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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 04 FEBRUARY 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b08bypk5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b08cv2qt)
Man of Iron: Thomas Telford and the Building of Britain, Episode 5

Julian Glover's biography of Thomas Telford: a shepherd's son, born in the Scottish Borders in 1757, who revolutionised British engineering and set the stage for the Industrial Revolution.

Telford built churches, harbours, canals, docks and the famously vertiginous Pontcysyllte aqueduct in Wales. He invented the modern road and created the backbone of Britain's road network. His bridges are some of the most dramatic and beautiful ever built, most of all the Menai Bridge, which spans the dangerous channel between the mainland and Anglesey.

With his death in September 1834, just as the railway age was dawning, Telford had little idea of how lasting his legacy would be: he shaped the lives of the Victorian civil engineers who followed him and almost everything he built is still in use today.

Reader: Robin Laing

Writer: Julian Glover

Abridger: David Jackson Young

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08bypk7)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08bypk9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08bypkc)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b08bypkf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08c354f)
Spiritual reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Richard Frazer of Greyfriars Kirk, Edinburgh.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b08c354h)
Why I took legal action against my daughter

The programme that starts with its listeners.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b08bypkh)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b08bypkk)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Open Country (b08c2ljs)
The Mildenhall Treasure

In January 1942, Gordon Butcher was ploughing a field in the village of West Row, near Mildenhall in Suffolk. His plough hit something solid, and on further investigation discovered a circular piece of metal. Sensing he'd found something significant he went and found his boss Sydney Ford, and for the rest of the afternoon he and Ford pulled piece after piece from the ground. What they found was in fact a Silver thirty-two piece set of Roman tableware, and it remains the greatest find of its kind in the UK. 'The Mildenhall Treasure' as it became known went on display in the British Museum, and the story of this extraordinary find was captured by Roald Dahl in a short story of the same name.

Helen Mark visits the find site to find out about a new joint-project between the British Museum and Suffolk County Council which aims to identify exactly where the treasure was buried and why, and to better understand the archaeological context of this find. Richard Hobbs from the British Museum tells the story of the Treasure, and Faye Minter and the detectorists talk about their work on the find site and how they've grown up with stories about it. She visits Mildenhall Museum in which a replica of the find is housed and finds out what this incredible Treasure still means to Ford's Grandson Sydney Holder.

Producer: Toby Field.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b08bypkm)
Sheep Industry

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b08bypkr)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b08cq78q)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b08bypkt)
Amanda Redman

Amanda Redman, best known for her role as DSI Sandra Pullman in BBC1's New Tricks, joins Rev Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir to discuss filming in Sri Lanka for a new TV medical drama, her early years in hospital following a scalding accident and why she set up The Artists' Theatre School.

Andrew Martin has had a passion for night trains since childhood. He talks about his recent experiences recreating journeys across Europe.

JP meets up with Saturday Live listeners who are related to cast members from Brief Encounter, to reunite them with Cyril Raymond's diaries.

Dave Morris shares his passion for Shepherds' Huts and describes how he restored one that was featured in Far From the Madding Crowd.

The gardener and designer, Joe Swift, explains how he came gardening via a post punk band and a spell on a kibbutz, what it takes to win gold at the Chelsea Flower Show and the healing power of horticulture.

Bill Turnbull chooses his Inheritance Tracks: 'Three Little Maids' from the Mikado by Gilbert and Sullivan and 'Che Gelida Manina' sung by Vittorio Grigolo, from Puccini's La Boheme.

The Good Karma Hospital is on ITV on Sunday night at 9pm.
Night Trains - The Rise and Fall of The Sleeper by Andrew Martin is published on 9th February.
Shepherd's Huts and Living Vans, by Dave Morris, is published by Amberley Publishing.
Joe Swift is on A Man About a Garden Tour 2017.
The album 'Bill Turnbull's Relaxing Classics' is out now.

SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08cq78s)
Series 15, Cirencester

Jay Rayner is in Cirencester with this week's panellists - Zoe Laughlin, Andi Oliver, Rachel McCormack and Tim Anderson.

Produced by Miranda Hinkley
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b08cq78w)
Helen Lewis of The New Statesman looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
What happens now that MPs have voted to go ahead with article 50 and trigger the UK's exit form the EU? Should an invitation to the new US president to visit the UK have been issued so soon? and Kenneth Clarke talks of his 40 plus years of engagement with the European question.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b08bypkw)
Bad Hombres

Bridget Kendall introduces correspondents' stories. Jon Sopel asks if we have got it all wrong about Donald Trump. He's not just a deal maker, he has ideologues standing right behind him. Will Grant, in Mexico City, muses on how President Trump wants to build a wall on the Mexican border and yet a distinctly unsavoury Mexican has been sent back across that border, to the US. North East Nigeria is still in the grip of violence as the military continues its operations against Boko Haram. But Katerina Vittozzi visits a zoo where life is more peaceful and where young lovers can meet - but don't touch. Lucy Daltroff is in Japan, where modern life and screens are getting in the way of getting together, so babies are not being born. And Huw Cordey struggles to find sleep in West Papua because of a pesky insect; and matters soon turn sinister.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b08bypky)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b08cq78y)
Thousands face current accounts shut down

Norwich & Peterborough current accounts to be shut down, workplace pension concerns and Npower announces the biggest energy price rise in years.

SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b08c33j5)
Series 92, Episode 5

Susan Calman, Andy Hamilton, Katy Brand and Lloyd Langford are amongst Miles' esteemed guests for this week's round of news-wrangling.

Theresa May won a vote, Donald Trump won a vote and François Fillon might have to drop out of a vote. Orangutans can't vote but still feature in the programme.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b08bypl0)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b08bypl2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b08c34q1)
Stephen Crabb MP, Nia Griffith MP, Sir Emyr Jones Parry, Leanne Wood AM

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from The Magic Lantern Cinema in Tywyn, Wales, with a panel including the former cabinet minister Stephen Crabb MP, Shadow Defence Secretary Nia Griffith MP, Sir Emyr Jones Parry who is Chancellor of University of Aberystwyth and a former diplomat and the leader of Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood AM.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b08bypl4)
Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

SAT 14:30 Drama (b08cq790)
Inspector Chen Novels, Red Mandarin Dress

The fifth in Qiu Xiaolong's series of crime novels following the career of academic turned Special Case Squad detective, Inspector Chen. A serial killer is loose on the streets of Shanghai but Chen is otherwise engaged on a high-level corruption case. With bodies appearing at the rate of one a week, Homicide are in desperate need of help. Dramatised by Joy Wilkinson.

Dramatised by Joy Wilkinson
Directed by Toby Swift.

SAT 15:30 Tunes from the Trash (b088fch9)
Just outside the Paraguayan capital city of Asuncion lies the town of Cateura. It's an impoverished settlement ranged along the banks of a stinking, polluted river, in the shadow of a giant landfill site. Many of its inhabitants scratch a living by reclaiming objects from the endless ocean of garbage to sell. Recycling of a kind. But for the last ten years the residents of Cateura have been part of a recycling project of a much sweeter sort.

La Orquesta de Instrumentos Reciclados de Cateura -- the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura -- use materials from the landfill site to create musical instruments. An oil drum for a cello, a pipe for a flute, a tin can for a guitar. They've toured the world and recorded with the likes of Metallica.

As the Orchestra leader Favio Chávez says, "The world sends us garbage. We send back music."

The BBC's South America Correspondent Wyre Davies visits Cateura, meets Favio Chávez and other members of the Recycled Orchestra and learns how trash, and lives, are being transformed by music.

Readings by:
John Norton
James Murphy-Johns
Lila Smith
Yahlini Smith

Producer: Martin Williams

For more information about the Recycled Orchestra: http://www.recycledorchestracateura.com/

The Recycled Orchestra have been the subject of a recent documentary film: http://www.landfillharmonicmovie.com/

And an illustrated children's book: http://www.simonandschuster.co.uk/books/Adas-Violin/Susan-Hood/9781481430951.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b08bypl7)
Harriet Harman, the mother of four daughters Clemmie Hooper, and talking to yourself worrying or beneficial?

The Labour MP Harriet Harman talks about her political and personal battles for equality fought over three decades at Westminster.

Widowed Parent's Allowance, the safety net that parents get thanks to the National Insurance Contributions their husband or wife made before they died is being replaced by a new Bereavement Support Payment from 6 April 2017. What impact will these changes have? Alison Penny from the Childhood Bereavement Network and Georgia Elms who is the chair of WAY Widowed and Young discuss.

Are expectant mothers really going to be called 'pregnant people' in the future? Advice in an internal BMA booklet discusses language from a transgender point of view. But is this the right way to go? We hear from Stephanie Davies-Arai from the website Transgender Trend and from Freddy McConnell who has transitioned from female to male but would like to carry his own baby in the future.

We hear from two five year old's Jude and Eva - does their gender influence their lives at this young age?

Carol Bates, Pauline Maddocks and Sandra Rees tell us what it's like to be a member of the Crawley Old Girls football team, the first of its kind for older women.

Nikki Haley is the new US ambassador to the UN Dr Heidi Tworek Assistant Professor of International History at the University of British Columbia tells us more about her.

The midwife and mother of four daughters Clemmie Hooper offers some practical advice about pregnancy and birth.

Why do so many of us talk to ourselves? Is this worrying or could it be beneficial? Molly Andrews, the Co-director of the Centre for Narrative Research, and the author of Narrative Imagination and Everyday Life, discusses.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.

SAT 17:00 PM (b08bypl9)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b08c2mlk)
Care Homes

The care home business is heading for a crisis according to Evan Davis's guests in this edition of The Bottom Line.

The cost of providing care in this labour-intensive business has increased significantly because of the introduction of the National Living Wage. The fees paid by local authorities on behalf of poorer residents no longer cover the cost of providing accommodation, food and staffing. Care homes make up the shortfall by charging higher fees to privately funded residents. Social care analyst William Laing tells Evan Davis that private payers subsidise publicly funded residents by, on average, £8000 per annum. But this is not an option in less affluent areas with a shortage of fee paying clients.

John Ransford of the HC-One group provides care for mainly publicly funded residents. He tells Evan that 24 hour care for the elderly has to be provided for less than the cost of a night in a Travelodge.

Evan's guests believe that the care sector's business model is unsustainable. Find out what they think will happen next.

Guests:

Dr. Jane Townson. Chief Executive Officer, Somerset Care Group

John Ransford, Non-Executive Director, HC-One

William Laing, Founder and a Director of Laing Buisson, Healthcare Intelligence Company

Producer: Julie Ball.

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08byplc)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b08byplf)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08byplh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b08bypll)
Rufus Hound, Kerry Howard, Frank Gardner, Josette Bushell-Mingo, Timothy B. Schmit, Big Thief, Sara Cox, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Sara Cox are joined by Rufus Hound, Kerry Howard, Frank Gardner and Josette Bushell-Mingo for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Timothy B. Schmit and Big Thief.

Producer: Sukey Firth.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b08cq793)
Neil Gorsuch

Series of profiles of people who are currently making headlines.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b08bypln)
Sex With Strangers, Toni Erdmann, John Burnside, Keith Tyson, The Moorside

Sex With Strangers is Laura Eason's 2009 play about a brash blogger (whose blog shares the title of the play) meeting a shy novelist the Hampstead Theatre

Toni Erdmann is a German comedy film which has been nominated for the Best Foreign Language Oscar. is it wunderbar or nicht so gut?

John Burnside has a new novel out: Ashland and Vine about friendship, history and memories

Turner Prize-winning Keith Tyson's latest exhibition Turn Back Now at the Jerwood Gallery in Hastings shows more than 350 of his studio wall drawings where the work itself is the process.

Sheridan Smith stars in The Moorside, a BBC TV drama about the kidnapping of Shannon Matthews

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Stig Abel, Dea Birkett, and Linda Grant. The producer is Oliver Jones.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b08cq9fk)
Ovid in Changing Times

In the 2000 years since Ovid's final metamorphoses back into base matter, his masterpiece has inspired writers, composers, artists, doctors, scientists and all those who want change to pursue the idea of transformation both physical and metaphorical. In this Archive on Four, Tom Holland explores Ovid's pagan hymn to transformation and traces its echoes through our cultural and natural world.

Producer Mark Rickards.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b08bz3hw)
Aurora Leigh

Aurora Leigh

Aurora Leigh is a talented young poet. Determined not to conform to society's expectations and instead pursue literary ambitions, she shuns marriage in order to navigate her own path in life. Dramatised from Elizabeth Barrett Browning's epic poem by Michael Symmons Roberts.

Directed by Charlotte Riches.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b08byplq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b08c0rr7)
Morality of international trade

If you want to watch the reality of modern politics being played out in real time, you could do worse than visit the Parliament petitions website. The petition to prevent Donald Trump from making a State Visit to the UK has now got well over a million signatures. Rather like the spinning figures on a petrol pump, you can see the total rising by the hundreds every minute as people register their moral outrage at the President's executive order banning travel to the US from certain Muslim majority countries. What price should we, as a nation, be willing to pay to make it clear to a foreign nation that their policies are unacceptable? Publicly humiliating Donald Trump by withdrawing, or downgrading, his state visit would certainly send him a message and might win us the equivalent of a diplomatic round of applause around the world, but what impact would that have on our ability to negotiate a favourable trade deal with the US? Would that be a price worth paying? If you draw the line at Donald Trump, how do you feel about the UK signing a £100m arms deal with Turkey - a country that, according to some human rights groups, jails more journalists than any other? These are questions we'll increasingly have to answer in a post-Brexit world where we need to sign deals to replace the trade that might be lost on leaving the EU. People talk euphemistically of "holding their noses" and "supping with a long spoon" in the national interest, but how far should you morally compromise to keep the bottom line in the black? Producer: Phil Pegum.

SAT 23:00 Brain of Britain (b08bz7yb)
Heat 2, 2017

(2/17)
Russell Davies asks the questions in the longest-running general knowledge contest of them all, as four more competitors gather at the BBC's Maida Vale studios for the second heat of 2017. Literature, history, physics, geography, sport, popular music and current affairs all crop up within the first few minutes. In Brain of Britain you never know how the questions will fall, and a few educated guesses can make all the difference. Today's winner will automatically go through to the semi-finals in the spring.

As always, a listener also stands to win a prize by suggesting an ingenious pair of questions with which to try and 'Beat the Brains'.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b08bz3j0)
Poems for Dark Days

Roger McGough presents a selection of poems for dark days: poems to get you through the saggy bit of the year between Christmas and spring, to sustain us during the dark days of late winter, and to bring comfort and cheer (whether our dark days be actual, personal or political). Listener requests for poems by Raymond Carver, Kathleen Jamie, WH Auden, Emily Dickinson and many more are read by Siobhan Redmond and Peter Marinker.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.


SUNDAY 05 FEBRUARY 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b08cqq6l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Short Rides in Fast Machines (b04pvp7z)
The Fall of Paris

A multi-contributor series of specially-commissioned radio stories about speed.

Every generation observes that life is getting faster - the pace of change, of action, or communication. Our cars, trains, boats and planes are faster than ever. And as every world-record on the athletic track confirms, we're still getting faster ourselves. The title is inspired by the minimalist composition by John Adams ('Short Ride In A Fast Machine').

Episode 2:
"The Fall Of Paris" by Toby Litt
A video-clip goes viral online with unforeseen and different consequences for the film-maker and his subject.

Toby Litt was born in 1968 and grew up in Bedfordshire. In 2003, he was named one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. His stories 'The Melancholy' (2010), 'People Carry Roses' (2011) and 'The Sandy' (2012) featured in previous Sweet Talk series for BBC Radio 4. His latest collection of short stories 'Life-Like' will be published in November 2014.

Reader: Julian Rhind-Tutt

Produced by Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08cqq6n)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08cqq6q)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08cqq6s)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b08cqq6v)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b08cqxgl)
St Bartholomew's, London

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from St. Bartholomew the Great, Smithfield in London. The tower has a ring of five bells, with the tenor weighing 51/2 hundredweight. The church was originally founded in 1123 as an Augustinian Priory, and is fortunate to have five bells cast by Thomas Bullisdon around 1510, the only complete pre-reformation ring of more than four bells by one founder. We hear them ringing now, 'Grandsire Doubles'.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b08cq793)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b08cqq6x)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b08cqq71)
We're Not out of the Woods

Michael Symmons Roberts goes into the depths of the forest to find out the meaning of the cliché "we're not out of the woods yet". From the time we are children, woods and forests are portrayed as places of menace and foreboding, where dangerous creatures like wolves and gruffalos lurk, intent on causing us harm. Normally they are places we want to escape from, but not everyone is so keen to get out.

For authors, poets and composers, the woods can be places of creativity, testing and transformation and a symbol not only of fertility - as it is for DH Lawrence - but also for the very health of a nation, as W.H Auden so powerfully expresses: "This great society is going to smash; They cannot fool us with how fast they go, How much they cost each other and the gods. A culture is no better than its woods."

Modern poetry and music also engage with the symbolism of the woods. We hear from Emily Berry and her beautiful poem Canopy, as well as Alice Oswald's Wood Not Yet Out and - perhaps surprisingly - from rock star Prince, whose song The Cross powerfully captures the emotion of the crucifixion. Roberts revisits the notion that, in literature, it is hard to escape the link between wood and the cross of Christ. He quotes the great Anglo Saxon poem The Dream of the Rood, where the cross itself is the narrator.

Roberts concludes that maybe being in the woods is not all bad. "Like all the richest metaphors...there's something so deep rooted about the woods, the forest, trees as symbols and metaphors that we can't leave them alone... We're not out of the woods yet, but perhaps we don't want to be."

Presenter: Michael Symmons Roberts
Producer: Michael Wakelin
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b08cqxgp)
Divis Mountain

Ruth Sanderson surveys the agriculture in the hills above Belfast. Divis Mountain towers above the city and, weather permitting, provides spectacular views across Northern Ireland. Formally a British Army base during The Troubles, the site has been owned for the last 12 years by the National Trust. Ruth meets the farmers who graze livestock on the mountain and hear about the unique challenges involved in farming on Divis.

Producer: Beatrice Fenton.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b08cqq77)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b08cqq7c)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b08cqq7h)
The 70th anniversary of a Catholic marriage guidance charity, Russian cathedral row and the Bishop of London's final interview.

Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b08cqxgr)
The British Asian Trust

Nina Wadia makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of The British Asian Trust.
Registered Charity Number 1127366
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'The British Asian Trust'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'The British Asian Trust'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b08cqq7r)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b08cqq7w)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b08cqxgt)
The Power of Story

"Story's the way we discover who we are." Winner of the Costa First Novel award Francis Spufford is the preacher, with fellow writer Catherine Fox as they explore the way we find our identity through discovering our place in God's story. Led by the Revd Dr Sam Wells with the Choir of St Martin-in-the-Fields, directed by Andrew Earis. Producer Stephen Shipley.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b08c34q3)
States of Confusion

Will Self argues that, at a time when we're observing "our so-called leaders, fretting and strutting on the world stage", it really is a worthwhile exercise to spend time worrying about why we're here.

"I'd argue", he writes, "that to engage fully with the weird mystery of being is to at least take the helm of your own ship - even if its course is determined by some automatic pilot".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qhyz)
Robin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the robin. The autumn song of the Robin is the soundtrack to shortening days, gathering mists and ripening fruit. Robins sing in spring but their autumn song is different. It may sound melancholy to us but for the Robin it has clear purpose - to defend the winter territories that male and female robins establish separately after they've moulted.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b08cqq7y)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b08cqq80)
Pip goes in search of the truth, and Helen is on a mission.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b08cr6w9)
Nigel Owens

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the rugby union referee Nigel Owens.

His steely authority and quick wit on the field have won him worldwide praise - he's widely regarded as one of the best referees in the business for the impact he makes on the flow and coherence of a game. In 2015 he became the second Welsh official since 1991 to referee a World Cup Final - in a memorable match between New Zealand and Australia.

Born and raised in a small village in Carmarthenshire, he first picked up the whistle aged 16, when it became clear to both his teacher and himself that he wouldn't make much impact as a player.

A former school technician and farm worker, he broke through onto the international refereeing circuit in 2005 and took charge of his first Test when Japan hosted Ireland in Osaka that summer.

In 2007 he became one of the first high-profile sports professionals to come out as gay - a courageous move in a sport which often defines the word macho. He has spoken about this decision as being the biggest challenge he has ever faced - even more so than officiating an international match under intense scrutiny in front of 95,000 spectators and a global TV audience. The severe depression he experienced coming to terms with his sexuality culminated in an attempt to take his own life in his twenties.

He now says the unwavering support he has received from the rugby authorities, the players and the fans has enabled him to be true to himself and carry on working in the game he loves.

Producer: Paula McGinley.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b08cqq83)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 The Museum of Curiosity (b08bzcd3)
Series 10, Episode 4

Professor John Lloyd & his curator Jo Brand are joined by Danish comedian Sofie Hagen, mollusc and cephalopod expert Jon Ablett and "Watching the English" anthropologist Kate Fox.

This week the Museum's Steering Committee ruminate on the rules of Dogma films, a snail that survived four years glued to a board in the British Museum and the paleolithic origins of the selfie.

Researched by Anne Miller of QI and Mike Turner.

The production coordinator was Sophie Richardson.

The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b08cr6wc)
Gumbo

What can one single dish can tell you about America's history? One particular bowl of soup gives us an insight about the future of cultures that convene around it. Gumbo is eaten by nearly everyone in New Orleans, but its past speaks of the deep inequalities in American history that still resonate to this day. The BBC's Dan Saladino looks into the origins of this dish and discovers influences from Native Americans, slaves from West Africa, settlers from Nova Scotia, and European immigrants from Spain, France and Italy. Dan tries to track down the perfect recipe for one of Louisiana's most famous dishes, and discover how the politics of which food belongs to whom, is still at play, hundreds of years later.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b08cqq86)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b08cqq88)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Fry's English Delight (b08cr6wf)
Series 9, Let's Get Physical

Roman carvings, graffiti, inky handwriting and printing - handmade physical text always offers extra clues about who created it and why. So, is digital text robbing English of a personality which enhances the experience of writing and reading?

Stephen Fry's inquiry starts and ends with an exchange of handwritten letters between himself and Grayson Perry, who uses lots of text in his work. What will Grayson make of Stephen's handwriting and vice versa? Especially as Stephen's letter quotes WH Auden, claiming we like our own handwriting in the same way we "like the smell of our own farts."

Although graphology - the divining of personality through handwriting - is a pseudo-science, handwriting inevitably feels more personal than electronic text. With the help of Sherlock Holmes and a modern forensic document examiner, Stephen delves deeper into what our handwriting says about us. Philip Hensher, author of The Missing Ink, helps uncover the mysteries of our writing, and Professor Mary Beard weighs in with a forensic examination of some Roman physical text - not, as you might assume, from a grand memorial, but from the walls of a Pompeian brothel.

We also visit the first industrial scale printing press in Europe, now housed in the Museum Plantin Moretus in Antwerp. Stephen learns how, in the late 16th century, industrial scale multiplication of human effort in a still intensely physical environment changed the nature of language and who is in charge of it. All the while, he concentrates on physical ingredients - why ink caused a stink and why much of what was written at the time was literally (yes, literally) not worth the paper it was printed on. Paper was expensive, and much of it was recycled, rather than kept for posterity.

A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08c32qh)
Whitefield, Manchester

Eric Robson and his panel visit Whitefield, Manchester. Joining Eric to answer the questions this week are Christine Walkden, Chris Beardshaw and Matt Biggs.

The experts offer advice on growing Saskatoon berries and debate the efficacy of salt and vinegar as weedkillers.

Also, Chris offers a masterclass on propagating Bougainvilleas, while Matt explores the fascinating world of Bonsai with expert Peter Chan.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b08cr6wh)
Sunday Omnibus - Understanding

Fi Glover introduces conversations between friends about issues that require a deeper level of understanding if we are to see them clearly and get the best for and from them. All in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b08cr6wm)
A Little Princess, Episode 1

Archie Panjabi (The Good Wife, The Fall) and Rebecca Front (War and Peace, Dr Thorne) star with Clare Perkins in this much-loved gothic treat.

'It's only an accident that I'm not you, and you're not me.'

A Little Princess starts with a schoolgirl. But it's not a school story. Frances Hodgson Burnett's tough tale shows us a London full of foreign wealth and child poverty. That's why for over a century, its shocking story and unforgettable young characters have influenced everything from Angela Carter to anime.

And Kate Clanchy's radical new dramatisation discovers the Indian heart of Sara Crewe. When Sara is rich, she is treated just the same as other girls. But when she is not rich - exactly who is she? And why has she been brought to England?

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.

SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b08cr6wp)
Barbara Trapido - The Travelling Hornplayer

Novelist Barbara Trapido has been delighting readers over a forty year career. In The Travelling Hornplayer (1998) she spins a tale of betrayal, misunderstanding, coincidence and the passions of youth, all with her subversive and entertaining sense of humour.

From its haunting start : "Early on in the morning of my interview, I woke up and saw my dead sister" to its grand finale at an Oxford College, The Travelling Hornplayer zips along with plot twists and character turns, shocking revelations and desperate reactions. Any attempt at summary and character explanation is dizzying, but here are a few hints: for three years, Ellen Dent has been devastated by the loss of her younger sister Lydia who had become an informal student of celebrated novelist Jonathan Goldman. Jonathan's daughter Stella, a precocious and difficult child, is unwittingly involved in Lydia's death, and Stella in turn befriends Ellen at Edinburgh University. Stella's mother Katherine, who had appeared as a dynamic character in Trapido's Brother of the More Famous Jack, becomes a passive mother in The Travelling Hornplayer. All their stories mesh together into a sparky, tragicomic puzzle.

Barbara tells James Naughtie and the gathered group of Bookclub readers how the novel was inspired by Schubert's song cycles, with their lyrics by William Muller, and how her dry wit and acerbic observations, especially of Britain's class system, come from her being an outsider. Brought up under the apartheid system in South Africa, Barbara came to London in the early 60s and became a schoolteacher.

Presenter: James Naughtie
Interviewed guest : Barbara Trapido
Producer : Dymphna Flynn

March's Bookclub Choice : Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer (2005).

SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b08cr6wv)
Cities

Roger McGough takes a poetic stroll through the streets of the city, from Liverpool to Bombay, and with the help of poets including Frank O'Hara, Imtiaz Dharker and TS Eliot.

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b08fg81w)
The Turnaround Game

Five people have been found guilty for their roles in bank corruption and fraud costing hundreds of millions of pounds. A sixth, it can now be revealed, had already pleaded guilty.

Lynden Scourfield, a middle-ranking banker with Halifax Bank of Scotland, accepted bribes in cash, foreign holidays and sexual entertainment. In exchange he would require small business customers to hire a firm of consultants called Quayside Corporate Services.

The consultants claimed to be able to turn the business customers' fortunes around - but the truth was very different. File on 4 follows the story of two small Hbos clients, former rock and rollers, who fought for a decade to expose the fraud, even as the bank sought to repossess their home.

We ask how this could happen, and how to prevent the ongoing mistreatment of small business customers by the banks.

Reporter: Andy Verity
Producer: David Lewis
Editor: Gail Champion.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b08cq793)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b08cqq8c)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b08cqq8f)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08cqq8h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b08cqq8l)
Sheila McClennon

Pick of the week is more like whiff of the week as we stop by Berlin for possibly the strangest cheese ever. It's made from one of David Beckham's old trainers. Talking of making something out of nothing there's the youth orchestra from the slums of South America whose instruments are created from rubbish reclaimed from the local tip, Hugh Sykes talks about reporting from Iraq and the music that helps him cope.
We pay tribute to Desmond Carrington, there's terror from Book at Bedtime with Daphne Du Maurier's The Birds and Sheila's BBC Radio iPlayer choice is an atmospheric ghost story as a pilot is lost over the North Sea.
Not forgetting architect Thomas Telford and his incredible legacy. We promise you it's all rivetting and not to be sniffed at.
Presenter: Sheila McClennon
Producer: Stephen Garner
Production support from Kay Bishton and Charlie Davies.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b08cr8pz)
Helen is concerned for Henry, and Harrison is having nightmares.

SUN 19:15 Guilt Trip (b07lhg2q)
Episode 1

Comedy drama in which Felicity Montagu (Lynn in Alan Partridge and Mrs Mainwaring in the new Dad's Army film) and her daughter (Olivia Nixon) play a mother and daughter doing a two week sponsored walk along The Thames Path to raise money for the dead father's charity. But the mother and father had been divorced for nine years and he had re-married, so relationships between them all have been strained. Things come to a head at any mention of the French Oak gable table that Ros and her now dead ex bought together in Camden. This has somehow ended up in the step-mother's house, much to Ros's annoyance: "I mean she sits at it! It's my table and she sits at it." The series is co-written by Katherine Jakeways who also plays the step-mother.

In episode one mother and daughter are just starting out and in her usual putting-her-large-foot-firmly-in-it manner Ros get's her daughter's ex-boyfriend (Tim Key) to drop them at the source, but without any prior warning to the daughter. The renewed bonding Ros is hoping for may be a bit bumpier than expected. Especially when along the way Ros also manages to offend pretty much everyone she meets - not least an Eastern European camp site warden.

Also starring Jeff Rawle and Velibor Topic. The producer was Jane Berthoud, it was a BBC Radio Comedy production.

SUN 19:45 The Poet and the Echo (b08crjlj)
Series 1, The Relic

5 writers choose 5 poems as inspiration for new stories.

Episode 3/5

The Relic

A young poet remembers his muse.

A poignant story inspired by John Donne's poem about love and immortality. By the best-selling novelist, Salley Vickers.

Credits

Writer ..... Salley Vickers
Reader ..... Paapa Essiedu
Producer ..... Kirsty Williams

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:00 Feedback (b08c33j1)
New Editor of Today

Roger Bolton asks if interviews with President Trump supporters require more care - or even censorship. And listeners give their reaction to the announcement of a new Today programme editor.

Earlier this week, the Today programme interviewed Frank Gaffney. Introduced as a former government official, Gaffney was invited to discuss his support for Donald Trump's ban on immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries. But some listeners thought his so-called controversial political stance and alleged conspiracy theories should have been made clearer, while others believed his alleged anti-Muslim views should have prevented him from appearing at all. Roger invites two Feedback listeners to discuss their views.

The task of dealing with such issues in the future has fallen into new hands - London Evening Standard editor Sarah Sands has been announced as the new editor of the Today programme. Listeners give their initial thoughts on the appointment - with some raising eyebrows over her lack of broadcast experience.

At this week's BBC Audio Drama Awards, James Fritz took home trophies for Best New Writer and Best Drama Script - the first time a writer has won both awards in the same year. His award winning drama was Comment is Free, which tackles the spiral of abuse on social media. James discusses how recent political events, including the tragic murder of Jo Cox, took the drama out of his imagination and aligned it with real fears.

The Welsh Assembly believes more should be done to reflect Welsh life in broadcasting. One station charged with doing just that is BBC Radio Cymru - which recently celebrated its 40th birthday. Reporter Llinos Jones goes behind the scenes to hear how the stations is meeting its audience's needs.

Producer: Katherine Godfrey
Presenter: Roger Bolton

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b08c33hz)
Sir John Hurt, Margaret Pereira CBE, Sir Christopher Bland, Emma Tennant, Mary Tyler Moore

Matthew Bannister on Sir John Hurt, the actor whose outstanding roles included Quentin Crisp, the Elephant Man and Caligula.

Margaret Pereira, the pioneering forensic scientist who was known as "Miss Murder" by the press.

Sir Christopher Bland who chaired LWT, the BBC and BT.

Emma Tennant, the author from an aristocratic background whose work included sequels to classic novels.

And Mary Tyler Moore, the American TV star whose sitcom made her a role model for independent career women.

Producer: Neil George.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b08cq78y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b08cqxgr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 Analysis (b08bzdd1)
Atom Man

The journey of an American 'cold warrior' from nuclear deterrence to nuclear disarmament. Former US Secretary of Defence William J Perry has spent his entire seven-decade career on the nuclear brink. A brilliant mathematician, he became involved in the development of weapons-related technology in the aftermath of World War II. As an analyst working at the heart of the Cuban Missile Crisis, he thought each day could be "my last day on earth." He was undersecretary for defence under President Carter in the 1970s, and secretary for defence under President Clinton in the 1990s. He arranged the dismantling of thousands of nuclear weapons in former Soviet republics after the collapse of the USSR, used strategic diplomacy with nuclear nations to prevent escalation, and argued - unsuccessfully - against the NATO expansion that Russia continues to find so threatening.

Now Secretary Perry is worried. Very worried. President Trump and President Putin are both ramping up their bellicose rhetoric. Mr Perry sees an increasing risk of nuclear conflagration in South Asia and the Korean peninsula, and in the face of an on-going terrorism threat, he is concerned unsecured nuclear materials could fall into the wrong hands.

"Today, the danger of some sort of nuclear catastrophe is greater than it was during the Cold War and most people are blissfully unaware of this danger," he argues.

What can be done? In a challenging interview with Edward Stourton, Secretary Perry reflects on the nuclear nightmare, and lays out his formula for nuclear security in our changing world.

Producer: Linda Pressly

(Image: Dr William Perry gives a lecture at Stanford University about the history of nuclear weapons. Credit: Light at 11b).

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b08cqq8q)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Moth Radio Hour (b08crlhy)
True stories told live in the USA.

SUN 23:50 A Point of View (b08c34q3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]


MONDAY 06 FEBRUARY 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b08cqqcl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b08c0rm2)
The brave new world of virtual workers; also globalisation, the old and the new.

Globalisation: the history of the movement of goods, knowledge and people. Laurie Taylor talks to Richard Baldwin, Professor of International Economics at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva and author of a groundbreaking new study. They were joined by Diane Coyle, Professor of Economics at the University of Manchester.
Juliet Webster, Director of Work and Equality Research at the LSE, explores the brave new world of virtual workers - characterised by short contracts, flexible working hours and the blurring of boundaries between work and free time.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b08cqxgl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqcn)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08cqqcq)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqcs)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b08cqqcv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08f2yz3)
Spiritual reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Richard Frazer of Greyfriars Kirk, Edinburgh.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b08cqqcx)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

MON 05:56 Weather (b08cqqd0)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qk4j)
Great Spotted Woodpecker

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the Great Spotted woodpecker. In spring Great Spotted Woodpeckers drum loudly with their bills against tree bark to advertise their territories. Unlike many of our woodland birds, which are declining, Great Spotted Woodpeckers have increased rapidly over the last few decades - up to 250% since the 1970's.

MON 06:00 Today (b08cqqd3)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (b08cqqd6)
Paul Abbott: finding comedy in the tragic

On Start the Week Andrew Marr explores how childhood experiences affect later life. The screenwriter Paul Abbott famously put his early life into the television series Shameless. Although his later work, including his latest police drama No Offence, moves far beyond his own experiences, he excels at finding the comedy in the tragic. In France the writer Édouard Louis has caused a storm with his brutal autobiographical novel about class, violence and sexuality. The book is his attempt to bury his childhood. The psychiatrist Gwen Adshead spent years working at Broadmoor Hospital studying the nature of human violence and looks at the moral choices people make. The poet Paul Farley is interested not in the early life of poets but in their dying. From Shelley's drowning to Sylvia Plath's desperate suicide their deaths have become the stuff of myth casting a backward shadow on their work, creating a skewed image of the poet's life as doomed and self-destructive.
Producer: Katy Hickman.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b08crt5x)
Once Upon a Time in the East, Episode 1

Xiaolu Guo's autobiography tells her remarkable story from adoption at birth through to her career as a writer and film-maker based in the UK. This abridgement deals with her formative years, living in China in times of transition.

Episode 1:
For the young Xiaolu, her first home was the fishing village of Shitang where she lived with her grandparents.

Xiaolu Guo is a novelist, essayist, screenwriter and film maker. She was born in south-eastern China in 1973 . Her novel, in English translation, Village of Stone, was shortlisted for the 2005 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and the 2006 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. It was followed by her first novel written in English,'A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers, which was shortlisted for the 2007 Orange Prize for Fiction. In April 2013, she was named one of the Best of Young British Novelists by Granta Magazine.

Her award-winning films include She, a Chinese (2009, Golden Leopard Award in Locarno Film Festival) and UFO In Her Eyes (2011), adapted as a screenplay from her novel. Her documentaries include Once upon a time Proletarian (2009), We Went to Wonderland (2008), How Is Your Fish Today? (2006) and The Concrete Revolution (2004), which was awarded the Grand Prix in the 2005 International Human Rights Film Festival.

Writer: Xiaolu Guo
Abridger Pete Nichols
Reader: Chipo Chung
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08cqqd9)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08crt5z)
Isaac Asimov's I, Robot, Robbie

The rise of robotics in the 21st century, told through the poignant and mysterious story of enigmatic lawyer, Stevie Byerley. Starring Hermione Norris.

Episode One : ROBBIE
As a child, Stevie Byerley is raised by Robbie, a robotic childminder, because her parents are too busy working. The powerful bond she forms with the robot is unbreakable. Their relationship will change the course of Stevie's life.

Originally written over 60 years ago, Isaac Asimov's stories are becoming truer with every day that passes. The world that he imagined is now upon us.

Original Music......................... Imran Ahmad
Sound Design.......................... Alistair Lock
Editorial Consultant.................. Bev Doyle
Script Editor........................... Colin Brake
Development Producer............... Patrick Chapman

Dramatised by Richard Kurti
Produced and Directed by Andrew Mark Sewell

A B7 production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 11:00 The English Fix (b08crt61)
Series 1, Riding with Cobbett

Patrick Wright has spent much of his career thinking about English identity - a question which has become more pressing in recent years.

He argues that no one has cared much about Englishness unless they could define it as a settled, organic way of life threatened by external beastliness: England, in other words, as a realm that tends to be imagined most fiercely when it is threatened by an encroaching modern force.

In three programmes, Patrick argues that the shaping of English identity as a reaction to threat goes back, at the very least, to the writings and rants of William Cobbett. Combating land enclosure and surging capitalism Cobbett identified a pressure on English values and an English rural way of life as being THE THING which threatened to undermine all that was precious about his native land.
Patrick sets out on a Rural Ride, one of the journey's that Cobbett himself took in the 1820s, to explore the resonances his fears, hates and passions have for today's nation which seeks to free itself from the trammels of the EU and the control of Global capitalism. He speaks to scholars, Cobbett enthusiasts and those who now live in the quiet backwaters where Cobbett sought to reveal the virtues of the real England he sought to protect.

Producer: Tom Alban.

MON 11:30 Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups (b04v3838)
Series 2, The Well of Loneliness

When Tom's father uncovers some potentially life-changing news through his research into the family tree, Tom is pressganged into helping him find a church which could be devastating for the Wrigglesworth name.

Meanwhile, Tom's mum and gran enter the cut-throat world of competitive well-dressing.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b08cqqdd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed (b08crt63)
Series 1, Who are we negotiating with?

When the UK negotiates Brexit, who will be on the other side of the table? The answer's complex. Chris Morris reports on the complicated range of interests on the EU side who will have a say in settling a deal on Britain's departure - with domestic elections across the Continent playing a key role. And find out why there could be scorpions....

Producers: Shabnam Grewal, Chris Bowlby
Editor: Hugh Levinson.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b08cqqdh)
'Free range' egg labels; Energy switching; Young entrepreneurs

Consumer affairs programme.

MON 12:57 Weather (b08cqqdm)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b08cqqdp)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08crt65)
Series 1, A Potted History

Professor David Rothkopf speaks to decision makers from Tony Blair to Malcolm Rifkind , and from Zbigniew Brzezinski to General Wes Clark, to chart the rapid and radical transformation of modern diplomacy.

At the heart of each episode is one seminal event or turning point, through which Professor Rothkopf discuss how diplomacy has evolved and - in some cases - lastingly changed.

The Cuban Missile crisis, for example, is a familiar story of brinkmanship but we discover how subsequent accounts of that event were manipulated to create a narrative about strong coercive leadership - one which was not only at odds with the facts but which sent out the wrong messages about the conduct of diplomacy. We also hear how dancing with the back of a chair honed the diplomatic skills of one of the 19th century's most prominent foreign ministers, and how hot drinks by a log fire in Norway broke the stalemate in middle east negotiations. A former spy reveals how espionage and diplomacy can be frequent if uncomfortable bedfellows. And finally, we discover how so called twittocracy is replacing conventional etiquette and laying foundations for the invention of a new diplomacy.

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b08cr8pz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Drama (b051vr32)
The Transfer

The Transfer by Nick Perry.
It's 5am on Monday 2 February and football's transfer window closes in eighteen hours. Danny Provisor is a football agent negotiating a last-ditch deal to bring Serbian prospect Slavko Ilich to the UK, but a call to his girlfriend Frankie reveals that Slavko hasn't returned home from a night out. Fending off phone calls from suspicious reporters and an increasingly irate Chief Executive, Danny searches for Slavko knowing that this deal will not only rescue his career, but also provide security for his family. With BBC Radio 5Live counting down the hours the pressure begins to build, and the deal and Danny's world start to collapse.

Producer: Toby Field.

MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b08crt67)
Heat 3, 2017

(3/17)
Competitors from Cheshire, North Yorkshire, Gloucestershire and Teesside join Russell Davies for the third heat in the current series. Would you know which film director first used the term 'splatter movie' to describe one of his films? Or by which treaty the island of Gibraltar was ceded to Great Britain? These and other general knowledge teasers await today's contestants, with the winner going through automatically to the semi-finals in the spring.

Producer Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b08cr6wc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 I Was... (b08crt69)
Series 3, Erno Goldfinger's Last Architectural Assistant

Andrew McGibbon analyses great artists at a significant time in their careers, but from the perspective of someone who worked for them, inspired them, employed them or even did their job for them while no one was looking.

Anyone driving along London's M40 Westway cannot fail to notice Trellick Tower, architect Erno Goldfinger's brutalist monument to the ideals of 20th century, urban residential living.

James Dunnett was the last architectural assistant to Erno Goldfinger, the great evangelist of the brutalist school of residential architecture, towards the end of his career in 1973 when public opinion turned against tower blocks as a form of social housing. The great émigré architect now found that he had to don his best suit, swallow his astonishing pride and start looking for work.

A moving and fascinating account of the last days of the Goldfinger whose iconic and now listed Trellick Tower, though controversially out of fashion when it opened in 1972, has not only become a listed building but spurred the imagination of writer JG Ballard in his novel High Rise and has been the visual backdrop to many futuristic urban dystopias.

Written and Presented by Andrew McGibbon
Producers: Nick Romero and Louise Morris

A Curtains For Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b08crt6c)
Series 15, Oceans: What Remains to Be Discovered?

Oceans: what remains to be discovered?
Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined by Andy Hamilton, Professor Jon Copley and marine biologist Helen Scales, as they look at the riches still remaining to be discovered deep within our oceans. The deep ocean remains the last great unexplored frontier of our planet, and as Brian and Robin discover, what we might find there could provide us with some extraordinary insights and applications. We've only just begun to touch the surface, literally, in terms of identifying and learning about the huge and varied life forms that live in our oceans -from the microbes that could inspire and generate new drugs to fight antibiotic resistant diseases, to the deep sea snails with iron clad shells, that may lead to the development of new super-strong materials. Even the humble limpet is providing inspiration to material scientists and engineers: the limpets' teeth, it turns out, are made from the strongest natural substance on the planet.

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.

MON 17:00 PM (b08cqqdr)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08cqqdt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b08crt6f)
Series 10, Episode 5

This week, the Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Jo Brand welcome comedian, screenwriter and Guilty Feminist podcaster Deborah Frances-White; the entomologist and bumblebee expert, Professor Dave Goulson; and "that bloke off Time Team who was Baldrick in Blackadder", Sir Tony Robinson.

This week, the Museum's Guest Committee enshrine the first Englishwoman to make a living as a professional poet, Emilia Lanier; speculate on the unusual polyphiloprogenitive strategies of virgin death watch beetles; and pay homage to the moment when Blackadder finally went "over the top".

The show was researched by Anne Miller of QI and Mike Turner.

The production coordinator was Sophie Richardson.

The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b08crt6h)
Eddie is given a warning, and Justin wants to make up for lost time.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b08cqqdw)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08crt5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 Aftermath (b08crt6k)
Series 1, Morecambe Bay

Alan Dein visits Morecambe Bay to investigate the aftermath of the 2004 cockle picking disaster. How did the community cope when 23 Chinese workers lost their lives in the bay?

The third programme in the Aftermath series, which explores what happens to a community after it has been at the centre of a nationally significant event.

Morecambe faced its greatest tragedy in February 2004, when a group of Chinese cockle pickers drowned in a bay notorious for its dangerous tides. The event brought to the country's attention issues of people-trafficking and illegal gangmaster activity. As the media of the world descended, reported and left, the shock felt by locals lived on. Alan Dein looks at how the community changed as a result.

MON 20:30 Analysis (b08crt6m)
How Not to Do It

Jacqui Smith, the former Labour home secretary, investigates why government policies fail, focusing on one of her party's most cherished reforms.

Indeterminate sentences for public protection (IPPs) were devised by David Blunkett and the Home Office to reassure voters that those convicted of serious violent and sexual offences would stay in prison until they could show by their changed behaviour that they could safely be released.

But much larger numbers of offenders received the sentences than had been expected and, as the prison population rose, jails struggled to provide the facilities IPP prisoners needed to show that they had reformed. The new sentencing structure, first passed in 2003, had to be drastically changed by Labour in 2008 and finally to be repealed by the coalition four years after that.

Jacqui Smith discovers the reasons why the change in sentencing was embarked upon, why its potential flaws weren't detected before its introduction and why the policy was maintained even as problems mounted. She considers the difficult legacy of IPPs - for those still in prison and for politicians devising shiny new initiatives in other fields of government.

Producer: Simon Coates.

MON 21:00 Meet the Cyborgs (b08bzl96)
Frank Swain can hear Wi-Fi.

Diagnosed with early deafness aged 25, Frank decided to turn his misfortune to his advantage by modifying his hearing aids to create a new sense. He documented the start of his journey three years ago on Radio 4 in 'Hack My Hearing'.

Since then, Frank has worked with sound artist Daniel Jones to detect and sonify Wi-Fi connections around him. He joins a community around the world who are extending their experience beyond human limitations.

In 'Meet the Cyborgs' Frank sets out to meet other people who are hacking their bodies. Neil Harbisson and Moon Rebus run The Cyborg Foundation in Barcelona, which welcomes like-minded body hackers from around the world. Their goal is not just to use or wear technology, but to re-engineer their bodies.

Frank meets the creators of Cyborg Nest, a company promising to make anyone a cyborg. They have recently launched their first product - The North Sense - a computer chip anchored to body piercings in the chest, which vibrates when it faces north.

"I'm a 51 year old bald guy, with no tattoos or piercings" says co-founder Scott Cohen. "This was never a place I thought I'd end up in. Everyone's talking about machine learning, but what we're trying to do is make our brains smarter."

Of course, the marriage of technology and biology is commonplace in medicine, from pacemakers to IUDs. But now 'citizen hackers' are modifying their medical equipment to add new functions. Dana Lewis from Seattle has created her own 'artificial pancreas' to help manage her Type 1 diabetes and released the code online.

But should limits be placed on self-experimentation? And will cybernetic implants eventually become as ubiquitous as smart phones?

Features music composed for The North Sense by Andy Dragazis.

Presenter: Frank Swain
Producer: Michelle Martin.

MON 21:30 Start the Week (b08cqqd6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b08cqqdy)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b08cqqf0)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08crt6p)
The Transition, Episode 1

An intriguing and wry debut novel about capitalism, the housing crisis and a generation in debt. Set a few years from now, in an unnamed city, award-winning poet Luke Kennard imagines what life might be like for young people from the squeezed middle-class if our society continues along its current economic path.

Thirty-something couple Karl and Genevieve (he writes copy for online content providers, she is a primary teacher) live in a room in a shared house; their combined income is less than their rent and they're falling ever deeper into debt. To help pay off his seventeen credit cards, Karl accepts a job generating 'clickbait' from a stranger online that seems to good to be true. It is. Very soon the messy strands of his and Genevieve's lives are beginning to unravel.

Reader: Bryan Dick

Writer: Luke Kennard

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b08bzmv5)
Words Roadshow in Birmingham

Michael Rosen and linguist Esther Asprey answer questions about interesting local and family words from listeners at a Words Roadshow at the Birmingham Literature Festival. What's a gubbins? What is your dander, when it's up? And what could it be that you're doing if you do a flink-a-flonk...
Recorded at BBC Birmingham.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08cqqf3)
News from Westminster.


TUESDAY 07 FEBRUARY 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b08cqqhk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b08crt5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqhm)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08cqqhp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqhr)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b08cqqht)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08fcj9c)
Spiritual reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Richard Frazer of Greyfriars Kirk, Edinburgh.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b08cqqhw)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03x46sm)
Treecreeper

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the treecreeper. Treecreepers are common woodland birds but because their high-pitched almost whispering song, is often drowned out by the dawn chorus, they're often overlooked. The first glimpse may be a silhouette, its belly close to the bark, braced by stiff tail feathers. It has a curved, tweezer-like bill with with which it delicately probes for hidden insects and spiders deep in the crevices of the bark.

TUE 06:00 Today (b08ff5t3)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b08crvm0)
Sean Carroll on how time and space began

How did time and space begin? From the age of ten, Sean Carroll has wanted to know. He first read about the big bang model of the universe as a child. Later, he turned down two job offers from Stephen Hawking. The big bang model of the universe is well established but, as Sean readily admits, the big bang itself remains a mystery. In the beginning, Sean applied Einstein's theories of relativity to this problem. But mid-career and painfully aware that trying to out Einstein Einstein was a tough call, he turned his attention from the very big to the very small. His most recent work imagines a universe without time and without space and describes how these two rather important aspects of our existence might have been created, using the laws of quantum mechanics and, in particular, the idea of quantum entanglement. Apparently it's quite straightforward. Things that are more entangled are closer. It doesn't explain the origin of time, however.
Producer: Anna Buckley.

TUE 09:30 One to One (b08crvm2)
Nikesh Shukla talks to Kieran Farrell

Nikesh Shukla continues his series of interviews on boxing. The level of violence and serious injury has always called the sport into question. Just last year it saw the tragic death of Mike Towell after a fatal head injury and Nick Blackwell retired after a bleed on the brain. These stories are familiar to Kieran Farrell, who discovered a love of boxing aged just 7, and who had 26 fights in a row unbeaten - 14 as a professional. But then he collapsed from a bleed on the brain after a fight against Anthony Crolla. Despite 30% brain damage he was desperate to fight again, but was forced to retire aged 22. Four years on he runs a gym and acts as coach and promoter. He tells Nikesh what attracts a child to the sport, what that night took from him and why he's still happy to encourage children and adults to put on the gloves.

Produced in Bristol by Anne-Marie Bullock.

TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b08crvm4)
Once Upon a Time in the East, Episode 2

Xiaolu Guo's autobiography tells her remarkable story from adoption at birth through to her career as a writer and film-maker based in the UK. This abridgement deals with her formative years, living in China in times of transition.

Episode 2:
Xiaolu's grandfather's struggle to provide for his family has tragic consequences.

Xiaolu Guo is a novelist, essayist, screenwriter and film maker. She was born in south-eastern China in 1973 . Her novel, in English translation, Village of Stone, was shortlisted for the 2005 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and the 2006 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. It was followed by her first novel written in English,'A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers, which was shortlisted for the 2007 Orange Prize for Fiction. In April 2013, she was named one of the Best of Young British Novelists by Granta Magazine.

Her award-winning films include She, a Chinese (2009, Golden Leopard Award in Locarno Film Festival) and UFO In Her Eyes (2011), adapted as a screenplay from her novel. Her documentaries include Once upon a time Proletarian (2009), We Went to Wonderland (2008), How Is Your Fish Today? (2006) and The Concrete Revolution (2004), which was awarded the Grand Prix in the 2005 International Human Rights Film Festival.

Writer: Xiaolu Guo
Abridger Pete Nichols
Reader: Chipo Chung
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08cqqhy)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08crvm6)
Isaac Asimov's I, Robot, Reason

The rise of robotics in the 21st century, told through the poignant and mysterious story of enigmatic lawyer, Stevie Byerley. Originally written over 60 years ago, Isaac Asimov's stories are becoming truer with every day that passes. The world that he imagined is now upon us. Starring Hermione Norris.

Episode Two : Reason
After two years recovering from a devastating car crash, Stevie returns to work as a Legal Psychologist. Her first case is to try and reason with a robot that has developed religious delusions and a Messiah complex.

Original Music......................... Imran Ahmad
Sound Design.......................... Alistair Lock
Editorial Consultant.................. Bev Doyle
Script Editor........................... Colin Brake
Development Producer............... Patrick Chapman

Dramatised by Richard Kurti
Produced and Directed by Andrew Mark Sewell

A B7 production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 11:00 The Rise of the Robots (b08crvz3)
Series 1, 07/02/2017

The idea of robots goes back to the Ancient Greeks. In myths Hephaestus, the god of fire, created robots to assist in his workshop. In the medieval period the wealthy showed off their automata. In France in the 15th century a Duke of Burgundy had his chateau filled with automata that played practical tricks on his guests, such as spraying water at them. By the 18th century craftsmen were making life like performing robots. In 1784 in Paris people queued to see the amazing flute playing automaton.

Adam Rutherford explores the role of robots in past societies and discovers they were nearly always made in our image.

TUE 11:30 Losing Margaret (b08crw13)
Novelist Margaret Forster and writer Hunter Davies were together for sixty years. In this moving tribute a year after her death, Hunter tells Roger Bolton about their life together, their prolific careers, and how he's coping without her.

Meeting as teenagers in Carlisle, the pair shared a fierce intelligence and a determination to escape their tough working class backgrounds. Both achieved early success with novels made into films in the mid-1960s - Forster's "Georgy Girl" and Davies' "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush". Soon after, Davies wrote the only authorised biography of The Beatles.

Forster went on to write 25 novels and 14 biographies, including award winning portraits of Daphne Du Maurier and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, as well as social history and journalism. She died of cancer on February 8th 2015.

In recordings made in London, Carlisle and the Lake District over the last six months, Hunter tells his friend and fellow Cumbrian, Roger Bolton, about Margaret's last days, clearing out her desk and selling their house of the past 30 years. In his 80th year, he has also had three books published and written three regular columns.

Inter-cut with archive recordings of Margaret and readings from her books, the programme provides not only an intimate portrait of a famous literary couple, but a poignant portrayal of loss.

Producer: Deborah Dudgeon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b08cqqj0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed (b08dc3s7)
Series 1, The cost of the divorce

How much will it cost the UK to leave the European Union? Chris Morris investigates with the help of a top divorce lawyer and an expert on the financial facts. He draws up a list of assets to be divvied up and the ongoing maintenance payments which may need to be made. It could add up to around £50 or £60 billion and the EU seems determined to extract payment. Will it all end in tears?

Producers: Shabnam Grewal, Chris Bowlby
Researcher: Dearbhail Starr.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b08cqqj2)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b08cqqj4)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b08cqqj6)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08crx11)
Series 1, Cuban Missile Crisis: The Wrong Lessons

Professor David Rothkopf discovers how White House narratives about the Cuban missile crisis resulted in the wrong lessons for diplomacy.

The Cuban Missile crisis was said to be a textbook example of how strong unwavering leadership can resolve existential crises. But new evidence reveals that the narrative promoted at the time by the White House was flawed. In fact, the Kennedy administration embarked on a strategy of secret diplomacy which involved missile swaps. It also resulted in behind the scenes negotiations including none other than the lawyer James Donovan, featured in the recent Hollywood spy film The Bridge.

In an episode featuring interviews with academics and members of the national security archive, Professor David Rothkopf separates the fact from fiction surrounding this apocalyptic event which brought the world closer than ever before to annihilation . He argues that the real lessons for diplomacy are very different from the ones we have been fed for years.

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b08crt6h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Drama (b08crzr1)
The Ethical Hacking Bureau

By David Leddy.

A high-energy drama about three women trying to make the world a little better.

Starring Patricia Hodge, Sarah Niles and Anita Vettesse.

Barbara is a glamorous, if slightly bored wife of a Tory Grandee. Recently she's thought her husband was having an affair. With the help of her Zumba teacher, she's hacked his phone only to discover he wasn't having an affair. He was just playing Angry Birds. A lot.

Her first foray into hacking gives her a taste for adventure. They start to look into her son-in-law. He's an MP. They stumble on a serious scandal. We join her just as she's about to get her daughter embroiled in their amateur sleuthing...

Directed by Kirsty Williams.

TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b08cq78s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]

TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b08crzr3)
World on Fire

When wildfires engulfed the Canadian city of Fort McMurray last May 90,000 people were displaced and well over £2bn of damage was caused, making it one of the costliest natural disasters of all time.

That fire proved to be just the start of a summer of flames that ripped through California, Greece and France, all part of a clear increase in the frequency and cost of wildfire around the globe. An area the size of India now burns every year and climate change is rapidly increasing the flammability of our forests.

Tom Heap visits Fort McMurray to find out how a city could be so easily engulfed by fire and to meet the local scientists and firefighters working out fresh strategies to make sure it doesn't happen again.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.

TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b08crzr5)
Pet or Pest? The revealing words we use about animals

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright on the language we use to talk about animals - and the names we give our dogs. Do the words used show changing attitudes? They're joined by Professor Alison Sealey, linguist at Lancaster University and co-investigator on a new study: People, Products, Pests and Pets: The Discursive Representation of Animals.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b08crzr7)
Victor Adebowale and Rachel Unthank

Lord Victor Adebowale and musician Rachel Unthank join Harriett Gilbert to talk books. Rachel chooses David Almond's tales from the Northeast, Half a Creature from the Sea, Victor enlightens his fellow guests with John Higgs' explanations of twentieth century phenomena such as the theory of relativity and modernism, and Harriett's choice of Robert Seehaler's A Whole Life charms everyone.
Producer Sally Heaven.

TUE 17:00 PM (b08cqqj8)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08cqqjb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 Jake Yapp Saves Humanity in 28 Minutes (b087p7m4)
Satirist Jake Yapp attempts to save humanity from its ills though the power of stand-up and sketch comedy.

In this pilot episode Jake turns his attention to the pernicious evil of TV advertisements, breaking down the five main formats used to peddle us products.

Performed by Jake Yapp, George Fouracres and Susan Wokoma
Written by Jake Yapp with additional material from Liam Beirne and Robin Morgan
Produced by Joe Nunnery
A BBC Studios Production.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b08crzr9)
Anisha worries for her reputation, and is Josh pulling a fast one?

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b08cqqjd)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08crvm6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b08crzrc)
Speaking Up - Whistleblowing in the NHS

Two years ago the first independent report into the treatment of whistle-blowers in the NHS was published.

The Freedom to Speak Up report was commissioned by the government amid concerns not enough progress had been made to create a more open culture within the NHS following the Mid Staffs inquiry which unearthed the poor care and high mortality rates at Stafford Hospital.

The report - which considered evidence from 600 individuals and 43 organisations across the country included chilling accounts of doctors, nurses and healthcare professionals whose lives and careers had been destroyed after trying to raise legitimate concerns about patient safety.

Whistle-blowers said they'd been left financially ruined, blacklisted and sent to the brink of suicide after being branded snitches and trouble-makers.

Revealing a continuing culture of secrecy with trusts demonising whistle-blowers instead of welcoming and investigating their concerns, it was hoped the report would herald a new era of openness and accountability.

File on 4 investigates what has happened since and asks whether measures put in place to protect those speaking out about patient safety are fit for purpose.

Doctors who have spoken up since say they've faced the same catalogue of bullying and abuse by their employers, and in some cases, the focus remains on protecting reputations of Trusts, rather than addressing poor care. So is the culture changing quickly enough?

Reporter: Simon Cox
Producer: Nicola Dowling.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b08cqqjh)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b08crzrf)
Dr Mark Porter presents a series that aims to demystify perplexing health issues.

TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b08crvm0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b08cqqjk)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08dwy6q)
The Transition, Episode 2

Debut novel set in an unnamed British city, a few years from now. Writer Luke Kennard imagines what life might be like for young people from the squeezed middle-class if society continues along its current economic path.

Thirty-something Karl has avoided a jail sentence for unwittingly aiding a credit card skimmer. Instead, he and his wife Genevieve have been offered a place on The Transition - a six month 'rehabilitation programme' in which they will live rent-free with two mentors, Stu and Janna, who will help them get back on their feet. It's an organisation he's never heard of before but, when they arrive for their first briefing, Karl is surprised to see how large the HQ is, and how well established.

Reader: Bryan Dick

Writer: Luke Kennard

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b08crt6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]

TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08cqqjm)
News from Westminster.


WEDNESDAY 08 FEBRUARY 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b08cqqlz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b08crvm4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqm1)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08cqqm3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqm5)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b08cqqm7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08ffcqn)
Spiritual reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Richard Frazer of Greyfriars Kirk, Edinburgh.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b08cqqm9)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03ws7gc)
Nuthatch

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the nuthatch. Nuthatches are the only UK birds that can climb down a tree as fast they can go up and you'll often see them descending a trunk or hanging beneath a branch. Nuthatches are unmistakable: blue-grey above, chestnut under the tail and with a black highwayman's mask.

WED 06:00 Today (b08fg37n)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Midweek (b08cqqmc)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b08csn3y)
Once Upon a Time in the East, Episode 3

Xiaolu Guo's autobiography tells her remarkable story from adoption at birth through to her career as a writer and film-maker based in the UK. This abridgement deals with her formative years, living in China in times of transition.

Episode 3:
The young Xiaolu has a new home in Wenling, where she is reunited with her parents.

Xiaolu Guo is a novelist, essayist, screenwriter and film maker. She was born in south-eastern China in 1973 . Her novel, in English translation, Village of Stone, was shortlisted for the 2005 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and the 2006 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. It was followed by her first novel written in English,'A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers, which was shortlisted for the 2007 Orange Prize for Fiction. In April 2013, she was named one of the Best of Young British Novelists by Granta Magazine.

Her award-winning films include She, a Chinese (2009, Golden Leopard Award in Locarno Film Festival) and UFO In Her Eyes (2011), adapted as a screenplay from her novel. Her documentaries include Once upon a time Proletarian (2009), We Went to Wonderland (2008), How Is Your Fish Today? (2006) and The Concrete Revolution (2004), which was awarded the Grand Prix in the 2005 International Human Rights Film Festival.

Writer: Xiaolu Guo
Abridger Pete Nichols
Reader: Chipo Chung
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08cqqmf)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b08csn40)
Isaac Asimov's I, Robot, Little Lost Robot

The rise of robotics in the 21st century, told through the poignant and mysterious story of enigmatic lawyer, Stevie Byerley. Originally written over 60 years ago, Isaac Asimov's stories are becoming truer with every day that passes. The world that he imagined is now upon us. Starring Hermione Norris.

Episode Three : Little Lost Robot
The Three Laws of Robotics are sacred because they define the limits of artificial intelligence, tamper with them at your peril. But Stevie finds that's exactly what's happened on a space station where a rogue robot has been reprogrammed and is now AWOL.

Original Music......................... Imran Ahmad
Sound Design.......................... Alistair Lock
Editorial Consultant.................. Bev Doyle
Script Editor........................... Colin Brake
Development Producer............... Patrick Chapman

Dramatised by Richard Kurti
Produced and Directed by Andrew Mark Sewell

A B7 production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b08csn42)
Gordon and Claire - The Kindness of Strangers

Fi Glover with a conversation between a father and daughter about their loss through suicide and the support and understanding that's helped them. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 Aftermath (b08crt6k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Simon Evans Goes to Market (b0435p0k)
Series 1, Land

How do you make economics funny? How do you put the comedy in commodity? Simon Evans has the answer in this new series which asks us to get involved in investment.

Rather than being cowed by an apparently complicated and overwhelming system, Simon jumps right in. He takes as his focus four commodities which are so intrinsic to our lives they have an almost elemental significance - land, gold, oil and grain. Yet, despite the fact we encounter them everywhere we look, very few people have been able to build a fortune on them.

All that's about to change as, Simon enlists help from the experts. Each week he will be joined by Tim Harford, Merryn Somerset Webb and a guest specialist as they examine the chequered social and economic histories of these commodities. By looking at four such fundamental products, Simon brings us to a closer understanding of how global economic forces have a far-reaching and often surprising impact on our lives.

In this first episode, Simon looks at Land. How did it come to be traded, why we think bricks and mortar are a safe investment and
who really owns the land we buy.
Performed by ..... Simon Evans, with regular guests Tim Harford and Merryn Somerset-Webb, and Land expert Kevin Cahill
Written by ..... Simon Evans with Benjamin Partridge, Guy Venables, Andy Wolton
Producer ..... Tilusha Ghelani.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b08cqqmj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed (b08dc3tw)
Series 1, 08/02/2017

As the UK prepares to begin leaving the EU, what are the key deals to be done? Chris Morris cuts through the jargon to discover how everyone's lives could change.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b08cqqml)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b08cqqmn)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b08cqqmq)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08csnwz)
Series 1, Embassy Spooks

In 1971, 105 Soviet diplomats were expelled from Britain in the biggest ever action taken against Moscow by any Western Government. The diplomats were accused of spying in a notorious example of the frequent blurring of the lines between diplomat and spy.

Professor David Rothkopf hears from George Walden, the foreign office diplomat who spearheaded Operation Foot, the plan to get rid of the diplomats . He examines the diplomatic ramifications of taking actions like this. We also hear from former covert CIA Operative Marti Petersen on what it was like operating in the American embassy in Moscow while playing courier to one of the Cold War's greatest spies.

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b08crzr9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Drama (b08csqy4)
My Mother Taught Me How to Sing

By Daf James

Docu-drama about two men negotiating the adoption process.

Daf and his partner Hywel want to adopt. But when his mum dies, Daf wonders if he has what it takes to become a parent. Returning to his childhood home, and with the help of some cassette recordings made of him growing up, Daf attempts to uncover what it means to be a mum.

Daf James.... Himself
Social Worker.... Eiry Thomas
Little Daf.... Lewis Howe
Dawn.... Mali Matthews

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b08csqy6)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.

WED 15:30 Inside Health (b08crzrf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b08csqy8)
Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b08cqqms)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b08cqqmv)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08cqqmx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 What Does the K Stand For? (b08csqyb)
Series 3, Breaking Up Is Hard To Do

Sitcom about comedian Stephen K Amos's teenage years in 1980s South London. Written by Jonathan Harvey with Stephen K Amos.
Relationships in the Amos household are strained by a new arrival.
Starring Ellen Thomas, Laurie Kynaston, Stephen K Amos, Frances Barber, Bola Okun, Emerald Crankson, Karen Bartke and David Sterne.
Produced by Paul Sheehan.
Production Coordinator Beverly Tagg.
A BBC Studios Production.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b08csqyd)
Jennifer wants to put an end to the rumours, and Fallon thinks outside the box.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b08cqqmz)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08csn40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b08csqyg)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Melanie Phillips, Giles Fraser, Anne McElvoy and Claire Fox.

WED 20:45 Four Thought (b08csqyj)
All You Need Is Love

Javed Khan, Chief Executive of Barnardo's, argues that our society needs more love.

Contrasting the seminal importance of the love he experienced as a child with the experiences of some of those children supported by Barnardo's, he argues that love is hard to pin down, hard to measure, hard to locate, and as a result is often overlooked.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b08crzr3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]

WED 21:30 Midweek (b08cqqmc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b08cqqn1)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b08cqqn3)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08dwy7v)
The Transition, Episode 3

Bryan Dick reads Luke Kennard's debut novel, inspired by 'Generation Debt', set a few years from now in an unnamed British city.

Mentors Janna and Stu lay down The Transition's ground rules, as Karl and Genevieve slowly adjust to life as protégés on the six-month 'rehabilitation' programme.

Reader: Bryan Dick

Writer: Luke Kennard

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

WED 23:00 Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme (b05419jk)
Series 3, Cookery

This week the comic poet has left the studio for the kitchen, as he peers into 'Tim's shopping bag' and attempts to cook up a feast. He is assisted by his guitarist and commis chef, Tom Basden.

Written and presented by Tim Key
With Tom Basden and Yasmine Akram

Produced by James Robinson

A BBC Cymru Wales Production

The Edinburgh Comedy Award-winning comedian returns for a third series of his Late Night Poetry Programme. Since series two Tim has been busy touring his latest acclaimed live show, Single White Slut, thrilling audiences at the Old Vic in Daniel Kitson's Tree, as well as filming movies such as Steve Coogan's Alpha Papa and Richard Ayoade's The Double. But now he's back on late night Radio 4 doing what he does best - attempting to recite poetry whilst tormenting his friend and musician, the equally brilliant Tom Basden.

Praise for Tim Key

"...You never know when Key will suddenly toss you a fantastic joke or startlingly well-constructed line." Radio Times

"The show... has a kind of artistry and strange beauty that makes it unlike any other hour of stand-up you are likely to see." The Observer

"In any other sphere apart from comedy, we'd probably class this way of looking at the world as certifiable. Here it feels like genius." The Telegraph.

WED 23:15 The Celebrity Voicemail Show (b08csrhw)
Series 2, Episode 1

The Celebrity Voicemail Show is an entirely fictitious comedy show written, improvised and starring only Kayvan Novak in which he imagines what it might be like to hear the answerphone messages of the rich and famous.

This week we listen in to the voicemail of the new London Mayor - Sadiq Khan.

The producer is Matt Stronge.

A BBC Studios production.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08cqqn5)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


THURSDAY 09 FEBRUARY 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b08cqqqd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b08csn3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqqg)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08cqqql)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqqn)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b08cqqqq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08fjpwy)
Spiritual reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Richard Frazer of Greyfriars Kirk, Edinburgh.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b08cqqqs)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcfq)
Stock Dove

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the stock dove. Perhaps 'stock pigeon' would be a better name, because they're like slightly smaller versions of the woodpigeon. Unlike their bigger relatives they have no white marks on their wings or neck and are more blue-grey in colour. When they fly, they look dumpier ...stockier you might say. Unlike woodpigeons, stock doves haven't taken to a life in town and they're mainly birds of wooded farmland.

THU 06:00 Today (b08fg3cj)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 In Our Time (b08cstfr)
John Clare

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the Northamptonshire poet John Clare who, according to one of Melvyn's guests Jonathan Bate, was 'the greatest labouring-class poet that England has ever produced'. Clare worked in a tavern, as a gardener and as a farm labourer in the early 19th century and achieved his first literary success with Poems Descriptive of Rural Life and Scenery. He was praised for his descriptions of rural England and his childhood there, and his reaction to the changes he saw in the Agricultural Revolution with its enclosures, displacement and altered, disrupted landscape. Despite poor mental health and, from middle age onwards, many years in asylums, John Clare continued to write and he is now seen as one of the great poets of his age.

With

Jonathan Bate

Mina Gorji

and

Simon Kövesi

Producer: Simon Tillotson.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b08cstft)
Once Upon a Time in the East, Episode 4

Xiaolu Guo's autobiography tells her remarkable story from adoption at birth through to her career as a writer and film-maker based in the UK. This abridgement deals with her formative years, living in China in times of transition.

Episode 4:
Xiaolu is encouraged by her father to become a poet.

Xiaolu Guo is a novelist, essayist, screenwriter and film maker. She was born in south-eastern China in 1973 . Her novel, in English translation, Village of Stone, was shortlisted for the 2005 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and the 2006 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. It was followed by her first novel written in English,'A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers, which was shortlisted for the 2007 Orange Prize for Fiction. In April 2013, she was named one of the Best of Young British Novelists by Granta Magazine.

Her award-winning films include She, a Chinese (2009, Golden Leopard Award in Locarno Film Festival) and UFO In Her Eyes (2011), adapted as a screenplay from her novel. Her documentaries include Once upon a time Proletarian (2009), We Went to Wonderland (2008), How Is Your Fish Today? (2006) and The Concrete Revolution (2004), which was awarded the Grand Prix in the 2005 International Human Rights Film Festival.

Writer: Xiaolu Guo
Abridger Pete Nichols
Reader: Chipo Chung
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08cqqqv)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08cstfw)
Isaac Asimov's I, Robot, Liar

The rise of robotics in the 21st century, told through the poignant and mysterious story of enigmatic lawyer, Stevie Byerley. Originally written over 60 years ago, Isaac Asimov's stories are becoming truer with every day that passes. The world that he imagined is now upon us. Starring Hermione Norris.

Episode Four : Liar
Stevie is urgently summoned to an advanced research lab in Siberia, where a robot has developed the ability to read human minds.

Original Music......................... Imran Ahmad
Sound Design.......................... Alistair Lock
Editorial Consultant.................. Bev Doyle
Script Editor........................... Colin Brake
Development Producer............... Patrick Chapman

Dramatised by Richard Kurti
Produced and Directed by Andrew Mark Sewell

A B7 production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b08cstfy)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

THU 11:30 Late Returns (b08csw17)
The writer Nicholas Royle is a passionate supporter of libraries and a devoted bibliophile. As a young man his passion for books was so strong, in fact, that some of the books he borrowed from libraries didn't manage to find their way back to their homes on the library shelves. Now, over three decades on, Nicholas is finally doing the right thing and returning the books to the places he first encountered them - Manchester, Paris and London - hoping to avoid any hefty fines in his attempt to straighten his accounts. Along the way he considers his evolving relationship with both books and libraries, meeting other writers such as Vahni Capildeo and Polar Bear to hear about books they have neglected to return because they loved them so much; he also speaks with others who would never dream of failing to take their books back, such as AL Kennedy. Nicholas also meets a successful journalist who went to the same school as him and was one of the last to borrow the novel before Nicholas himself took it on extended leave.
Producer: Geoff Bird.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b08cqqqx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed (b08dc3vn)
Series 1, 09/02/2017

As the UK prepares to begin leaving the EU, what are the key deals to be done? Chris Morris cuts through the jargon to discover how everyone's lives could change.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b08cqqr1)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b08cqqr3)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b08cqqr5)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08csw19)
Series 1, Taking the Middle East Shuttle

Professor David Rothkopf discovers how the fallout from the Yom Kippur war in 1974 resulted in the development of Henry Kissinger's shuttle diplomacy.

In January 1975, the US Secretary of state Henry Kissinger embarked on an exhausting timetable of talks, shuttling between Egypt and Israel and negotiating a disengagement agreement in the aftermath of the so called Yom Kippur war. This was the first time such a tactic had been used and has since became the hallmark of diplomacy where two sides cannot or will not sit down with each other.

We hear how Kissinger navigated the delicate negotiations, second guessing and often wooing the warring nations leaders into accepting a dramatic result, the like of which had never yet been seen in this most bitter of international disputes.

But, as Professor Rothkopf discovers, shuttle diplomacy can only work in the hands of a deft negotiator.

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b08csqyd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b038zh9z)
Red and Blue, Ransomware

By Philip Palmer

Under constant threat from hackers, financial institutions take cyber-security very seriously. A City hedge fund has hired war-gaming expert Bradley Shoreham to test its networks in a planned exercise. Although barely computer literate himself, Shoreham has prepared a whole box of cyber tricks to do battle with the firm's IT experts. And he's prepared to play dirty in order to demonstrate how a multi-million pound business can be brought to its knees.

Written by Philip Palmer
Directed by Eoin O'Callaghan

The second series of Red and Blue from 2013; Philip Palmer's trilogy that focuses on Bradley Shoreham (Tim Woodward). After leaving the British Army, Shoreham became a Consultant Subject Matter Expert. He spends his working life creating war games for training purposes. Fictional they may be but the higher the level of authenticity the greater their value to the participants. And when governments are paying for training they expect a high return for their money.

In 'Sacrifice', Bradley tries to convince an eminent scientist to take part in a war-game exercise that explores a major pandemic outbreak in the UK.

In 'Shadow', Shoreham finds himself on an oil rig in the North Sea, testing the safety protocols and the rig's security.

THU 15:00 Open Country (b08csw1c)
The Pill Hobblers

For this week's Open Country Helen Mark explores the fascinating world of the Pill Hobblers - the 'boat men' who for centuries have risked their lives to keep ships safe on the River Avon.

The Pill Hobblers are known to have existed from at least the 17th centuary and still provide the linesmen who handle the lines for all shipping coming through the locks and onto the quaysides at Avonmouth and Royal Portbury Docks. Alongside the 'Pill Pilots' (the skilled navigators who guided ships through the waters) the Hobblers of today still work much as they did hundreds or years ago, working the ropes to secure and release ships into the Bristol Channel.

The Hobblers are still required to live in Pill - the small North Somerset Village that generations of Hobblers have come from - to ensure swift access to the nearby docks so that they can be on hand 24 hours a day, seven days a week to tend to the ships just as they always have been.

Whilst visiting the village of Pill itself and The Royal Portbury Docks, Helen meets with Hobblers and Pilots - past and present - to hear how generations of local men have kept ships sailing - and trade flowing - safely into the 21st Century, come rain or shine.

Presented by Helen Mark
Produced by Nicola Humphries.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b08cqxgr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Bookclub (b08cr6wp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b08csxwc)
Annette Bening

Antonia Quirke meets Annette Bening.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b08cqqr7)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b08cqqr9)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08cqqrc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 The Cold Swedish Winter (b06vn6zy)
Series 2, Episode 3

The second series of this sitcom from Danny Robins (co-creator Lenny Henry comedy Rudy's Rare Records), set and recorded in Sweden and starring Edinburgh Comedy Award-winner Adam Riches, Danny Robins and a cast of Sweden's most popular TV comedy actors.

Geoff has moved to Yxsjö in northern Sweden, to start a new life with his girlfriend Linda in the (frequently frosty) bosom of her family.

This year, new dad Geoff has plenty of fresh experiences to contend with, including three varieties of pickled cabbage, sinister Christmas elves and an unpleasant visit from Sweden's answer to the BNP. It's all worth it though for Linda (Sissela Benn, star of the Swedish version of The Office) and baby John.

While Geoff and Linda now have their own place, he still has to deal with her disapproving Dad, Sten (comedian Thomas Orredsson from Crimes of Passion), her alarmingly flirtatious mother Gunilla (comedian Anna- Lena Bergelin) and her apparently suicidal, arsonist brother, Anders (award-winning stand upFredrik Andersson).

Geoff is determined to be more Swedish than the Swedes as he takes to his new country with renewed enthusiasm, and he has help, in the form of fellow ex-pat, cynical Ian (Danny Robins), an unending source of (slightly misleading) information, and Soran (Farshad Kohlgi of The Killing), a Danish Kurd with Swedophobia.

Episode 3: Everything works so well in Sweden that Geoff misses complaining about life. It's making him homesick. Then Ian suggests they try making a satirical podcast about Sweden - with seismic results.

Writer: Danny Robins
Additional Material by Ben Kersley

Director: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b08csxwm)
Kirsty receives an unexpected gift, and Peggy does some investigating.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b08cqqrf)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08cstfw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b08cqqrh)
Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.

THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b08csxwr)
The Challenges of Running a Charity

How can people running charities balance doing good, maximising income, while retaining public trust? The sector is undergoing changes in regulation in the wake of scandals involving fundraising and governance. Evan Davis meets the experts. Taking part are: the chairman of the new Fundraising Regulator, Lord Grade of Yarmouth; Jayne Clarke of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution and Simon Gillespie from the British Heart Foundation.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b08cqqr7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 In Our Time (b08cstfr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b08cqqrm)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b08cqqrp)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08dwyg0)
The Transition, Episode 4

Bryan Dick reads Luke Kennard's 'Generation Debt' inspired debut novel, set in an unnamed British city a few years from now.

To prevent him going to jail for his part in a card skimming scam, Karl and Genevieve have signed up to a six-month 'rehabilitation' programme run by a mysterious organisation The Transition. Forced to give up their bedsit and move in with their mentors, the pair are slowly adjusting to life as 'protégés'. Exercise is a key part of the course and mentor Stu tests Karl's physical and emotional mettle with a punishing gym workout.

Reader: Bryan Dick

Writer: Luke Kennard

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

THU 23:00 Spoot! (b08bbddm)
Comedy. Spoof sports documentary show hosted by Harry Hill, who rediscovers Britain's oldest sport, spoot.

THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08cqqrr)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


FRIDAY 10 FEBRUARY 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b08cqqty)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b08cstft)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqv0)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b08cqqv2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b08cqqv4)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b08cqqv6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08fj9gp)
Spiritual reflection and prayer to start the day with the Rev Richard Frazer of Greyfriars Kirk, Edinburgh.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b08cqqv8)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and presented by Sally Challoner.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378tmb)
Long-Tailed Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachan presents the long-tailed tit. They are sociable birds and family ties are vital. They even roost together at night, huddled in lines on a branch, and this behaviour saves lives in very cold winter weather. The nest of the Long-Tailed Tit is one of the most elaborate of any UK bird, a ball of interwoven moss, lichen, animal hair, spider's webs and feathers.

FRI 06:00 Today (b08fg3m9)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b08cr6w9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b08ctykd)
Once Upon a Time in the East, Episode 5

Xiaolu Guo's autobiography tells her remarkable story from adoption at birth through to her career as a writer and film-maker based in the UK. This abridgement deals with her formative years, living in China in times of transition.

Episode 5:
Xiaolu determines upon a new career path.

Xiaolu Guo is a novelist, essayist, screenwriter and film maker. She was born in south-eastern China in 1973 . Her novel, in English translation, Village of Stone, was shortlisted for the 2005 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and the 2006 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. It was followed by her first novel written in English,'A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers, which was shortlisted for the 2007 Orange Prize for Fiction. In April 2013, she was named one of the Best of Young British Novelists by Granta Magazine.

Her award-winning films include She, a Chinese (2009, Golden Leopard Award in Locarno Film Festival) and UFO In Her Eyes (2011), adapted as a screenplay from her novel. Her documentaries include Once upon a time Proletarian (2009), We Went to Wonderland (2008), How Is Your Fish Today? (2006) and The Concrete Revolution (2004), which was awarded the Grand Prix in the 2005 International Human Rights Film Festival.

Writer: Xiaolu Guo
Abridger Pete Nichols
Reader: Chipo Chung
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b08cqqvq)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08ctykj)
Isaac Asimov's I, Robot, The Evitable Conflict

Sixty years ago, Isaac Asimov imagined the impact Artificial Intelligence would have on our world. Only now can we appreciate the prophetic accuracy of his predictions. The last of five moments in one woman's journey, as she lives through the rise of robots. Starring Hermione Norris.

Episode Five : The Evitable Conflict
Stevie enjoys a meteoric rise to political power. Then in a final showdown with her oldest friend Quinn, she reveals the secret that has shaped her life and changed the course of civilisation forever.

Original Music......................... Imran Ahmad
Sound Design.......................... Alistair Lock
Editorial Consultant.................. Bev Doyle
Script Editor........................... Colin Brake
Development Producer............... Patrick Chapman

Dramatised by Richard Kurti
Produced and Directed by Andrew Mark Sewell

A B7 production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 11:00 The Split Second Decision (b08c0s41)
As the pace of technology moves at ever greater speeds, how vulnerable are we when making split second decisions? Kevin Fong flies with the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service, making split-second, life-or-death decisions. He examines how we can come to terms with the growing challenge of quick and accurate front line decision making.

FRI 11:30 Secrets and Lattes (b0415hb2)
Series 1, Spring Awakening

It's Spring in Edinburgh but sisters Trisha and Clare's newly opened cafe isn't blossoming. A business-boosting Polish music evening ends in major heart trauma all round but can an unexpected proposal save the day?

It's Spring in episode 3 of Hilary Lyon's new Edinburgh-based series and everything is blossoming...... apart from sisters Trisha and Clare's new business, unfortunately. 'Cafe Culture' is way too quiet for comfort and it's time to be financially inventive. Temperamental, opera-loving, Polish chef, Krzysztof, (Simon Greenall) suggests that they hold an Eastern European music evening and it's full steam ahead.....apart from the fact that he, mysteriously, keeps nipping off.........

Arty younger sister, Trisha, (Julie Graham) has recently returned to her native city after years of living in London and also loves to nip off out, but not mysteriously......she's just healthily jogging round the Meadows.

However, one morning, she bumps into a friendly American (Guy Paul) making far too many offers for her liking and she finds it hard to be friendly back. Fretting that Clare has plans to bail out and sell the cafe to the highest bidder, Trisha is all set for a barney with her. Indeed, sensible big sister Clare (Hilary Lyon) is harbouring a few secrets on several fronts whilst Lizzie (Pearl Appleby) continues to battle with her shoplifting habit, but comes up trumps, however, when she's unexpectedly left holding the fort on the big night.

There are identity issues and heart traumas of the major variety all round but can an unexpected, yet welcome, proposal save the day..........

Director: Marilyn Imrie
Producers: Moray Hunter and Gordon Kennedy
An Absolute production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b08cqqvs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed (b08dc3xs)
Series 1, 10/02/2017

As the UK prepares to begin leaving the EU, what are the key deals to be done? Chris Morris cuts through the jargon to discover how everyone's lives could change.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b08cqqvv)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b08cqqvx)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b08cqqvz)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08ctz6x)
Series 1, Small Nation, Big Diplomacy

Professor David Rothkopf discusses the pivotal role of a small nation in negotiating a landmark Middle East peace agreement - the Oslo accords.

In 1973, a single handshake on the White House lawn between the Israeli and Palestinian leaders marked the end of decades of confrontation and conflict. But this breakthrough was brokered not through superpower intervention but with the help Norway.

Crucially it was done through secret informal communications called 'back channel diplomacy'.

Professor Rothkopf hears from the negotiators about how they brought the two sides together under the cover of an academic conference and how, ultimately, their careful diplomacy resulted in the landmark Oslo accords . But, as he discovers, back channel diplomacy does not always work.

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b08csxwm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Drama (b08cv1g3)
The Thickness

Daniel Lawrence Taylor's first drama for radio is a razor-sharp satire about gender and power.

Marcus is a great Dad - intelligent, involved, cool, creative, spontaneous.

So why is his 14 year-old daughter pregnant 'by boredom'?

Why is his 17 year-old son trying to get off with Marcus' (latest) 21 year-old girlfriend?

Why doesn't his ex-partner talk to him any more?

What's happened to his family - since he's been away?

Best known for his starring roles in Cockroaches, Uncle and Hunderby, Daniel Lawrence Taylor's new sitcom Timewasters (about a time-travelling South London jazz band) will be out next year.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08cv1g5)
St Monans, Scotland

Eric Robson and the panel are in St Monans in Scotland.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 Still Life in the Old Dog (b08cv1g7)
A tale from American award-winning essayist, poet and undertaker Thomas Lynch, set in the far North of his home state, Michigan.

The Upper Peninsula is sparsely populated, heavily forested and has long cold snowy winters. It's home to Doyle Shields who, at the grand age of 90, has more life behind him than ahead. But when his reverie on the end of days is interrupted by a visit from Emma, he realises he's still ready to risk one last chance at love.

Directed by Kate McAll
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b08cvj8t)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 Feedback (b08cvmh0)
Radio 4's forum for audience comment.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b08cvmh5)
Fiona and Ursula - Missing Someone You Never Knew

Fi Glover with a conversation between sisters with 7 years between them who still both miss the brother they lost in The Troubles, even though only one can remember him. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b08cqqw1)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b08cqqw3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b08cvmh8)
Series 92, Episode 6

Jeremy Hardy and Holly Walsh slalom their way through another week of headlines with Miles

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b08cqqw5)
Lilian is keen to enjoy herself, and Pat wonders if her family needs more support.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b08cqqw7)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08ctykj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b08cvmhc)
Anne-Marie Treveleyan MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Framwellgate School in Durham with a panel including the Conservative MP Anne-Marie Trevelyan.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b08cvmhf)
A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy (b08cvmhh)
Series 1, Omnibus - Part 1

Professor David Rothkopf speaks to decision makers from Tony Blair to Malcolm Rifkind , and from Zbigniew Brzezinski to General Wes Clark, to chart the rapid and radical transformation of modern diplomacy.

By focussing on seminal events or turning points, Professor Rothkopf discusses how diplomacy has evolved and - in some cases - lastingly changed.

The Cuban Missile crisis, for example, is a familiar story of brinkmanship but we discover how subsequent accounts of that event were manipulated to create a narrative about strong coercive leadership - one which was not only at odds with the facts but which sent out the wrong messages about the conduct of diplomacy. We also hear how dancing with the back of a chair honed the diplomatic skills of one of the 19th century's most prominent foreign ministers, and how hot drinks by a log fire in Norway broke the stalemate in middle east negotiations. A former spy reveals how espionage and diplomacy can be frequent if uncomfortable bedfellows. And finally, we discover how so called twittocracy is replacing conventional etiquette and laying foundations for the invention of a new diplomacy.

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b08cqqwb)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b08cqqwf)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08dwyh9)
The Transition, Episode 5

Bryan Dick reads Luke Kennard's 'Generation Debt' inspired debut novel, set in an unnamed British city a few years from now.

Transition mentors Janna and Stu confront Karl and Genevieve with the stark facts of their situation: heavily in debt and no prospect of that changing if they continue with their current jobs and expectations. Karl is becoming increasingly suspicious about the true motives behind the secretive organisation's 'rehabilitation' programme.

Reader: Bryan Dick

Writer: Luke Kennard

Abridger: Robin Brooks

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b08crzr7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b08cqqwh)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b08cvmhk)
Sarah and Hasina - A Reborn Funeral Director

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between funeral directors whose personal losses influence the comfort they extend to their clients. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b08crt5z)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b08crt5z)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b08crvm6)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b08crvm6)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b08csn40)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b08csn40)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b08cstfw)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b08cstfw)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b08ctykj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b08ctykj)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b08crzr7)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b08crzr7)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b08c34q3)

A Point of View 23:50 SUN (b08c34q3)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b08cvmhf)

Aftermath 20:00 MON (b08crt6k)

Aftermath 11:00 WED (b08crt6k)

Afternoon Drama 14:15 THU (b038zh9z)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b08bzdd1)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b08crt6m)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b08bypl4)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b08c34q1)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b08cvmhc)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b08cq9fk)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b08cqqr7)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b08cqqr7)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b08cqxgl)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b08cqxgl)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b08crt6p)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b08dwy6q)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b08dwy7v)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b08dwyg0)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b08dwyh9)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b08cv2qt)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b08crt5x)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b08crt5x)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b08crvm4)

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Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b08csn3y)

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Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b08cstft)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b08cstft)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b08ctykd)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b08cr6wp)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b08cr6wp)

Brain of Britain 23:00 SAT (b08bz7yb)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b08crt67)

Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed 12:04 MON (b08crt63)

Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed 12:04 TUE (b08dc3s7)

Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed 12:04 WED (b08dc3tw)

Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed 12:04 THU (b08dc3vn)

Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed 12:04 FRI (b08dc3xs)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b08cqq7y)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b08crzr3)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b08crzr3)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b08cr6w9)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b08cr6w9)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b08cq790)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b08bz3hw)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b08cr6wm)

Drama 14:15 MON (b051vr32)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b08crzr1)

Drama 14:15 WED (b08csqy4)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b08cv1g3)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b08bypkm)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b08cqqcx)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b08cqqhw)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b08cqqm9)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b08cqqqs)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b08cqqv8)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b08c33j1)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b08cvmh0)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b08fg81w)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b08crzrc)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b08cr6wc)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b08cr6wc)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b08csqyj)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 13:45 MON (b08crt65)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 13:45 TUE (b08crx11)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 13:45 WED (b08csnwz)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 13:45 THU (b08csw19)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 13:45 FRI (b08ctz6x)

Friends & Foes - A Narrative History of Diplomacy 21:00 FRI (b08cvmhh)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b08bypkw)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b08cstfy)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b08cqqdw)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b08cqqjd)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b08cqqmz)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b08cqqrf)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b08cqqw7)

Fry's English Delight 13:30 SUN (b08cr6wf)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b08c32qh)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b08cv1g5)

Guilt Trip 19:15 SUN (b07lhg2q)

I Was... 16:00 MON (b08crt69)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b08cstfr)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b08cstfr)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b08cqqjh)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b08crzrf)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b08crzrf)

Jake Yapp Saves Humanity in 28 Minutes 18:30 TUE (b087p7m4)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b08c33hz)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b08cvj8t)

Late Returns 11:30 THU (b08csw17)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b08bypll)

Losing Margaret 11:30 TUE (b08crw13)

Meet the Cyborgs 21:00 MON (b08bzl96)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b08bypk5)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b08cqq6l)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b08cqqcl)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b08cqqhk)

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Midweek 09:00 WED (b08cqqmc)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b08cqqmc)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b08cq78y)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b08cq78y)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b08csqy6)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b08c0rr7)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b08csqyg)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b08bypkf)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b08cqq6v)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b08cqqcv)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b08cqqht)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b08cqqm7)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b08cqqqq)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b08cqqv6)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b08cqq6x)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b08bypky)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b08cqq83)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b08cqqdd)

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News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b08bypkh)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b08cqq7c)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b08cqq7w)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b08byplq)

News 13:00 SAT (b08bypl2)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b08cqxgp)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b08crvm2)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b08c2ljs)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b08csw1c)

PM 17:00 SAT (b08bypl9)

PM 17:00 MON (b08cqqdr)

PM 17:00 TUE (b08cqqj8)

PM 17:00 WED (b08cqqmv)

PM 17:00 THU (b08cqqr9)

PM 17:00 FRI (b08cqqw1)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b08cqq8l)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b08bz3j0)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b08cr6wv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b08c354f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b08f2yz3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b08fcj9c)

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Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b08fj9gp)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b08cq793)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b08cq793)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b08cq793)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b08cqxgr)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b08cqxgr)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b08cqxgr)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b08bypkt)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b08bypln)

Secrets and Lattes 11:30 FRI (b0415hb2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b08bypk9)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b08cqq6q)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b08cqqcq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b08cqqhp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b08cqqm3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b08cqqql)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b08cqqv2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b08bypk7)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b08bypkc)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b08byplc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b08cqq6n)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b08cqq6s)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b08cqq8c)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b08cqqcn)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b08cqqcs)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b08cqqhm)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b08cqqhr)

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Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b08cqqv0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b08cqqv4)

Short Rides in Fast Machines 00:30 SUN (b04pvp7z)

Simon Evans Goes to Market 11:30 WED (b0435p0k)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b08byplh)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b08cqq8h)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b08cqqdt)

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Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b08cqqrc)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b08cqqw3)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b08cqq71)

Spoot! 23:00 THU (b08bbddm)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b08cqqd6)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b08cqqd6)

Still Life in the Old Dog 15:45 FRI (b08cv1g7)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b08cqxgt)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b08cqq7h)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b08cqq80)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b08cr8pz)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b08cr8pz)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b08crt6h)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b08crt6h)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b08crzr9)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b08crzr9)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b08csqyd)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b08csqyd)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b08csxwm)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b08csxwm)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b08cqqw5)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b08c2mlk)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b08csxwr)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b08cqqrh)

The Celebrity Voicemail Show 23:15 WED (b08csrhw)

The Cold Swedish Winter 18:30 THU (b06vn6zy)

The English Fix 11:00 MON (b08crt61)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b08csxwc)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b08crt6c)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b08crt6c)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b08cq78s)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b08cq78s)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b08crvm0)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b08crvm0)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b08cr6wh)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b08csn42)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b08cvmh5)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b08cvmhk)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b08cqqms)

The Moth Radio Hour 23:00 SUN (b08crlhy)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:04 SUN (b08bzcd3)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b08crt6f)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b08c33j5)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b08cvmh8)

The Poet and the Echo 19:45 SUN (b08crjlj)

The Rise of the Robots 11:00 TUE (b08crvz3)

The Split Second Decision 11:00 FRI (b08c0s41)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b08cqq88)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b08cqqf0)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b08cqqjk)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b08cqqn3)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b08cqqrp)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b08cqqwf)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b08c0rm2)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b08csqy8)

Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme 23:00 WED (b05419jk)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b08cqqf3)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b08cqqjm)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b08cqqn5)

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Today 07:00 SAT (b08cq78q)

Today 06:00 MON (b08cqqd3)

Today 06:00 TUE (b08ff5t3)

Today 06:00 WED (b08fg37n)

Today 06:00 THU (b08fg3cj)

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Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups 11:30 MON (b04v3838)

Tunes from the Trash 15:30 SAT (b088fch9)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b038qhyz)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b038qk4j)

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Weather 06:04 SAT (b08bypkk)

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Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b08cq78w)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b08cqq8q)

What Does the K Stand For? 18:30 WED (b08csqyb)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b08bypl7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b08cqqd9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b08cqqhy)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b08cqqmf)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b08cqqqv)

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Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b08bzmv5)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b08crzr5)

World at One 13:00 MON (b08cqqdp)

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World at One 13:00 WED (b08cqqmq)

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You and Yours 12:15 MON (b08cqqdh)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b08cqqj2)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b08cqqml)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b08cqqr1)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b08cqqvv)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b08c354h)