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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 11 FEBRUARY 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b08cqqzk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b08ctykd)
Once Upon a Time in the East, Episode 5

Xiaolu Guo's autobiography tells her remarkable story from adoption at birth through to her career as a writer and film-maker based in the UK. This abridgement deals with her formative years, living in China in times of transition.

Episode 5:
Xiaolu determines upon a new career path.

Xiaolu Guo is a novelist, essayist, screenwriter and film maker. She was born in south-eastern China in 1973 . Her novel, in English translation, Village of Stone, was shortlisted for the 2005 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and the 2006 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. It was followed by her first novel written in English,'A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers, which was shortlisted for the 2007 Orange Prize for Fiction. In April 2013, she was named one of the Best of Young British Novelists by Granta Magazine.

Her award-winning films include She, a Chinese (2009, Golden Leopard Award in Locarno Film Festival) and UFO In Her Eyes (2011), adapted as a screenplay from her novel. Her documentaries include Once upon a time Proletarian (2009), We Went to Wonderland (2008), How Is Your Fish Today? (2006) and The Concrete Revolution (2004), which was awarded the Grand Prix in the 2005 International Human Rights Film Festival.

Writer: Xiaolu Guo
Abridger Pete Nichols
Reader: Chipo Chung
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqzm)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08cqqzp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqzr)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b08cqqzt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08cvn18)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Reverend Marie-Elsa Bragg.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b08cvn1d)
Every day I wonder, what could have been?

iPM is the news programme that starts with its listeners. Email ipm@bbc.co.uk. Twitter: @BBCiPM. Presented by Luke Jones and Eddie Mair.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b08cqqzw)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b08cqqzy)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Open Country (b08csw1c)
The Pill Hobblers

For this week's Open Country Helen Mark explores the fascinating world of the Pill Hobblers - the 'boat men' who for centuries have risked their lives to keep ships safe on the River Avon.

The Pill Hobblers are known to have existed from at least the 17th centuary and still provide the linesmen who handle the lines for all shipping coming through the locks and onto the quaysides at Avonmouth and Royal Portbury Docks. Alongside the 'Pill Pilots' (the skilled navigators who guided ships through the waters) the Hobblers of today still work much as they did hundreds or years ago, working the ropes to secure and release ships into the Bristol Channel.

The Hobblers are still required to live in Pill - the small North Somerset Village that generations of Hobblers have come from - to ensure swift access to the nearby docks so that they can be on hand 24 hours a day, seven days a week to tend to the ships just as they always have been.

Whilst visiting the village of Pill itself and The Royal Portbury Docks, Helen meets with Hobblers and Pilots - past and present - to hear how generations of local men have kept ships sailing - and trade flowing - safely into the 21st Century, come rain or shine.

Presented by Helen Mark
Produced by Nicola Humphries.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b08cqr03)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b08cqr08)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b08fsdqt)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b08cqr0b)
Una Stubbs

Una Stubbs discusses her love of painting and her role playing Sherlock's landlady Mrs Hudson

Dinosaur expert Ben Garrod on the latest theories of how the beasts died out

Bill Griffin founder of the Crowdwish website explains how he helps people fulfil their wishes and tries to set them on the path to happiness

Listener and folk singer Ian W. Brown on the perils of sharing your name with someone famous.

Plus singer Marti Webb shares her Inheritance Tracks

Producer: Steven Williams

Editor: Anne Peacock.

SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08dmgjr)
Series 15, Stirling

Jay Rayner and his panel of cooking experts are in Stirling. Rachel McCormack, Sue Lawrence, Rob Owen Brown and Dr Annie Gray answer the questions this week.

The panellists discuss methods of curing salmon and how to make herring more tempting, and unwrap the mystery of the cardoon.

They also chew over the exotic pineapple - and its more interesting companions - as well as offering up Six Nations buffet ideas.

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton
Producer: Miranda Hinkley

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b08dwyxs)
Tom Newton Dunn of The Sun looks behind the scenes at Westminster . The editor is Peter Mulligan.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b08cqr0n)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b08cqr0r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b08dmgjt)
Landmark moment for cohabiting couples?

A woman has won a Supreme Court battle over access to her late partner's occupational pension. Will this now strengthen pension rights for millions more unmarried couples? Could the impact be felt wider still in other areas of cohabiting couples' personal finances?

Ofgem has announced details of a price cap for customers on prepayment meters. How will it work in practise?

And the elderly couple systematically defrauded of their life savings of almost £200k across a couple of months. Many of the payments were withdrawn and paid in again within minutes at the same bank branch.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Andrew Smith.

SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b08cvmh8)
Series 92, Episode 6

Jeremy Hardy, Francis Wheen, Kerry Godliman and Holly Walsh slalom their way through another week of headlines with Miles.

This week Clive Lewis stands down, John Bercow stands up and what happens when seagulls attack?

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b08cqr0t)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b08cqr0x)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b08cvmhc)
Jenny Chapman MP, Matt Kelly, Jonathan Ruffer, Anne-Marie Trevelyan MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Framwellgate School in Durham with a panel including Shadow Brexit Minister the Labour MP for Darlington Jenny Chapman MP, the Editor of the New European newspaper Matt Kelly, the fund manager and philanthropist based in County Durham Jonathan Ruffer and the backbench conservative party MP for Berwick-upon-Tweed Anne-Marie Trevelyan.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b08cqr0z)
Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230
Call 03700 100 444. Email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Tweet,#BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.

Presented by Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Anne Peacock.

SAT 14:30 Drama (b08dmgjw)
Inspector Chen Novels, The Mao Case

by Qiu Xiaolong dramatised by Joy Wilkinson

It's a dangerous and politically sensitive case for Inspector Chen when he is asked to investigate the sudden change of fortune of the granddaughter of Chairman Mao's mistress. The sixth in Qiu Xiaolong's series of Crime novels.

Director: David Hunter.

SAT 15:30 Losing Margaret (b08crw13)
Novelist Margaret Forster and writer Hunter Davies were together for sixty years. In this moving tribute a year after her death, Hunter tells Roger Bolton about their life together, their prolific careers, and how he's coping without her.

Meeting as teenagers in Carlisle, the pair shared a fierce intelligence and a determination to escape their tough working class backgrounds. Both achieved early success with novels made into films in the mid-1960s - Forster's "Georgy Girl" and Davies' "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush". Soon after, Davies wrote the only authorised biography of The Beatles.

Forster went on to write 25 novels and 14 biographies, including award winning portraits of Daphne Du Maurier and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, as well as social history and journalism. She died of cancer on February 8th 2016.

In recordings made in London, Carlisle and the Lake District over the last six months, Hunter tells his friend and fellow Cumbrian, Roger Bolton, about Margaret's last days, clearing out her desk and selling their house of the past 30 years. In his 80th year, he has also had three books published and written three regular columns.

Inter-cut with archive recordings of Margaret and readings from her books, the programme provides not only an intimate portrait of a famous literary couple, but a poignant portrayal of loss.

Producer: Deborah Dudgeon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b08cqr11)
Naomie Harris on her new film Moonlight, and former model Victoire Dauxerre talks about surviving on just three apples a day

Naomie Harris has been nominated for an Oscar for best supporting actress for the film Moonlight. She tells us about her role as a crack addict mother and how she dealt with bullying at school.

Professor Alexis Jay the Chair of the Inquiry into Child Sex Abuse and author of the Jay Report talks about lessons learnt from Rotherham, and the desire to change awareness about the nature and extent of abuse.

The French former model Victoire Dauxerre tells us about the reality of being on the catwalk for the major fashion houses and how she had to survive on just three apples a day to ensure she fit into the size 0 clothes.

Listener Val Dawson discusses why she's chosen to live in a cabin in her son's back garden.

The award winning actress Cherry Jones tells us about playing the iconic role of aging Southern Belle Amanda in Tennessee Williams' play The Glass Menagerie.

A new BBC drama The Moorside is set around the fake kidnapping of nine year old Shannon Matthews, which dominated the news in 2008. The drama focuses on the local women in the community who worked to find her. We hear from one of them Natalie Murray on the role she played.

The writer, director and actress Alice Lowe discusses her new film Prevenge. It's a dark British comedy horror film about a pregnant woman on a killing spree. Alice tells us why she wrote and starred in the film when she was herself 7 months pregnant.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor:Jane Thurlow.

SAT 17:00 PM (b08cqr14)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b08csxwr)
The Challenges of Running a Charity

How can people running charities balance doing good, maximising income, while retaining public trust? The sector is undergoing changes in regulation in the wake of scandals involving fundraising and governance. Evan Davis meets the experts. Taking part are: the chairman of the new Fundraising Regulator, Lord Grade of Yarmouth; Jayne Clarke of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution and Simon Gillespie from the British Heart Foundation.

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08cqr18)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b08cqr1b)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08cqr1d)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b08cqr1h)
Clive Anderson, Tom Allen, Shane Richie, Christian O'Connell, Daniel Pinchbeck, Angela Barnes, Flavia Coelho, Deep Throat Choir

Clive Anderson and Tom Allen are joined by Shane Richie, Daniel Pinchbeck, Angela Barnes and Christian O'Connell for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Flavia Coelho and Deep Throat Choir.

Producer: Sukey Firth.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b08dmgjy)
John Bercow

The Speaker of the House of Commons - John Bercow - stunned MPs this week when he announced he was "strongly opposed" to US President Donald Trump addressing Parliament when he visits Britain.

It's already led one Conservative backbencher to table a motion of no confidence in him.

John Bercow is no stranger to controversy. His brutal put downs of MPs and ministers in the Commons have often grabbed the headlines.

Bullied at school because he was short, he began his political career on the far right - a member of the notorious Monday Club.

But over the years, in his own words, his political views have "mellowed" - to the point where many Tories now regard him as a traitor and plot to unseat him.

On Profile this week, Mark Coles examines the highs and lows of Speaker Bercow's life and career.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b08cqr1k)
Beware of Pity, Ang Lee, Viet Tanh Nguyen, Breugel

Ang Lee's Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk is the first film to utilise a shooting and projection frame rate of 120 frames per second in 3D at 4K HD resolution. In a drama which tells the story of American war heroes on leave from Iraq, will audiences be won over by what Ang Lee calls a " new immersive cinema?"

Vietnamese American writer Viet Thanh Nguyen won the Pullitzer Prize for his debut novel The Sympathizer about the Vietnam war. His new book of short stories, The Refugees, draws heavily on his own experience of arriving in America having fled Vietnam after the fall of Saigon in 1975.

Bruegel's Defining A Dynasty at The Holburne Museum in Bath is the UK's first exhibition devoted to the Bruegel dynasty and brings together 35 works produced by four different generations of the family. A key work in the exhibition is the Wedding Dance in the Open Air, an oil painting from the Holburne's own collection which, following conservation work and technical examination, can be attributed firmly to the hand of Pieter Bruegel the Younger.

The Kettering Incident is a new 8 part series on Sky Atlantic starring Elizabeth Debicki who played opposite Tom Hiddleston in BBC's hit drama The Night Manager. Shot entirely on location in Tasmania, The Kettering Incident follows a doctor (Debicki) who returns to her home town after several years overseas, only to find herself at the centre of a mystery surrounding the disappearance of a young girl.

Stefan Zweig's 1938 novel Ungueld des Herzens (Beware of Pity) brings together two of Europe's most boundary-pushing, imaginative theatre companies at the Barbican for the first time. Theatre de Complicite's Simon McBurney directs the outstanding Berlin theatre company Schaubühne in a story of a doomed romance set in the Austro-Hungarian empire just before the first world war.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b08dmgk0)
A Brief History of Failure

"Success is not final, failure is not fatal," said Winston Churchill. The American satirist Joe Queenan thinks he might be wrong. In this archive hour follow up to his previous programmes on Blame, Shame, Anger and Irony, Queenan rails against the very idea of failure. His sharpest attack is reserved for the supposed romance of defeat. From Braveheart in Scotland via the heretic Cathars in France to the pretend soldiers in Virginia still re-enacting the American Civil War, Queenan explores whether there may be something noble about losing a war.

"I'm in the south, at one of the many re-enactment battles of the American civil war that go on every year. Thousands have turned up to re-fight a war they lost. We don't do this in the north - it would be odd, and divisive, perhaps even inflammatory. But the memories of a conflict that took place over 150 years down here - they don't go away."

This is the first of two archive programmes from Joe Queenan, with A Brief History of Lust coming next week.

Failure features archive contributions from classics professor Edith Hall; historian Geoffrey Regan; writer Armando Iannucci; former political correspondent and Strictly star John Sergeant; plus music from Laura Marling, Viv Albertine of the Slits and rock and roll's greatest failure, John Otway.

The producer in Bristol is Miles Warde.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b08cr6wm)
A Little Princess, Episode 1

Archie Panjabi (The Good Wife, The Fall) and Rebecca Front (War and Peace, Dr Thorne) star with Clare Perkins in this much-loved gothic treat.

'It's only an accident that I'm not you, and you're not me.'

A Little Princess starts with a schoolgirl. But it's not a school story. Frances Hodgson Burnett's tough tale shows us a London full of foreign wealth and child poverty. That's why for over a century, its shocking story and unforgettable young characters have influenced everything from Angela Carter to anime.

And Kate Clanchy's radical new dramatisation discovers the Indian heart of Sara Crewe. When Sara is rich, she is treated just the same as other girls. But when she is not rich - exactly who is she? And why has she been brought to England?

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b08cqr1n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b08csqyg)
Peace, Justice and Morality

How far should we be willing to forgive and forget past crimes in the interests of building lasting peace? The issue has been a running sore in Northern Ireland politics despite the Good Friday peace agreement. The Police Service of Northern Ireland has a special unit, the Legacy Investigations Branch, to review more than 3000 murders during the Troubles. But there are allegations it is prioritising re-opening the killings where soldiers from the British Army were involved, over those carried out by terrorists - the majority of which were by Republicans. There are practical issues of getting evidence for crimes that happened so long ago and the cost of investigations, but the moral questions are harder to answer. How do you weigh the right and the need of the families of victims to get justice for their loved ones, against the need to move on and find peace for the whole community? A general amnesty might solve the narrow question, but does that serve the interests of justice? And can you find reconciliation and peace if people feel they've been denied justice? As we move further away from the conflict, does the current generation who lived through it (and in some cases took and active role in it) have a responsibility to set aside their history in the interests of peace for the next generation? These are questions for Northern Ireland, but also around the world - in Cyprus, where there are renewed hopes for a peace deal that can united the island; in Colombia where, in a referendum, the people rejected a peace deal between the government and Farc rebels that would have ended the 52-year-long conflict that has killed more than 220,000 people; and in the Balkans where the truth and reconciliation process is struggling. What price peace? Producer: Phil Pegum.

SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b08crt67)
Heat 3, 2017

(3/17)
Competitors from Cheshire, North Yorkshire, Gloucestershire and Teesside join Russell Davies for the third heat in the current series. Would you know which film director first used the term 'splatter movie' to describe one of his films? Or by which treaty the island of Gibraltar was ceded to Great Britain? These and other general knowledge teasers await today's contestants, with the winner going through automatically to the semi-finals in the spring.

Producer Paul Bajoria.

SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b08cr6wv)
Cities

Roger McGough takes a poetic stroll through the streets of the city, from Liverpool to Bombay, and with the help of poets including Frank O'Hara, Imtiaz Dharker and TS Eliot.


SUNDAY 12 FEBRUARY 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b08dmjyv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Short Rides in Fast Machines (b04sy3qy)
About Time

A multi-contributor series of specially-commissioned radio stories about speed.

Every generation observes that life is getting faster - the pace of change, of action, or communication. Our cars, trains, boats and planes are faster than ever. And as every world-record on the athletic track confirms, we're still getting faster ourselves. The title is inspired by the minimalist composition by John Adams ('Short Ride In A Fast Machine').

Episode 3:
"About Time" by Tania Hershman
A writer's research for a story about time machines takes him in some unusual directions.

Tania Hershman is the author of two story collections - 'My Mother Was An Upright Piano: Fictions' and 'The White Road and Other Stories'. Her award-winning short stories and poetry have been widely published in print and online and broadcast on BBC Radio 3 and 4. Tania is founder and curator of ShortStops, celebrating short story activity across the UK and Ireland. She is a Royal Literary Fund fellow at the faculties of science at Bristol University and is studying for a PhD in Creative Writing at Bath Spa University, exploring the intersection between fiction and particle physics. She is co-writer and editor of Writing Short Stories: A Writers' and Artists' Companion which will be published in December 2014.

Produced by Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08dmjyx)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08dmjyz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08dmjz1)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b08dmjz3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b08dmnr7)
St Helen's Church, Lundy Island

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from St Helen's Church on Lundy Island. The tower, completed in 1896 has a peal of 10 bells with the Tenor, weighing 13 and a quarter hundredweight, tuned to F sharp. The original peal of eight bells was cast by Charles Carr and Company of Smethwick. They were refurbished in 1994 at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry, two new trebles being added and the ring of ten rehung in a new frame.
We hear them now ringing Double Norwich Court Bob Caters.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b08dmgjy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b08dmjz8)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b08dmjzb)
Reading Between the Lines

When does the ability to read between the lines become vital? From codes in Shakespeare to modern surveillance states, Mark Tully seeks out the secret messages of everyday life.

Shakespeare scholar Clare Asquith has witnessed the secret dissident propaganda that flourished in Soviet Russia and she has also written a book about hidden political and religious allegories in the plays of Shakespeare. Mark discusses her approach to reading between the lines and the techniques she has learnt to help her interpret literary codes.

In the light of this, he considers the symbols and subtexts that exist all around us - through culture, literature and music, touching on the work of Alban Berg, Sergei Prokoviev and Barrington Pheloung and the writing of Queen Elizabeth I, World War Two cryptographer Leo Marks and poet Theodore Weiss.

The readers are Claire Vousden and Vincent Ebrahim.

Presenter: Mark Tully
Producer: Frank Stirling

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b08dmnr9)
Chorizo Farmer

Ruth Sanderson visits a Northern Irish farmer who's making fresh pork chorizo using his herd of free range saddleback pigs. Together with his father's help rearing the pigs, Alastair Crown has developed his own range of charcuterie which he sells to local restaurants and delis. Ruth's particularly impressed by his use of a 'salami sauna'!

Producer: Beatrice Fenton.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b08dmjzd)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b08dmjzg)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b08dmjzj)
Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b08dmnrc)
MediCinema

Sir Derek Jacobi makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of MediCinema.
Registered Charity Number 1058917
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'MediCinema'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'MediCinema'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b08dmjzl)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b08dmjzq)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b08dmnrf)
'My work station is my worship station'

Mark Coffey considers the relationship between faith and work in a programme live from Emmanuel Church Didsbury in South Manchester. How does faith inform approaches to work and the way in which people communicate about faith with their colleagues? The Kantos Chamber Choir is directed by Ellie Slorach. Producer Helen Lee.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b08cvmhf)
Protecting Our Way of Life

John Gray examines what lies behind our desire to protect our "way of life".

"If people are forced to choose between insecurity and a promise of stability through tyranny", he writes, "many will opt for tyranny".

He argues that spending vast amounts of money on "grandiose wars while large sections of our own people languish in neglect and despair can only leave our societies more vulnerable to extremist demagogues".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qk4j)
Great Spotted Woodpecker

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the Great Spotted woodpecker. In spring Great Spotted Woodpeckers drum loudly with their bills against tree bark to advertise their territories. Unlike many of our woodland birds, which are declining, Great Spotted Woodpeckers have increased rapidly over the last few decades - up to 250% since the 1970's.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b08dmjzw)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b08dmjzy)
Helen is concerned for Henry, and Jennifer wants to put an end to the rumours.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b08dmr01)
June Brown

June Brown is best known today for her role as the long-suffering chain-smoking Dot Cotton (now Dot Branning) in the BBC TV soap EastEnders. She arrived on a three month contract in 1985 and is still in the show. She was nominated for a BAFTA in 2008.

She celebrates her 90th birthday in February 2017 and has no intention of retiring as acting "keeps her alive".

June was born in Suffolk and brought up in a music-loving family. Towards the end of World War Two, she joined up, choosing the WRNS where she worked as a cinema operator showing training films and newsreels to the sailors.

She did some acting during that time and after a brief and unsuccessful job in an office, she was one of very few chosen to receive a classical training at the Old Vic Theatre School. From there she joined the Old Vic Theatre Company where she worked with such greats as Edith Evans, Laurence Oliver and Albert Finney. Her roles included Lady Macbeth and Ibsen's Hedda Gabler.

She had five children in relatively quick succession and continued acting on TV and the London stage, often putting her youngest in a pram and going in the guard's van on the train to the theatre.

Throughout her time on EastEnders she has occasionally ventured away to direct or take part in other television series. In 2009 she stripped down to nothing as Jessie in the stage production Calendar Girls. She was 82.

She was awarded an MBE for services to drama and charity in 2008.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b08dmk03)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 The Museum of Curiosity (b08crt6f)
Series 10, Episode 5

This week, the Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Jo Brand welcome comedian, screenwriter and Guilty Feminist podcaster Deborah Frances-White; the entomologist and bumblebee expert, Professor Dave Goulson; and "that bloke off Time Team who was Baldrick in Blackadder", Sir Tony Robinson.

This week, the Museum's Guest Committee enshrine the first Englishwoman to make a living as a professional poet, Emilia Lanier; speculate on the unusual polyphiloprogenitive strategies of virgin death watch beetles; and pay homage to the moment when Blackadder finally went "over the top".

The show was researched by Anne Miller of QI and Mike Turner.

The production coordinator was Sophie Richardson.

The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b08dmr07)
Citrus

Sheila Dillon goes on a citrus journey, discovering vivid flavour possibilities and hidden histories.

Joining Sheila are Catherine Phipps, food writer and creator of a new book 'Citrus - Recipes that Celebrate the Sour and the Sweet' out this week, Helena Attlee author of 'The Land Where Lemons Grow' and Michael Barker, Editor of Fresh Produce Journal.

Presenter: Sheila Dillon
Producer: Rich Ward.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b08dmk05)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b08dmk08)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Fry's English Delight (b08dmr0d)
Series 9, The Story of Oh!

Stephen Fry with a story of sounds . From the involuntary sounds people make - Oh! Ah! Mmmm, Ooops - to some of our favourite onomatopoeia - Bang!, crash, Kapow! and tinkle.

Ummm!, Phht and Yipee! are, strictly speaking, interjections not words. But, if Oh! is an involuntary noise humans make rather than a word, isn't that also a kind of onomatopoeia? According to linguist Richard Ogden, reader in phonetics and linguistics at the University of York, interjections like Oh! and onomatopoeia like Kapow! are linked on a sliding scale.

Stephen tries to look at this practically by talking to comedian Spencer Jones who communicates on stage almost entirely using an extraordinary repertoire of crazy noises and interjections. He explains why these sounds create intimacy and warm humour.

But our story of Oh! is also about language imitating non human sound and the beauty of onomatopoeia - words like cuckoo, tinkle and plop. Stephen talks to graphic novelist and Watchmen artist Dave Gibbons about the specialised lexicon of onomatopoeia in comic book and graphic art work, and about the odd games graphic artists play when they're developing new fillings for speech bubbles.

But how does our story of Oh! translate into other languages? Why is foreign onomatopoeia different to English onomatopoeia if both are mimicking the same sound? We hear from Professor Catherine Laing and from illustrator James Chapman about onomatopoeia in Korean, Spanish and Japanese. It's one of the most remarkable features of comparing foreign languages to our own - we're hearing exactly the same sound but producing wildly different interpretations of the words to represent those sounds.

A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08cv1g5)
St Monans, Scotland

Eric Robson and the panel are in St Monans in Scotland. Anne Swithinbank, Bunny Guinness and Matthew Wilson answer the questions.

This week, the panel help out with suggestions for growing plants in wellington boots, and discuss when to prune roses and what to do with a non-flowering Kiwi. They also offer advice on aiding ailing Yews and debate whether or not a Giant Redwood could be grown in Scotland.

And Anne Swithinbank visits the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh to admire the snowdrops.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b08dmrzs)
Sunday Omnibus - Contending with Death

Fi Glover introduces conversations about the death of a loved one, by suicide or violence, how the dead can be remembered and how the living can best be comforted. All in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b08dmrzv)
A Little Princess, Episode 2

Archie Panjabi (The Good Wife, The Fall) and Rebecca Front (War and Peace, Dr Thorne) star with Clare Perkins in this much-loved gothic treat.

'It's only an accident that I'm not you, and you're not me.'

A Little Princess starts with a schoolgirl. But it's not a school story. Frances Hodgson Burnett's tough tale shows us a London full of foreign wealth and child poverty. That's why for over a century, its shocking story and unforgettable young characters have influenced everything from Angela Carter to anime.

And Kate Clanchy's radical new dramatisation discovers the Indian heart of Sara Crewe. When Sara is rich, she is treated just the same as other girls. But when she is not rich - exactly who is she? And why has she been brought to England?

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (b08dmrzx)
Bestselling novelist Joanna Trollope has always embraced contemporary life, and contemporary problems, in her books. She's written about step families, aging, empty nesting, and in her latest City of Friends, she considers working life, as she writes about four highly successful career women, who have known each other since university and whose close ties are threatened when their personal lives and work mix.
Also on the programme, Mariella and guests explore the literature of the USA's Mid West, and romantic novels from Nigeria and South Africa.

SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b08dmrzz)
Philip Larkin

Hull is 2017's European Capital of Culture and, Roger McGough is joined by poets Sean O'Brien, Douglas Dunn and Paul Farley to celebrate the city's most famous librarian, Philip Larkin. Producer Sally Heaven.

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b08crzrc)
Speaking Up - Whistleblowing in the NHS

Two years ago the first independent report into the treatment of whistle-blowers in the NHS was published.

The Freedom to Speak Up report was commissioned by the government amid concerns not enough progress had been made to create a more open culture within the NHS following the Mid Staffs inquiry which unearthed the poor care and high mortality rates at Stafford Hospital.

The report - which considered evidence from 600 individuals and 43 organisations across the country included chilling accounts of doctors, nurses and healthcare professionals whose lives and careers had been destroyed after trying to raise legitimate concerns about patient safety.

Whistle-blowers said they'd been left financially ruined, blacklisted and sent to the brink of suicide after being branded snitches and trouble-makers.

Revealing a continuing culture of secrecy with trusts demonising whistle-blowers instead of welcoming and investigating their concerns, it was hoped the report would herald a new era of openness and accountability.

File on 4 investigates what has happened since and asks whether measures put in place to protect those speaking out about patient safety are fit for purpose.

Doctors who have spoken up since say they've faced the same catalogue of bullying and abuse by their employers, and in some cases, the focus remains on protecting reputations of Trusts, rather than addressing poor care. So is the culture changing quickly enough?

Reporter: Simon Cox
Producer: Nicola Dowling.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b08dmgjy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08dmk0d)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b08dmk0g)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08dmk0j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b08dmk0l)
Julie Hesmondhalgh

Sheila McClennon chooses her BBC Radio highlights.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b08dmv0t)
Roy and Helen have a nervous wait, and Jennifer raises her game.

SUN 19:15 Guilt Trip (b07m7833)
Episode 2

Comedy drama in which Felicity Montagu (Lynn in Alan Partridge and Mrs Mainwaring in the Dad's Army fiilm) and her daughter (Olivia Nixon) play a mother and daughter doing a two week sponsored walk along The Thames Path to raise money for the dead father's charity. But the mother and father had been divorced for nine years and he had re-married, so relationships between them all have been strained. Things come to a head at any mention of the French Oak gable table Ros and her now dead ex bought to-gether in Camden. This has somehow ended up in the step-mother's house, much to Ros's annoyance: "I mean she sits at it! It's my table and she sits at it." The series is co-written by Katherine Jakeways who also plays the step-mother.

It's day six of the walk and Ros is concerned that they aren't doing enough to revive the bond between them, while Laura is worried that she doesn't have a passion and focus in her life. Will they both find what they are looking for?

Also starring Tim Key and Javone Prince. The producer was Jane Berthoud, it was a BBC Radio Comedy production.

SUN 19:45 The Poet and the Echo (b08dmv0w)
Series 1, Song of Myself

5 writers choose 5 poems as inspiration for new stories.

Episode 4/5

Gold

A traveller finds freedom in the Blue Ridge Mountains.

A story inspired by Walt Whitman's 'Song of Myself', by Janice Galloway.

Credits

Writer ..... Janice Galloway
Reader ..... Anne Lacey
Producer ..... Eilidh McCreadie

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:00 Feedback (b08cvmh0)
Melvyn Bragg, Feisty Moral Maze, Brexit agriculture

Roger Bolton hears the comments and concerns of listeners on the past week's radio broadcasting and raises their issues with those involved in making the programmes.

As In Our Time prepares to celebrate its 750th episode, Roger Bolton talks to the programme's presenter Melvyn Bragg, who reveals how he ramps up the pressure to achieve the best live programme and talks about the programmes that have transformed his thinking.

Long-standing BBC Correspondent Hugh Sykes considers the importance of accurate language, responding to listeners' critiques of one of his recent reports regarding President Trump's executive order banning immigration for people from seven, predominantly Muslim, countries.

Charlotte Smith speaks to Feedback about her Radio 4 series Against the Grain, which considered the implications for British agriculture of leaving the European Union. The series has been praised by both listeners and farmers. But some ask if it would have been better to broadcast such a series before the EU Referendum?

Also, listeners respond to heated outbursts about President Trump in an edition of The Moral Maze about the Morality of International Trade.


Presenter: Roger Bolton
Producer: Katherine Godfrey
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b08cvj8t)
Alan Simpson, Brunhilde Pomsel, Sir Ken Morrison, Buchi Emecheta

Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b08dmgjt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b08dmnrc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 Analysis (b08crt6m)
How Not to Do It

Jacqui Smith, the former Labour home secretary, investigates why government policies fail, focusing on one of her party's most cherished reforms.

Indeterminate sentences for public protection (IPPs) were devised by David Blunkett and the Home Office to reassure voters that those convicted of serious violent and sexual offences would stay in prison until they could show by their changed behaviour that they could safely be released.

But much larger numbers of offenders received the sentences than had been expected and, as the prison population rose, jails struggled to provide the facilities IPP prisoners needed to show that they had reformed. The new sentencing structure, first passed in 2003, had to be drastically changed by Labour in 2008 and finally to be repealed by the coalition four years after that.

Jacqui Smith discovers the reasons why the change in sentencing was embarked upon, why its potential flaws weren't detected before its introduction and why the policy was maintained even as problems mounted. She considers the difficult legacy of IPPs - for those still in prison and for politicians devising shiny new initiatives in other fields of government.

Among those taking part: David Blunkett, Kenneth Clarke, Lord Judge, Professor Nick Hardwick.

Producer: Simon Coates.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b08dmk0r)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b08csxwc)
Annette Bening

With Antonia Quirke

Annette Bening reveals why she's rarely seen without a cigarette even though she gave up smoking long ago.

Antonia meets Sylvette Baudrot, the only woman in film history to have worked with Alfred Hitchcock, Roman Polanksi and Laurel and Hardy

Foley artist Sue Harding demonstrates the tricks of her trade with the help of a cabbage, a melon and a couple of coconuts.

SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b08dmjzb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]


MONDAY 13 FEBRUARY 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b08dmk3z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b08csqy8)
Vertical Cities - India's property boom

Vertical cities: Laurie Taylor explores the increasing segregation of cities by height. Stephen Graham, Professor of Cities & Society at Newcastle University, ponders 'class war from above'. His exploration of the built environment around the world, both above and below ground, finds that the wealthy have gone upwards; into "islands" and "archipelagos" of residential towers, hotels, private clubs, roof gardens, restaurants, swimming pools, even heliports. They enjoy fresher air, commanding vistas, safety from crime and speedy travel. Privileged Chinese citizens retreat to air conditioned citadels in the sky; wealthy Thai commuters enjoy the Skytrain, Bangkok's elevated railway for the fortunate few. Graham lays out a landscape where architecture reflects and reinforces divisions with ever greater brazenness.
India's property boom. In recent years, India has seen a sudden and spectacular urban transformation. Gleaming business complexes encroach on fields and villages. Giant condominium communities offer gated security and pristine pools. Spacious, air-conditioned malls have sprung up alongside open-air markets. Llerena Guiu Searle , Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Rochester, interviewed estate agents, investors and developers, documenting the new private sector partnerships and practices that are bringing prosperity, but also making India's cities ever more inaccessible to the urban poor
Producer: Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b08dmnr7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08dmk41)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08dmk43)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08dmk45)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b08dmk47)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08fsstl)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Reverend Marie-Elsa Bragg.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b08dmk49)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

MON 05:56 Weather (b08dmk4c)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03szrzm)
Mallard

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the mallard. Mallards are our commonest ducks. In winter, mallards from Continental Europe join our resident birds. Some may have flown from as far away as Russia and many infiltrate local flocks, so the bills which snatch your bread may have been born hundreds, if not thousands of kilometres away.

MON 06:00 Today (b08dmk4f)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (b08dmk4h)
On Start the Week, Tom Sutcliffe considers the relationship between play and creativity. Steven Johnson examines how the human appetite for amusement has driven innovation throughout history. Novelist and theatre director Stella Duffy has revived Joan Littlewood's 1960s concept of The Fun Palace- a 'laboratory of fun' for all. The economist Tim Harford advocates embracing disorder in every area of our lives, from messy desks to messy dating. Journalist and former cricketer Ed Smith believes that creativity in sport is a combination of skill and luck.

Producer: Kirsty McQuire.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b08fll1l)
Age of Anger, Episode 1

In a ground-breaking new analysis, Pankaj Mishra traces the tangled roots of hatreds and nationalisms across the world.

Inspired by Hindu nationalists in his own country, the rise of the so-called Islamic State, the emergence of Donald Trump as a candidate for President, as well as Brexit, the author attempts to re-examine the divided modern world.

Mishra looks at historical events from the industrial revolution to the French revolution, from the writings of philosophers to the end of the Cold War. Indeed, at the end of the Cold War, there was a belief that the global capitalist economy would alleviate ethnic and religious differences to usher in prosperity and peace. This belief, he states, now lies in tatters, with no alternative in sight, and with economic power shifting from the West. Meanwhile, the IMF suggests that emerging economies will take much longer to catch up economically with the West than was previously believed.

Further, Mishra looks at nationalism, alienation, xenophobia, the 'lone wolf' and the pack behind him, domestic terrorism and the frustration and resentment both aimed at the West and from those in the West who are alienated.

He introduces us to the people at the heart of much of the action as we discover the causes and consequences of their beliefs and their actions.

Read by Pankaj Mishra
Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08dmk4k)
Allison Schroeder, Sandi Toksvig, Family Drug and Alcohol Courts

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08dn2gl)
Modesty Blaise: The Silver Mistress, Episode 1

Beautiful, intelligent and the catsuit wearing queen of hand-to-hand combat, Modesty Blaise was once the head of an international crime operation. Now, having given up her nefarious ways, Modesty and her faithful side-kick, Willie Garvin, offer their services for more respectable causes.

In this new adventure, adapted from Peter O'Donnell's novel by Stef Penney, Modesty invites Sir Gerald Tarrant of British Intelligence to join her for a holiday at the Gorges du Tarn in the South of France. But, after stopping on the cliff road to help two nuns who have broken down, Sir Gerald's car is found smashed to pieces at the bottom of the ravine.

With music by Will Gregory, arranged by Ian Gardiner and performed by the National Orchestra of Wales, conducted by Ben Foster.

Sound by David Thomas.
Directed by Kate McAll

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 11:00 The English Fix (b08dn2gn)
Series 1, The Secret People

Patrick Wright continues his exploration of English identity and his argument that England tends to be most fiercely imagined when it is threatened by an encroaching modern force.

In the second of three programmes, he examines the work of the writer G.K. Chesterton who as a "Little Englander" opposed Britain's imperialist expansion abroad. Instead of world politics, he celebrated "making the world small". Echoing the speech made by Theresa May last year, in which she said "if you believe you are a citizen of the world, you are a citizen of nowhere", Chesterton held that cosmopolitan globe-trotters knew less about England than the rooted man, permanently present in one place.

Patrick will also explore how increasingly the state seemed, to Chesterton, to threaten the English people and to take away their liberty. Nowhere was this more apparent than in the English pub, where meddling temperance reformers wanted to implement restrictive licensing laws. Chesterton felt that politicians "understand nothing else but money" and do not know how to help the poor as they have "no instinctive grip, no lively eye for anything as it really is."

So Chesterton issued a warning to the governing elites in his famous poem "The Secret People" not to forget the power of the English people, who "have not spoken yet". Patrick asks what this poem, cited in parliament at moments of crisis and quoted by journalists post-Brexit, has to tell us about modern society and how we define Englishness today.

Producer: Clare Walker.

MON 11:30 Chain Reaction (b08dn2gq)
Series 12, Sara Cox Interviews Joe Lycett

The return of the hostless chat show as presenter Sara Cox interviews comedian Joe Lycett.

Chain Reaction is the talk show with a twist where one week's interviewee becomes the next week's interviewer. John Cleese was first in the hot seat back in 1991 and since then, a procession of big names from the world of comedy and entertainment including Jennifer Saunders, Jarvis Cocker and Eddie Izzard have helped continue the chain.

Since the early days of The Girlie Show on Channel 4, Sara Cox has gone on to become one of the UK's best loved presenters. She is perhaps most well-known as a ratings hit in the early morning breakfast chair on BBC Radio 1 and her regular TV and radio appearances since then have included hosting BBC 2's Great Pottery Throw Down, appearing on myriad panel shows and pressing the nation's collective nostalgia button every Friday night on her very own Radio 2 Sounds of the Eighties show.

Sara's interview pick is Joe Lycett because "he makes me happy" and because someone needed to finally chart his much discussed journey "from Birmingham to 10th hottest man in the world". Joe is a stand-up comedian who some know as "the parking fine man" from 8 out of 10 Cats Does Countdown while others celebrate him for any number of acclaimed live tours and festival shows that have delighted the British comedy viewing public in recent years. This programme not only confirms that Joe is a man who can famously write a show title - "That's the Way A Ha A Ha, Joe Lycett" and "If Joe Lycett Then You Should Have Put a Ring On It" to name just two - but also hints at a addictive fondness for baths.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b08dmk4m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed (b08dn2gs)
Series 1, Bonfire of the regulations?

After Brexit, what happens to all those EU rules and regulations? Chris Morris discovers how Britain will face will undergo an extraordinary legal revolution. Many of the country's laws will be rewritten, and all kinds of new agencies created to police them. What will this mean in practice, how long might it take, and what has Henry VIII got to do with it?

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Researcher: Dearbhail Starr
Editor: Hugh Levinson.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b08dmk4p)
Mobility cars, Dog screening, US tourism

Consumer affairs programme.

MON 12:57 Weather (b08dmk4r)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b08dmk4t)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08dnh1r)
Series 1, Bosnia: Coercive Diplomacy

They grease the cogs of international relations, yet as agents of history they are all too often overlooked. Professor David Rothkopf explores the emergence of coercive diplomacy in the Balkans conflicts between 1991 and 1999, specifically in Bosnia and later Kosovo.

Professor Rothkopf explores what happens when diplomacy fails and the impact of the Srebrenica massacre in 1995. He asks what happens when diplomacy takes a decidedly undiplomatic turn into militarism.

With contributions from Tony Blair, Malcolm Rifkind, Rory Stewart and General Wesley Clark, the programme explores the new diplomatic doctrine that emerged from these conflicts, assessing how the mistakes and achievements that occurred here shaped the diplomatic world of today.


A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b08dmv0t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Drama (b08dnhjx)
Borderland

By Sarah Woods

A dark vision of a near-future in which the United Kingdom is divided by borders.

In the not so distant future, the UK has fragmented. Layla and her daughter are on a desperate mission across borders from England, through Wales and over the Irish Sea.

Based on the stories and experiences of real refugees, Borderland is a thriller about what it means to be a displaced person in the 21st Century. It explores the rise of the UK's various nationalisms via a nightmare future. But it also offers a unique perspective on the urgent issue of global migration - by giving British listeners a taste of what it might be like to be pushed to leave your home, in a desperate search for a better life.

From an original idea by John Norton.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.

MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b08dnkgt)
Heat 4, 2017

(4/17)
Which New York building was once described as the 'Mozart of skyscrapers'? And which type of meat takes its name from the Latin for 'to hunt'?

These and many other questions await the contenders in today's heat of the 2017 tournament, to decide who takes the fourth of the automatic places in this year's semi-finals later in the spring.

There's also a chance, as always, for a listener to win a prize by suggesting ingenious questions which will 'Beat the Brains'.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b08dmr07)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 I Was... (b08dnkgw)
Series 3, I Was Philip K Dick's Reluctant Host

Andrew McGibbon analyses great artists at a significant time in their careers, but from the perspective of someone who worked for them, inspired them, employed them or even did their job for them while no one was looking.

In "I Was Philip K Dick's Reluctant Host", Michael Walsh - a journalist and respected film reviewer for The Province, a leading Vancouver newspaper - talks about the time he came to the aid of the author of Minority Report, Blade Runner, Total Recall and Man in the High Castle, who he met at a convention in 1972.

Discovering that Dick's wife had walked out on him, that he had nowhere to go and was also suffering deep addiction problems, Michael invited Philip to stay with him and his wife Susan at their home in Vancouver.

It would go on to be one of the most challenging experiences of Michael's life, as drug dependency, unwanted advances on Michael's wife and unpredictable mood swings made the period something of an emotional rollercoaster for the wary hosts - but also fascinating insight into one of Sci-Fi's greatest ever visionaries.

Written and Presented by Andrew McGibbon
Producers: Nick Romero and Louise Morris

A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b08dnkgy)
Series 15, The Human Story: How We Got Here and Why We Survived.

The Human Story: how we got here and why we survived.
Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by comedian Ross Noble, Professor Danielle Schreve and Professor Chris Stringer as they look at the tricky job of piecing together the history of modern humans and how we came to be here. They look back to the earliest known human ancestors and the fossils and tools that have allowed us to paint the picture of our journey out of Africa, to become the last surviving human species on the planet. They ask why we have gone from more than 5 or 6 species of humans some 200,000 years ago, to just 1 today. They also look at how discoveries made in just the last 5 years have completely transformed our understanding of human history and what new DNA technology has revealed about our ancient past. They also reveal what surprising tropical animal remains have been found buried deep under Trafalgar Square.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.

MON 17:00 PM (b08dmk4w)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08dmk4y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b08dnkh0)
Series 10, Episode 6

John Lloyd & Jo Brand with guests Michelle Wolf, Bee Wilson and Henry Eliot. This week the Museum considers a 24-hour news channel, a 1,000 year long piece of music and the smell of fresh coffee.

Researched by Anne Miller of QI and Mike Turner.

The production coordinator was Sophie Richardson.

The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b08dnkh2)
Tom struggles to accept the truth, and Eddie and Clarrie lock horns.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b08dmk50)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08dn2gl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 The Philosopher's Arms (b08dnkh6)
Series 6, Hypocrisy

What's wrong with hypocrisy? The Philosopher's Arms, everyone's favourite abstract pub, is back with a pint and a philosophical conundrum. This week, presenter Matthew Sweet is joined at at the bar by philosopher Lisa Bortolotti and political scientist David Runciman. Plus human rights activist, Peter Tatchell, who in the past has publicly exposed people whom he has accused of hypocrisy.
Producer: David Edmonds.

MON 20:30 Analysis (b08dnkh8)
Is Talent Overrated?

When hiring people, is the concept of talent so ill-defined as to be useless? Entrepreneur and author Margaret Heffernan thinks so and explores what characteristics recruiters might want to look for instead. She argues that we need something new, as good grades and top degrees have proved no guarantee of high performance in the workplace. She talks to the recent head of HR (or "people operations") at Google, the pioneer of the concept of a "growth mindset", and the academic who found people's intelligence increased over the course of the 20th century. She also hears about other measures like "grit", "cultural fit" and how to interview people to find the candidate who is best for the job and the company, rather than the one you like.
Producer: Arlene Gregorius.

MON 21:00 The Rise of the Robots (b08crvz3)
Series 1, 07/02/2017

The idea of robots goes back to the Ancient Greeks. In myths Hephaestus, the god of fire, created robots to assist in his workshop. In the medieval period the wealthy showed off their automata. In France in the 15th century a Duke of Burgundy had his chateau filled with automata that played practical tricks on his guests, such as spraying water at them. By the 18th century craftsmen were making life like performing robots. In 1738 in Paris people queued to see the amazing flute playing automaton, designed and built by Jacques Vaucanson.

With the industrial revolution the idea of automata became intertwined with that of human workers. The word robot first appears in a 1921 play, Rossum's Universal Robots, by Czech author Carel Chapek.

Drawing on examples from fact and fiction, Adam Rutherford explores the role of robots in past societies and discovers they were nearly always made in our image, and inspired both fear and wonder in their audiences. He talks to Dr Elly Truitt of Bryn Mawr College in the US about ancient and medieval robots, to Simon Shaffer, Professor of History of Science at Cambridge University and to Dr Andrew Nahum of the Science Museum about !8th century automata, and to Dr Ben Russell of the Science Museum about robots and workers in the 20th century. And Matthew Sweet provides the cultural context.

MON 21:30 Start the Week (b08dmk4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b08dmk52)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b08dmk54)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08dnkhb)
The Transition, Episode 6

Luke Kennard's debut novel is set a few years from now and is inspired by the housing crisis and a generation in serious debt.

Karl and his wife have signed up to a rehabilitation programme run by THE TRANSITION to avoid a jail sentence for his part in a credit card skimming scam. As the weeks pass, he is increasingly suspicious about the secretive organisation's true motives.

Reader: Bryan Dick

Writer: Luke Kennard

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b08crzr5)
Pet or Pest? The revealing words we use about animals

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright on the language we use to talk about animals - and the names we give our dogs. Do the words used show changing attitudes? They're joined by Professor Alison Sealey, linguist at Lancaster University and co-investigator on a new study: People, Products, Pests and Pets: The Discursive Representation of Animals.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

MON 23:30 Reimagining the City (b082sywy)
Series 3, Barcelona

Writer Colm Toibin offers us a different vision of Barcelona, a city he first fell in love with as a student. For him, it's a city which has dreamed itself into existence.

In 1975, Colm had just graduated from Trinity College, Dublin. He heard that there were jobs going in a language school in Barcelona, so travelled there, despite his lack of Spanish and knowing little other than it was a port city.

"I was really shocked when I saw the Gothic quarter first. I just thought the streets were extraordinarily beautiful. In those days there was no photography of them, there was no one around at night. I was just amazed by the city".

That sense of amazement has never left him.

He moved away after three years in the city, returning ten years later to write Homage to Barcelona. He now visits every year.

Colm walks us around from the old city through to the new. We hear the impact of the new Pakistani community which has taken over decrepit parts of the old town and turned them into new thriving areas of commerce. Ever the consummate storyteller, Colm weaves in stories of his own time in the city with a description of how the city views itself - built on the remains of a roman city, a city of two languages, a capital without a parliament.

"If you don't have a parliament, then other forms of utterance beside political speeches become dominant. One of those is music and music was immensely important here. For nations attempting to become a state their 'dream life' is often more important than their waking life".

Colm has draws the listener into understanding a city which has taken brave decisions with its architecture, history and narrative.

Produced by Rachel Hooper
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUESDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b08dmk85)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b08fll1l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08dmk8h)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08dmk8t)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08dmk97)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b08dmk9t)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08g02gt)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Reverend Marie-Elsa Bragg.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b08dmkbb)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03tj99h)
Wigeon

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the wigeon. Wigeon are dabbling ducks and related to mallards and teal but unlike these birds Wigeon spend much of their time out of the water grazing waterside pastures with their short blue-grey bills. The drakes are handsome-looking birds with chestnut heads and a cream forehead which contrasts well with their pale grey bodies.

John Aitchison recorded a flock of wigeon, for Tweet listeners, on a pool in Norfolk where they had found a safe place to roost on an island.

TUE 06:00 Today (b08g0310)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b08dnr3g)
Simon Wessely on unexplained medical syndromes

Professor Sir Simon Wessely has spent his whole career arguing that mental and physical health are inseparable and that the Cinderella status of mental health funding is a national disgrace.
His current role, as President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, has given him a platform to bang the drum for parity of funding, better training for doctors and the need to reduce stigma around mental health (and armchair psychiatrists who think it's OK to diagnose the new American President with a mental illness get short shrift as well).
Professor of Psychological Medicine at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, part of King's College in London, Simon Wessely has always been fascinated by those puzzling symptoms and syndromes which can't easily be explained. So it was perhaps inevitable that he would find himself at the centre of research trying to explain the distressing and debilitating illness, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
Threats and abuse finally led to him leave this particular research field, and he moved instead to military health and another complex illness which appeared after the first Gulf War in the early 90s, Gulf War Syndrome.
Years of detailed epidemiological studies about the health of British troops followed through the King's Centre for Military Health Research and many of the findings had a direct impact on policy within the armed forces.
Yet for somebody who has spent years as a psychiatrist treating patients with serious mental illness, Simon tells Jim Al-Khalili that people are tougher than many in authority give credit for and his research has had a major impact on the way we treat people after traumatic events. We used to think "better out than in" but studies showed after the London 7/7 Bombings for example, that jumping in and getting people to talk through the trauma straight away can actually do more harm than good.

TUE 09:30 One to One (b08dnr3j)
Nikesh Shukla talks to Deborah Jump

Novelist Nikesh Shukla started to learn to box after a racist incident on a train left him feeling vulnerable and needing to learn how protect himself. In the last of his three interviews exploring the sport - and getting personal advice - he speaks to criminologist Dr Deborah Jump. She left her desk at Manchester Metropolitan University to do an ethnographic study - immersing herself into the world of boxing to research it from the inside. She wanted to investigate whether boxing gyms help reduce offending among young people. Her research made her fitter but gave her some food for thought.

TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b08fll9y)
Age of Anger, Episode 2

In a ground-breaking new analysis, Pankaj Mishra traces the tangled roots of hatreds and nationalisms across the world.

Inspired by Hindu nationalists in his own country, the rise of the so-called Islamic State, the emergence of Donald Trump as a candidate for President, as well as Brexit, the author attempts to re-examine the divided modern world.

Mishra looks at historical events from the industrial revolution to the French revolution, from the writings of philosophers to the end of the Cold War. Indeed, at the end of the Cold War, there was a belief that the global capitalist economy would alleviate ethnic and religious differences to usher in prosperity and peace. This belief, he states, now lies in tatters, with no alternative in sight, and with economic power shifting from the West. Meanwhile, the IMF suggests that emerging economies will take much longer to catch up economically with the West than was previously believed.

Further, Mishra looks at nationalism, alienation, xenophobia, the 'lone wolf' and the pack behind him, domestic terrorism and the frustration and resentment both aimed at the West and from those in the West who are alienated.

He introduces us to the people at the heart of much of the action as we discover the causes and consequences of their beliefs and their actions.

Read by Pankaj Mishra
Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08dmkbg)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08dnr3p)
Modesty Blaise: The Silver Mistress, Episode 2

British Intelligence man, Sir Gerald Tarrant, is missing presumed dead in the Gorges du Tarn. Then Modesty finds an injured man on a ledge opposite the spot where Sir Gerald's car went over the cliff. Was he a witness to what happened? If only he could remember.

Meanwhile, Willie Garvin is puzzled by a case of blackmail that doesn't seem to add up.

Adapted from Peter O'Donnell's novel by Stef Penney.

With music by Will Gregory, arranged by Ian Gardiner and performed by the National Orchestra of Wales, conducted by Ben Foster.

Sound by David Thomas.
Directed by Kate McAll

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 11:00 The Rise of the Robots (b08dnr3r)
Series 1, 14/02/2017

Robots are becoming present in our lives, as companions and as helpers. Some are humanoid, others are like dustbins. Adam Rutherford explores our relationship with these machines. Have we made them to be merely more dextrous versions of us? Why do we want to make replicas of ourselves? Should we be worried that they could replace us at work? Is it a good idea that robots are becoming carers for the elderly and for children with autism? In this programme Adam Rutherford meets some of the latest robots and their designers and compares the current reality with fictional robots from films.

TUE 11:30 Jazzed Up: How Jazz Changed Britain (b08dnrq2)
A century after the first jazz recordings , how has jazz has been received in the UK? Kevin Le Gendre explores how the music spread into popular culture after the Original Dixieland Jazz Band first brought the sound of jazz to people's consciousness.

Episode 1:
Kevin explores how the music of jazz first made its way to the UK and hears how the idea of jazz began to spread into other areas of culture.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b08dmkbl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed (b08dnrq4)
Series 1, Could Brexit change our travel plans?

When the UK leaves the EU, will travel to and from Europe change? Will low-cost airlines find it more expensive to do business and pass on the costs to us? Will we have to factor in the cost of a visa and the hassle of getting one, just to cross the Channel? And even if we do, does it matter? Or are these things just a price worth paying for controlling our borders and blocking the free movement of people? To find out how things could go, Chris Morris takes his own journey - into the future.
Producers: Shabnam Grewal, Chris Bowlby
Editor: Hugh Levinson.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b08dmkbq)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b08dmkbs)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b08dmkbv)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08dnrq6)
Series 1, Sanctions: Carrot or Stick?

How effective are sanctions in contemporary diplomacy? Professor David Rothkopf investigates.

The recent nuclear agreements in Iran and the democratic opening in Burma were both brought about, at least in part, by using sanctions. And although sanctions have been a diplomatic tool since the 5th century BC, when Athens imposed trade blockades on her neighbours, they were rarely used in the 20th century.

Before the fall of the Berlin wall, there were only two UN sanctions - one imposed against Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in 1965, and another against South Africa in 1986. But after the end of the Cold War, the use of sanctions revived as a means of curbing human-rights violations, ousting belligerent leaders and limiting the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

Professor Rothkopf hears from Lady Cathy Ashton and former diplomat Robert Cooper, leading negotiators in Iran and Burma respectively, to discover what makes sanctions successful.

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b08dnkh2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Drama (b08dnrq8)
Hashtag Love

A live romantic comedy set behind the fictional scenes of The Archers. The drama will report and react to listeners' social media comments as it tells the story of an unravelling romance, with the audience steering the course of true love as it unfolds.

Starring Ruth Jones and Stephen Tompkinson and written by Peter Souter.

Sound Nigel Lewis
Director Alison Hindell

A BBC Cymru Wales production.

TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08dmgjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]

TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b08dnrqb)
Rig Retirement

As many of the oil and gas platforms in the North Sea come to the end of their useful life, they're due to be decommissioned - sealed off, cleaned up and taken apart. The cost of this has been estimated to around £50bn and much of this will be footed by the taxpayer due to the tax breaks offered. But are there alternative solutions which might benefit the environment more?

Tom Heap has exclusive access to an onshore decommissioning facility in Norway to which an oil platform has just been transported whole in a 'single lift'. He investigates the clean up process and asks how easily the sea floor can be returned to its natural state. He investigates if the alternatives are worth considering - could cleaning them up and leaving them in place actually form a sanctuary for marine and wildlife and allow the billions saved to be invested into environmental issues instead?

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.

TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b08dnrqd)
Intonation: The Music of Speaking

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright explore the tunes we sing when we are speaking - without even realising it. Sound artist John Wynne extracts the melodies to play in the studio and Sam Hellmuth explains what we use intonation for.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b08dnrqg)
Lionel Shriver and Mae Martin

Lionel Shriver, author of We Need to Talk About Kevin, and Mae Martin, stand-up comedian, talk with Harriett Gilbert about books they love. Lionel's is an American classic that's largely unknown in the UK: A Separate Peace by John Knowles, an intense story of adolescent friendship and betrayal. Mae's choice is a magical short story by HG Wells, The Door in The Wall, published in the same year as The Secret Garden and evoking some of the same feelings. And Harriett introduces them to The Gathering, by the Irish author Anne Enright.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

TUE 17:00 PM (b08dmkbx)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08dmkbz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 Mark Watson Talks a Bit About Life (b04l0x01)
Series 1, Success

A new series from multi-award winning comic Mark Watson where he attempts to answer the big questions and make sense of life, nimbly assisted by Tim Key and Tom Basden.

Mark and his two henchmen tackle academic and abstract topics. Themes will be examined from every angle, torn apart, laughed at and put back together again in an effort to understand ourselves and the world around us, and make it a slightly better place using stand-up, poetry, songs and dippy interactions.

This week Mark looks at "Success". Everyone wants to be successful, just as everyone wants to be loved, or have a big flashy car. But how do we actually measure success? Is it measured by how many things we have, how many swimming certificates are on our walls, whether or not we are Lionel Richie? Some people appear to be doing well in the world but are miserable. Other people don't have money, a good job or anything - but are happy. Is that, in fact, the true definition of success - to find contentment with whatever life brings you?

Mark, Tim and Tom draw on modern definitions of success, and decide which ones are worthwhile. They look at successful people and those who have made a dog's dinner of life, to draw what conclusions they can.

Mark Watson is a multi-award winning comedian - his awards include the inaugural If.Comedy Panel Prize 2006. He is assisted by Tim Key, winner of an Edinburgh Comedy Award in 2009, and Tom Basden who won the the If.Comedy Award for Best Newcomer in 2007.

Written and performed by Mark Watson, Tim Key and Tom Basden

Produced by Lianne Coop
An Impatient production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b08dnrqj)
Anisha has a difficult day at the office, and Miranda presents her case.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b08dmkc1)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08dnr3p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 The Pull of Putin (b08dnryy)
Why do populist politicians across the West want warmer relations with Russia? Are they just Kremlin agents? Or are they tapping into a growing desire to find common cause with Moscow - and end East-West tension? Tim Whewell travels from Russia to America and across Europe to unravel the many different strands of pro-Moscow thinking, and offer a provocative analysis which challenges conventional thinking about the relationship between Russia and the West.

Donald Trump is just one of a new breed of Western politicians who want warmer relations with Vladimir Putin. Most Western experts say that's dangerous: an aggressive Russia is plotting to divide and weaken the West. But Trump and others seem to have tapped into a popular desire to reduce tension and discover what Moscow and the West have in common. Could Moscow now lead a "Conservative International", promoting traditional social values and national sovereignty around the world? On the right, some see Russia as a spiritual beacon. Others, both on the right and left, simply think the threat from the East is much exaggerated - and are warming to Russia as a protest against the Western establishment. Maybe it's time for a new way of understanding relations between the old superpowers.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b08dmkc3)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b08dnrz0)
Inside the NHS: What needs to give?

Dr Mark Porter hosts a special debate on the current state of the NHS.

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b08dmkc7)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08dnrz2)
The Transition, Episode 7

Bryan Dick reads Luke Kennard's 'Generation Debt' inspired debut novel, set in an unnamed British city a few years from now.

As Genevieve becomes more and more engaged with The Transition's programme, Karl, by contrast, is increasingly suspicious about the secretive organisation's motives.

Reader: Bryan Dick

Writer: Luke Kennard

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b08dnkgy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]

TUE 23:30 Reimagining the City (b083j4rk)
Series 3, Preston

"We're five minutes from Preston High Street and it's almost silent," says artist and lecturer Lubaina Himid. "It's like a very big village - it was only made a city very recently."

Lubaina guides us round her adoptive city - from the "splendid" Harris Art Gallery which houses some of her own work, to the sweeping landscapes of the parks which run along the River Ribble, and on to her own studio space where so much of her creativity happens.

"The best thing about the city is that it gives you creative space - there's more time than there would be in a city like London. There are a lot of artists in Preston, all of us work hard making and thinking about art...I can't idle away three or four hours gossiping in an art centre because there isn't one!"

Lubaina's father was from Zanzibar and her mother was English. She left Zanzibar as a small child and grew up in London.

Alongside the sense of the city which she creates for us, we also learn about her own creative journey. Lubaina was part of the radical black art movement of the 1980s. Now she curates an archive of black and ethnic minority artists within the University of Central Lancashire.

"My mother was a textile designer, so the possibility of being an artist was always there. But I realised my blackness was an issue - in art college it was a real challenge. For me, teaching in art school is about making it better for the next generation."

There is gladness and regret for Lubaina about having lived in Preston for so long. Regret that she couldn't make living in London work, but gladness that there has been so much time and opportunity for her art to flourish in Preston.

Produced by Rachel Hooper
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


WEDNESDAY 15 FEBRUARY 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b08dmkfn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b08fll9y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08dmkfq)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08dmkfs)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08dmkfv)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b08dmkfz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08g5tgt)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Reverend Marie-Elsa Bragg.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b08dmkg1)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k2gq8)
Teal

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the teal. Teal are our smallest duck and the drakes are striking birds, heads burnished with chestnut surrounding a green mask fringed with yellow. They whistle softly in a piping chorus which sounds, from a distance, like the chime of tiny bells. That sound of the male's call is probably the origin of the bird's name, teal.

WED 06:00 Today (b08dnxy3)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Midweek (b08dmkg3)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b08fllyl)
Age of Anger, Episode 3

In a ground-breaking new analysis, Pankaj Mishra traces the tangled roots of hatreds and nationalisms across the world.

Inspired by Hindu nationalists in his own country, the rise of the so-called Islamic State, the emergence of Donald Trump as a candidate for President, as well as Brexit, the author attempts to re-examine the divided modern world.

Mishra looks at historical events from the industrial revolution to the French revolution, from the writings of philosophers to the end of the Cold War. Indeed, at the end of the Cold War, there was a belief that the global capitalist economy would alleviate ethnic and religious differences to usher in prosperity and peace. This belief, he states, now lies in tatters, with no alternative in sight, and with economic power shifting from the West. Meanwhile, the IMF suggests that emerging economies will take much longer to catch up economically with the West than was previously believed.

Further, Mishra looks at nationalism, alienation, xenophobia, the 'lone wolf' and the pack behind him, domestic terrorism and the frustration and resentment both aimed at the West and from those in the West who are alienated.

He introduces us to the people at the heart of much of the action as we discover the causes and consequences of their beliefs and their actions.

Read by Pankaj Mishra
Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08dmkg6)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b08dnsn8)
Modesty Blaise: The Silver Mistress, Episode 3

Sir Gerald Tarrant of British Intelligence is missing, presumed dead, after stopping to help some stranded nuns on the cliff road. Willie Garvin, meanwhile, is trying to get to the bottom of an unusual blackmail plot involving a bank in Hong Kong.

Then Fraser drops a bombshell about Tarrant's driver, and Quinn starts to get his memory back.

Adapted from Peter O'Donnell's novel by Stef Penney.

With music by Will Gregory, arranged by Ian Gardiner and performed by the National Orchestra of Wales, conducted by Ben Foster.

Sound by David Thomas.
Directed by Kate McAll

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b08dnwrc)
Victoria and David - Anger Is the Stickiest Emotion

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who feel it's time to burst their social media bubble. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 The Philosopher's Arms (b08dnkh6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Simon Evans Goes to Market (b043xqry)
Series 1, Grain

How do you make economics funny? How do you put the comedy in commodity? Simon Evans has the answer in this new series which asks us to get involved in investment.
Rather than being cowed by an apparently complicated and overwhelming system, Simon jumps right in. He takes as his focus four commodities which are so intrinsic to our lives they have an almost elemental significance - land, gold, oil and grain. Yet, despite the fact we encounter them everywhere we look, very few people have been able to build a fortune on them.
All that's about to change as, Simon enlists help from the experts. Each week he will be joined by Tim Harford, Merryn Somerset Webb and a guest specialist as they examine the chequered social and economic histories of these commodities. By looking at four such fundamental products, Simon brings us to a closer understanding of how global economic forces have a far-reaching and often surprising impact on our lives.
In this episode, Simon looks at commodities markets in grain. How moral is it to trade in food? how much of it is animal feed and what is the future of food?

Performed by ..... Simon Evans, with regular guests Tim Harford and Merryn Somerset-Webb, and to talk about grain markets, Kanes Rajah and Jim Rogers.
Written by ..... Simon Evans with Benjamin Partridge and Andy Wolton
Producer ..... Tilusha Ghelani.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b08dmkg8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed (b08dnwrf)
Series 1, Can Scotland do Brexit differently?

The Scottish government says it wants to stay closer to the EU than England after Brexit. What could this mean in practice? Chris Morris investigates - with the help of a glass of claret, a fishing excursion and a brain-stretching session of neuropolitics.

Producer: Chris Bowlby
Editor: Hugh Levinson
Reseacher: Dearbhail Starr.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b08dmkgb)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b08dmkgd)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b08dmkgg)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08dnwrh)
Series 1, Public Diplomacy: Talking to the World

Professor David Rothkopf explores how public diplomacy changed in aftermath of the September 11th attacks.

When the Twin Towers collapsed, so too did many of our assumptions about America herself. All that the West held as self-evident about the States - her position as the world's supreme power, her national security, her place as the seat of freedom and democracy - was thrown in doubt.

Professor Rothkopf looks at the resulting sea-change in diplomatic relations and methods. He hears from Tony Blair, soldier-turned-MP Rory Stewart and former US Under Secretary of State Charlotte Beers, among others, to gain a better understanding of where the practice of diplomacy went wrong in the run up to 9/11. He asks what lessons we need to learn from the methods of the past thirty years of diplomatic endeavour - and what new lessons we need to take on board for the future.

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b08dnrqj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Drama (b08dnwrk)
Love Me

by Sarah Cartwright

A comedy to give romance a bad name: Maggie loves Ed but he loves Katrina and she's sleeping with Stan. Wes attempts to sort it out and he doesn't believe in love - yet.

Directed by Sally Avens

This is Sarah Cartwright's third play for radio.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b08dnwrm)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.

WED 15:30 Inside Health (b08dnrz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b08dnwrp)
Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b08dmkgj)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b08dmkgs)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08dmkgv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 What Does the K Stand For? (b08dnwrr)
Series 3, Let's Talk About Sex

Travel back in time to the 1980's for this sitcom about comedian Stephen K Amos's teenage years growing up gay, funny and black in South London. This week Stephen plucks up the courage to reveal a secret.

Written by Jonathan Harvey with Stephen K Amos.
Starring Ellen Thomas, Laurie Kynaston, Stephen K Amos, Bola Okun, Emerald Crankson, Karen Bartke and David Sterne.
Produced by Paul Sheehan.
Production Coordinator Beverly Tagg.
A BBC Studios Production.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b08dnwrt)
Harrison hatches a plan, and Alistair faces a dilemma.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b08dmkgx)
John Adams

John Adams is one of the world's most critically acclaimed and popular composers whose music is performed frequently and globally. Over more than four decades he's covered a lot of musical ground, from experiments in recorded sound, and the harmony and rhythm of Minimalism to grand-scale symphonies and operas that tell big stories of global politics, science and terrorism. As he turns 70 he looks back at his musical life with John Wilson.
Producer: Rebecca Armstrong

Playlist:

Hallelujah Junction

Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture

Bozo the Clown's theme tune

Grand Pianola Music

On The Transmigration Of Souls

Steve Reich's Drumming

Philip Glass's Knee Play from Einstein on the Beach

Phrygian Gates

Beginning from Nixon in China

The People Are The Heroes Now from Nixon in China

Chorus of Exiled Palestinians from The Death of Klinghoffer

Chorus of Exiled Jews from The Death of Klinghoffer

Marilyn Klinghoffer: "You embraced them!" from The Death of Klinghoffer

Tale of the Wize Young Woman from Scherherazade 2.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08dnsn8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b08dnwrw)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Michael Portillo, Claire Fox, Giles Fraser and Matthew Taylor.

WED 20:45 Four Thought (b08dnwry)
A Good Book

Daniel Hahn, a judge for this year's Man Booker International Prize, asks what really makes a good book.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b08dnrqb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]

WED 21:30 Midweek (b08dmkg3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b08dmkgz)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b08dmkh1)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08dnws0)
The Transition, Episode 8

Bryan Dick reads Luke Kennard's 'Generation Debt' inspired debut novel, set in an unnamed British city a few years from now.

While Genevieve falls further under the influence of Transition mentors Stu and Janna; Karl is increasingly suspicious about the secretive organisation's true motives.

Reader: Bryan Dick

Writer: Luke Kennard

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

WED 23:00 Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme (b054tfhy)
Series 3, Space

This week Tim Key is broadcasting from a space simulator in St Albans, while grappling with the concept of space through the medium of his poetry. Musical accompaniment is provided by Tom Basden.

Written and presented by Tim Key
With Tom Basden and Yasmine Akram

Produced by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.

WED 23:15 The Celebrity Voicemail Show (b08dnws2)
Series 2, Episode 2

The Celebrity Voicemail Show is an entirely fictitious comedy show written, improvised and starring only Kayvan Novak in which he imagines what it might be like to hear the answerphone messages of the rich and famous.

This week we listened to Nigel Farage's voicemail as he flies off to America.

The producer was Matt Stronge.

A BBC Studios production.

WED 23:30 Reimagining the City (b0848bll)
Series 3, Reykjavik

The musician John Grant on Reykjavik, a city he fell in love with on tour. "In 2011 I was asked to come and play in Reykjavik...three months later I was living here...I go where I feel welcome and safe, and this is one of those places for me."

John Grant is an accomplished linguist - he speaks German, Spanish, French and Russian, amongst others. Icelandic, however, has been a real challenge.

"The combination of sounds, the phonetics of Icelandic, are beyond evil...I get giddy about synthesisers and language grammar."

But it soon becomes clear that John is now fluent. Talking with the owner of one of his favourite coffee shops, she reminds him that within two days of living there he could make himself understood.

John guides us around his adopted city, paying particular interest to book shops, architecture and interesting stair wells. It's a very different landscape from Michigan, where he grew up:

"The world was hostile and there was a lot of nastiness directed at me because people thought they could see I was gay...'Look at that faggot', that kind of thing". So I developed a fear of leaving my nest."

Reykjavik is the first city he has called home for a long long time.

Produced by Rachel Hooper
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


THURSDAY 16 FEBRUARY 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b08dmkk7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b08fllyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08dmkk9)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08dmkkc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08dmkkf)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b08dmkkh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08g96yl)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Reverend Marie-Elsa Bragg.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b08dmkkk)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k5bgq)
Gadwall

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the gadwall. Gadwall were rare ducks until a few decades ago, now though, gadwall are spreading fast in the UK. Gadwall can be sneaky thieves, exhibiting what scientists call klepto-parasitic tendencies. They often wait for birds such as coot and mute swans to bring up aquatic vegetation beyond their reach and seize it before their victims can eat it themselves.

THU 06:00 Today (b08g96yn)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 In Our Time (b08dr5qt)
Maths in the Early Islamic World

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the flourishing of maths in the early Islamic world, as thinkers from across the region developed ideas in places such as Baghdad's House of Wisdom. Among them were the Persians Omar Khayyam, who worked on equations, and Al-Khwarizmi, latinised as Algoritmi and pictured above, who is credited as one of the fathers of algebra, and the Jewish scholar Al-Samawal, who converted to Islam and worked on mathematical induction. As well as the new ideas, there were many advances drawing on Indian, Babylonian and Greek work and, thanks to the recording or reworking by mathematicians in the Islamic world, that broad range of earlier maths was passed on to western Europe for further study.

With

Colva Roney-Dougal

Peter Pormann

and

Jim Al-Khalili.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b08flm2j)
Age of Anger, Episode 4

In a ground-breaking new analysis, Pankaj Mishra traces the tangled roots of hatreds and nationalisms across the world.

Inspired by Hindu nationalists in his own country, the rise of the so-called Islamic State, the emergence of Donald Trump as a candidate for President, as well as Brexit, the author attempts to re-examine the divided modern world.

Mishra looks at historical events from the industrial revolution to the French revolution, from the writings of philosophers to the end of the Cold War. Indeed, at the end of the Cold War, there was a belief that the global capitalist economy would alleviate ethnic and religious differences to usher in prosperity and peace. This belief, he states, now lies in tatters, with no alternative in sight, and with economic power shifting from the West. Meanwhile, the IMF suggests that emerging economies will take much longer to catch up economically with the West than was previously believed.

Further, Mishra looks at nationalism, alienation, xenophobia, the 'lone wolf' and the pack behind him, domestic terrorism and the frustration and resentment both aimed at the West and from those in the West who are alienated.

He introduces us to the people at the heart of much of the action as we discover the causes and consequences of their beliefs and their actions.

Read by Pankaj Mishra
Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08dmkkm)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08dr5qz)
Modesty Blaise: The Silver Mistress, Episode 4

Sir Gerald Tarrant of British Intelligence has disappeared, presumed killed in a road accident after stopping to help two nuns who had broken down. Meanwhile Modesty and Willie have uncovered a blackmail scam - also involving a nun - and a Chateau in the Pyrenees, which can be accessed by a secret cave.

Could Tarrant have been kidnapped? They head for the Chateau to find out.

Adapted from Peter O'Donnell's novel by Stef Penney.

With music by Will Gregory, arranged by Ian Gardiner and performed by the National Orchestra of Wales, conducted by Ben Foster.

Sound by David Thomas.
Directed by Kate McAll

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b08dr5r2)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

THU 11:30 Two Poets (b08dr5r4)
The poetry of Australian Les Murray opens up a new world for Daniel Tammet, an autistic savant for whom words are filled with colour and numbers have become friends.

"Belonging is something that other people decide for you," says the internationally acclaimed author Daniel Tammet, who is on the highly functional end of the autism spectrum. "I wanted desperately to belong when I was growing up."

This feature is about the power of poetry. And about seeing the world differently from everyone around you. In Daniel's world, four is shy, six a little sad. Numbers and words come easy to him. And he never forgets - once, he recited 22154 digits of Pi from memory. On another occasion, he learned Icelandic in a week.

We meet Daniel in Paris where he lives as an author, poet and translator. We hear about his early life in suburban London, about getting lost in his own mind while walking to school, trying to learn social skills as he would later learn a language. Then, one day, he stumbles across a book by the Australian poet Les Murray.

It transforms his life.

Les Murray's poetry gives him a language he understands. He recognises himself completely in Murray's words and sets about translating his poems into French. As a consequence, there's suddenly the possibility of the two poets meeting up, in person in Paris, when Les Murray asks Daniel to translate a poem about autism.

Presented and produced by Martin Johnson
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b08dmkkp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed (b08dr5r8)
Series 1, 16/02/2017

As the UK prepares to begin leaving the EU, what are the key deals to be done? Chris Morris cuts through the jargon to discover how everyone's lives could change.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b08dmkkr)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b08dmkkt)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b08dmkkw)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08dr5rg)
Series 1, Talking to Terrorists

Can or should you negotiate with insurgent groups? Professor David Rothkopf investigates.

Terrorism is a growing problem for diplomacy. Since it emerged as a political means in the 1970s, there have been constant debates about whether it is appropriate or desirable to engage in negotiations with groups who use violence to further their political causes.

Professor Rothkopf hears from Tony Blair and his chief of staff, Jonathan Powell, about why they decided to open up the peace process in Northern Ireland, leading to the Good Friday agreements. Beyond the case of Northern Ireland, Jonathan Powell believes that one should always engage with one's political opponents. For Tony Blair, groups with religious and otherwordly aims can be more difficult to engage with successfully.

Professor Rothkopf also talks to psychologist and terrorism expert Anne Speckhard on the psychological profiles of terrorists, revealing that many suffer from PTSD and other traumas which are often overlooked. Could thinking of the perpetrators of violence through this lens make us more willing to negotiate with them?

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b08dnwrt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b039dbk0)
Red and Blue, Shadow

Tom Wilson runs an oil rig in the North Sea. It's a challenging job at the best of times. But today he's being put through his paces by wargame exercise writer Bradley Shoreham who has invented all manner of crises to push him and his crew to the limit and beyond.

Written by Philip Palmer
Directed by Toby Swift

Part of the 2013 series of Red and Blue, Philip Palmer's drama focusing on the work of Lieutenant Colonel Bradley Shoreham (Tim Woodward). After leaving the British Army, Shoreham became a Consultant Subject Matter Expert. He spends his working life creating war games for training purposes. Fictional they may be but the higher the level of authenticity, the greater their value to the participants. And when governments and major corporations are paying for training, they expect a high return for their money.

THU 15:00 Ramblings (b08dr5rj)
Series 35, The Doolough Famine Walk, County Mayo

Clare Balding travels to Ireland, County Mayo, to retrace the steps of those who walked from Louisburg to Delphi, in 1849 at the height of the potato famine, in the hope of receiving aid. Now known as The Doolough Tragedy Famine Walk, hundreds of people come from all over the world to walk the twelve miles each year in memory of those who died of starvation along the route. Clare talks to Joe Murray who organises the event which not only remembers those who died of hunger but also those, across the world, who now live in hunger and struggle with a shortage of food.
They're joined by Mary O'Malley whose forebears suffered during the Great Hunger, or An Gorta Mor, and by Prof John Maguire who puts the famine into historical context.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b08dmnrc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (b08dmrzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b08dr93v)
John Waters

Antonia Quirke talks trash with director John Waters.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b08dmkky)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b08dmkl0)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08dmkl2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 The Cold Swedish Winter (b06wj5wm)
Series 2, Episode 4

The second series of this sitcom from Danny Robins (co-creator Lenny Henry comedy Rudy's Rare Records), set and recorded in Sweden and starring Edinburgh Comedy Award-winner Adam Riches, Danny Robins and a cast of Sweden's most popular TV comedy actors.

Geoff has moved to Yxsjö in northern Sweden, to start a new life with his girlfriend Linda in the (frequently frosty) bosom of her family.

This year, new dad Geoff has plenty of fresh experiences to contend with, including three varieties of pickled cabbage, sinister Christmas elves and an unpleasant visit from Sweden's answer to the BNP. It's all worth it though for Linda (Sissela Benn, star of the Swedish version of The Office) and baby John.

While Geoff and Linda now have their own place, he still has to deal with her disapproving Dad, Sten (comedian Thomas Orredsson from Crimes of Passion), her alarmingly flirtatious mother Gunilla (comedian Anna- Lena Bergelin) and her apparently suicidal, arsonist brother, Anders (award-winning stand up Fredrik Andersson).

Geoff is determined to be more Swedish than the Swedes as he takes to his new country with renewed enthusiasm, and he has help, in the form of fellow expat, cynical Ian (Danny Robins), an unending source of (slightly misleading) information, and Soran (Farshad Kohlgi of The Killing), a Danish Kurd with Swedophobia.

Episode 4: It's Summer and Geoff, Linda and baby Jon are off on holiday - bliss. Geoff has seriously romantic plans too, as they head further north for bright summer nights, skinny dipping and wild strawberries. But their idyll is soon under threat from mosquitoes, fish and the rest of the family.

Writer: Danny Robins
Director: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b08dr93x)
Emotions run high at Bridge Farm, and Freddie has a lot on his mind.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b08dmkl4)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08dr5qz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b08dmkl6)
Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.

THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b08dr940)
Managing Workplace Relationships

Evan Davis presents the business magazine.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b08dmkky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 In Our Time (b08dr5qt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b08dmkl8)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b08dmklb)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08dr942)
The Transition, Episode 9

Luke Kennard's debut novel, read by Bryan Dick.

To avoid being jailed for his part in a credit card scam, Karl and Genevieve have signed up to a six-month 'rehabilitation' programme run by secretive organisation THE TRANSITION. One month in: Genevieve is completely assimilated, while Karl is close to full scale rebellion.

Reader: Bryan Dick

Writer: Luke Kennard

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

THU 23:00 Mark Steel - Who Do I Think I Am? (b08drbx2)
The star of the award winning Mark Steel's In Town brings his new, critically acclaimed stand-up show to Radio 4.

"I've always known I was adopted, even before I knew where babies who weren't adopted came from."

Who Do I Think I Am? is a surprising, moving and incredibly funny story about what Mark discovered in his half-hearted attempt to navigate the red tape required to track down his birth mother.

"It never really bothered me that I'd never met my mum. It never occurred to me I needed to meet her to 'find out who I was', as it didn't seem likely I'd discover I was someone different to who I thought I was. Could it turn out I was three stone lighter than I thought, or I spoke Italian or supported Arsenal or had a fear of Liquorice Allsorts? But after the birth of my own son, I realised it's quite an event to have a child, and she may well remember giving birth to me, and maybe even the adoption..."

This is a special performance of 'Mark Steel: Who do I Think I Am' - recorded at the BBC Radio Theatre

Written and performed by Mark Steel
Producer Carl Cooper
BBC Studios Production.


FRIDAY 17 FEBRUARY 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b08dmkn9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b08flm2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08dmknc)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08dmknf)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08dmknh)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b08dmknk)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08gcmn8)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day, with the Reverend Marie-Elsa Bragg.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b08dmknm)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k5bwv)
Shelduck

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the shelduck. Shelducks are birds of open mud and sand which they sift for water snails and other tiny creatures. They will breed inland and they nest in holes. Disused rabbit burrows are favourite places and they'll also settle down in tree cavities, sheds, out-buildings and even haystacks.

FRI 06:00 Today (b08g97fm)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b08dmr01)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b08flq4l)
Age of Anger, Episode 5

In a ground-breaking new analysis, Pankaj Mishra traces the tangled roots of hatreds and nationalisms across the world.

Inspired by Hindu nationalists in his own country, the rise of the so-called Islamic State, the emergence of Donald Trump as a candidate for President, as well as Brexit, the author attempts to re-examine the divided modern world.

Mishra looks at historical events from the industrial revolution to the French revolution, from the writings of philosophers to the end of the Cold War. Indeed, at the end of the Cold War, there was a belief that the global capitalist economy would alleviate ethnic and religious differences to usher in prosperity and peace. This belief, he states, now lies in tatters, with no alternative in sight, and with economic power shifting from the West. Meanwhile, the IMF suggests that emerging economies will take much longer to catch up economically with the West than was previously believed.

Further, Mishra looks at nationalism, alienation, xenophobia, the 'lone wolf' and the pack behind him, domestic terrorism and the frustration and resentment both aimed at the West and from those in the West who are alienated.

He introduces us to the people at the heart of much of the action as we discover the causes and consequences of their beliefs and their actions.

Read by Pankaj Mishra
Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08dmknp)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08drjds)
Modesty Blaise: The Silver Mistress, Episode 5

Sir Gerald Tarrant of British Intelligence has been imprisoned by kidnappers with a bizarre and deadly business plan, and subjected to slow torture in a Pyrenean Chateau by Martial Arts Master, Mr Sexton. Now Modesty and Willy have also been captured, along with Willie's girlfriend Lady Janet, and disgraced pilot, Quinn.

To save her friends Modesty must face Sexton in a fight to the death.

Adapted from Peter O'Donnell's novel by Stef Penney.

With music by Will Gregory, arranged by Ian Gardiner and performed by the National Orchestra of Wales, conducted by Ben Foster.

Sound by David Thomas.
Directed by Kate McAll

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 11:00 Objet Trouve (b08587nv)
To Whom It May Concern

Proinsias O'Coinn was a teenager on a rare shopping trip to Belfast when he stumbled across a vintage military shop.

Hidden among the old fatigues, army garb and war memorabilia, he found a jacket he just knew he had to have. It smelt old and musty but he didn't care. It seemed different, authentic, well-made, smart - the kind of jacket that someone would have worn with pride. So Proinsias bought it.

On the train on the way home, he put his hand into the pocket and found a letter -

"To whom it may concern. The uniform was given to David Griffiths from his uncle George Nelson who resides at N. Atlantic Ave Cocoa Beach, Florida.

Signed,

George Nelson"

At that moment Proinsias knew he needed to return the jacket to its rightful owner. But more than a decade later, nothing can prepare him for what he's about to discover.

Producer: Conor Garrett.

FRI 11:30 Secrets and Lattes (b041vvvp)
Series 1, Heart Failures

Episode 4. Heart Failures

It's the Edinburgh festival in episode 4 of Hilary Lyon's new BBC Radio 4 comedy narrative series, 'Secrets and Lattes' and it's drama and fireworks all round.

Business is booming in the Edinburgh cafe that erstwhile free spirit Trisha (played by Julie Graham) has recently opened with her sensible solvent older sister, Clare, (Hilary Lyon) but, sadly, things seem to be unravelling for everybody else on the personal front.

Trisha finds herself not only propping up her sister as she becomes increasingly distraught about her husband's behaviour, but she also ends up providing refuge for teenage waitress Lizzie ( Pearl Appleby) who, despite her buoyant facade, is definitely in need of some tlc.

Thankfully, temperamental opera-loving Polish chef, Krzyzstof (played by Simon Greenall) is back on top form again and it appears that, even for the broken-hearted, eating birthday cake and drinking fizz on the top of a hill can actually be good for you..........

Directed by: Marilyn Imrie

Producers: Moray Hunter and Gordon Kennedy
An Absolute production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b08dmknr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed (b08drjdv)
Series 1, 17/02/2017

As the UK prepares to begin leaving the EU, what are the key deals to be done? Chris Morris cuts through the jargon to discover how everyone's lives could change.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b08dmknv)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b08dmknx)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b08dmknz)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08drjdx)
Series 1, The Revolution Will Be Tweeted

Professor David Rothkopf explores how cyber diplomacy is leading to the emergence of a new diplomatic doctrine.

Digital diplomacy has become an indispensable communication tool for governments. Twitter is now used by heads of state and governments in 173 countries. More than half of the world's foreign ministries are now active on social media. Its use is now part and parcel of any diplomatic training for ambassadors and diplomats.

Professor Rothkopf examines the birth of this new cultural ecosystem, where every individual in planet is connected for the first time in a new frontier which is transforming the way our politics, economics, security and diplomacy are conducted. He speaks with Alec Ross, Hillary Clinton's Senior Advisor for Innovation when she was Secretary of State, and Jane Holl-Lute, Deputy Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security from 2009 to 2013.

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b08dr93x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Drama (b08drk4n)
Romance Is Dead

By Ben Lewis.

Lauren and Jamie would probably make a great couple. If only he wasn't dead...

A charmingly quirky comedy drama about an unwilling young psychic.

Starring Alexandra Roach and Kieran Hodgson.

Directed by Kirsty Williams.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08drk4q)
Faversham

The panel of horticultural experts is in Faversham, Kent to answer questions from an audience of local gardeners.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 What He Said (b08drk4s)
As the misanthropic Marcus - he prefers 'principled outsider' - awaits the rest of his quiz team in the local pub he is approached by an unwelcome and inquisitive stranger. What does this man want from him and why does he persist in asking Marcus about subjects he'd really rather not discuss?
A specially commissioned story from acclaimed dramatist Doug Lucie whose recent Radio 4 credits include 'Stage Left, 'The Milky Way', 'Hitched' and 'Ditched'.

Reader ..... Tim McInnerny
Writer .....Doug Lucie
Producer ..... Heather Larmour.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b08drk4v)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 Feedback (b08drk4x)
Radio 4's forum for audience comment.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b08drk50)
Shirley Ann and Karlis - Paint It Blue

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a couple who took part in Spencer Tunick's 'Sea of Hull' installation remembering how exciting it was, and how cold... Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b08dmkp2)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08dmkp4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b08drk52)
Series 92, Episode 7

This week Miles presides over a panel of news hounds who include Jeremy Hardy and Simon Evans.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b08dmkp6)
Jazzer dishes out some tough love, and Lilian sails close to the wind.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b08dmkpb)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08drjds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b08drkjd)
Douglas Carswell MP, Christine Tacon

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Louth Town Hall in Lincolnshire with a panel including the UKIP MP Douglas Carswell and the Groceries Code Ajudicator Christine Tacon.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b08drkjh)
The Follies of Experts

John Gray assesses why experts failed to predict recent seismic events.

He says they operated under the long-held but mistaken belief that history unfolds according to predictable patterns.

"Human events have no overall direction", he writes, "and history obeys no laws".

He discusses how we can prepare ourselves for the "unknowable future".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

FRI 21:00 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08drkjk)
Series 1, Omnibus - Part 2

Professor David Rothkopf speaks to decision makers from Tony Blair to Malcolm Rifkind , and from Zbigniew Brzezinski to General Wes Clark, to chart the rapid and radical transformation of modern diplomacy.

By focussing on seminal events or turning points, Professor Rothkopf discusses how diplomacy has evolved and - in some cases - lastingly changed.

The Cuban Missile crisis, for example, is a familiar story of brinkmanship but we discover how subsequent accounts of that event were manipulated to create a narrative about strong coercive leadership - one which was not only at odds with the facts but which sent out the wrong messages about the conduct of diplomacy. We also hear how dancing with the back of a chair honed the diplomatic skills of one of the 19th century's most prominent foreign ministers, and how hot drinks by a log fire in Norway broke the stalemate in middle east negotiations. A former spy reveals how espionage and diplomacy can be frequent if uncomfortable bedfellows. And finally, we discover how so called twittocracy is replacing conventional etiquette and laying foundations for the invention of a new diplomacy.

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b08dmkpd)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b08dmkpg)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08drky3)
The Transition, Episode 10

Moving conclusion of Luke Kennard's debut novel, read by Bryan Dick.

Although he's been banished to the basement and relegated to The Transition's 'B stream' programme, Karl's only concern is for Genevieve: her increasingly erratic behaviour, which he knows from long experience, is a precursor to a serious breakdown. Janna and Stu refuse to listen to his concerns, however, and soon his fears are proved correct.

Reader: Bryan Dick

Writer: Luke Kennard

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b08dnrqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:27 Dying for a Song (b08flr11)
Rex Bloomstein meets musicians from around the world who are being persecuted for raising their voices against political, cultural or religious repression. He talks to artists whose songs have led to their imprisonment, torture and to the continuing threat of violence, artists who have been driven from their homelands, and artists who, literally, risk dying for a song.

In one recent year alone, 30 musicians were killed, 7 abducted and 18 jailed by regimes, political and religious factions and other groups determined to curb the power of music to rally opposition to them. In Syria, singer Ibrahim Quashoush was found dead in the Orontes River, his vocal chords symbolically ripped out.

Rex hears stories of tremendous courage and determination not to be intimidated and silenced.

Egyptian singer Ramy Essam tells of how he was brutally tortured after his songs rallied the crowds in Tahir Square during the Arab Spring. Two weeks later, after recovering from his injuries, he was back performing his songs aimed at bringing down the regime of Hosni Mubarak. Iranian singer Shahin Najafi continues to perform around the world despite a fatwa calling for his death, after his songs upset the religious leaders in his home country. He says, "At night I turn to the wall and slowly close my eyes and wait for someone to slit my throat."

Amid tales of musical repression in Sudan, Tunisia, Burkina Fasso and Lebanon, come stories, more surprisingly, from Norway. Deeyah Kahn reveals how she was forced to flee the country in the face of violent threats aimed at stopping her singing and Sara Marielle Gaup talks of her struggle against repression of the music of the indigenous Sami people in the north of the country - labelled "the devil's music".

Producer: Brian King
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b08drky5)
Bill and Claire - Running for Life

Fi Glover with a conversation revealing how, after her runner husband's heart attack, Claire decided to take up running and she and Bill have now done the Great North Run together. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b08dn2gl)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b08dn2gl)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b08dnr3p)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b08dnr3p)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b08dnsn8)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b08dnsn8)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b08dr5qz)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b08dr5qz)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b08drjds)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b08drjds)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b08dnrqg)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b08dnrqg)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b08cvmhf)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b08drkjh)

Afternoon Drama 14:15 THU (b039dbk0)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b08crt6m)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b08dnkh8)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b08cqr0z)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b08cvmhc)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b08drkjd)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b08dmgk0)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b08dmkky)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b08dmkky)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b08dmnr7)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b08dmnr7)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b08dnkhb)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b08dnrz2)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b08dnws0)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b08dr942)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b08drky3)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b08ctykd)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b08fll1l)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b08fll1l)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b08fll9y)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b08fll9y)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b08fllyl)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b08fllyl)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b08flm2j)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b08flm2j)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b08flq4l)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b08crt67)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b08dnkgt)

Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed 12:04 MON (b08dn2gs)

Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed 12:04 TUE (b08dnrq4)

Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed 12:04 WED (b08dnwrf)

Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed 12:04 THU (b08dr5r8)

Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed 12:04 FRI (b08drjdv)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b08dmjzw)

Chain Reaction 11:30 MON (b08dn2gq)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b08dnrqb)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b08dnrqb)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b08dmr01)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b08dmr01)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b08dmgjw)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b08cr6wm)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b08dmrzv)

Drama 14:15 MON (b08dnhjx)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b08dnrq8)

Drama 14:15 WED (b08dnwrk)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b08drk4n)

Dying for a Song 23:27 FRI (b08flr11)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b08cqr03)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b08dmk49)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b08dmkbb)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b08dmkg1)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b08dmkkk)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b08dmknm)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b08cvmh0)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b08drk4x)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b08crzrc)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b08dmr07)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b08dmr07)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b08dnwry)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 13:45 MON (b08dnh1r)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 13:45 TUE (b08dnrq6)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 13:45 WED (b08dnwrh)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 13:45 THU (b08dr5rg)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 13:45 FRI (b08drjdx)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 21:00 FRI (b08drkjk)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b08cqr0n)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b08dr5r2)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b08dmk50)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b08dmkc1)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b08dmkgx)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b08dmkl4)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b08dmkpb)

Fry's English Delight 13:30 SUN (b08dmr0d)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b08cv1g5)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b08drk4q)

Guilt Trip 19:15 SUN (b07m7833)

I Was... 16:00 MON (b08dnkgw)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b08dr5qt)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b08dr5qt)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b08dmkc3)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b08dnrz0)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b08dnrz0)

Jazzed Up: How Jazz Changed Britain 11:30 TUE (b08dnrq2)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b08cvj8t)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b08drk4v)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b08cqr1h)

Losing Margaret 15:30 SAT (b08crw13)

Mark Steel - Who Do I Think I Am? 23:00 THU (b08drbx2)

Mark Watson Talks a Bit About Life 18:30 TUE (b04l0x01)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b08cqqzk)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b08dmjyv)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b08dmk3z)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b08dmk85)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b08dmkfn)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b08dmkk7)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b08dmkn9)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b08dmkg3)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b08dmkg3)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b08dmgjt)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b08dmgjt)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b08dnwrm)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b08csqyg)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b08dnwrw)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b08cqqzt)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b08dmjz3)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b08dmk47)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b08dmk9t)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b08dmkfz)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b08dmkkh)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b08dmknk)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b08dmjz8)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b08cqr0r)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b08dmk03)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b08dmk4m)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b08dmkbl)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b08dmkg8)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b08dmkkp)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b08dmknr)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b08cqqzw)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b08dmjzg)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b08dmjzq)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b08cqr1n)

News 13:00 SAT (b08cqr0x)

Objet Trouve 11:00 FRI (b08587nv)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b08dmnr9)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b08dnr3j)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b08dmrzx)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b08dmrzx)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b08csw1c)

PM 17:00 SAT (b08cqr14)

PM 17:00 MON (b08dmk4w)

PM 17:00 TUE (b08dmkbx)

PM 17:00 WED (b08dmkgs)

PM 17:00 THU (b08dmkl0)

PM 17:00 FRI (b08dmkp2)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b08dmk0l)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b08cr6wv)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b08dmrzz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b08cvn18)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b08fsstl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b08g02gt)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b08g5tgt)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b08g96yl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b08gcmn8)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b08dmgjy)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b08dmgjy)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b08dmgjy)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b08dmnrc)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b08dmnrc)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b08dmnrc)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b08dr5rj)

Reimagining the City 23:30 MON (b082sywy)

Reimagining the City 23:30 TUE (b083j4rk)

Reimagining the City 23:30 WED (b0848bll)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b08cqr0b)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b08cqr1k)

Secrets and Lattes 11:30 FRI (b041vvvp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b08cqqzp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b08dmjyz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b08dmk43)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b08dmk8t)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b08dmkfs)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b08dmkkc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b08dmknf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b08cqqzm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b08cqqzr)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b08cqr18)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b08dmjyx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b08dmjz1)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b08dmk0d)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b08dmk41)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b08dmk45)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b08dmk8h)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b08dmk97)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b08dmkfq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b08dmkfv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b08dmkk9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b08dmkkf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b08dmknc)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b08dmknh)

Short Rides in Fast Machines 00:30 SUN (b04sy3qy)

Simon Evans Goes to Market 11:30 WED (b043xqry)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b08cqr1d)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b08dmk0j)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b08dmk4y)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b08dmkbz)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b08dmkgv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b08dmkl2)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b08dmkp4)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b08dmjzb)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b08dmjzb)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b08dmk4h)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b08dmk4h)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b08dmnrf)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b08dmjzj)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b08dmjzy)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b08dmv0t)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b08dmv0t)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b08dnkh2)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b08dnkh2)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b08dnrqj)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b08dnrqj)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b08dnwrt)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b08dnwrt)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b08dr93x)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b08dr93x)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b08dmkp6)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b08csxwr)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b08dr940)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b08dmkl6)

The Celebrity Voicemail Show 23:15 WED (b08dnws2)

The Cold Swedish Winter 18:30 THU (b06wj5wm)

The English Fix 11:00 MON (b08dn2gn)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b08csxwc)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b08dr93v)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b08dnkgy)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b08dnkgy)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b08dmgjr)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b08dmgjr)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b08dnr3g)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b08dmrzs)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b08dnwrc)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b08drk50)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b08drky5)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b08dmkgj)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:04 SUN (b08crt6f)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b08dnkh0)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b08cvmh8)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b08drk52)

The Philosopher's Arms 20:00 MON (b08dnkh6)

The Philosopher's Arms 11:00 WED (b08dnkh6)

The Poet and the Echo 19:45 SUN (b08dmv0w)

The Pull of Putin 20:00 TUE (b08dnryy)

The Rise of the Robots 21:00 MON (b08crvz3)

The Rise of the Robots 11:00 TUE (b08dnr3r)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b08dmk08)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b08dmk54)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b08dmkc7)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b08dmkh1)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b08dmklb)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b08dmkpg)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b08csqy8)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b08dnwrp)

Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme 23:00 WED (b054tfhy)

Today 07:00 SAT (b08fsdqt)

Today 06:00 MON (b08dmk4f)

Today 06:00 TUE (b08g0310)

Today 06:00 WED (b08dnxy3)

Today 06:00 THU (b08g96yn)

Today 06:00 FRI (b08g97fm)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b038qk4j)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03szrzm)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03tj99h)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03k2gq8)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03k5bgq)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03k5bwv)

Two Poets 11:30 THU (b08dr5r4)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b08cqqzy)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b08cqr08)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b08cqr0t)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b08cqr1b)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b08dmjzd)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b08dmjzl)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b08dmk05)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b08dmk0g)

Weather 05:56 MON (b08dmk4c)

Weather 12:57 MON (b08dmk4r)

Weather 21:58 MON (b08dmk52)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b08dmkbs)

Weather 12:57 WED (b08dmkgd)

Weather 21:58 WED (b08dmkgz)

Weather 12:57 THU (b08dmkkt)

Weather 21:58 THU (b08dmkl8)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b08dmknx)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b08dmkpd)

Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b08dwyxs)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b08dmk0r)

What Does the K Stand For? 18:30 WED (b08dnwrr)

What He Said 15:45 FRI (b08drk4s)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b08cqr11)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b08dmk4k)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b08dmkbg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b08dmkg6)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b08dmkkm)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b08dmknp)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b08crzr5)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b08dnrqd)

World at One 13:00 MON (b08dmk4t)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b08dmkbv)

World at One 13:00 WED (b08dmkgg)

World at One 13:00 THU (b08dmkkw)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b08dmknz)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b08dmk4p)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b08dmkbq)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b08dmkgb)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b08dmkkr)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b08dmknv)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b08cvn1d)