all around her to test their allegiance to faith or reason in an age of rapid scientific advancement. At the same time, the novel explores the boundaries of love and friendship and the allegiances that we have to one another. The depth of feeling that the inhabitants of Aldwinter share are matched by their city counterparts as they strive to find the courage to express and understand their deepest desires, and strongest fears.

Episode Nine
Cora and Will resume their deep friendship. Stella Ransome enlists the young Francis Seaborne's help with a secret project.

Sarah Perry was born in Essex in 1979. She has a PhD in creative writing at Royal Holloway which she completed under the supervision of Andrew Motion. She has been writer in residence at the Gladstone Library and is the winner of a Shiva Naipaul award for travel writing. Her first novel, After Me Comes The Flood won the East Anglian Book of the Year Award in 2014. The Essex Serpent was Waterstone's Book Of The Year in 2016 and was short-listed for the Costa Novel Award 2016. She lives in Norwich.

Writer: Sarah Perry
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Ruth Gemmell
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 23:00 Start/Stop (b04prh93)
Series 2, Pregnancy

Hit comedy about three marriages in various states of disrepair. Starring Jack Docherty, Kerry Godliman, John Thomson, Fiona Allen, Charlie Higson and Sally Bretton.
This week Cathy has some big news for Barney: she's pregnant. Alice faces up to the fact she can't get pregnant. And Fiona has a big idea for Evan about a small operation he could have which means she won't ever get pregnant again.
In this week's episode Cathy reveals to a shocked Barney that she is pregnant. Fiona suggests to a shocked Evan that he get a vasectomy. And David suggests to a shocked Alice that they adopt.

Producer ..... Claire Jones.

THU 23:30 Short Cuts (b082xc07)
Series 10, Vox

Finding your voice, life or death conversations and seeking anonymity - Josie Long explores the power of the human voice. From losing yourself in a crowd of others to the medium who finds herself conversing with a murderer.

Cards on the Table
Produced by Andrea Rangecroft

Frantumaglia
Produced by Phil Smith

Power and Freedom
http://sarahboothroyd.com/home.html
Produced by Sarah Boothroyd

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


FRIDAY 14 APRIL 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b08lfc9n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b08ljx83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08lfc9q)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08lfc9s)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08lfc9v)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b08lfc9x)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08mfcxw)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Tom Wright, Professor of New Testament, St Andrews.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b08lfc9z)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrc4v)
Swallow (Spring)

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the swallow. A flash of blue across farmland or a stableyard and a burst of twittering can only mean one thing, the swallows are back after their long migration from South Africa. No matter how grey the April weather, the sight and sound of a swallow dispels the winter blues at a stroke. These agile migrants arrive as the insect population is beginning to increase, and they are a delight to watch as they hawk for flies in the spring sunshine.

FRI 06:00 Today (b08lfcb1)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 The Reunion (b08lzdv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b08lk3jh)
David Jones: Engraver, Soldier, Painter, Poet, In Parenthesis - The Epic War Poem

Thomas Dilworth's biography of the visual artist and poet, David Jones, illuminates the life and work of a great but neglected Modernist. Today, the years spent in the First World War's trenches take their toll. The epic war poem, In Parenthesis reaches a conclusion, and we hear David Jones himself read an extract.

Read by Nicholas Farrell
Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08lfcb3)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08lk3jk)
The Amateur Marriage, 1960, Lost and Found

By Anne Tyler dramatised by Rebecca Lenkiewicz.

Episode Five - 1960, Lost and Found

The ragged marriage of Michael and Pauline is further strained by the extreme actions of a difficult teenage daughter.

Director: David Hunter.

FRI 11:00 Do Pass Go (b08lk3jm)
Board games are back. Samira Ahmed sets out to uncover the modern allure of an analogue table top game in an increasingly digital world.

When a computer finally beat the world's best player of Go, we had a problem. If even the most complex game can be reduced to a mathematical procedure, are games as the embodiment of human desires and abilities doomed?

Not a chance. Board games are booming, and self-confessed board-game geek Samira Ahmed is determined to find out why.

Along the way, she meets the designers, players and everyday obsessives who throng in their thousands to shows like Essen's famous Spiel festival. She discovers how games mirror the preoccupations of our age and how they allow us to vent our instinctive desire for combat.

But could the real answer to our gaming addiction lie elsewhere? As it turns out, old-fashioned gaming seems to create a safe space like no other, where we can explore sides of our identities forbidden in real life. Samira talks to the man who rediscovered the rules of one of mankind's oldest games.

A Leaping Wing production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 11:30 Gloomsbury (b08lk3jp)
Series 4, Your Very Very Humble Servant

Vera and Ginny are off to Sandwich to get Mrs Gosling back. Henry must crack on with his biography of the King - Ginny orders Lionel to stay and help him. Ginny wants to call en route on Lytton Scratchy and Dora Barrington who have rented a cottage nearby. Ginny admires Barrington's boyish and independent spirit (and haircut) and thinks she is the epitome of the Modern Woman. Back at Sizzlinghurst , Lionel, a republican, tries to persuade Henry to abandon the biography of the King, but Henry needs the money, finds Lionel's interference annoying, and sends him off to walk the dogs. The peace and quiet is interrupted by the unexpected arrival of the Prince of Wales with Mrs Simpleton. The Prince wonders how the book is going and Henry assures him he it's all wonderful and fascinating even though moments before, he was telling Lionel that the King is the most boring man ever born. Then, walking in the garden, Mrs Simpleton meets Lionel. Not knowing who she is, he launches into an anti-monarchist tirade about Henry's talents being wasted on this mediocre king. When he realizes who she is, he has a panic attack and feigns madness to escape. Meanwhile Ginny and Vera have moved on to Sandwich, disappointed by what they found at the cottage. For all their claims to a modern lifestyle, Scratchy and Barrington displayed a nauseating example of women's enslavement. Talking of which, Mrs Gosling is persuaded to come home, but her marriage to Mr Gosling is more fragile than ever now that she knows he has slept with her sister.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b08lfcb5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 The Listening Project (b08lk3jr)
The Listening Project One Thousand, Psychological Insights

Susie Orbach, who will deliver The Listening Project Lecture at the British Library, explores the archive's insights into contemporary emotional life, in the company of Fi Glover. Part of a celebration of the delivery of the thousandth conversation to the British Library and examination of the value of this unique archive from the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen, now and in the future.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b08lfcb7)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b08lfcb9)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b08lfcbc)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 Owning Colour (b08lk3jt)
Series 1, Black

Designer Wayne Hemingway looks at five colours that have been at the centre of ownership and trademark battles, revealing the complex status of colours in our society - their artistic, commercial and cultural impact.

He explores our response to colour - whether it's the red soles of designer shoes, the blue strip of a football team or the purple of a chocolate bar wrapper - interviewing those involved in branding, advertising and IP, as well as the psychologists, scientists , colour gurus, artists and those creating the colours of tomorrow using Nanotechnology.

Programme 5 - Black
Whether black is a colour is debatable. Unlike colours which are created from the reflection of different wavelengths of light, black is created from the absorption of light. Wayne tells the story of Vantablack - the blackest black created which, unlike other blacks, absorbs all but a tiny (less than 0.04%) of light. Anish Kapoor has bought exclusive rights to the black. Wayne concludes the series by questioning the rights of colour ownership.

Producer: Sara Parker
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b08ljxcq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Drama (b05r78dw)
My Dear Bessie

A love story in letters played out against the backdrop of the Second World War between Chris Barker, a solider in North Africa, and Bessie Moore, a Morse code interpreter at the Foreign Office in London.

Compiled by Simon Garfield and adapted for radio by Sara Davies

Produced by Gemma Jenkins

A small blue box opened in 2008 revealed a wartime world of love, longing and frustration.

On September 5th 1943, Chris Barker, a Signalman stationed near Tobruk decided to write to a former work colleague, Bessie Moore, back in London. The unexpected warmth of Bessie's reply changed their lives forever.

Chris and Bessie's love letters first appeared in Simon Garfield's book To The Letter, they have toured literary festivals as part of Letters Live before getting their own book, My Dear Bessie, published this year on Valentine's Day.

FRI 15:00 Good Friday Meditation (b08lk53w)
In the final few days, Jesus knew that that he was going to be crucified. It was a lonely time because those closest to him did not know his fate and, when he needed them most, they deserted him. As the Roman soldiers marched him away, the disciples scattered and Peter even denied knowing him.

But it wasn't just the actual abandonment of his friends but the perceived abandonment by God that intensified Jesus' loneliness.

"My God, my God why hast thou forsaken me?"

The final moments of Christ on the cross ache with abandonment and loneliness and in The Good Friday Meditation, the Rev Lucy Winkett explores these feelings in a 21st century context in conversations with a new mother, a 92 year old woman and a man whose faith has been challenged by his struggle with self-hatred and addiction.

Young mothers can feel isolated as they seek to come to terms with their new responsibilities and say goodbye to their old, independent life. Elderly people often struggle to come to terms with being alone as friends and partners die and children move away. But what about the rest of us struggling with jobs, families and finances? How is it that despite success, wealth and relationships we can feel lonely in the crowd?

Lucy Winkett investigates different types of loneliness and challenges our perceptions of what it means to be alone and asks if this necessarily leads to loneliness.

FRI 15:30 Soundstage (b07cvhrz)
The Oak Woodland

A journey through the seasons in the company of an oak tree. Beginning in winter with the sounds of melting ice and a lone robin singing its plaintive melody, we travel through the seasons, noting not only the changes in the oak tree, but the wildlife which relies on the tree for food and shelter. In spring the young leaves break free of their bud scales and the number of young caterpillars in the foliage can be so great that on a fine day their droppings or frass can sound like rain. By late spring, oaks support huge populations of insects and this in turn attracts more birds; Great Tits, Pied Flycatchers, Redstarts and Tree creepers. In early summer, the wood warblers, whose song has been likened to a small coin spinning on a marble slab return and on warm summer nights the air is filled with the sound of oak bush crickets; which sing by drumming their hind leg against a leaf. They are accompanied by bats. Autumn arrives and with it the storms. Undeterred a storm cock continues to sing from its high perch. Jays are a common sight now collecting large numbers of acorns. Wood pigeons too gorge themselves on acorns whilst squirrels chase after one another up and down the Oak branches prior to mating. As the days shorten and winter approaches, another year in the life of the oak comes to an end, accompanied by roe deer and foxes calling in the darkness of the shortening days. Producer Sarah Blunt.

FRI 15:45 Short Works (b08lk53y)
Series 1, Pork Cooked with Prunes in Vouvray

In Tessa Hadley's specially commissioned short story a 1970s dinner party leads Alison to reflect on the truths obscured by glamour and privilege. Read by Kate O'Flynn.

Tessa Hadley is the author of six novels, and three short story collections, the most recent is the critically acclaimed Bad Dreams and Other Stories.

Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b08lk540)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 More or Less (b08lk542)
Investigating the numbers in the news.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b08lk544)
Nichola and Ann - Missing the Way We Used to Talk.

After her mother's stroke and consequent aphasia, a daughter wishes their conversations could go back to how they once were. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b08lfcbf)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08lfcbh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b08lk546)
Series 50, 14/04/2017

Steve Punt and Marcus Brigstocke present the week in news through stand-up and sketches.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b08lk548)
David cannot contain his anger, and Pip is cornered.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b08lfcbk)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08lk3jk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b08lk54b)
Stephen Dorrell, Giles Fraser, Dominic Raab MP

Ritula Shah presents political debate from the Radio Theatre at Broadcasting house London with a panel including the Chair of the NHS Confederation and of the European Movement Stephen Dorrell, the Rev Giles Fraser, and the Conservatie MP Dominic Raab.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b08lk54d)
A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (b07z2j3r)
Song of the Singer Sewing Machine

The song of the Singer has whirred its way through more than 160 years. There is not a town in the world where this machine has not made its presence felt. Maria Margaronis considers the might of the sewing machine to make empires and change lives for better or worse.

Isaac Singer patented his machine in 1851. That bald fact alone doesn't even begin to describe the individual behind this perfection of technologies and processes. Impresario, inventor, actor and millionaire and father of 22 children with six wives, the last of whom was the model for the Statue of Liberty. There was skull duggery and power play at work in his ability to capture the market - the rise of the first multi-national. As the slogan goes 'Sewing made easy'.
By the late nineteenth century Singer had 86,000 employees and 5,000 branch offices in 190 countries--a reach second only to the Catholic Church.

But we begin on a busy North London road. The shop simply says SINGER, inside is a nest of sewing machines. It is here that Maria Margaronis has brought her mother's old machine and it is here she begins her story, unpicking the threads of time. This machine was one of millions made on Glasgow's Clyde Side. Singer's European heartland until 1980. A place that produced some 36 million machines. Maria Margaronis travels to both Glasgow and to the site of the vast American Singer factory in Elizabethport New Jersey to piece together the story of a once all powerful empire. From the Amazon river where they were traded for emeralds to St Petersburg where the Bolsheviks had the temerity to nationalize the Singer factory. Drawing on oral history, newly recorded interviews and rare gems Maria follows the many threads of Singers presence in the world.

Producer: Mark Burman.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b08lfcbm)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b08lfcbp)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08lk54g)
The Essex Serpent, Episode 10

Sarah Perry's award-winning novel, set at the end of the nineteenth century and inspired by true events.

Moving between Essex and London, myth and modernity, Cora Seaborne's spirited search for the Essex Serpent encourages all around her to test their allegiance to faith or reason in an age of rapid scientific advancement. At the same time, the novel explores the boundaries of love and friendship and the allegiances that we have to one another. The depth of feeling that the inhabitants of Aldwinter share are matched by their city counterparts as they strive to find the courage to express and understand their deepest desires, and strongest fears.

Episode Ten
The villagers confront the myth of the Essex Serpent for the last time. Cora and Will are forced to re-examine their relationship and their future.

Sarah Perry was born in Essex in 1979. She has a PhD in creative writing at Royal Holloway which she completed under the supervision of Andrew Motion. She has been writer in residence at the Gladstone Library and is the winner of a Shiva Naipaul award for travel writing. Her first novel, After Me Comes The Flood won the East Anglian Book of the Year Award in 2014. The Essex Serpent was Waterstone's Book Of The Year in 2016 and was short-listed for the Costa Novel Award 2016. She lives in Norwich.

Writer: Sarah Perry
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Reader: Ruth Gemmell
Producer: Rosalynd Ward

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b08lh6r3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:27 Short Cuts (b083n15b)
Series 10, The Dreamers

Josie Long hears stories of dreamers - from the search for utopia to striving to transform into the writer Barbara Cartland.

Becoming Barbara
Produced by Natalie Kestecher

Utopia
Featuring Michaela Vieser
Produced by Tim Hinman and Michaela Vieser

Dear Face at Deer Lake with Deer People
Originally made for Third Coast International Audio Festival
http://thirdcoastfestival.org/explore/feature/dear-face-at-deer-lake-with-deer-people
Produced by Dear Deer Face Collective

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b08lk54j)
Zahra and Yousif - A Lot to Pay Back

The children of refugees are acutely aware of how much they owe their parents and the country that took them in. Fi Glover introduces another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b08lglt3)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b08lglt3)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b08lh5yt)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b08lh5yt)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b08lh8ny)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b08lh8ny)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b08ljx8p)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b08ljx8p)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b08lk3jk)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b08lk3jk)

A Degree of Fraud 17:00 SUN (b08kv5fd)

A Journey Through English 23:00 MON (b07rgybq)

A Passion for Bach 11:30 TUE (b08lh5z0)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b08kylx2)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b08lk54d)

Adventures in Social Mobility 20:00 TUE (b08lh7gf)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b08kscnz)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b08kylx0)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b08lk54b)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b08lfbh9)

Archive on 4 21:00 FRI (b07z2j3r)

BACH: Man of Passion 16:00 MON (b08lgpr7)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b08lfc7m)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b08lfc7m)

Believe It! 11:30 WED (b08lhg9p)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b08lg8rv)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b08lg8rv)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b08lgq9q)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b08lh7v1)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b08ljqcp)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b08ljz9x)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b08lk54g)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b08l78gf)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b08lglt1)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b08lglt1)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b08lh5yr)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b08lh5yr)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b08lh8nw)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b08lh8nw)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b08ljx83)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b08ljx83)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b08lk3jh)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b08kttsr)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b08lgpr5)

Bridget Christie Minds the Gap 23:00 TUE (b050bhnq)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b08lfbvd)

Can't Tell Nathan Caton Nothing 18:30 WED (b04jm36p)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b08lh6qz)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b08lh6qz)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b08kxykq)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b08ljx91)

Do Pass Go 11:00 FRI (b08lk3jm)

Document 21:00 TUE (b07jysdv)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b08lfbh5)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b08ktmz9)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b08lgbwy)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b055jpnh)

Drama 14:15 WED (b08ljmll)

Drama 14:15 THU (b08ljxbb)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b05r78dw)

Everything You Think About Sport Is Wrong 09:30 WED (b085gplp)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b08kscnj)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b08lfby6)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b08lfc13)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b08lfc41)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b08lfc73)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b08lfc9z)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b08kylwr)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b08lgbwt)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b08lgbwt)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b08kscnq)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b08lfbyy)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b08lfc1p)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b08lfc4r)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b08lfc7t)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b08lfcbk)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b08ky656)

Glass Half Full 22:15 SAT (b08kvpvz)

Glass Half Full 20:00 WED (b08ljmlv)

Gloomsbury 11:30 FRI (b08lk3jp)

Good Friday Meditation 15:00 FRI (b08lk53w)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b08lh6r3)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b08lh6r3)

Hal 19:15 SUN (b08lgdpn)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b08ky3xp)

In Business 20:30 THU (b08ljz9v)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b08lfc77)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b08lfc77)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b08lfc1r)

Keep Digging 21:00 MON (b08kv3y6)

Kevin Bacon's Game of Fame 11:00 MON (b085h73f)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b08kylwp)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b08lk540)

Lent Talks 05:45 SUN (b08kvpw1)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (b08ljmlz)

Life at Absolute Zero 19:45 SUN (b08lgf1f)

Litter from America 23:15 WED (b08ljqct)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b08kscpc)

Mark Steel's in Town 11:30 MON (b05vy6ps)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b08kscn2)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b08lfbtm)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b08lfbxw)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b08lfc0s)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b08lfc3q)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b08lfc6s)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b08lfc9n)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b08lfbgn)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b08lfbgn)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b08lfc4h)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b08lk542)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b08kscnb)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b08lfbtw)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b08lfby4)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b08lfc11)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b08lfc3z)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b08lfc71)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b08lfc9x)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b08lfbty)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b08kscns)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b08lfbvj)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b08lfbyk)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b08lfc19)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b08lfc47)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b08lfc7c)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b08lfcb5)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b08kscnd)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b08lfbv4)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b08lfbvb)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b08kscph)

News 13:00 SAT (b08kscnx)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b08lg8rx)

Only Artists 09:00 WED (b08lh879)

Only Artists 21:30 WED (b08lh879)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b08lgbx0)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b08lgbx0)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b08kxykx)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b08ljxbs)

Owning Colour 13:45 MON (b08lgmt3)

Owning Colour 13:45 TUE (b08lh65s)

Owning Colour 13:45 WED (b08lhg9v)

Owning Colour 13:45 THU (b08ljxb3)

Owning Colour 13:45 FRI (b08lk3jt)

PM 17:00 SAT (b08kscp3)

PM 17:00 MON (b08lfbyt)

PM 17:00 WED (b08lfc4m)

PM 17:00 THU (b08lfc7p)

PM 17:00 FRI (b08lfcbf)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b08lfbvx)

Playing Tennis in a Coma 11:00 TUE (b08588cp)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b08kypw9)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b08mfmn5)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b08mfhnb)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b08msgqd)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b08mtbwj)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b08mfcxw)

Printing a Nation 11:30 THU (b08ljx97)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b08lfbh7)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b08lfbh7)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b08lg8rz)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b08lg8rz)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b08lg8rz)

Recycled Radio 13:30 SUN (b0801l05)

Reluctant Persuaders 18:30 THU (b08ljxcc)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b08kscnn)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b08kscpf)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b08kscn6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b08lfbtr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b08lfby0)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b08lfc0x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b08lfc3v)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b08lfc6x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b08lfc9s)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b08kscn4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b08kscn8)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b08kscp5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b08lfbtp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b08lfbtt)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b08lfbvq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b08lfbxy)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b08lfby2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b08lfc0v)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b08lfc0z)

Shipping Forecast 17:00 TUE (b08lfc1k)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b08lfc3s)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b08lfc3x)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b08lfc6v)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b08lfc6z)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b08lfc9q)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b08lfc9v)

Short Cuts 23:30 MON (b07z414x)

Short Cuts 23:30 TUE (b07zyhq0)

Short Cuts 23:30 WED (b081ldd6)

Short Cuts 23:30 THU (b082xc07)

Short Cuts 23:27 FRI (b083n15b)

Short Works 00:30 SUN (b08lg8rs)

Short Works 15:45 FRI (b08lk53y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b08kscp9)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b08lfbvv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b08lfbyw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b08lfc1m)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b08lfc4p)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b08lfc7r)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b08lfcbh)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b08lfbv0)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b08lfbv0)

Soundstage 15:30 FRI (b07cvhrz)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b08lfbyd)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b08lfbyd)

Start/Stop 23:00 THU (b04prh93)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b08lg8s1)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b08lfbv6)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b08lfbvg)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b08lgc78)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b08lgc78)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b08lgq9l)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b08lgq9l)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b08lh7dj)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b08lh7dj)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b08ljmlr)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b08ljmlr)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b08ljxcq)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b08ljxcq)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b08lk548)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b08ljxcy)

The Digital Human 16:30 MON (b08lgq9g)

The Echo Chamber 23:30 SAT (b08ktmzf)

The Echo Chamber 16:30 SUN (b08lgbx2)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b08kxykz)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b08ljxc9)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b08lfbgj)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b08lfbgj)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b08lh5yp)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b08lh5yp)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b08lgbww)

The Listening Project 12:04 MON (b08lglt5)

The Listening Project 12:04 TUE (b08lh5z2)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b08lh8qb)

The Listening Project 12:04 WED (b08lhg9s)

The Listening Project 12:04 THU (b08ljx9p)

The Listening Project 12:04 FRI (b08lk3jr)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b08lk544)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b08lk54j)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b08lfc4k)

The Missing Hancocks 18:30 TUE (b08lh7dg)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b08kylww)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b08lk546)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b08lzdv7)

The Reunion 09:00 FRI (b08lzdv7)

The Rise and Fall of the Meritocracy 20:00 MON (b08lgq9n)

The Rise and Fall of the Meritocracy 11:00 WED (b08lgq9n)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (b08kttsw)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b08lgq9j)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b08lfbvn)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b08lfbz2)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b08lfc1t)

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The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b08lfc7y)

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Today 07:00 SAT (b08lfbgg)

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Tom Parry's Fancy Dressed Life 23:00 WED (b08mqtgg)

Tommies 14:15 MON (b08lgpr3)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03zr1zj)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b08lfbvz)

Whodunnit? 09:30 TUE (b0851jgq)

Why Become a Doctor? 15:30 WED (b07pgw3m)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b08kscp1)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b08lfbyg)

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World at One 13:00 MON (b08lfbyr)

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You and Yours 12:15 MON (b08lfbym)

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