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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 18 MARCH 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b08hl62s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b08hqf5p)
The Rule of the Land, Derry/Londonderry

Travelling on foot and by canoe, mapmaker Garrett Carr follows the border between the UK and Ireland. At the end of his journey he considers the notion of 'border' in the dual city of Derry/Londonderry.

Read by John Paul Connolly
Abridged by Anna Magnusson
Producer: Eilidh McCreadie.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08hl62v)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08hl62x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08hl63s)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b08hl63v)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08hqmqc)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Richard Littledale.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b08j8mtq)
My referendum

Are we having more referendums? We meet a listeners who ran one this week.

To get in touch, email ipm@bbc.co.uk or we're @BBCiPM on Twitter.

Presented by Luke Jones and Eddie Mair.
Produced by Lewis Vickers.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b08hl63x)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b08hl63z)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b08hpwbq)
Series 35, Hampshire Jane Austen

Clare Balding walks in the footsteps of Jane Austen as she takes a path regularly taken by Jane, from her home in Chawton, now a museum, to Farringdon, to visit her friends. Clare is joined by husband and wife, Martyn and Sue Dell. Both work as volunteers at the museum, fulfilling a long held ambition of Sue's. She fell in love with Austen as a teenager upon first reading Pride and Prejudice and has fancied herself as Elizabeth Bennet ever since. Sue promised herself she would work at the museum once she retired from teaching. Martyn is a trustee and steward and talks about the importance of the house to visitors from all over the world, especially this year which marks the 200 th anniversary of Austen's death. They are also joined by the Museum Administrator, Gill Stanton.
The walk can be found on OS Explorer 133 Haslemere and Petersfield. Starting at the house in Chawton and walking to Farringdon, across the fields as Jane would have done and then back along the old disused railway, which she would have not.
Producer Lucy Lunt.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b08hl641)
The war on plant pests and diseases

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produced by Chris Ledgard.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b08hl643)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b08j8mts)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b08hl645)
Jimmy Osmond

Extraordinary stories, unusual people and a sideways look at the world.

SAT 10:30 To the Ends of the Earth: Lost Worlds, New Worlds (b08j94df)
Extraordinary tales from the golden age of adventure. To accompany new dramatisations of King Solomon's Mines and Journey to the Centre of the Earth, literary critic Alex Clark explores the imagined worlds of writers such as Henry Rider Haggard, Jules Verne and Arthur Conan Doyle. She talks to adventure novel enthusiasts Fay Weldon and Tom Holland about the scientific and cultural legacy of these novels, and asks whether they are more than ripping yarns of derring-do.

Produced by Emma Harding.

SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b08j94dh)
After heated demands for a second referendum on independence for Scotland, Steve Richards asks whether Brexit could lead to the break-up of the United Kingdom.

The editor is Peter Mulligan.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b08hl647)
Chips and Mayonnaise

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b08hl649)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b08j94dk)
Backlog builds ahead of probate changes

The latest news from the world of personal finance.

SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b08hqm35)
Series 50, 17/03/2017

Steve Punt, Hugh Dennis and guests present the week in news through stand-up and sketches.

Jack Carroll explores the possible impact of President Trump's health-care reform, Jake Yapp plans for a time when robots take all of our jobs and Lord West of Spithead joins Punt and Dennis to discuss the function of the House of Lords in modern politics.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b08hl64c)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b08hl64f)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b08hqm39)
Saqib Bhatti, Lord Heseltine, John Nicolson MP Gisela Stuart MP.

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Aston University Engineering Academy in Birmingham with a panel including the President of the Asian Business Chamber of Commerce Saqib Bhatti, conservative peer Lord Heseltine, the SNP spokesman on Culture Media and Sport at Westminster John Nicolson MP and Gisela Stuart MP, the chair of Change Britain, which is the successor organisation to Vote Leave.
Apply for tickets to join the audience via the website tickets@auea.co.uk.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b08hl64h)
Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

SAT 14:30 Drama (b053rz5r)
Unmade Movies, Harold Pinter's Victory

The world premiere of Harold Pinter's screenplay of Josef Conrad's last major novel, in a special adaptation for radio by Sir Richard Eyre.

It's 1900 in the Dutch East Indies. Disenchanted with life and humanity, Heyst, a mysterious Swedish Baron, lives alone on a deserted island.

He believes he can avoid suffering by cutting himself off from others, but his life is altered when he visits the neighbouring island for a doctor's check up. Here he meets and falls in love with Lena, a young English violinist, travelling across the Pacific with a small commercial ladies Orchestra.

Surrounded by predatory older men, including the hotel manager Schomberg, she is drawn to Heyst and the sense of mystery that surrounds him. Together, in the middle of the night, they escape by boat to his island.

Sound Design: John Leonard and Wilfredo Acosta

Director: Richard Eyre

Producer: Laurence Bowen

A Feelgood Fiction production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b08hl64k)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week.

SAT 17:00 PM (b08hl64m)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b08hpwbz)
Fintech

The UK is a world leader in financial services technology, otherwise known as fintech.

Presenter Evan Davis asks how Britain has beaten Silicon Valley and what challenges fintech poses to traditional banking?

Guests:
Antony Jenkins, Founder and Executive Chairman, 10x Future Technologies
Ishaan Malhi, Founder, Trussle.com
Eileen Burbidge, Co-founder, Passion Capital

Producer: Julie Ball.

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08hl64p)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b08hl64r)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08hl64t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b08j94dp)
Sir Trevor McDonald, Harry Hill, Alison Moyet, Kurupt FM, James Rhodes, Sara Cox, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Sara Cox are joined by Sir Trevor McDonald, Alison Moyet, Harry Hill, Kurupt FM and James Rhodes for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Alison Moyet and James Rhodes.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b08j94dr)
Philip Hammond

The Chancellor, Philip Hammond, made a U-turn on his Budget this week. Just seven days after announcing a rise in National Insurance Contributions for some self-employed people, the policy was reversed. It's been portrayed as a huge political setback for the man nicknamed 'spreadsheet Phil'
But who is the man behind the headlines? Mark Coles finds out.

Producer: China Collins.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b08hl64y)
Griff Rhys Jones in The Miser, Personal Shopper, George Saunders, Michelangelo and Sebastiano, Carnage

Griff Rhys Jones plays the title rol in a freely adapted production of Moliere's The Miser
Personal Shopper stars Kristen Stewart as a young woman trying to communicate with her dead twin brother beyond the veil
President Abraham Lincoln never overcame his grief at the death of his son Willie and American novelist George Saunders has written Lincoln In The Bardo which explores how he tried to cope
An exhibition of works by Michelangelo & Sebastiano at London's National Gallery explores the two artists mutually supportive and inspiring relationship
Simon Amstell has created Carnage, a mockumentary from the future looking at the rise of veganism.
Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Mark Ravenhill, Rosie Boycott and Melissa Harrison. The producer is Oliver Jones.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b08j94dt)
Torrey Canyon and the Toxic Tides

18th March 1967. The Torrey Canyon strikes the Seven Stones. Julian May, a boy on the Cornish coast, watches Britain's worst environmental disaster unfold. 50 years to the day later, he tells the story of the accident using extraordinary archive and eyewitness accounts. The clean up operation was as damaging, perhaps more, than the oil itself. The disaster led to changes to protect the environment. And it changed people's attitudes to it.

Radio producer Julian May grew up in Cornwall. He was on the north Cornish coast when the super tanker, the Torrey Canyon, almost 1,000 feet long, carrying 100,000 tons of crude oil, struck Pollard's Rock off the Isles of Scilly. The authorities were not prepared.

Hugh Scully described the sight as millions of gallons of crude oil spilled into the sea. A slick drifted ashore, polluting both Cornish coasts, Brittany and Guernsey where thousands of tons were pumped into a quarry. Rob Roussel explains what has happened to it - and why it's still there.

Julian May watched the surf turn chocolate brown, the sands crust with crude oil. He saw the gulls, guillemots and cormorants, dying horribly, clagged with tar. He remembers that smell. Mike Sagar Fenton, one of scores of young people who volunteered, recalls working tirelessly to clean the stricken birds.

One day May saw jets flying low, streaking westward - Buccaneers sent to bomb the ship and ignite the oil with napalm. One of the pilots muses on that mission.

Marine life was devastated, much of the damage was done by what was called detergent, but was in fact highly toxic. It did not so much clean as sterilise the beaches. T.O. Darke, farmer and fisherman, protested in the press, and his diary.

Producer and Presenter: Julian May.

SAT 21:00 From Savage to Self (b08j94tx)
Omnibus, Part 2

Farrah Jarral continues to tell the intriguing and unexpected story of anthropology.

In this second omnibus edition, Farrah investigates the tangled history of anthropologists during times of war, she hears how anthropology suffered a crisis of conscience as colonialism came to an end, and how some anthropologists responded by getting much more involved in the lives of those they were studying. She meets anthropologists helping businesses understand how their products and services might fit into our lives, and speaks to anthropologists studying animals, cyborgs, cheese and even alien life. And as she catches up on what she calls her own favourite 'modern ethnographic masterpiece', The Only Way Is Essex, Farrah concludes by reflecting on how the success of the ideas and methodology of anthropology make it less visible as a distinct discipline.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b08hl650)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b08hpf7f)
Meritocracy Of Grammar Schools

The government has pledged that a new generation of grammar schools will improve social mobility. One way being proposed to ensure that is to force grammar schools to lower the 11-plus pass mark for poorer children from disadvantaged backgrounds. The idea is already running into opposition. People are asking what's the point of having a selective academic system if you don't select the most able students? It's also said that it risks patronising disadvantaged communities by sending out a message that less is expected of them. At the heart of this debate is the moral value of meritocracy - that you should be rewarded on the basis of your skills and not on your background. Every child should be offered the chance to achieve their maximum educational potential, but what if they can't achieve that because of an accident of birth? Isn't it right to try to balance the scales? Or will that come at the cost of another, perhaps more able child, being denied a place at a grammar, again because of an accident of birth? Does this encourage identity politics and blur the line between equality of opportunity and equality of outcome? Is this treating the symptom and not the cause - creating a state education system that's lost sight of the quest for academic excellence and is more interested in the politics of social mobility, class envy and division? Witnesses are Dr Martin Stephen, Dame Rachel De Souza, Prof Peter Saunders and Conor Ryan.

SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b08hm0x5)
Heat 8, 2017

(8/17)
Russell Davies welcomes another four competitors to the BBC's Maida Vale studios for the latest general knowledge contest. Will they know the shared name of Jane Austen's mother and sister, what specific number the word 'myriad' technically means, or where Stalin was born? If they do, they may be in with a chance of a place in the semi-finals, and be another step nearer to the 64th Brain of Britain title.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b08hlbv1)
In-between Days

Winter is over but Spring has not quite sprung. Roger McGough presents a selection of poetry requests for an in-between time of year which looks both forward and back. The programme's full of memories and desires, some regrets; but poems of hope and expectation too. Expect stars, trees, childhood escapades, journeys taken (and not taken); things viewed across distances of time and space. Producer James Cook.


SUNDAY 19 MARCH 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b08j98zs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Opening Lines (b04fchm0)
Series 16, Baker, Emily and Me

A chance to hear Claire Fuller's story again in the series which gives emerging short story writers their radio debut.

Lizzie Watts reads this post-apocalyptic tale set in a world of never-ending rain. A young girl is thrilled to be part of a plan to steal a chicken from the Snatchers.

Produced by Gemma Jenkins

Claire Fuller's first novel, Our Endless Numbered Days, won the 2015 Desmond Elliot Prize. She has written many short stories and several of these have been selected to be read in public performances by White Rabbit Theatre Company, as well as being published in the literary fiction journals, Vintage Script and From the Depths. Her second novel, Swimming Lessons, was published in January of this year.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08j98zv)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08j98zx)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08j98zz)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b08j9901)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b08j9f0f)
St Nicholas, Leeds, Kent

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from St. Nicholas' Church, in the Kent village of Leeds. There's a ring of ten bells, with the tenor weighing seventeen and a half hundred weight, tuned to E. We hear them ringing now, 'Kent Treble Bob Royal'.

SUN 05:45 Lent Talks (b08hpf7h)
Oliver McTernan - Destiny and Faith

The former Catholic priest Oliver McTernan talks about how his decision to leave the church shaped his destiny and led him to become the co-founder and director of the conflict resolution charity "Forward Thinking".
Producer: Phil Pegum.

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b08j9903)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b08j9905)
Piety

What do we mean by piety? And how hard is it now to live a pious life? In this programme for Lent, Mark Tully debates humility, religious observance, duty, hypocrisy, backsliding and the relationship between ritual and pious living.

There are readings from the work of Geoffrey Chaucer, Spanish poet Nicolas Suescun and writer and anthropologist Saba Mahmood, along with music from Anton Bruckner, John Rutter and The Mavericks.

The readers are Jasper Britton and Shaheen Khan.

Presenter: Mark Tully
Producer: Frank Stirling

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 The Living World (b08j9f0x)
Booming Bitterns

Chris Packham relives programmes from The Living World archives.

Sounding rather like air being blown over the top of an empty milk bottle, the male bitterns call once heard drifting over the landscape is not easily forgotten. The bittern is a shy secretive member of the heron family who is more often heard than seen. Once widespread over the British Isles, following human persecution and loss of its reedbed habitat it became extinct in Britain around 1885. A few decades later a small number of continental bitterns had returned to our shores but the fate of the bittern population was still precarious. In this programme from 2004 the best place in the UK to hear a bittern was in the extensive wetlands and reedbeds of East Anglia. Brett Westwood travelled to Minsmere in Suffolk in the company of Ian Hawkins and Ken Smith of the RSPB in search of a bittern booming.

Producer Andrew Dawes.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b08j9907)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b08j9909)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b08j990c)
Tuam babies, European workplace ruling, Jainism manuscripts

The remains of hundreds of babies and toddlers found at a former Bon Secours mother and baby home at Tuam, Co. Galway have led to calls for further investigation. Joe Little from RTE talks to Martin.

The first publication of a historical encyclopaedic text on Jainism has been launched by SOAS University of London. It was written by Dr Johannes Emil Otto Klatt who dedicated his life primarily to the study of the historical records of Jainas. Martin talks to Dr Peter Flügel, he's made the writing accessible in English for the first time.

Bob Walker reports on the religious response to the European Court of Justice ruling on the wearing of hijabs at work.

The Vatican has confirmed that a papal trip to Egypt is being considered. It follows the end of a five-year freeze in relations between the Vatican and the Al-Azhar University in Cairo. The Tablet's Christopher Lamb talks to Martin about the state of Catholic-Islamic dialogue.

Senior government defence adviser, Major-General Tim Cross, has said that Foreign Office officials' understanding of the importance of religion is inadequate. He discusses this with Francis Davis former faith advisor to the cabinet.

Trevor Barnes hears the quarter peal of bells at Westminster Abbey dedicated to Julie McDonnell, she has terminal cancer and has raised over 7 million pounds for Cancer research ringing bells.

Producers
Carmel Lonergan
Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

Editor
Amanda Hancox.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b08j9f14)
Women and Children First (UK)

Juliet Stevenson makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Women and Children First (UK).

Registered Charity Number 1085096
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Women and Children First (UK)'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Women and Children First (UK)'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b08j990f)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b08j990h)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b08j9f16)
Pearl of Great Value

'What we hold" is the theme is for the fourth of Radio 4's special services for Lent, from St Patrick's Church, Newtownards, Co. Down. It is led by the Priests - Fathers Martin and Eugene O'Hagan and Father David Delargy who also sing at the service. The service considers our tendency to keep hold on what we have, failing to recognise that everything we do have is a gift from God and is not simply to be used for ourselves. This is in contrast with the attitude of Mary in John Chapter 12 who anointed Jesus with very costly ointment. The service will look at ways in which we might change our essentially selfish attitudes.

The Priests have been singing together since they met as boarders at what was then St MacNissi's College on the coast of North Antrim. Their first album was produced in 2008 and another four have followed. They have toured America and sung at many important events. Yet they still work as priests in the Diocese of Down and Connor. Father Martin is the Parish Priest of Newtownards and Comber, Father Martin the Parish Priest of St Michael the Archangel in Belfast while Father Eugene is the Diocesan Chancellor.

A link to resources for individuals and small groups based on the Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book are is available on the Sunday Worship web pages.
Producer: Bert Tosh.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b08hqm3c)
Sic transit

Tom Shakespeare on why - in today's world of uncertainty and fear - it may give us some political consolation to remember that while everything positive in life is short-lived, so too is everything negative.

He argues that believing that the best is behind us stops us making the most of present opportunities.

"To wallow in the past is to be sentimental, to seek an impossible return", he writes. "Our task is to create something different but equally fulfilling in future".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03tht7c)
Skylark

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison tells the story of the skylark. No other UK bird is capable of sustaining such a loud and complex song while hovering high above the ground, rapidly beating its wings to stay aloft. Some songs can last 20 minutes or more and their performance is likely to be as much a territorial display as an exhibition of the male's physical fitness to impress a female.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b08j990k)
News with Paddy O'Connell including politics, ghost trains and a huge statue. Reviewing the papers - novelist Frederick Forsyth, rights champion Dame Esther Rantzen and journalist Denis Staunton.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b08j990m)
Lilian has some news, and Alice spots an opportunity.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b08j9h6g)
Amanda Levete

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the architect Amanda Levete. She won the Stirling prize in 1998 for the Media Centre at Lord's Cricket Ground which she designed with then husband, the late Jan Kaplicky. Later this year the Victoria and Albert Museum in London will open her extension, featuring a new entrance, courtyard and gallery.

Brought up in Richmond, the oldest of three children, she showed her independent spirit early on, and left school at 16. She discovered architecture while on a Foundation year at art school and was offered a place at the Architectural Association, even though her portfolio didn't feature a single drawing of a building.

Since setting up her own practice in 2009, her creative endeavours have included the Museum of Art, Architecture & Technology (MAAT) in Lisbon, a retail and hotel complex in Bangkok, and the MPavilion Queen Victoria Gardens in Melbourne. In 2016 her practice won competitions to transform the Galleries Lafayette building in Paris and create a new mosque in Abu Dhabi. She has also designed furniture, stackable football pitches and set up a pop-up restaurant serving nothing but tinned fish.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b08j990p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b08hm9vy)
Series 77, Episode 4

Just A Minute is 50 years old this year! Nicholas Parsons has been hosting since day one, and continues to host with skill and panache! This week our panelists are Paul Merton, Josie Lawrence, Zoe Lyons and Graham Norton, who will endeavor to talk on a given subject for sixty seconds without repetition, hesitation or deviation.

What can Graham Norton tell us about Marie Tussaud? How long can Josie Lawrence talk about Sherwood Forest? Paul Merton begs his pardon and does Zoe plough her own furrow?

Warning! This episode contains not one but TWO uninterrupted minutes! But who scores them and on what subject? Tune in to find out!

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle and it was produced by Matt Stronge.

Just A Minute is a BBC Studios production.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b08j9h6j)
BBC Food & Farming Awards 2017: The Finalists

You've cast your nominations in the thousands. Now it's time to reveal who's in the running in the BBC Food & Farming Awards 2017. Judges including Giorgio Locatelli, Joanna Blythman, Allegra McEvedy, Stefan Gates, Romy Gill and Gill Meller help Sheila Dillon to reveal this year's finalists. They prepare to embark on journeys which will take them up and down the UK in search of the best British food and farming the country has to offer.

Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced by Clare Salisbury.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b08j990s)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b08j9910)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Tim Samuels' Sleepover: Inside the Israeli Hospital (b08j9r62)
Tim Samuels spends twenty-four hours immersed in an extraordinary medical scene - Israeli doctors tending to Syrians who have been smuggled over the border for life-saving treatment into a country Syria is technically still at war with.

In the Ziv hospital in the northern Israeli town of Safed, Tim follows two doctors on their rounds as they treat Syrians - both civilians and fighters - who have been seriously wounded in their country's civil war. Unable to get proper medical attention at home, they are amongst several thousand Syrians who have headed to the border and into Israel for treatment. Tim meets a Syrian man shot during conflict; once his leg has been repaired he intends to head back to rejoin the fight.

On the children's ward, a mother who has brought her son for treatment describes how her trip to Israel must remain a secret - or she fears she could be killed when they return. On the Syrian border, Tim sees two badly wounded fighters smuggled into Israel by the IDF as they are rushed to Ziv for emergency attention.

In the hospital - staffed by Jewish, Muslim and Druze medics - the doctors talk about the psychological toll of treating the war wounded. A hospital social worker describes waking up repeatedly through the night at home to check that his young son wasn't injured. The doctors at Ziv say they hope their work is at least a sliver of humanity in a dark region.

Tim explores what motivations might underpin Israel's assistance to those coming from enemy territory - and how such an unusual situation, even by Middle Eastern standards, has come about.

A Tonic Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08hqm2x)
Fife

Eric Robson and the panel are in Fife.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b08j9r64)
Omnibus - Coming Out

Fi Glover introduces conversations about being gay - now and when it was illegal - and how it can still be hard to acknowledge difficulties, even with supportive friends, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b08j9r66)
Journey to the Centre of the Earth, Episode 1

Adapted from the Jules Verne novel by Moya O'Shea
The first of the extraordinary tales from the golden age of adventure. Three intrepid explorers venture into the heart of a dormant Icelandic volcano where there is shock and peril at every turn beneath the earth's layers.

In the first drama from To The Ends of the Earth: extraordinary tales from the golden age of adventure, renowned professor, Otto Lidenbrock, discovers a mysterious, runic cryptogram in a rare manuscript he has bought. It is his nephew, Axel, who accidentally cracks the message which is by a sixteenth century alchemist who claims to have found a pathway to the centre of the earth! "Descend, bold traveller into the crater of the Jokul of Snæfell, which the shadow of Scartaris touches before the kalends of July and you will attain the centre of the earth."

Lidenbrock decides he must see for himself if such a journey is possible and with the reluctant Axel in tow, and the help of their guide, Hans, the three venture into the heart of a dormant, Icelandic volcano on a dangerous expedition beneath the earth's layers.

It's the ultimate adventure story in the best Victorian tradition with plenty of action, science, knowledge, discovery and surprise. The three attempting this tremendous feat are - the somewhat cowardly, dewy-eyed romantic, Axel; the highly strung and oh, so eccentric, Otto Lidenbrock and the calm, phlegmatic Danish speaking, Icelandic guide, Hans.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (b08j9r68)
George Saunders, Kathleen Collins

George Saunders' Lincoln In The Bardo is one of the most anticipated and acclaimed novels of this year, so far. He talks to Mariella Frostrup about creating his extraordinary bardo - a transitional space between life and death - where a chorus of spirits watch President Abraham Lincoln grieve for his young son.

Also on the programme, a glimpse into a publisher's archive;, the frank, funny, fearless short stories of Kathleen Collins and why authors can never chose a favourite novel.

SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b08j9r6b)
Spring

Daffodils, lambs, snow melt, green shoots and lengthening days... Roger McGough explores the BBC archives to find the most evocative spring poems read by some of our best actors. With poems by Alice Oswald, Laurie Lee, Robin Robertson, Philip Larkin, Kathryn Simmonds and Edward Thomas.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b08hnpml)
The Prison Contraband Crisis

Prisons are a crucible for corruption, a former governor claims. Staff are working in the toughest conditions the system has seen in decades. Thousands of experienced staff have left and some areas are struggling to replace them. Morale is falling amid record levels of violence. The use of new psychoactive substances is out of control - fuelling yet more violence. Mobile phones are flooding in, making the flow of drugs even more difficult to contain. So how does contraband make its way onto prison wings?

Former prisoners tell File on 4 that the bulk of smuggled goods come in with staff. Drones and visitors bring in small amounts, but the bigger consignments can only make it through with inside help. John Podmore, who's run jails and led the service's anti-corruption unit, says staff corruption is the inconvenient truth at the heart of the prison crisis.

"It is uncomfortable. They are few in number but they are large in their effect. One prison officer bringing in one coffee jar full of spice or cannabis can keep that jail going for a long time and make an awful lot of money."

Former prisoners tell the BBC's Home Affairs Correspondent, Danny Shaw, staff corruption is a serious problem but has become "the elephant in the room" that prison officials don't want to acknowledge. The ex-inmates say some staff are being corrupted while others turn a blind eye.

The Ministry of Justice has promised renewed efforts to combat corruption and professionalise the service. Thousands of frontline staff in London and south-east England will benefit from a pay boost, thanks to a new £12m package.

So will it stop the rot?

Reporter: Danny Shaw
Producer: Sally Chesworth
Editor: Gail Champion.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b08j94dr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08j992t)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b08j992w)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08j992y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b08j9930)
Sarfraz Manzoor

Sarfraz Manzoor chooses his BBC Radio highlights.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b08j9s09)
Lilian seeks another point of view, and Brian gets a telling off.

SUN 19:15 Boswell's Lives (b05415pv)
Series 1, Boswell's Life of Callas

by Jon Canter

Comedy as James Boswell Dr Johnson's celebrated biographer pursues other legends to immortalise. Today he meets Maria Callas and her poodle and finds himself in an opera of his own making.

Directed by Sally Avens

Jon Canter is an award winning comedy writer for both television and radio. He recently penned the radio series 'Believe It' starring Richard Wilson but his work goes back to Spitting Image. He is also the author of several books and has been called our greatest living comic novelist.

Miles Jupp is an actor and stand up. He is best known for playing Nigel in the series 'Rev' and is a regular contributor to R4 panel games and 'Have I Got News For You' on BBC1. In March he will open in a new play at the National Theatre: 'Rules For Living'.

Arabella Weir is best known for her roles in The Fast Show and Posh Nosh (written with Jon Canter) and for writing several books including the international best seller Does My Bum Look Big in This?

SUN 19:45 I, the Flock (b08j9s0c)
Specially commissioned short stories by some of Ireland's most exciting writers.

A father tries to move on after the death of his son, an online activist. As read by Stuart Graham (The Fall).

Mike McCormack is an acclaimed Irish writer and past winner of the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature. His most recent novel 'Solar Bones' was awarded the 2016 Goldsmiths Prize and the Irish Book Award's Novel of the Year.

Reader ..... Stuart Graham
Writer ..... Mike McCormack
Producer ..... Michael Shannon.

SUN 20:00 Feedback (b08j9s0f)
Is it time to re-think the Official Chart show?

Radio 4's forum for audience comment.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b08hqm31)
John Surtees, Gordon Thomas, Sir Howard Hodgkin, H. Boyd Woodruff, Joni Sledge

Matthew Bannister on

The racing driver John Surtees who won world championships on two wheels and four.

Gordon Thomas who wrote best selling books about espionage and religion.

Sir Howard Hodgkin - one of the UK's most admired modern painters.

H. Boyd Woodruff, the microbiologist who isolated life saving antibiotics in soil.

Joni Sledge one of four singing sisters in the disco group Sister Sledge.

Producer: Neil George.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b08j94dk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b08j9f14)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 Analysis (b08hm9w4)
Holland's Challenge to Tolerance

Why is liberal, tolerant Netherlands home to one of Europe's most successful anti-immigration, anti-Islamic parties?

Geert Wilders' radical right-wing Party For Freedom (PVV) - which wants to close mosques and ban the Qur'an - will be one of the biggest in the new Dutch parliament. So have its voters - whom Wilders once described as "Henk and Ingrid", Holland's Mr and Mrs Average - turned their backs on centuries-old Dutch values? Or do they just understand those values in a different way?

Unlike some far-right parties elsewhere in Europe, the PVV has no neo-Nazi roots. It's loud in its support for gay and women's rights. It promotes itself as a strong defender of Holland's Jewish community. Is its ideology just an opportunistic mishmash? Or does it make some sense in a Dutch context? Searching for Henk and Ingrid, Tim Whewell sets off through Dutch "flyover country" - the totally un-photogenic satellite towns and modern villages that tourists, and Holland's own elite, rarely see.

He asks if the PVV's platform is just thinly disguised racism. Or has it raised important questions about immigration and multiculturalism that other European countries, including the UK, have been scared to ask?

Producer: Helen Grady.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b08j9932)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b08hpwbs)
Personal Shopper

With Francine Stock.

Olivier Assayas reveals the secrets of Kristen Stewart's screen presence in Personal Shopper, and the connection between phone technology and spiritualism.

This year's winner of the foreign language Oscar, Asghar Farhadi, who boycotted the Aacademy Awards ceremony in protest against Donald Trump's travel ban, tells Francine that the interests of the USA cannot be preserved by the humiliation of other states.

Beauty And The Beast features the first gay character in a Disney movie. Critic Larushka Ivan-Zadeh wonders if a company once known for its gender stereotypes and traditional family values is becoming a bastion of liberalism.

Critics Jonathan Romney and Corrina Antrobus slug it out to get their chosen director into The Film Programme's A to Z of Film - this week it's Claire Denis versus Ava DuVernay.

SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b08j9905)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]


MONDAY 20 MARCH 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b08j996z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b08hpf77)
Teen bedrooms - Skydivers

Get out of my room! A social history of teen bedrooms in America. Laurie Taylor talks to Jason Reid, Lecturer in History at Ryerson University who charts the evolution and meaning of this sanctuary for adolescent self expression.They're joined by Sian Lincoln, Senior Lecturer in Media Studies at Liverpool John Moores University who has explored the role of bedrooms in the lives of young British people.

Skydivers & dangerous sports: James Hardie-Bick, Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Criminology at the University of Sussex, discusses the motivations, behaviours and experiences of those who voluntarily engage in high-risk activities

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b08j9f0f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08j9973)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08j9975)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08j9977)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b08j9979)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08k9j2w)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Richard Littledale.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b08j997c)
Germaine Greer on post-Brexit agriculture

Author Germaine Greer tells Charlotte Smith why protecting our wildlife, pollinators and natural habitats will be so important as the UK enters negotiations for post-EU trade deals. The journalist - who famously bought a redundant Australian dairy farm and turned it into rainforest - is President of the charity Buglife.

This is part of a special week of programmes on Farming Today that are exploring the environmental and farming opportunities that will come with Brexit featuring a line-up of special guests. During the week Princess Anne, Germaine Greer, Tim Martin, Jay Rayner and Sir Tim Smit will each explore some of the issues close to their heart relating to how we could look after our countryside, environment and produce food.

Produced by Sally Challoner.

MON 05:56 Weather (b08j997f)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zdbr0)
Willow Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the willow warbler. The first willow warblers return from Africa in late March. Willow warblers were once the commonest and most widespread summer migrant to the UK but in the last two decades numbers in the south and east of England have dropped by two thirds. Fortunately in Scotland, Ireland and the west, numbers seem to be holding up.

MON 06:00 Today (b08j997h)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (b08j997k)
The Free Thinking Festival at Sage Gateshead

Start the Week is at the Free Thinking Festival at Sage, Gateshead where Tom Sutcliffe explores the pace and rhythm of life - from the heart-stopping moments to the sleep of the innocent.

His guests include Russell Foster whose work on circadian rhythms sheds light on the mechanisms of our body clocks and sleep.

The crime writer Denise Mina is more interested in counting the bodies than counting sheep, as she revels in the psychological undercurrents in her latest thriller.

The cardiac surgeon Stephen Westaby understands the delicate balance between life and death: he has saved hundreds of lives, holding each heart in his hand and feeling its beat.

The mathematician Eugenia Cheng considers what it means when that beat goes on forever, with her study of the infinite.

Producer: Katy Hickman.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b08j9tk4)
Fathers and Sons, Episode 1

As a boy growing up on the south coast of England, Howard Cunnell's sense of self was dominated by his father's absence. Now, years later, he is a father, and his daughter is becoming his son.

Starting with his own childhood in the Sussex beachlands, Howard tells the story of the years of self-destruction that defined his young adulthood and the escape he found in reading and the natural world. Still, he felt compelled to destroy the relationships that mattered to him.

Saved by love and responsibility, Cunnell charts his journey from anger to compassion, as his daughter Jay realises he is a boy, and a son.

Most of all, this is a story about love - its necessity and fragility, and its unequalled capacity to enable us to be who we are.

Deeply thoughtful, searingly honest and exquisitely lyrical, Fathers and Sons is an exploration of fatherhood, masculinity, authenticity and family.

Written by Howard Cunnell
Read by James Lailey
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08j997m)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08j9v52)
Revelation, Episode 1

London, 1543, the freezing cold spring is marked by turmoil and darkness. The city's streets are filled with preachers. Radical religion has spilled over into dangerous fundamentalism as young men are maddened by differing interpretations of the Bible. Where the monasteries once acted as gatekeepers to God, the Lord now seems to be very close at hand. Strange signs and portents are observed that suggest the end times are near.

As King Henry VIII slips back towards the old religion, the reactionaries are fighting back: radicals are being arrested, heretics threatened with burning and everyone is looking over their shoulder, including Archbishop Cranmer. Into this unsettled landscape comes a murderer who appears to be killing for pleasure. Worse still, his first victim was someone close to Catherine Parr - the King's latest romantic obsession. Their marriage would serve the Reformist cause well and, to protect her chances of becoming Queen, Cranmer wants news of the killer kept from the superstitious King.

And so he calls upon lawyer detective Matthew Shardlake to conduct a secret investigation. Once again, Shardlake and his loyal assistant Barak must descend into the murky depths of Tudor society to try to stop the murderer before they strike again.

Other parts are played by members of the cast.

Dramatist ..... Colin MacDonald
Writer ..... C. J. Sansom
Producer and Director ..... Kirsteen Cameron.

MON 11:00 The Great Egg Freeze (b08j9z4s)
Fi Glover takes a personal look at a growing trend - egg freezing offered as a corporate work benefit. She speaks to women who have done it, as well as doctors and employers.

Freezing eggs seems the ultimate in planning a family and a career - and Fi Glover considered it when she was living in the US almost a decade ago. Back then it was still a niche technology. Now a growing number of companies, including Apple and Facebook, are offering it as a benefit and some UK tech companies are also discussing the option.

Fi speaks to women who have frozen their eggs - both privately and through a company scheme. She follows the experience of Brigitte Adams, a marketing executive who froze her eggs at 39 and is about to have one of them fertilized and implanted at 44. Brigitte explains how the marketing of egg freezing took the fear out of it, but she has words of warning for women considering this route. We also hear from a former employee who froze her eggs via the company's benefit scheme.

Professor Geeta Nargund is an expert in reproductive medicine and the Director of Europe's largest private fertility clinic. She explains why she views egg freezing as the second wave of emancipation for women - after the contraceptive pill.

However critics suggest that employer-funded egg freezing sends a clear message that the corporate preference is for women to delay childbearing. And Obstetrician Susan Bewley believes encouraging women to freeze their eggs is making a risky and unreliable option seem desirable and routine.

A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 11:30 Chain Reaction (b08j9z4v)
Series 12, Harry Hill Interviews Tim Vine

In this edtition, Harry Hill turns interviewer and invites his chosen guest Tim Vine into the Chain Reaction hot seat.

Chain Reaction is the talk show with a twist where one week's interviewee becomes the next week's interviewer. John Cleese was first in the hot seat back in 1991 and since then, a procession of big names from the world of comedy and entertainment including Jennifer Saunders, Jarvis Cocker and Eddie Izzard have helped continue the chain.

Harry Hill is an award winning comedian and world class swingball player. Born in Woking in 1964, he holds a medical degree from the University of London. His books include Flight from Deathrow and Tim the Tiny Horse. He has been a stand-up since the early 90s and is well known as the star of TV Burp and the voice of You've Been Framed. Harry can currently be seen on Alien Fun Capsule.

For this edition Harry is joined by Tim Vine (AKA The Punslinger, The Joke-a-motive or The Punaway Train). Tim is best known for his frenetic stage shows, rammed full of rapid one liners, songs and props. He previously starred in BBC1s Not Going Out, ITV1s The Sketch Show and hosted the seminal Channel 5 quiz show Whittle.

Together they discuss Tim's teenage dreams of being a pop star, giant moths and the roots of Tim's act.

Producer: Adnan Ahmed
A BBC Studios Production

Photo credit: Matt Stronge.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b08j997p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b08j9z4x)
Series 1, Diesel Engine

Rudolf Diesel died in mysterious circumstances before he was able to capitalise on his extraordinary invention: the eponymous engine that powers much of the world today. Before Diesel invented his engine in 1892, as Tim Harford explains, the industrial landscape was very different. Urban transport depended on horses and steam supplied power for trains and factories. Incredibly, Diesel's first attempt at a working engine was more than twice as efficient as other engines which ran on petrol and gas, and he continued to improve it. Indeed, it wasn't long before it became the backbone of the industrial revolution; used in trains, power stations, factories and container ships.

Producer: Ben Crighton
Editors: Richard Knight, Richard Vadon.

MON 12:13 Four Seasons (b08jt9lq)
Charlotte Mew - In the Fields, Philip Larkin - The Trees

For Four Seasons: Spring a day of fresh poems old and new: Charlotte Mew's 'In the Fields' read by Juliet Stevenson and Philip Larkin's 'The Trees' read by Alex Jennings. Producer: Tim Dee.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b08j997r)
Leasehold abuse, Care homes, Death of diesel

With campaigners pushing against leasehold deals that lead to the doubling of ground rent in 10 years, we ask if the Government is about to offer better protection when it comes to leasehold abuse.

We look at the cost of residential care - and whether people have the right information to make the right choice when it comes to care for a loved one.

An email blast from the past as EE announces it is closing all of the Freeserve accounts. You may not still use it, but will its passing cause you a data headache?

Will tougher tests spell the end for diesel cars?

And we look at the practice of wealth screening - and how charities are using it to find out who can afford to give that little bit more.

PRESENTER WINIFRED ROBINSON

PRODUCER PETE WILSON.

MON 12:57 Weather (b08j997t)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b08j997w)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:43 Four Seasons (b08jt9lt)
Alice Oswald - A Wood Coming into Leaf.

A poem for the first day of spring as part of a day of seasonal poetry: Alice Oswald reads her 'A Wood Coming into Leaf'. Producer: Tim Dee.

MON 13:45 The Uncommon Senses (b08j9z4z)
Series 1, Making Sense of the Senses

For thousands of years people thought we had 5 senses, now it's believed we have up to 33. In this new series, philosopher Barry Smith and sound artist Nick Ryan take us on a journey into the extraordinary world of sensory perception.

The multisensory world is a strange place, once you look at it closely. Heston Blumenthal explains why a drink tastes different depending on which hand you hold it in; Barry Smith takes us on a plane to show how balance effects vision, and shows how the sensory dulling effects of air travel can be altered by tasting spice.

We discover how the senses interact with other constantly in ways that can be surprising and strange. And we try to answer the question: why does everyone agree that lemons are fast, while bananas are slow?

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b08j9s09)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Drama (b08j9z51)
Finding Freud

The 1960's. John Huston launched a movie project that seemed foolproof. He hired the great existentialist philosopher Jean Paul Sartre to write a film script about Sigmund Freud. Sartre was world-famous. And his known dislike of Freud would ensure publicity. But all did not go to plan.

Kenneth Cranham and Dervla Kirwan star in David Pownall's imagining of the comedy mayhem that ensued.

Writer ..... David Pownall
Director ..... Peter Kavanagh.

MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b08j9z53)
Heat 9, 2017

(9/17)
The Fields Medal is awarded for achievement in what field of endeavour? And if something is described as 'amygdaloid', what shape is it? These and many other questions await the competitors in the ninth heat of this year's tournament, which comes from Salford. Today's winner will take another of the automatic places in the semi-finals, with the possibility open for a runner-up to go through too if they score enough points.

A Brain of Britain listener also stands to win a prize if the four competitors, between them, can't answer the questions he or she has devised for the interval.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b08j9h6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 Four Seasons (b08jt9lw)
Gerard Manley Hopkins - Spring

A poem for the first day of a new season: 'Spring' by Gerard Manley Hopkins, read by Ray Fearon. Part of Radio 4's Four Seasons: Spring. Producer: Tim Dee.

MON 16:02 Bus Lines (b06vmw29)
First Bus company run a writing competition for their drivers. Hop on board to meet those who have taken part. David from Glasgow won the annual Company Short Story Competition with his moving tale of a homeless man, inspired by the tramp he spotted whilst driving through the city centre one Christmas; Sue loves the freedom of driving a bus around Bristol and writes poems and stories for her family to show them how much she loves them, while Lou wants to write a novel based on her experiences as a bus driver "You have a lot of weird and wonderful experiences driving a bus" she says "I even had passengers come to my wedding."

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b08j9z6j)
Interfaith Worship

The reading of a passage from the Koran at Glasgow's St Mary's Cathedral during its Epiphany Mass earlier in the year caused an almighty row. The verses, which were read out by a local Muslim student, denied the divinity of Jesus and brought a wave of criticism and social media threats, which prompted a police investigation.

Most people agree that interfaith dialogue is a good thing, but interfaith crossovers within a worship setting risk causing great offense. Why is interfaith worship so controversial, particularly if the intention is to deepen friendships between local faith communities? How can churches, mosques and temples steer a safe course?

Robert Beckford discusses interfaith worship with Rev Anthea Ballam, an interfaith minister and priest; Rev Dr Gavin Ashenden, an Anglican priest and theologian; and Shayk Sohaib Sayeed, a Koranic scholar and a chaplain at the University of Edinburgh.

Producer: Dan Tierney
Series producer: Amanda Hancox.

MON 17:00 PM (b08j997y)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

MON 17:58 Four Seasons (b08jt9ly)
Edward Thomas - The Cherry Trees

Edward Thomas's poem 'The Cherry Trees' read by Noma Dumezweni. A poem for spring and part of Radio 4's Four Seasons. Producer: Tim Dee.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08j9980)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b08j9zqh)
Series 77, Episode 5

Just A Minute is 50 years old this year! Nicholas Parsons has been hosting since day one, and continues to host with skill and panache! This week our panellists are Paul Merton, Shelia Hancock, Tom Allen and Gyles Brandreth, who will endeavour to talk on a given subject for sixty seconds without repetition, hesitation or deviation.

Find out what Paul Merton's best chat up line is! How much does Sheila Hancock know about Queen Victoria? What isn't Gyles Brandreth's cup of tea and can Tom Allen get his first full minute?

Beverly Tagg blows the whistle and it was produced by Matt Stronge.

Just A Minute is a BBC Studios production.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b08j9zqv)
Alistair deals with an emergency, and Tom returns revitalised.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b08j9982)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08j9v52)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 The Age of Consent (b08jb0m6)
Episode 2

Helena Kennedy QC explores the key idea of consent in our politics, law, media and digital lives.

Contemporary living is predicated on the concept of consent, in our relationships with each other, in law, in healthcare - and above all in politics. Legitimate government relies upon the consent of the people. At some level, consent means we must have agreed to be governed, allegedly through the ballot box. Without our consent, political institutions would lack legitimacy.

Yet we know it is not quite so straightforward. How well informed is our consent, and can the methods for securing it be manipulated? When should silence be taken as a form of 'tacit' consent, and does an absence of dissent imply widespread agreement to the order of things? Isn't consent really a spectrum and when new norms are created, what happens when they are not shared by all parts of society? These questions go to the heart of our politics, law, data, media and whole areas of public life.

This two-part series explores the idea of consent as a vital component of our political life, our legal obligations and how we control personal information in the digital age. But also, in terms of the psyche, an idea that says something about our own selves - what have we really consented to in the way we live, the way we are governed? Is informed consent even possible in age of so-called post-truth, fake news, propaganda and spin?

Series contributors include psychotherapist Adam Phillips, historian Quentin Skinner, digital philosopher Mark Andrejevik, essayist Pankaj Mishra and American political writer Thomas Frank.

Presenter: Helena Kennedy QC
Producer: Simon Hollis
A Brook Lapping Production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 20:30 Analysis (b08jb0m8)
Detoxifying France's National Front

Has Front National leader Marine Le Pen really detoxified the party founded by her father 40 years ago? Is it a right-wing protest movement or a party seriously preparing for power? Anand Menon, professor of European politics at Kings College London, analyses the process the French call Dédiabolisation. Le Pen has banished the name of the party and even her own surname from election posters and leaflets. Her party is making inroads into socialist and communist fiefdoms in northern and eastern France. Combining nationalism with a message designed to reach out to the left, she speaks up loudly for the have-nots, people who live in the land she calls "the forgotten France." She targets trade unionists, teachers and gay voters. But widening the party's appeal leads to a tricky balancing act. Can Marine Le Pen manage the process of political exorcism without alienating die-hard supporters?
Producer: Lucy Ash.

MON 21:00 Supersense Me (b08hnj2v)
Timandra Harkness explores the devices and technologies being developed that, in combination with our brain processes, allow the perception of previously un-sensed information about the world around us.

As humans, we can perceive less than a ten-trillionth of all light waves. "Our experience of reality," says neuroscientist David Eagleman, "is constrained by our biology." He wants to change that.

What if we could experience the world in the same way some animals do? Feel magnetic north like migratory birds, see infrared light like snakes or hear in the ultrasonic frequency range like bats?

Timandra considers whether she could evolve her biology and acquire a super sense.

Contributors include Dr David Eagleman, neuroscientist; Dr Scott Novich, co-founder, NeoSensory; Dr Giles Hamilton-Fletcher, research fellow at University of Sussex; Daniel Hajas, student at University of Sussex; Liviu Babitz, co-founder of Cyborg Nest; and Hannes Sjoblad, co-founder of biohacker network Bionyfiken.

[Photo credit: Sandra Lawrence]

Producer: Dom Byrne
A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 21:30 Start the Week (b08j997k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b08j9984)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b08j9986)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08jb0mb)
Behind Her Eyes, Episode 1

Louise is a working mum, stuck in a rut. When she connects with a man on a rare night out, she hopes that things are about to change. But, very quickly, events take an unsettling turn.

Sarah Pinborough's electrifying psychological thriller with "a pull-the-rug-out ending" (Ian Rankin).

Episode One:
Single mum Louise meets the man of her dreams in a bar. But there's a catch.

Sarah Pinborough is an award-winning YA and adult thriller, fantasy and horror novelist and screenwriter.

Writer: Sarah Pinborough
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Readers: Rosie Cavaliero & Tracy Wiles
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 23:00 Wireless Nights (b08jb0md)
Series 5, Night Tube

Jarvis Cocker rides in the driver's cab of a late night Tube train, hearing tales of nocturnal travellers across London.

With Beyonce-loving Night Tube driver Kylie at the controls, Jarvis is whisked along the Victoria line late into the night. En route he hears from a cast of characters embroiled in their own dramas as they make their way around the capital in the small hours - including a late night reveller who fell sleep on the train and got more than she'd bargained for.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08jb0mg)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.

MON 23:55 Four Seasons (b08jt9m0)
Christopher Marlowe - Come Live with Me, William Wordsworth - Lines Composed in Early Spring, Louis MacNeice - Nuts in May

Three poems for the new season: Christopher Marlowe's 'Come Live with Me' read by Anton Lesser, William Wordsworth's 'Lines Composed in Early Spring' read by Simon Russell Beale, and Louis MacNeice's 'Nuts in May' read by Bill Paterson. Producer: Tim Dee.


TUESDAY 21 MARCH 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b08j999z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b08j9tk4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08j99b1)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08j99b3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08j99b5)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b08j99b7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08k9hyn)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Richard Littledale.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b08j99b9)
Eden Project founder Sir Tim Smit on a post-Brexit agricultural landscape

Eden Project founder Sir Tim Smit says we'll need a revolution in attitudes to producing food if we're to protect food security in the UK post-Brexit. He criticises our current leaders who, he claims, 'look down their noses at farming'. Food production will be the most important profession as the global population moves towards 9 billion, and we need to be inspiring the next generation of producers. He wants leaders who will make it 'rock and roll'.

This is part of a special week of programmes on Farming Today that are exploring the environmental and farming opportunities that will come with Brexit featuring a line-up of special guests. During the week Princess Anne, Germaine Greer, Tim Martin, Jay Rayner and Sir Tim Smit will each explore some of the issues close to their heart relating to how we could look after our countryside, environment and produce food.

Producer Sally Challoner.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sbyxy)
Redshank

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Redshank. Redshanks are one of our commonest wading birds at home in freshwater marshes and on estuaries where you can easily recognise them from their combination of long scarlet legs, white rumps and wing-bars and greyish brown bodies.

TUE 06:00 Today (b08j99bc)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Long View (b08jb6rt)
The Long View of Targeted Fake News

Jonathan Freedland compares the current wave of fake news stories, particularly those targeted at Muslims and immigrants in the UK, with the anti-Semitic story of an eight-year-old Christian boy, William of Norwich, who was murdered in woodland outside his native city in 1144. His death was later reported as a Jewish conspiracy and ritual, becoming the founding myth of the so-called 'blood libel'.
Producer: Tom Alban.

TUE 09:30 Unforgettable (b07pgvjq)
Tony Garnett/Mary Whitehouse

Filmmaker Tony Garnett has an imagined conversation with the late Mary Whitehouse. Using archive clips, they are reunited in one final debate across the political and moral divide.

Tony Garnett's productions include Cathy Come Home, Kes and This Life. He has made films investigating police corruption, and advocating abortion law reform and the abolition of the death penalty. Mary Whitehouse, alarmed at the rapid social changes of the 1960s, waged crusades against 'the permissive society' and criticised the BBC for portraying 'promiscuity as normal'.

Although diametrically opposed to her ethics and opinions, Garnett reveals a respect for Whitehouse's courage. As the conversation develops, he re-evaluates the effectiveness of his own attempts to influence public opinion, and the successes and failures of Mary Whitehouse's moral and political campaigns in the years since her death in 2001.

In 1991 Natalie Cole sang a duet with her long dead father, Nat King Cole - the result was Unforgettable. This is the radio equivalent. In each edition of the series, a different guest is invited to interact with someone, now dead, with whom they have, or have wanted to have, a connection. Using technology designed for musicians and DJs to spontaneously play out short musical clips, producer Adam Fowler facilitates a real-time conversation between the two participants, using conversational snippets of the deceased from past recordings.

The guest has no advance knowledge of the excerpts, and the conversation can take unexpected turns, occasionally leading to some emotionally charged interchanges, as living voices engage with those preserved in the archive.

Research: Philippa Geering
Producer: Adam Fowler
An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b08jb6s0)
Fathers and Sons, Episode 2

As a boy growing up on the south coast of England, Howard Cunnell's sense of self was dominated by his father's absence. Now, years later, he is a father, and his daughter is becoming his son.

Starting with his own childhood in the Sussex beachlands, Howard tells the story of the years of self-destruction that defined his young adulthood and the escape he found in reading and the natural world. Still, he felt compelled to destroy the relationships that mattered to him.

Saved by love and responsibility, Cunnell charts his journey from anger to compassion, as his daughter Jay realises he is a boy, and a son.

Most of all, this is a story about love - its necessity and fragility, and its unequalled capacity to enable us to be who we are.

Deeply thoughtful, searingly honest and exquisitely lyrical, Fathers and Sons is an exploration of fatherhood, masculinity, authenticity and family.

Written by Howard Cunnell
Read by James Lailey
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08j99bf)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08jb6s2)
Revelation, Episode 2

Dramatisation of C. J. Sansom's bestselling Tudor crime novel, the fourth in his series featuring hunchback detective Matthew Shardlake.

Spring, 1543. London's streets are filled with preachers sermonising about the apocalypse. Radical religion has spilled over into dangerous fundamentalism as young men are maddened by differing interpretations of the Bible.

The family of one such man, Adam Kite, has sought the help of lawyer Matthew Shardlake; Adam is convinced God has forsaken him and spends his days and nights praying. He has been placed in the Bedlam for his own safety. But Shardlake is distracted from the case when a close friend of his, Roger Elliard, is found brutally murdered in Lincoln's Inn Yard. He has sworn an oath to Roger's widow that he will find the killer and bring them to justice.

Other parts are played by members of the cast.

Dramatist ..... Colin MacDonald
Writer ..... C. J. Sansom
Producer and Director ..... Kirsteen Cameron.

TUE 11:00 Can the Centre Hold? (b08jb6s4)
Mary Ann Sieghart asks what the future holds for the political centre.

As a populist wave has been rising around the world, parties of the centre appear in retreat. Much energy has been devoted to understanding this new wave, but what of the parties which have traditionally been the home of swing voters and occupy the ground on which elections have usually been fought? In this programme Mary Ann Sieghart follows elections in Stoke, France and the Netherlands, and speaks to politicians from across the world who have thrived in the political centre, about its future. What clues does history hold to how parties of the centre should respond, and what models seem to be working?

Producer: Giles Edwards.

TUE 11:30 Rock Transition (b08jb6s8)
For centuries musicians have defied gender boundaries to create some of the most evocative and provocative art and music.

Journalist and culture critic Laura Snapes joins the dots of a fascinating musical history that encompasses musical icons such as Ma Rainey, Little Richard, Lou Reed, the Pet Shop Boys, Grace Jones and Madonna, and looks at how today's musicians use music and performance to express who their own gender and sexuality.

In recent years the issue of gender and identity has been a hot topic in the musical landscape and beyond. From niche publications to tabloids and political debate, issues surrounding gender identity and how it influences both personal and social life have been widely publicised.

Amid the deeply complex personal world of gender identity and the often ruthlessly myopic world of the music industry, a new generation of artists are using music for fearless expressions of their gender and sexuality that break beyond the archetypes set by their forebears.

Rock Transition speaks with artists such as garage maverick Ezra Furman, Canadian pop stars Tegan and Sara, musician and author CN Lester, and musician and activist Ryan Cassata to understand why music offers an exciting platform to express and explore gender identity and sexuality - and asks how these artists can resist being marginalised and commodified by an industry keen to capitalise on a hot topic.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b08j99bh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b08jb6sb)
Series 1, Haber-Bosch Process

Saving lives with thin air - by taking nitrogen from it to make fertiliser, the Haber-Bosch Process has been called the greatest invention of the 20th century - and without it almost half the world's population would not be alive today. Tim Harford tells the story of two German chemists, Fritz Haber and Carl Bosch, figured out a way to use nitrogen from the air to make ammonia, which makes fertiliser. It was like alchemy; 'Brot aus Luft', as Germans put it, 'Bread from air'.

Haber and Bosch both received a Nobel prize for their invention. But Haber's place in history is controversial - he is also considered the 'father of chemical warfare' for his years of work developing and weaponising chlorine and other poisonous gases during World War One.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b08j99bk)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b08j99bm)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b08j99bp)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 The Uncommon Senses (b08k5zlm)
Series 1, Interoception

For thousands of years people thought we had 5 senses, now it's believed we have up to 33. In this ten-part series, philosopher Barry Smith and sound artist Nick Ryan take us on a journey into the extraordinary world of sensory perception.

In this episode: Eerie premonitions? A feeling you're being watched? A sudden feeling of unease? Do we really have "sixth senses" for things that are... not of this earth? Maybe we do, but there's nothing supernatural about it. Philosopher Barry Smith explores interoception, the mysterious sense we all and asks why it often feels so spooky. From infrasonic pulses to interoceptive heart-beats, there is more going on in our bodies and minds than you might think.

Producer: Emily Knight.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b08j9zqv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Drama (b054t79g)
The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, The Handsome Man's Deluxe Cafe

A new two-part dramatisation of Alexander McCall Smith's latest No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency book, 'The Handsome Man's Deluxe Cafe'. Mma Ramotswe and Mma Makutsi return to Radio 4 for an eleventh series based on the popular novels set in Bostwana, dramatised by the author.

Episode 1 : The Handsome Man's Deluxe Cafe

New mother Mma Makutsi expands her business portfolio in an unexpected direction. Meanwhile Mma Ramotswe meets a client with a problematic house guest.

Directed by Eilidh McCreadie.

TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b08jb9ng)
Series 11, Counterpoint

How do we talk to people we disagree with? How do we learn to listen? Josie Long presents short documentaries and stories about communicating across the divide.

From the holocaust survivor who's dedicated her life to talking to those who hurt her to the musician who believes the world can be understood through the medium of counterpoint.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b08jb9nj)
Trump's Big Clearance Sale

Tom Heap examines the future for America's Wild West- and its Mild East- under a Donald Trump administration threatening to sell off Federal land.

Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.

TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b08jb9nl)
Legal magazine programme presented by Joshua Rozenberg.

TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b08jb9nn)
Chris and Xand Van Tulleken

Doctor twins Chris and Xand van Tulleken talk to Harriett Gilbert about favourite books. The guests recommend The House of God, a bawdy tale set in a hospital, by Samuel Shem and Yellow Tulips, a poetry collection by James Fenton. Harriett introduces Vile Bodies by Evelyn Waugh to the discussion. Producer Sally Heaven.

TUE 17:00 PM (b08j99br)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08j99bt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 The Missing Hancocks (b08jb9nq)
The Crown Jewels

The Missing Hancocks recreates those episodes of the classic Hancock's Half Hour that have been wiped or lost from the archive. Something else has gone missing in this episode from the second series - the lad 'imself, who had absconded to Rome. In 1955, he was replaced for the first three episodes by the Goon Show's Harry Secombe. In this recreation, he has been replaced by Andy Secombe - Harry's son. Not heard since then, this is a real piece of comedy history.

The first modern sitcom, Hancock's Half Hour made stars of Tony Hancock, Sid James and Kenneth Williams, and launched Ray Galton and Alan Simpson on one of the most successful comedy-writing partnerships in history. But 20 episodes of the show are missing from the BBC archives. Now, after two highly successful series, another five of those episodes have been lovingly re-recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC Radio Theatre.

Tonight's episode: The Crown Jewels. As Hancock is absent, Bill is staying with Harry Secombe. They decide to show Andree the sights of London but get caught up in Sid's plot to steal the Crown Jewels.

Written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, and with the classic score newly recorded by the BBC Concert Orchestra, the show stars Andy Secombe, Kevin Eldon, Simon Greenall, Robin Sebastian and Susy Kane. The Crown Jewels was first broadcast on the 26th April, 1955.

Produced by Ed Morrish & Neil Pearson.

Written by Ray Galton & Simpson

Music recorded by the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Levon Parikian.

A BBC Radio Comedy Production.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b08jbc1q)
Pip massages the truth, and Shula gets a warning.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b08j99bw)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08jb6s2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b08jbc1s)
Councils in Crisis

There's a quiet revolution going on in our Town Halls. With funding slashed, Local Government is tasked with finding new ways to raise money and deliver services, or face failing to comply with its legal obligations. As councils in England are tasked with becoming more self sufficient, File on 4 examines the different approaches councils are taking in an effort to balance the books.

As some invest in commercial property others are spinning off traditional council departments into new companies with commercial divisions. The aim is to plough profits back into services.

But as the programme discovers these plans don't always work out. What happens when there is no profit? As the pressure on adult social care grows, some councils now face the twin struggles of meeting demand, with the need to turn a profit. Is this too much of a gamble in services which can mean the difference between life and death?

Allan Urry investigates the scale of the challenge as local authorities grapple with rising demand, falling income, and new ways of doing business.

Reporter: Allan Urry
Producer: Laura Harmes.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b08j99by)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b08jbc1v)
Dr Mark Porter presents a series that aims to demystify perplexing health issues.

TUE 21:30 The Long View (b08jb6rt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b08j99c0)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08jt7y3)
Behind Her Eyes, Episode 2

Louise is a working mum, stuck in a rut. When she connects with a man on a rare night out, she hopes that things are about to change. But, very quickly, events take an unsettling turn.

Sarah Pinborough's electrifying psychological thriller with "a pull-the-rug-out ending" (Ian Rankin).

Episode Two:
Louise bumps into Adele outside the school gates.

Sarah Pinborough is an award-winning YA and adult thriller, fantasy and horror novelist and screenwriter.

Writer: Sarah Pinborough
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Readers: Rosie Cavaliero & Tracy Wiles
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 23:00 Bridget Christie Minds the Gap (b04wwnh8)
Series 2, Episode 1

Bridget Christie returns in another series of her multi-award winning series about modern feminism. Bridget thought that she'd be able to put her feet up after her last Radio 4 series, she expected it to bomb. Sadly it was a huge success and she's had to bang on about feminism ever since, perform two sell-out runs at the Edinburgh festival and win lots of awards.

But she hasn't managed to single-handedly eradicate sexism so she's made a whole new four-part series about it for Radio 4.

In the first episode, she asks who has the best sexism in the world, deconstructs a yogurt advert and looks at what happens when a perfectly normal woman appears on television.

She's assisted in this by the series' token man, Fred MacAulay who in episode one, reveals a hitherto unsuspected penchant for certain kitchen cleaning products.

The series is written and performed by Bridget Christie and the producers are Alison Vernon-Smith and Alexandra Smith.

TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08jbc1x)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


WEDNESDAY 22 MARCH 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b08j99dz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b08jb6s0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08j99f1)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08j99f3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08j99f5)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b08j99f7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08kg7x5)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Richard Littledale.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b08j99f9)
Wetherspoons founder Tim Martin on UK food production post-Brexit

Wetherspoons pub chain founder Tim Martin tells Anna Hill that UK food and farming will thrive post-Brexit, even without a tariff-free deal from Europe. But he does want to see controlled immigration, which he says is vital for the economy. Mr Martin famously campaigned for Leave in the Referendum by printing anti-EU messages on half a million beer mats. Now he says new trade deals won't put UK farmers at risk, either because consumers won't buy cheaper, lower quality meat and veg, or because our government won't allow it in.

This is part of a special week of programmes on Farming Today that are exploring the environmental and farming opportunities that will come with Brexit featuring a line-up of special guests. During the week Princess Anne, Germaine Greer, Tim Martin, Jay Rayner and Sir Tim Smit will each explore some of the issues close to their heart relating to how we could look after our countryside, environment and produce food.

Produced by Sally Challoner.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp6d)
Goldfinch

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Goldfinch. With its bright yellow wing-flashes and face painted black, white and red, the goldfinch is one of our most colourful birds.

WED 06:00 Today (b08j99fc)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Midweek (b08j99ff)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b08jbc21)
Fathers and Sons, Episode 3

As a boy growing up on the south coast of England, Howard Cunnell's sense of self was dominated by his father's absence. Now, years later, he is a father, and his daughter is becoming his son.

Starting with his own childhood in the Sussex beachlands, Howard tells the story of the years of self-destruction that defined his young adulthood and the escape he found in reading and the natural world. Still, he felt compelled to destroy the relationships that mattered to him.

Saved by love and responsibility, Cunnell charts his journey from anger to compassion, as his daughter Jay realises he is a boy, and a son.

Most of all, this is a story about love - its necessity and fragility, and its unequalled capacity to enable us to be who we are.

Deeply thoughtful, searingly honest and exquisitely lyrical, Fathers and Sons is an exploration of fatherhood, masculinity, authenticity and family.

Written by Howard Cunnell
Read by James Lailey
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08j99fh)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b08jbc3j)
Revelation, Episode 3

Gripping dramatisation of C. J. Sansom's bestselling Tudor crime novel, the fourth in his series featuring hunchback detective Matthew Shardlake.

Spring, 1543. London's streets are filled with preachers sure that the end times are near. Strange signs and portents are seen everywhere - including two great fish, as big as houses, washed up on the banks of the Thames: could they be the Leviathan, a sign of the Second Coming?

In addition to this, it seems that a killer is prowling the city - but what links the victims? Shardlake is summoned to Lambeth Palace and asked by Archbishop Cranmer to conduct a secret investigation - no word of the murders must reach King Henry because one of the dead men was close to Catherine Parr, the King's current romantic obsession, and an ally of the reformers' cause.

Other parts are played by members of the cast.

Dramatist ..... Colin MacDonald
Writer ..... C. J. Sansom
Producer and Director ..... Kirsteen Cameron.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b08jbd1y)
Martin and Molly - Look Smile Chat

Molly no longer uses sign language; she has a cochlear implant, but she and her Dad know her hearing isn't perfect, especially when it comes to the cinema. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 The Age of Consent (b08jb0m6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Simon Evans Goes to Market (b061t68k)
Series 2, Tobacco

Comedian Simon Evans returns with a new series about the economics of some of the goods - or bads - we are addicted to.

If you crave your daily coffee, can't get by without a cigarette, feel that mid-afternoon slump without your sugar-fix, or can't face an evening without a glass of wine, you are definitely not alone. But have you ever thought about the economics that has made your addiction possible? Who does it profit? And would you want to make some canny investments that take advantage of our human weaknesses?
In this series, Simon Evans looks at the economics, history and health issues behind these oh-so-addictive commodities.

This week it's tobacco. It's been called the single biggest avoidable cause of death in the world today yet it has remained an investment goldmine, with a single pound invested in tobacco stocks in 1900 now being worth over 6 million pounds.

Simon speaks to Robert West, Professor of Health Psychology and Director of Tobacco Studios at University College London about current global trends in smoking. He is also joined by economics guru, More Or Less host Tim Harford and the Queen of investment know-how, Merryn Somerset-Webb, as he walks us around the economics of these very familiar commodities and pokes fun at our relationship with them.

Presented by Simon Evans, with Professor Robert West, Tim Harford and Merryn Somerset-Webb.
Written by Simon Evans, Benjamin Partridge and Andy Wolton.
Produced by Claire Jones.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b08j99fk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b08jbd20)
Series 1, Shipping Container

How a simple steel box changed the face of global trade. Shipping goods around the world was - for many centuries - expensive, risky and time-consuming. But 60 years ago the trucking entrepreneur Malcolm McLean changed all that by selling the idea of container shipping to the US military. Against huge odds he managed to turn "containerisation" from a seemingly impractical idea into a massive industry - one that slashed the cost of transporting goods internationally and provoked a boom in global trade. Tim Harford tells the remarkable story of the shipping container.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b08j99fm)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b08j99fp)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b08j99fr)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 The Uncommon Senses (b08k5zp0)
Series 1, The Predictive Brain

For thousands of years people thought we had 5 senses, now it's believed we have up to 33. In this ten-part series, philosopher Barry Smith and sound artist Nick Ryan take us on a journey into the extraordinary world of sensory perception.

In this episode: The brain has a more pro-active role in sensory perception than you might think. Rather than passively waiting for sensory input, like a blank slate waiting to be written on, the brain is constantly second-guessing what it expects from our senses.

Sometimes, it gets it wrong, and the world becomes a very confusing place.

Producer: Emily Knight.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b08jbc1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Drama (b08jbd8l)
Love (sic)

by Jessica Swale

Ruth is desperate because boyfriend Tom seems to have fallen out of love with her.
Could science provide the answer?

Produced and directed by Marion Nancarrow

Jessica Swale won the Olivier Award for Best Comedy in 2016. This is her first play for radio.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b08jbdr3)
Money Box Live: The 'appeal' of death taxes

Financial phone-in.

WED 15:30 Inside Health (b08jbc1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b08jbdrh)
Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b08j99ft)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b08j99fw)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08j99fy)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 Rich Hall's (US) Breakdown - 60 Days of Trump (b08jbdrm)
Washington D.C.'s favourite political call-in show returns to Radio 4 as stand-up legend Rich Hall and a selection of comedians from both sides of the Atlantic reflect on the first 60 days of Donald Trump's presidency.

Speaking to American pundits, comics and of course hearing extensively from the man on the street the show will explore how radically one of the most interesting countries on the planet has changed in 60 short days.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b08jbfbx)
Alice expresses her thanks, and Harrison needs to find the right words.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b08j99g0)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08jbc3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b08jbfbz)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Mona Siddiqui, Matthew Taylor, Claire Fox and Anne McElvoy.

WED 20:45 Lent Talks (b08jbfc1)
Ben Judah - Destiny and the Migrant

Ben Judah, the journalist and author of "This is London" talks about his family's journey over the centuries from the Jewish Quarter of Baghdad, to India and finally London.
Producer: Phil Pegum.

WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b08jb9nj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]

WED 21:30 Midweek (b08j99ff)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b08j99g2)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b08j99g4)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08jt87k)
Behind Her Eyes, Episode 3

Louise is a working mum, stuck in a rut. When she connects with a man on a rare night out, she hopes that things are about to change. But, very quickly, events take an unsettling turn.

Sarah Pinborough's electrifying psychological thriller with "a pull-the-rug-out ending" (Ian Rankin).

Episode Three:
As their friendship develops, Louise discovers disturbing anomalies in Adele's marriage.

Sarah Pinborough is an award-winning YA and adult thriller, fantasy and horror novelist and screenwriter.

Writer: Sarah Pinborough
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Readers: Rosie Cavaliero & Tracy Wiles
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:00 Spotlight Tonight with Nish Kumar (b08jbfhh)
Series 1, 22/03/2017

We all like to think we know about the news and yet, whilst jokes about Boris Johnson's haircut are all well and good, do you still have that nagging suspicion there's important things going on beneath the headlines you'd like to know about? Well, help is at hand! Nish Kumar is here to cast his spotlight on the week's most talked about news items, taking an in-depth look at the biggest stories from the past seven days to scrutinise what's actually going on beneath the bluster.

Recorded on the day of transmission, Spotlight Tonight brings you the most reactive up to date in-depth look at the news.

Starring Nish Kumar & Sarah Campbell.

Written by Robin Morgan, Sarah Campbell, Max Davis, Gabby Hutchinson-Crouch, Nish Kumar, and Tom Neenan.

It was produced by Matt Stronge and was a BBC Studios Production.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08jbfhk)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


THURSDAY 23 MARCH 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b08j99j4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b08jbc21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08j99j6)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08j99j8)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08j99jb)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b08j99jd)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08kgfxw)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Richard Littledale.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b08j99jg)
Princess Anne on food and farming post-Brexit

Anna Hill meets the Princess Royal at Buckingham Palace to discuss food, farming and environmental opportunities in the next couple of years. Princess Anne, who farms in Gloucestershire and is a patron of many rural charities, talks about biofuels, the use of science and technology in farming and what kind of subsidies could help farmers in the future. She explores whether support should also be used to enable producers to grow food 'staples' at a reasonable cost so that all consumers can afford them.

This is part of a special week of programmes on Farming Today that are exploring the environmental and farming opportunities that will come with Brexit featuring a line-up of special guests. During the week Princess Anne, Germaine Greer, Tim Martin, Jay Rayner and Sir Tim Smit will each explore some of the issues close to their heart relating to how we could look after our countryside, environment and produce food.

Produced by Sally Challoner.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020vp98)
Common Sandpiper

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Common Sandpiper. This bird can look slightly pot-bellied as it bobs nervously on the edge of an upland lake or on a midstream boulder. Get too close though and it will be off - flickering low over the surface on bowed wings.

THU 06:00 Today (b08j99jj)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 In Our Time (b08j99jl)
The Battle of Salamis

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss what is often called one of the most significant battles in history. In 480BC in the Saronic Gulf near Athens, between the mainland and the island of Salamis, a fleet of Greek allies decisively defeated a larger Persian-led fleet. This halted the further Persian conquest of Greece and, at Plataea and Mycale the next year, further Greek victories brought Persian withdrawal and the immediate threat of conquest to an end. To the Greeks, this enabled a flourishing of a culture that went on to influence the development of civilisation in Rome and, later, Europe and beyond. To the Persians, it was a reverse at the fringes of their vast empire but not a threat to their existence, as it was for the Greek states, and attention turned to quelling unrest elsewhere.

With

Lindsay Allen

Paul Cartledge

and

Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones

Producer: Simon Tillotson.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b08jclm7)
Fathers and Sons, Episode 4

As a boy growing up on the south coast of England, Howard Cunnell's sense of self was dominated by his father's absence. Now, years later, he is a father, and his daughter is becoming his son.

Starting with his own childhood in the Sussex beachlands, Howard tells the story of the years of self-destruction that defined his young adulthood and the escape he found in reading and the natural world. Still, he felt compelled to destroy the relationships that mattered to him.

Saved by love and responsibility, Cunnell charts his journey from anger to compassion, as his daughter Jay realises he is a boy, and a son.

Most of all, this is a story about love - its necessity and fragility, and its unequalled capacity to enable us to be who we are.

Deeply thoughtful, searingly honest and exquisitely lyrical, Fathers and Sons is an exploration of fatherhood, masculinity, authenticity and family.

Written by Howard Cunnell
Read by James Lailey
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08j99jn)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08jclm9)
Revelation, Episode 4

Atmospheric dramatisation of C. J. Sansom's bestselling Tudor crime novel, the fourth in his series featuring hunchback detective Matthew Shardlake.

Spring, 1543. London's streets are filled with preachers convinced that the end times are near. Strange signs and portents are seen everywhere - including two great fish, as big as houses, washed up on the banks of the Thames: could they be the Leviathan, a sign of the Second Coming?

In this fervid atmosphere, a killer is prowling the city - but what links the victims? Summoned to Lambeth Palace, Shardlake is asked by Archbishop Cranmer to conduct a secret investigation - no word of the murders must reach King Henry because one of the dead men was close to Catherine Parr, the King's current romantic obsession, and an ally of the reformers' cause. While working on another case, Shardlake receives information that suggests the killer has been active for some time.

Other parts are played by members of the cast.

Dramatist ..... Colin MacDonald
Writer ..... C. J. Sansom
Producer and Director ..... Kirsteen Cameron.

THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b08jclmc)
Russia's Extreme Selfie Daredevils

Young Russians have gained a reputation on social media for taking the most extreme selfies, often involving death-defying stunts on top of skyscrapers, all for the sake of internet fame.

Lucy Ash travels from Moscow to Siberia to meet some of this trend's most high-profile figures. They explain how they are building themselves into living brands, and the ways they can make money out of their risky roof-top photographs. They reveal what initially motivated them to chance their lives in this way - and an indifference to the rising number of selfie-related deaths in Russia.

The government is less nonchalant though. and around 18 months ago it launched a 'safe selfie' campaign, to warn young people of the risks of taking photos in moving traffic, on top of radio towers, with loaded weapons or with wild animals.

But why has this phenomenon taken root in Russia? Crossing Continents reveals how a mixture of provincial malaise, a misdirected sense of masculinity, and lax law enforcement has allowed extreme selfie culture to flourish.

Contributors include:

Alexander Chernikov

Angela Nikolau

Kirill Vslensky

Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith
Researcher: Tatyana Movshevich.

THU 11:30 The Stately Pleasure Dome (b08jclmf)
Poet Michael Symmons Roberts gets under the glowing domes of Manchester's Intu Trafford Centre, the largest shopping centre ever seen in the UK when it was built in 1998. to argue that it makes a unique poetic and architectural statement. It's a landmark that attracts more than thirty million visitors a year, and displays over two thousand works of art. Michael ventures behind its facades to ask whether we've been looking at this building in the right way, and to find inspiration for new poetry.

The main dome of this shopping centre is one of its most evocative and striking features - Michael has long thought of it a relative of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's 'stately pleasure dome' from his great poem 'Kubla Khan'. Here, Michael discovers that this late twentieth century Mancunian 'people's palace has uncanny echoes of 'Kubla Khan' - from the dome itself, through to the 'intermittent fountains' and the presiding figure of 'Kubla Khan'.

Music was specially composed for this documentary by Scanner, a musician who has long experimented with the terrain between sound space and image. Scanner was asked to help Michael find a way to tune into the 'visual music' of a building that can hard be to take in, because of its sheer scale and detail. Scanner has previously worked on projects with artists including Bryan Ferry, Wayne MacGregor, Michael Nyman, Steve McQueen, and Laurie Anderson.

Coleridge's 'Kubla Khan' is also part of the soundscape, performed here by members of INTU staff, who work under the changing light of a real stately pleasure dome.

Presenter: Michael Symmons Roberts
Music: Scanner
Producer: Faith Lawrence
Studio Manager: Sue Stonestreet.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b08j99jq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b08jclmh)
Series 1, Concrete

It's improved health, school attendance, agricultural productivity and farm worker wages, but concrete has a poor reputation. It takes a lot of energy to produce and releases a great deal of CO2 in the process. However, architects appreciate its versatility and there are few more important inventions. Tim Harford tells the remarkable hidden story of a ubiquitous, unloved material.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b08j99js)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b08j99jv)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b08j99jx)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 The Uncommon Senses (b08k5zqw)
Series 1, Dinnertime: A Multisensory Extravaganza!

For thousands of years people thought we had 5 senses, now it's believed we have up to 33. In this ten-part series, philosopher Barry Smith and sound artist Nick Ryan take us on a journey into the extraordinary world of sensory perception.

In this episode we introduce the most multisensory experience on earth: Dinnertime!

Food keeps us alive, it makes us happy, it powers everything we do. So it should be no surprise that many of our senses are geared towards helping us find a good meal. With guest Heston Blumenthal, Philosopher Barry Smith delves into all the ways our senses are enhancing or changing the experience of eating, in some very unexpected ways.

Producer: Emily Knight.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b08jbfbx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Drama (b08jclmk)
Inappropriate Relationships, Episode 5

Five-part original drama series by Christopher Reason.

Psychological drama. Following the murder of 17-year-old girl, Rachel has been investigating widespread sexual abuse in local institutions. She has discovered that Samuel Stokes, the MP supposedly leading the fight against 'grooming gangs', is at the heart of it all. Stokes attempts to threaten Rachel by making it known that she's been living under an assumed identity for the last 20 years, following her involvement in a terrible crime.

Director . . . . . Sasha Yevtushenko.

THU 15:00 Ramblings (b08jclmm)
Series 35, Isaac's Tea Trail, Allendale

Clare Balding returns to her favourite county, Northumberland, to walk part of Isaac's Tea Trail, a thirty-six mile (58km) circular route, starting from Allendale. This long distance path, launched in 2002, was inspired by the tale of Isaac Holden, an itinerant tea seller and philanthropist who in Victorian times was a familiar figure on the rough tracks over Allendale Common and Alston Moor.
Clare is accompanied on her walk by Roger Morris who devised and maintains the route, Andy Lees ,from The north Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and retired journalist Anne Leuchars, who blogs about the route and has walked it all . She explains why the area is her adopted home and the very special role Isaac played in the local community.
The walk starts at Keenley Wesleyan Methodist Church and ends at Holden Hearse house.
Grid Ref : NY803567 End ref at NY782523
Producer Lucy Lunt.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b08j9f14)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (b08j9r68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b08jclmp)
Paul Laverty

Paul Laverty, the writer of I, Daniel Blake, discusses his parallel career in Spain where he makes award-winning art-house movies.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b08j99jz)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b08j99k1)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08j99k3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 Meet David Sedaris (b066zvy9)
Series 5, Calypso; Follow Me

One of the world's best storytellers is back on BBC Radio 4 doing what he does best.

This week: the story of an unorthodox minor operation in Calypso, a reflection on selfie culture in Follow Me and a final extract from his diaries (5/6)

Produced by Steve Doherty
A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b08jclmr)
Toby hopes he meets the measure, and Clarrie can't help but be suspicious.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b08j99k5)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08jclm9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 Law in Action (b08jb9nl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]

THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b08jclmt)
Migrant Entrepreneurs

Evan Davis presents the business magazine.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b08j99jz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 In Our Time (b08j99jl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b08j99k9)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b08j99kc)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08jt8gm)
Behind Her Eyes, Episode 4

Louise is a working mum, stuck in a rut. When she connects with a man on a rare night out, she hopes that things are about to change. But, very quickly, events take an unsettling turn.

Sarah Pinborough's electrifying psychological thriller with "a pull-the-rug-out ending" (Ian Rankin).

Episode Four:
Despite her better judgement, Louise's relationship with David progresses.

Sarah Pinborough is an award-winning YA and adult thriller, fantasy and horror novelist and screenwriter.

Writer: Sarah Pinborough
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Readers: Rosie Cavaliero & Tracy Wiles
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 23:00 Rich Hall's (US) Breakdown - 60 Days of Trump (b08jbdrm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:30 on Wednesday]

THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08jcqzn)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


FRIDAY 24 MARCH 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b08j99m2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b08jclm7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08j99m4)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08j99m6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08j99m8)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b08j99mb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08kc83c)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Richard Littledale.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b08j99md)
Food critic and author Jay Rayner on his ideas for a post-Brexit rural economy

Author and food critic Jay Rayner tells Charlotte Smith why he believes it's time for a completely fresh look at food production post-Brexit. He wants to see producers and retailers taking their 'carbon footprint' into account as part of pricing and labelling, right along the food chain. He'll say we'll see the end of ultra cheap food as we've known it in recent decades, but the future of the planet depends on us cutting down on foods that harm the environment.
If subsidies to farmers continue he says they should only be to reward progress on environmental or wildlife stewardship.

This is part of a special week of programmes on Farming Today that are exploring the environmental and farming opportunities that will come with Brexit featuring a line-up of special guests. During the week Princess Anne, Germaine Greer, Tim Martin, Jay Rayner and Sir Tim Smit will each explore some of the issues close to their heart relating to how we could look after our countryside, environment and produce food.

Produced by Sally Challoner.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sby1j)
Blackcap

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Blackcap. Many Blackcaps winter in sub-Saharan Africa, but increasingly birds have been wintering in the Mediterranean and over the last few decades spent the winter in the UK.

FRI 06:00 Today (b08j99mg)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b08j9h6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b08jdx6p)
Fathers and Sons, Episode 5

As a boy growing up on the south coast of England, Howard Cunnell's sense of self was dominated by his father's absence. Now, years later, he is a father, and his daughter is becoming his son.

Starting with his own childhood in the Sussex beachlands, Howard tells the story of the years of self-destruction that defined his young adulthood and the escape he found in reading and the natural world. Still, he felt compelled to destroy the relationships that mattered to him.

Saved by love and responsibility, Cunnell charts his journey from anger to compassion, as his daughter Jay realises he is a boy, and a son.

Most of all, this is a story about love - its necessity and fragility, and its unequalled capacity to enable us to be who we are.

Deeply thoughtful, searingly honest and exquisitely lyrical, Fathers and Sons is an exploration of fatherhood, masculinity, authenticity and family.

Written by Howard Cunnell
Read by James Lailey
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08j99mj)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08jdx6r)
Revelation, Episode 5

Atmospheric dramatisation of C. J. Sansom's bestselling Tudor crime novel, the fourth in the series featuring lawyer detective Matthew Shardlake.

London, 1543. A serial killer prowls the city, each death worse than the last - but what links the victims? Shardlake has been asked by Archbishop Cranmer to conduct a secret investigation and catch the killer before word of the bloodshed reaches the King: one of the victims was close to Catherine Parr, Henry's current romantic obsession, and an ally of the reformers' cause; Cranmer knows that such a taint will ruin any chance of her becoming Queen. While pursuing a lead, Shardlake has been stabbed by an unknown attacker in a crowded street.

Shardlake must also attend to another pressing case, that of a young man driven mad by the conviction that he is damned and that the Lord has forsaken him. Adam Kite is being held in the Bedlam for his own safety - his wild ranting about Hell and damnation verge on heresy - but Shardlake hopes his friend Guy the Apothecary can help ease his suffering.

Other parts are played by members of the cast.

Dramatist ..... Colin MacDonald
Writer ..... C. J. Sansom
Producer and Director ..... Kirsteen Cameron.

FRI 11:00 Subversion (b08jdz0h)
Subversion, East

Complaints that Russia interfered in America's presidential election are only the latest chapter in a much longer story. Both Moscow and the West have engaged in political subversion over the last one hundred years, in an attempt to undermine the other. This dangerous game has largely been played out in the clandestine world of spies but has burst out into the open at regular intervals. BBC Security Correspondent Gordon Corera tells the stories behind a struggle which still dominates - and often poisons - relations between the East and the West.
Producer: Mark Savage.

FRI 11:30 A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics (b08jdz0k)
Series 2, The Prophecy

By Richard Katz and John Nicholson

In medieval Scotland, a pair of soldiers, fleeing their own regiment, come face-to-face with a trio of witches on a desolate moor. One of them receives a prophecy that he will become King of Scotland. It's a classic case of mistaken identity.

In this second series, the comedy troupe Peepolykus assume the roles of minor characters in great works of fiction and derail the plot through their hapless buffoonery.

Director . . . . . Sasha Yevtushenko.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b08j99ml)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy (b08jdz0m)
Series 1, iPhone

Surprisingly, Uncle Sam played an essential role in the creation and development of the iPhone - of course, much has been written about the late Steve Jobs and other leading figures at Apple and their role in making the modern icon, and its subsequent impact on our lives. And rightfully so. But who are other key players without whom the iPhone might have been little more than an expensive toy? Tim Harford tells the story of how the iPhone became a truly revolutionary technology.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b08j99mn)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b08j99mq)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b08j99ms)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 The Uncommon Senses (b08k60m1)
Series 1, Smell, Emotion and Memory

For thousands of years people thought we had 5 senses, now it's believed we have up to 33. In this ten-part series, philosopher Barry Smith and sound artist Nick Ryan take us on a journey into the extraordinary world of sensory perception.

Today we explore why smell unlocks the door to such vivid memories and emotions. And we discover that training yourself to improve your sense of smell might be better for ageing brains than crosswords and sudoku.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b08jclmr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Drama (b08jf0f1)
Give Dotty a Chance

Give Dotty a Chance by Martyn Hesford.
It is 1989 and the Welsh singer Dorothy Squires is living a penniless existence in a caravan. She thinks her glittering career that took her to Hollywood has been forgotten. But then two fans turn up to try persuade her to put her glad rags on and revive her career. But can she still do it?

Director/Producer Gary Brown.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08jf2j9)
Audley End

Eric Robson and his panel answer the questions from Audley End in Essex.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 The Beating of Tiny Wings (b08jf2jh)
In the award winning writer Danielle McLaughlin's new story Evie is unsettled when the city's birds are beset by an unexplained malaise.

The acclaimed Irish short story writer Danielle McLaughlin's well received debut collection, Dinosaurs on Other Planets, was published in 2016. Her stories have also appeared in publications including the New Yorker an the Irish Times.

Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b08jf2jz)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 Feedback (b08jf2kf)
Radio 4's forum for audience comment.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b08jf2l4)
Clare and Ruth - Climbing the Ladder

They met on the first brick-laying course for women and have supported each other through life in the construction industry ever since. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b08j99mv)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08j99mx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b08jf2ln)
Series 50, 24/03/2017

Steve Punt, Hugh Dennis and guests present the week in news through stand-up and sketches.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b08jf2m4)
Kirsty accepts an offer, and Justin is put in the picture.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b08j99mz)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08jdx6r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b08jf76l)
Caroline Lucas MP, Gisela Stuart MP.

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Ashlawn School in Rugby with a panel including the Co-Leader of the Green Party of England and Wales Caroline Lucas MP and the Chair of Change Britain, the successor organisation of Vote Leave, the Labour MP Gisela Stuart.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b08jf76n)
The Power and Peril of Stories

A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 The Uncommon Senses (b08jf76q)
Series 1, Making Sense of the Senses

A fantastic journey into the intricate, tangled world of human multi-sensory experience. In this Omnibus edition, hear the first five episodes of the brand new series.

For thousands of years people thought we had 5 senses, now it's believed we have up to 33. Philosopher Barry Smith explores how they work, with help from scientists, neurologists, and sound artist Nick Ryan.

We introduce the unfamiliar sense of 'interoception' - could it be responsible ghosts, ghouls and those rising hairs on the back of our necks? We delve into the brain, and find out the ingenious ways it is creating, rather than simply interpreting, our sensory world. We pull up a chair at one of the most multisensory experiences it is possible to have - one that we do every day in fact - lunchtime. Not forgetting to draw a deep, deep, healing breath, while finding out how olfaction, or the sense of smell, can have startling effects on our emotions and memories.

Produced by Emily Knight, Melvin Rickarby, and Becca Bryers.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b08j99n1)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b08j99n3)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08jt8q2)
Behind Her Eyes, Episode 5

Louise is a working mum, stuck in a rut. When she connects with a man on a rare night out, she hopes that things are about to change. But, very quickly, events take an unsettling turn.

Sarah Pinborough's electrifying psychological thriller with "a pull-the-rug-out ending" (Ian Rankin).

Episode Five:
After seeing Adele, Louise is forced to accept there is a darker side to David.

Sarah Pinborough is an award-winning YA and adult thriller, fantasy and horror novelist and screenwriter.

Writer: Sarah Pinborough
Abridger: Jeremy Osborne
Readers: Rosie Cavaliero & Tracy Wiles
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b08jb9nn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08jf76s)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b08jf76v)
Wendy and Christine - Speech Therapy

Wendy used to hide rather than talk to people, but with Christine's help she's no longer a covert stammerer and has found her voice. Fi Glover presents another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b08j9v52)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b08j9v52)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b08jb6s2)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b08jb6s2)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b08jbc3j)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b08jbc3j)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b08jclm9)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b08jclm9)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b08jdx6r)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b08jdx6r)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 MON (b08j9z4x)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 TUE (b08jb6sb)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 WED (b08jbd20)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 THU (b08jclmh)

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy 12:04 FRI (b08jdz0m)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b08jb9nn)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b08jb9nn)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b08hqm3c)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b08jf76n)

A Trespasser's Guide to the Classics 11:30 FRI (b08jdz0k)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b08hm9w4)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b08jb0m8)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b08hl64h)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b08hqm39)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b08jf76l)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b08j94dt)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b08j99jz)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b08j99jz)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b08j9f0f)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b08j9f0f)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b08j9z6j)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b08jb0mb)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b08jt7y3)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b08jt87k)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b08jt8gm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b08jt8q2)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b08hqf5p)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b08j9tk4)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b08j9tk4)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b08jb6s0)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b08jb6s0)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b08jbc21)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b08jbc21)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b08jclm7)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b08jclm7)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b08jdx6p)

Boswell's Lives 19:15 SUN (b05415pv)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b08hm0x5)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b08j9z53)

Bridget Christie Minds the Gap 23:00 TUE (b04wwnh8)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b08j990k)

Bus Lines 16:02 MON (b06vmw29)

Can the Centre Hold? 11:00 TUE (b08jb6s4)

Chain Reaction 11:30 MON (b08j9z4v)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b08jb9nj)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b08jb9nj)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b08jclmc)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b08j9h6g)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b08j9h6g)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b053rz5r)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b08j9r66)

Drama 14:15 MON (b08j9z51)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b054t79g)

Drama 14:15 WED (b08jbd8l)

Drama 14:15 THU (b08jclmk)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b08jf0f1)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b08hl641)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b08j997c)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b08j99b9)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b08j99f9)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b08j99jg)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b08j99md)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b08j9s0f)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b08jf2kf)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b08hnpml)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b08jbc1s)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b08j9h6j)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b08j9h6j)

Four Seasons 12:13 MON (b08jt9lq)

Four Seasons 13:43 MON (b08jt9lt)

Four Seasons 16:00 MON (b08jt9lw)

Four Seasons 17:58 MON (b08jt9ly)

Four Seasons 23:55 MON (b08jt9m0)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b08hl647)

From Savage to Self 21:00 SAT (b08j94tx)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b08j9982)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b08j99bw)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b08j99g0)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b08j99k5)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b08j99mz)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b08hqm2x)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b08jf2j9)

I, the Flock 19:45 SUN (b08j9s0c)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b08j99jl)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b08j99jl)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b08j99by)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b08jbc1v)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b08jbc1v)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b08hm9vy)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b08j9zqh)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b08hqm31)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b08jf2jz)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b08jb9nl)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b08jb9nl)

Lent Talks 05:45 SUN (b08hpf7h)

Lent Talks 20:45 WED (b08jbfc1)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b08j94dp)

Meet David Sedaris 18:30 THU (b066zvy9)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b08hl62s)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b08j98zs)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b08j996z)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b08j999z)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b08j99dz)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b08j99j4)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b08j99m2)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b08j99ff)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b08j99ff)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b08j94dk)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b08j94dk)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b08jbdr3)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b08hpf7f)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b08jbfbz)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b08hl63v)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b08j9901)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b08j9979)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b08j99b7)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b08j99f7)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b08j99jd)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b08j99mb)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b08j9903)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b08hl649)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b08j990p)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b08j997p)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b08j99bh)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b08j99fk)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b08j99jq)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b08j99ml)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b08hl63x)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b08j9909)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b08j990h)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b08hl650)

News 13:00 SAT (b08hl64f)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b08j9r68)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b08j9r68)

Opening Lines 00:30 SUN (b04fchm0)

PM 17:00 SAT (b08hl64m)

PM 17:00 MON (b08j997y)

PM 17:00 TUE (b08j99br)

PM 17:00 WED (b08j99fw)

PM 17:00 THU (b08j99k1)

PM 17:00 FRI (b08j99mv)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b08j9930)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b08hlbv1)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b08j9r6b)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b08hqmqc)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b08k9j2w)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b08k9hyn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b08kg7x5)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b08kgfxw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b08kc83c)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b08j94dr)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b08j94dr)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b08j9f14)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b08j9f14)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b08j9f14)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b08hpwbq)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b08jclmm)

Rich Hall's (US) Breakdown - 60 Days of Trump 18:30 WED (b08jbdrm)

Rich Hall's (US) Breakdown - 60 Days of Trump 23:00 THU (b08jbdrm)

Rock Transition 11:30 TUE (b08jb6s8)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b08hl645)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b08hl64y)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b08hl62x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b08j98zx)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b08j9975)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b08j99b3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b08j99f3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b08j99j8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b08j99m6)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b08hl62v)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b08hl63s)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b08hl64p)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b08j98zv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b08j98zz)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b08j992t)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b08j9973)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b08j9977)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b08j99b1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b08j99b5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b08j99f1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b08j99f5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b08j99j6)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b08j99jb)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b08j99m4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b08j99m8)

Short Cuts 15:00 TUE (b08jb9ng)

Simon Evans Goes to Market 11:30 WED (b061t68k)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b08hl64t)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b08j992y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b08j9980)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b08j99bt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b08j99fy)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b08j99k3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b08j99mx)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b08j9905)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b08j9905)

Spotlight Tonight with Nish Kumar 23:00 WED (b08jbfhh)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b08j997k)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b08j997k)

Subversion 11:00 FRI (b08jdz0h)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b08j9f16)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b08j990c)

Supersense Me 21:00 MON (b08hnj2v)

The Age of Consent 20:00 MON (b08jb0m6)

The Age of Consent 11:00 WED (b08jb0m6)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b08j990m)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b08j9s09)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b08j9s09)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b08j9zqv)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b08j9zqv)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b08jbc1q)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b08jbc1q)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b08jbfbx)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b08jbfbx)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b08jclmr)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b08jclmr)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b08jf2m4)

The Beating of Tiny Wings 15:45 FRI (b08jf2jh)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b08hpwbz)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b08jclmt)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b08hpwbs)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b08jclmp)

The Great Egg Freeze 11:00 MON (b08j9z4s)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b08j9r64)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b08jbd1y)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b08jf2l4)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b08jf76v)

The Living World 06:35 SUN (b08j9f0x)

The Long View 09:00 TUE (b08jb6rt)

The Long View 21:30 TUE (b08jb6rt)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b08j99ft)

The Missing Hancocks 18:30 TUE (b08jb9nq)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b08hqm35)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b08jf2ln)

The Stately Pleasure Dome 11:30 THU (b08jclmf)

The Uncommon Senses 13:45 MON (b08j9z4z)

The Uncommon Senses 13:45 TUE (b08k5zlm)

The Uncommon Senses 13:45 WED (b08k5zp0)

The Uncommon Senses 13:45 THU (b08k5zqw)

The Uncommon Senses 13:45 FRI (b08k60m1)

The Uncommon Senses 21:00 FRI (b08jf76q)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b08j9910)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b08j9986)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b08j99c0)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b08j99g4)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b08j99kc)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b08j99n3)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b08hpf77)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b08jbdrh)

Tim Samuels' Sleepover: Inside the Israeli Hospital 13:30 SUN (b08j9r62)

To the Ends of the Earth: Lost Worlds, New Worlds 10:30 SAT (b08j94df)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b08jb0mg)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b08jbc1x)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b08jbfhk)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b08jcqzn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b08jf76s)

Today 07:00 SAT (b08j8mts)

Today 06:00 MON (b08j997h)

Today 06:00 TUE (b08j99bc)

Today 06:00 WED (b08j99fc)

Today 06:00 THU (b08j99jj)

Today 06:00 FRI (b08j99mg)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03tht7c)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03zdbr0)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b01sbyxy)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b020tp6d)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b020vp98)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b01sby1j)

Unforgettable 09:30 TUE (b07pgvjq)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b08hl63z)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b08hl643)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b08hl64c)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b08hl64r)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b08j9907)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b08j990f)

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Weather 17:57 SUN (b08j992w)

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Weather 21:58 THU (b08j99k9)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b08j99mq)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b08j99n1)

Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b08j94dh)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b08j9932)

Wireless Nights 23:00 MON (b08jb0md)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b08hl64k)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b08j997m)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b08j99bf)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b08j99fh)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b08j99jn)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b08j99mj)

World at One 13:00 MON (b08j997w)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b08j99bp)

World at One 13:00 WED (b08j99fr)

World at One 13:00 THU (b08j99jx)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b08j99ms)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b08j997r)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b08j99bk)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b08j99fm)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b08j99js)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b08j99mn)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b08j8mtq)