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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 21 JANUARY 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b088b8x6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 America Rewritten (b08bl1kx)
Richard Ford

Robert McCrum talks to eminent writers, including Marilynne Robinson and Malcolm Gladwell, about making the transition from Obama to Trump. Today he talks to Richard Ford whose novels include The Sportswriter, Independence Day and the Lay of the Land. Ford's characters are often middle class white men living in traditional Republican worlds. It's a demographic that helped put Trump in the White House.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b088b8x8)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b088b8xb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b088b8xd)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b088b8xg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0890736)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b0890738)
Love After Love

The programme that starts with its listeners.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b088b8xj)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b088b8xl)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Open Country (b088fx30)
London: A National Park City?

There's a campaign gaining ground to make London a National Park City. But what exactly does that mean? David Lindo meets the campaign founder Dan Raven-Ellison to find out and goes on a journey across London to see for himself why anyone would think the UK's biggest city could qualify for such a title. Along the way he finds a ghost of a river, an enthusiastic ornithologist, and some paddlers who call Regents Canal their breathing space.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b088b8xn)
A Hard Brexit and Agriculture

Charlotte Smith hosts a panel discussion to assess the possible implications of a 'hard' Brexit on the UK's agricultural industry. Guests are: Barclay Bell, farmer and President of the Ulster Farmers Union; Richard Hirst, farmer and chair of G's Growers; Peter Hardwick, head of trade development at the farmers' levy board, the AHDB; and Professor Allan Buckwell, an agricultural economist.
With 72% of the UK's agricultural produce currently being exported to the EU, how will the possibility of new trade barriers and tariffs impact farmers' profits?
And how can farmers and businesses prepare for the uncertainty ahead?
We also hear from the Farming Minister George Eustice, and some of the farmers at the UK's biggest agricultural machinery show, Lamma.
Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b088b8xq)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b08907f9)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b088b8xs)
Mark Watson

Mark Watson is an award winning comedian who has written six novels. He explains why in spite of his success, his dream job is still to be a football commentator.

Ben Earle and Crissie Rhodes make up The Shires, a British Country band. They discuss playing the Grand Ole Opry and how they both started out in choirs - one of them regularly singing for the Queen at Windsor Castle.

Toby Capwell has loved knights and shining armour since childhood. He is an experienced jouster, curator of Arms and Armour at The Wallace Collection and the man who escorted the remains of Richard III to Leicester Cathedral.

Parkour expert Charlotte Blake not only enjoys running, jumping and climbing her way across the urban landscape but also teaches the discipline to people with mental health problems.

Plus the Inheritance Tracks of Tom Fletcher author and singer from McFly.

Mark's tour 'I'm Not Here' finishes at the Old Vic on Feb 11th.

Armour of the English Knight 1400-1450 by Tobias Capwell is published by Thomas Del Mar Ltd.

The Shires' single Daddy Little Girl is out now.

SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b0890cv9)
Series 15, Lincoln

Jay Rayner hosts the culinary panel programme.

SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b0890cvc)
Anushka Asthana of the Guardian looks at the aftermath of the Prime Minister's speech on Brexit, its effect on our nearest EU neighbour Ireland, and the prospect of a progressive alliance of the left in parliament.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b088b8xv)
Drawing Out the Story

Bridget Kendall introduces correspondents stories. Today, Robin Denselow is in one of the most sparsely populated countries on the planet, Namibia, where they are seeking divine intervention in a time of drought. Andrew North uses his sketchbook to weave his way through Soviet memorabilia in Georgia. In Nepal, economic necessity means that families aren't able to look after their older relatives as they once did. Melissa Van der Klugt visits an alien concept in the country - the first old people's home. Rob Stepney is with Austrian archaeologists before they're thrown out, in the ancient Turkish city of Ephesus. And it's the bean-eaters they're focused on. And Tim Mansel is in Leipzig, in eastern Germany, with the football upstarts of RB. But he's careful not to spill the beans over dinner with the old stalwarts of LOK.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b088b8xx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b0890cvf)
Southern Comfort

One frustrated user of the Southern rail franchise was refunded half of the cost of his season ticket this week. But instead of the refund coming from the train company it came from his credit card provider. He claimed the refund under Section 75 of the Credit Card Act citing non-delivery of goods and services due to the recent disruption he'd experienced.

January is traditionally known as divorce month - when lawyers see a spike in the numbers of couples who've decided to go their separate ways - but we may also see an end to the traditional 50/50 split to divorce proceedings too. The Court of Appeal is currently considering the case of a banker who is arguing that because of his exceptional contribution to the family's wealth he should be awarded more rather than his ex-wife.

According to the Office for National Statistics crime survey, nearly half of all crime reported in England and Wales is fraud and cybercrime. Whilst the numbers of these types of crimes are up, the numbers of cases passed to the police to investigate is down. We also report an update on the case of Nargess Sajady who lost £12k to criminals but recorded the calls the fraudsters made to her.

And the whistleblower who has just won a 13-year "David and Goliath battle" against HSBC and the Financial Conduct Authority, resulting in a multimillion-pound compensation payout to thousands of people.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Richard Vadon.

SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b088jj6g)
Series 92, Episode 3

Miles Jupp's house guests for his weekly news-based shindig are Andy Hamilton, Andrew Maxwell, Angela Barnes and Susan Calman.

This week Theresa May, a certain inauguration party Stateside and the pressing domestic issue of a UK-wide courgette shortage.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b088b8xz)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b088b8y1)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b088jj6j)
Diane Abbott MP, Lionel Barber, Jacob Rees-Mogg MP, Xenia Wickett

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from the Cotswold School Academy Trust in Bourton on the Water, Gloucestershire, with the Shadow Home Secretary Diane Abbott MP, the Editor of the Financial Times Lionel Barber, the Conservative Party MP Jacob Rees-Mogg and Xenia Wickett the head of the US and Americas Programme at Chatham House.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b088b8y3)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?
Presented by Amol Rajan
Producer Beverley Purcell

Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230
Call 03700 100 444. Email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Tweet,#BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.

SAT 14:30 Drama (b08bbqhb)
Boswell at Large: A Corsican Adventure

An irreverent riff on James Boswell's Tour to Corsica.

By the creator of Radio 4's much loved detective series McLevy, David Ashton.

James Boswell is 24 and under pressure to grow up and become a man. He heads to Europe to buy some time and sets foot on Corsica, hoping for adventure. What he finds is a fearless society of freedom fighters and their charismatic leader.

Flutist: Claire Simpson

Directed by Kirsty Williams.

SAT 15:30 Laura Mvula's Miles Davis (b08b7wcs)
Singer-songwriter and composer Laura Mvula meets jazz musicians Jason Yarde and Laura Jurd, and music broadcaster journalist Kevin Le Gendre, to discuss her musical inspiration, the visionary American jazz musician Miles Davis.

'He has always been and will always remain one of the greatest inspirations of my musical life. To me he was and is an icon, a pioneer, the unique innovator. He never held himself back - maybe that's what first attracted me to him and his sound'.

Picking up on these opening remarks, and in the company of three contributors with contrasting perspectives on the man and his music, Mvula and her guests consider the impact and legacy of Miles Davis, a unique musician who repeatedly reinvented himself musically, and single-handedly shape-shifted the language of jazz, for nearly half a century. With glimpses of music from Miles Davis's vast discography, the programme paints a unique and personal portrait of one of the 20th century's greatest musical creators and iconclasts.

Laura Mvula is one of the most exciting music talents to emerge in Britain in recent years. Growing up in Birmingham's Kings Heath to parents from Jamaica and St Kitts, Mvula cut her musical teeth singing in and directing local church and gospel choirs, and performing with soul group Judyshouse, before going on to Birmingham Conservatoire to study composition with, among others, composer Joe Cutler. After working as a music supply teacher in Birmingham schools, she sent demo recordings of her songs to record labels; the result has been spectacular international success that ranges from touring the world with her band, to composing for the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Laura Mvula cites Miles Davis as one of her greatest influences - first urged by her father to watch documentaries about him, then given albums by a relative, her initial puzzlement grew into unbounded admiration for a black musician who refused utterly to be bounded by musical style or social position. His appetite for musical innovation and experiment, his dismissal of the idea of musical mistakes, his vision for successful creative collaboration - all of these characteristics and more combined to create a template for the sort of musician Laura Mvula has aspired to become. In this documentary feature, Laura sounds out her thoughts in the company of three guests, all of whom are equally great admirers of Miles Davis, but who approach him from different perspectives.

Mvula's guests are:

Kevin Le Gendre is a journalist and broadcaster with a special interest in black music. Deputy editor of Echoes, he contributes to a wide range of publications that include Jazzwise, MusicWeek, Vibrations and The Independent On Sunday and also appears as a commentator and critic on radio programmes such as BBC Radio 3's Jazz On 3 and BBC Radio 4's Front Row.

Laura Jurd is a British award-winning trumpet player, composer and bandleader and BBC New Generation Jazz Artist for 2015-2017. Highly active throughout the UK scene, Laura has developed a formidable reputation as one of the most creative young musicians to emerge from the UK in recent years.
In 2015 Laura received the Parliamentary Jazz Award for 'Instrumentalist of the Year' and in the past has been shortlisted for a BASCA British Composer Award, received the Dankworth Prize for Jazz Composition and the Worshipful Company of Musician's Young Jazz Musician of the Year award. Her band Dinosaur is one of the most vital and creative new ensembles in the UK today, and in September 2016, the band's debut album 'Together, As One' was released on Edition Records.

Jason Yarde is a saxophonist, composer, arranger, producer, and musical director who writes music across various styles including jazz, classical, hip-hop, fusion, free improvisation, broken beats, R&B, reggae, soul, song writing and for a variety of media: his BBC Proms compositional debut 'Rhythm and Other Fascinations' won the first ever BASCA award for 'Contemporary Jazz Composition' in 2010.

Yarde began playing alto and soprano saxophones with the Jazz Warriors while a teenager, and went on to MD this landmark orchestra. He is a longtime sideman of Louis Moholo, and has appeared in the big bands of Sam Rivers, Hermeto Pascoal, McCoy Tyner, Manu Dibango, Roy Ayers, and Andrew Hill.

Producer: Lyndon Jones for Music Department, BBC Wales.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b088b8y5)
Call The Midwife, Nicole Kidman, Miriam Margolyes

As Call The Midwife returns to our screens we hear from it's creator and Executive Producer, Heidi Thomas. She shares some of the upcoming story lines including Thalidomide and FGM.

The actor Miriam Margolyes talks about her life and career as part of our series 'The Chain'.

How easy was it to raise a family on a vegan diet in the 1970s? Joanne O'Connell the author of The Homemade Vegan and Dilys Cluer who has been a vegan since 1948 discuss.

Older parents: we hear from Sue Tollefsen who gave birth to her daughter Freya when she was 57 and Charlotte who is now 23 about what it's like to have an older dad.

Nicole Kidman talks about her new film 'Lion' based on the true story of a five year old boy who gets lost on the streets of Calcutta and ends up being adopted by a couple in Australia.

The poet Theresa Lola performs her poem 'Notes on Loving Your Grandfather with Dementia'.

Samantha Ellis, author of a new book Take Courage, tells us why she believes Anne Bronte's writing is every bit as accomplished and radical as her sisters' work.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.

SAT 17:00 PM (b088b8y7)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 iPM (b0890738)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b088b8yc)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b088b8yf)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b088b8yk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b088b8ym)
Lucy Worsley, Reggie Yates, Bruce Guthrie, Tayo Aluko, Fairport Convention, Reuben Hollebon, Emma Freud, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Emma Freud are joined by Lucy Worsley, Reggie Yates, Tayo Aluko and Bruce Guthrie for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Fairport Convention and Reuben Hollebon.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.

SAT 19:00 America Rewritten (b08c04pz)
Lionel Shriver

All this week Robert McCrum has been talking to great American writers such as Richard Ford, Marilynne Robinson and Walter Mosley. Lionel Shriver's latest novel The Mandibles features a new America where there really is a wall between Mexico and the USA. She talks to Robert McCrum about how she will write a new America under President Trump.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b088b8yp)
Lion, Raising Martha, Laszlo Krasznahorkai, material/rearranged/to/be - Siobhan Davies

A review of the week's cultural highlights.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b0890f7j)
How Marx Made the Right

Marking 150 years since the publication of Das Kapital, Tim Stanley, a former Marxist, makes the case that the Right's ideological debt to Marx is almost as large as that of the Left. He argues that, both historically and on a personal level, conservatism is largely a response to Marxism.

We can trace the Marxist influence on conservative doctrine as far back as the 19th century when, reacting to the revolution of 1848, French political theorist Alexis de Tocqueville first made the case for turning the proletariat into a class of small property owners so as to give them a stake in society and prevent revolutions. A nation of property owners remains a central conservative ideal nowadays.

Meanwhile, the contemporary right is defined by a fiscal credo devised by economists Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman, as a direct response to the ideological threat they saw in state socialism.

On a personal level, many leading conservatives - including Tim Stanley himself - became conservatives as if in response to their own early embrace of Marxist doctrines.

And while the right wing ideologies devised by Hayek, Friedman, and Thatcher seemed to have triumphed in the 1990s and early 2000s, the rise of a new brand of right-wing populism suggests that the right-wing doctrines of neo-liberalism in fact needed their socialist enemy to survive.

A Kati Whitaker production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b051r80b)
Reading Europe - France: Three Strong Women, Episode 1

Reading Europe - France: Three Strong Women - over the next 18 months Radio 4 takes you on a journey across Europe exploring the best in contemporary literature.

In this award winning and best-selling French novel Marie NDiaye explores the immigrant experience and the power of humanity. Caught between France and Africa, three women take flight, and their lives are altered forever.

Part 1

When Norah's terrifying father calls, she's forced to leave her home in Paris and journey to Dakar. Secrets from the past and horrors from the present are unveiled.
Meanwhile, in the Gironde, Fanta and her husband Rudy are still coming to terms with the life they left behind in Senegal.

Adapted for radio by Pat Cumper
From a translation by John Fletcher.

Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production

Marie NDiaye is French novelist and playwright. She is the first black woman to win France's most prestigious literary prize - the Prix Goncourt - for Three Strong Women in 2009. The novel was also long-listed for The 2014 International IMPAC DUBLIN Literary Award and it was a finalist for the 2013 Man Booker International Prize.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b088b8z4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 FutureProofing (b088fkyn)
Art

Art may not survive the 21st century as a separate, meaningful category - according to one of the UK's foremost art teachers. Both cultural change and massively increased accessibility to the tools with which to create will have a huge impact on the nature of art itself. Presenters Timandra Harkness and Leo Johnson explore the impact that technological change will have on art, and speak to artists at the forefront of the digital revolution.

Producer: Jonathan Brunert.

SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b088f0nb)
The Final, 2016-17

(12/12)
The current Round Britain Quiz series comes to a close with the last clash between the North of England and the Midlands. Back in the autumn when these two teams last met, the North won. Can the Midlands claw back some honour today?

Rosalind Miles and Stephen Maddock are the regulars on the Midlands team, while Stuart Maconie and Adele Geras appear for the North of England.

As usual they'll have to muster all of their arcane knowledge in such diverse fields as literature, geography, cinema, music and politics to make the right connections between the apparently random clues. Tom will be on hand to steer them away from the blind alleys: but the more help he has to give them, the fewer points they'll accumulate.

By the end of the contest the final rankings for the 2016-17 series will have been decided.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

SAT 23:30 I, by the Tide of Humber (b088k0ls)
BBC coverage of Hull City of Culture will be extensive across 2017. At its very start, the award-winning poet Sean O'Brien reflects upon why his native city, its waterscape and landscape, have inspired poets past and present.

The programme features a specially commissioned new poem from Sean - a three-part memory-piece, which is also a love-song for Hull, its surroundings and their metaphorical resonance:

........The great void
Where the land loses track of itself,
And the water comes sidling past at the roadside

Awaiting the signal to flood, is a kind of belief
Where there is no belief, is the great consolation
Of knowing that nothing will follow but weather and tides,

Yet also that when the world ends
There must be a Humber pilot keeping watch
As the great ships are passing silently away

Through the estuary's mouth and the saw-toothed marriage
Of river and sea, and out past the fort at Bull Island
And over the edge, and away.............

Sean also celebrates the work of poets who have made the city their home: Andrew Marvell, a line from whose 17th Century poem, To His Coy Mistress, gives this programme its title; Philip Larkin, Stevie Smith and others. He brings in an eclectic range of music, including his personal favourite, Dirty Water, by local band The Fabulous Ducks.

He hears from the Hull-based geographer Chris Skinner, and poet Sarah Stutt.

Starting with memories of digging holes in the garden of the house where he grew up, via flood-cellars, culverts and drains, the smaller river Hull and the great estuarine river Humber itself, this highly-textured programme culminates with Sean at the top of the disused lighthouse at Spurn Point, gazing out into the North Sea.

Producer Beaty Rubens.


SUNDAY 22 JANUARY 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b0890k4y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Ian Fleming's Thrilling Cities (b04lsxhf)
Chicago and New York

Long In 1959, Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond, was commissioned by the Sunday Times to explore some of the world's most exotic cities. Travelling to the Far East and then to America, he left the bright main streets for the back alleys, abandoning tourist sites in favour of underground haunts, and mingling with celebrities, gangsters and geishas. The result is a series of vivid snapshots of a mysterious, vanished world.

Fleming wote, 'On November 2nd, armed with a sheaf of visas...one suitcase...and my typewriter, I left humdrum London for the thrilling cities of the world. All my life I have been interested in adventure and abroad. I have enjoyed the frisson of leaving the wide, well-lit streets and venturing up back alleys in search of the hidden, authentic pulse of towns. It was perhaps this habit that turned me into a writer of thrillers.'

In today's episode, Fleming flies to the USA and visits the garage in Chicago where the St. Valentine's Day Massacre took place. In New York, he thrills at the sight of the traffic lights changing from red to green in unison all the way down Park Avenue.

Read by Simon Williams
Abridged by Mark Burgess

Copyright Ian Fleming Publications Ltd 1963

Produced by David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0890k50)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0890k52)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0890k54)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b0890k56)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b08b3jry)
Holy Cross, Woodchurch

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from the Church of the Holy Cross in Woodchurch on the Wirral. The present bells were recast In 1971 from the old peal of six by the Whitechapel Foundry.
The tenor weighs three and three quarter hundred-weight and is tuned to the key of D. They are one of the lightest peal of church bells in the UK. We hear them ringing 'Cambridge Surprise Major'.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b0890f7g)
Mike Pence

Becky Milligan profiles the man who could be the next President of America. Mild mannered, disciplined and a seasoned politician, Mike Pence was largely unknown until he was selected by Donald Trump to serve as his Vice-President.

PRODUCERS: Beth Sagar Fenton and Joe Kent
EDITOR Penny Murphy.

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b0890k58)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b0890k5b)
Seeing the Light

In the week of the Feast of the Conversion of St Paul, Mark Tully asks what causes sudden flashes of inspiration and what the American psychologist Dr Gary Klein has called "light bulb moments".

January 25th traditionally marks the day Saul saw a blinding light leading to his conversion to Christianity when "the scales fell from his eyes". Isaac Newton is supposed to have discovered gravity when struck on the head by an apple. Archimedes cries "Eureka" in his bath. The history books are littered with anecdotes of great discoveries made in the blink of an eye, problems solved in a single moment or radical changes of mind that are seemingly divinely inspired. Has the divine anything to do with the process or is it the subconscious at work - and do we all have the capacity to experience "eureka moments"?

Expert witnesses include Archimedes, George Frederick Handel, Sir Paul McCartney, mathematician Henri Poincaré and green campaigner Annie Leonard.

The readers are Claire Vousden and Vincent Ebrahim.

Presenter: Mark Tully
Producer: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b08b3js0)
Holistic Grazing

'Healing the land one bite at a time': that's the motto of Joel Salatin, one of America's most famous farmers, who practices and promotes his own brand of holistic mob grazing and mixed farming.

The Salatin system mirrors the herd movement of ancient times, steering cattle or sheep from pasture to pasture, following the best grass without over-grazing. Livestock are followed by chickens to fertilise and sanitise, which apparently enhances the grass growth and the soil beneath it - allowing for better carbon capture and ensuring well-fed, free range animals.

Here in the UK, Joel's system - tried and tested on his farm in Virginia, USA - has been embraced by the team at Fir Farm in Gloucestershire, who are steadily implementing mob grazing methods, with slight adjustments to account for the British climate.

Sybil Ruscoe meets the Fir Farm team and Joel Salatin himself, to see exactly how the system is being implemented here in the UK and learn more about its potential benefits.

Produced by Lucy Taylor.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b0890k5d)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b0890k5g)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b0890k5l)
Sunday morning religious news and current affairs programme.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b08b3jws)
LawWorks

Broadcaster and presenter Clive Anderson makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of LawWorks.

Registered Charity Number 1064274
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'LawWorks'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'LawWorks'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b0890k5n)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b0890k5q)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b08b3jwv)
St George's Cathedral, Southwark

Mass during the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity live from St George's Cathedral, Southwark. The celebrant is the Dean, Canon Richard Hearn, and the homily is given by Archbishop Peter Smith. Haydn's Little Organ Mass is sung by the Cathedral Choir directed by Norman Harper and accompanied by Frederick Stocken. Producer: Stephen Shipley.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b088jj6l)
The Fourth Plinth

Will Self explores the significance of the art work that adorns the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square.

He asks what such public art projects represent in this "festival of ephemerality our society seems to have become".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sbyj8)
Tawny Owl

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents young Tawny Owls. Most of us know the "hoot" and "too-wit" of Tawny Owls but might be puzzled if we heard wheezing in the woods, the sound of the young.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b0890k5s)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b0890k5v)
Kirsty has unwanted company, and Rob has got a meeting to attend.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b08b3k40)
Caitlin Moran

Kirsty Young's castaway this week is the writer Caitlin Moran.

A columnist for The Times newspaper for 25 years, she's published five books and co-wrote the Channel 4 sitcom Raised by Wolves. The eldest of eight children, and raised on benefits on a council estate in Wolverhampton, she was taken out of school by her parents aged eleven and educated herself at the library and by watching television, reading all the classics and learning from popular culture.

She started writing early and after winning several writing competitions, her first novel, The Chronicles of Narmo, was published when she was just sixteen. She became a music journalist for Melody Maker and, not long after that, started writing regular columns for The Times covering everything from politics and feminism to musings on her own background. She is currently finishing her sixth book and writing several film scripts.

She has been married to the music journalist Peter Paphides since 1999 and they have two daughters.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b0890k5x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 The Museum of Curiosity (b088f2vz)
Series 10, Episode 2

This week, the Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Jo Brand welcome the feel-good writer and comedian, Lucy Porter; the etymologist, self-proclaimed pedant and "Inky Fool" Mark Forsyth; and the lipsmackin' thirstquenchin' acetastin' motivatin' goodbuzzin' cooltalkin' highwalkin' fastlivin' evergivin' coolfizzin' advertising creative legend, Dave Trott.

This week, the Museum's Guest Committee stretch their minds over the subject of Lycra, revive an old word for a printer's day off; and explore the surprisingly recent cultural heritage of the Ploughman's Lunch.

The show was researched by Anne Miller of QI and Mike Turner.

The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.

The production coordinator was Sophie Richardson.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b08b3k42)
Lancashire: My Food Roots

Sheila Dillon returns to her food roots in Lancashire - and discovers the ideas, flavours and produce that this county has to offer the world.

Presenter: Sheila Dillon
Producer: Rich Ward.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b0890k5z)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b0890k61)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Moving Pictures (b07wxc7t)
Scenes in and around Kyoto

A three-part series for BBC Radio 4 offering listeners the chance to take a long, slow look at great artworks, photographed at high-resolution.

What would it be like to walk the streets of 17th century Kyoto? In this week's episode, Cathy FitzGerald explores a sumptuous pair of Japanese screens that depict the historic city in incredible detail. Follow the link to zoom in and examine the artwork as you listen.

Temples, shrines, castles, shops and homes - the image is crammed with tiny scenes. A man in a barber's shop examines his new hair cut in a mirror. People peer down into the street to watch a parade pass. Weary pilgrims sit on a verandah, sharing fruit. Men and women of every age and every social class appear, more than 1,800 in all.

Cathy FitzGerald hears how these glittering screens - a genre known as 'rakuchû rakugai-zu' or 'scenes in and around Kyoto' - were made and what they tell us about everyday life in the 17th century Japanese city.

Presenter and Producer: Cathy FitzGerald
A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Image: Sights in and around Kyoto, Artist Unknown, Mid Genna era (1615-24). From the collection of the Shimane Museum, courtesy of the Bureau of Public Enterprise, Shimane Prefectural Government. Photograph by Google Arts and Culture.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b088jj66)
Aldershot and District Allotment Association

Eric Robson and his panel are guests of the Aldershot and District Allotment Association. Chris Beardshaw, Pippa Greenwood and Bob Flowerdew answer the audience questions.

This week the panel offer advice on combating Equisetum and how to harvest skirret, and they debate the myth behind placing rhubarb in a hole ahead of a seed.

Also, Chris Beardshaw visits Jane Austen's house in Chawton and discovers her deep love of gardening.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b080py66)
Sunday Omnibus - Passion

Fi Glover with conversations that show how common interests fire parent-child relationships, and another that reveals the re-kindling of a romance after 40 years. All in the Omnibus of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b08b3k7t)
Reading Europe - Italy: The Story of a New Name, Episode 2

From one of Italy's most acclaimed authors, Elena Ferrante, the continuing story of Lila and Lena, two bright young girls who have grown up in the tough, rough streets of post war Naples.

Lila finds it hard to forgive her husband Stefano. Meanwhile Lena continues her higher education and is determined to make a difference with her life and escape the clutches of Naples - but at the expense of her friendship with Lila.

Written by Elena Ferrante
Dramatised by Timberlake Wertenbaker
Producer: Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (b08b3k7w)
Tessa Hadley, Female friendships, The Russian Revolution

Award winning author Tessa Hadley talks to Mariella Frostrup. As comfortable with the scope of the novel as she is with the 'bite' of the short story, Hadley discusses her latest collected tales, Bad Dreams, which suggests an entirely new genre: the domestic thriller.

Continuing our occasional series about writers working together, Mariella is joined by novelists Kitty Aldridge and Esther Freud who, despite being friends since their late teens, still manage to have an honest and unsparing writing relationship.

Also on the programme, we discuss what the release of a new anthology of writings from 1917 can teach us about the impact of the Russian Revolution on writers. And novelist Camilla Way explores why the bonds between women - and how they can break - has long fascinated writers.

SUN 16:30 Can yr Adar - Song of the Birds (b08b3k7y)
Singer-songwriter Kizzy Crawford returns to the RSPB nature reserve at Carngafallt in Mid Wales, where she was inspired to create "Can Yr Adar - Birdsong" with pianist and composer, Gwilym Simcock, and members of Sinfonia Cymru. Kizzy and Gwilym share how they wove music out of the landscape and wildlife she found at Wales's own 'Celtic rainforest', and they open a window on the hidden processes of creation, collaboration and communication that gave birth to a brand new work of art.

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b088fg4b)
Breaking Into Britain

Revealed: the secret UK immigration dodges on offer on the high street.

Theresa May has promised to stick to a promise to bring down net migration to the tens of thousands, and post the vote for Brexit, is under pressure to be tough on immigration.

But File on 4 has found a market in fake documentation is helping some migrants who aren't eligible to come here, to get the necessary visas.

High street immigration advisers, and even a solicitor tell the programme's undercover researcher how to buy their way in using fake documentation.

The programme asks what the authorities are doing to catch the crooks.


Reporter: Jane Deith
Producer: Paul Grant
Editor: Gail Champion.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b0890f7g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b0890k65)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b0890k67)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0890k6c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b0890k6f)
John Waite

This week, John Waite features the poet laureate with his eye on the pop charts; it's a ten from Len for his nominated Great Life - Lionel Bart. We've current affairs for you or should that be currant affairs as Professor Brian Cox supervises an experiment involving a glass of lemonade and some raisins, that really puts the fizz into physicist. And bless me - heavens above, the Daily Service gets a barbershop quartet to praise the Lord and pass the brilliantine. And they're divine - truly.
Producer: Stephen Garner
Production support: Kay Bishton and Pete Liggins.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b08b3kb8)
Justin spreads the word, and Jill and Peggy compare notes.

SUN 19:15 Robert Newman's Entirely Accurate Encyclopaedia of Evolution (b06kgvcs)
One of Britain's finest comedians, Rob Newman returns to Radio 4 with a witty, fact-packed series mixing stand-up and sketches, challenging notions of Survival of the Fittest and The Selfish Gene with a new theory that's equal parts enlightening and hilarious.

Rob is our guide on a journey through a unique audio A-Z of nature that takes in everything from altruistic amoebae and dancing squid to Richard Dawkins wrestling naked with a postal worker.
Piecing these fragments together allows Rob to correct some major distortions of Darwinism, as well as rejig the theory of natural selection in the light of what we now know about epigenetics, mirror neurons and the Flintstones.

Written by Rob Newman
Starring Claire Price, with Jenni Murray as the voice of the Encyclopaedia.

Producer: Jon Harvey
Executive Producer: Richard Wilson
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 19:45 The Poet and the Echo (b08b3kd4)
Series 1, Ozymandias

5 writers choose 5 poems as inspiration for new stories.

Episode 1/5

Looking

An unwelcome visitor inspires a meditation on permanence.

A powerful story inspired by Shelley's poem 'Ozymandias', by the Booker long-listed author James Robertson.

Credits

Writer ..... James Robertson
Reader ..... Andy Clark
Producer ..... Eilidh McCreadie

A BBC Scotland Production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:00 Feedback (b088jj6d)
Roger Bolton follows up the issues that are concerning listeners and asks if the BBC Reality Check team can combat the spread of 'fake news'.

With audiences across the world getting caught out by viral stories, and dodgy statistics and shocking facts beginning to have a direct impact on politics, the BBC is responding with concrete efforts to tackle the growing phenomena of 'fake news'. The corporation has established a permanent statistic verification team called Reality Check. From the central newsroom of the BBC, News Editor James Stephenson details the inner workings of this group and what he hopes they will achieve, and discusses how much attention the BBC should give to stories based on 'fake news'.

Ahead of Donald Trump's inauguration as President of the USA, Michael Gove was invited onto Radio 4's Today Programme to discuss his exclusive interview with the President Elect. But some listeners were left scratching their heads over the heavyweight 8:10am slot being given to a backbencher - and the lengthy time he was allocated.

Listeners have also been expressing their dismay at the news that Radio 2 are axing live overnight presenters Alex Lester and Janice Long from the After Midnight show - to be replaced with repeats and pre-recorded playlists. Roger Bolton asks Lewis Carnie, the relatively new head of BBC Radio 2, to justify the cutbacks.

And can music be the flame to ignite radio drama? Listeners give their poignant and personal reflections to recent Radio 4 drama On Kosovo Field, which was inspired by and written from previously unreleased music by PJ Harvey. Writer Fin Kennedy explains how he translated emotive lyrics into dramatic narratives.

Producer: Karen Pirie
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b088jj6b)
Baroness Heyhoe Flint, Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, Una Kroll, William Peter Blatty, Sir James Mancham

Matthew Bannister on

Baroness Rachael Heyhoe Flint who captained the England women's cricket team to victory in the World Cup.

Iranian President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, one of the key players in the country's revolution.

Dr. Una Kroll, a tireless campaigner for the ordination of women.

William Peter Blatty who wrote the book and the film "The Exorcist"

And Sir James Mancham, the first President of the Seychelles

Producer: Neil George.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0890cvf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b08b3jws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 In Business (b088fx3g)
The NHS: The Recruitment Dilemma

Since its inception, the National Health Service has always relied on doctors and nurses who have been trained overseas. How does it plan for the workforce it requires? In the second of two programmes exploring today's health service, doctor-turned-journalist Smitha Mundasad, asks why the NHS is currently facing a recruitment crisis on so many fronts. She'll ask what impact Brexit could have. Can pharmacists, physician associates and other health workers do some of the work of doctors, who take longer to train and cost more to employ? And will the NHS start training more of its workforce?

Presenter: Smitha Mundasad
Producer: Rosamund Jones.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b0890k6m)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b088fx3b)
Goodfellas

With Francine Stock

Oscar winning editor Thelma Schoonmaker takes Francine behind the scenes of one of the great set-pieces in Martin Scorsese's classic gangster picture Goodfellas. And reveals why the director once considered burning all copies of the movie.

The Film Programme begins a new series about cinema history that hopefully will change cinema history - The A to Z of Film. Two critics slug it out to get their chosen film-maker into the programme's alphabet of movie directors. This week, critic Naima Khan and Jonathan Romney face off as Andrea Arnold takes on Michelangelo Antonioni.

Critics Tim Robey and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh consider how Natalie Portman's perfomance as Jackie Kennedy compares with other portrayals of the First Lady from actors as diverse as Katie Holmes, Joanne Whalley and ex Charlies Angel Jaclyn Smith.

SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b0890k5b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]


MONDAY 23 JANUARY 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b0890k8m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b088fmj9)
Age of noise - British drinking

The 'age of noise': How a preoccupation with unwanted sounds came to characterise modernity. The 20th century saw the expansion of cities and technological change. The sounds of motor cars, vacuum cleaners and gramaphones filled the air, leading social commentators to forecast the end of civilisation and a breakdown in mental health. Did noise provide people with a way of talking about their social anxieties? Does it still serve this function today? Laurie Taylor talks to James Mansell, Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies at the University of Nottingham and Marie Thompson, Lecturer in the School of Film and Media at the University of Lincoln.
British drinking and the night time carnival. William Haydock, Visiting Fellow in the Faculty of Health and Social Sciences at the University of Bournemouth, argues that our alcohol consumption is peculiarly 'carnivalesque', combining ritual with risk taking and spectacle.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b08b3jry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0890k8p)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0890k8r)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0890k8t)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b0890k8w)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08c3vjq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b0890k8y)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

MON 05:56 Weather (b0890k90)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03x474w)
Rook

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the rook. High in the treetops buffeted by March winds, rooks are gathering twigs to build their untidy nests. The bustle of a rookery is one of the classic sounds of the UK countryside, especially in farming areas, where rooks are in their element, probing the pastures and ploughed fields with long pickaxe bills.

MON 06:00 Today (b0890k92)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (b0890k94)
Les Misérables: novel of the century?

On Start the Week Andrew Marr talks to David Bellos about Victor Hugo's Les Misérables. Bellos argues that this 19th century masterpiece is the novel of the century, which demonstrates the drive to improve human life both morally and materially. Dinah Birch compares what was happening in literature on the other side of the channel, reflecting the breadth of society in Britain. Simon Callow makes the case for the composer of the century, Richard Wagner, while the singer Barbara Hannigan explains how a 12th century legend has been given a contemporary twist in the opera Written On Skin.
Producer: Katy Hickman.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b08b7rv2)
The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Miserables, Episode 1

David Bellos explores why Les Miserables is "France's greatest gift". He reveals its inspirations and its resonance now, while describing Victor Hugo's life as he penned his epic.

There has never been a book like it. War and Peace, Great Expectations, Crime and Punishment were all published in the same decade, yet only Les Misérables can stand as the novel of the nineteenth century. How did Victor Hugo's epic work come to be the most widely read and frequently adapted story of all time? And why is its message just as important for our century as it was for his own?

Author David Bellos tells the compelling story of The Novel of the Century.

Reader: Daniel Weyman
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0890k96)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08b7rv4)
Little Women, The First Wedding

Rhiannon Tise's dramatisation of Louisa May Alcott's coming of age novel continues this week. Three years have passed since we were last with the March girls. War is now over and John Brooke is safely home. Everyone is eagerly looking forward to Meg and John's wedding.

Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.

MON 11:00 The Untold (b08b7rv6)
A Habit of Hoarding

David is a hoarder and lives alone in a house in south Belfast that's reached gridlock. Rooms are filled with his accumulated belongings and doors won't open against piles of furniture and random possessions. He hasn't dusted for years, hasn't had any form of central heating for longer and won't let anyone come round for a visit - not even members of his own family.

Now David has discovered the house has a potentially devastating case of dry rot. Floors and ceilings may be in danger of collapsing but with all his piles of stuff, dealing with it is a far from straight-forward process.

Will the dry-rot be the catalyst that lets David break the hoarding habit of a lifetime? And will he be able to invite his daughter Ruth into the house for the first time in years?

Presenter: Grace Dent

Producer: Conor Garrett.

MON 11:30 Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups (b04svfsc)
Series 2, The Separatists

When the lights from a new zebra crossing outside Tom's parent's house causes insomnia in the Wrigglesworth household, Tom's dad is forced to take matters into his own hands and cause a fuss. Not perhaps in the way everyone else would though...

Meanwhile, Tom is down in London preparing himself for a visit from the bailiffs.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b0890k98)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 Home Front (b083lkjf)
23 January 1917 - Kenny Stokoe

On this day in 1917, the Board of Education announced it would consider training wounded soldiers for teaching, and in Tynemouth, injured veteran Kenny Stokoe tries to make amends.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b0890k9b)
Milton Keynes at 50; Sainsburys same-day delivery; Targeting scam mail

Milton Keynes marks 50 years as a New Town. One of its original designers tells us what lessons today's new villages and towns can learn.
We go behind the scenes at Sainsbury's to see how their same day delivery order process actually works.
And problems getting Trading Standards officers out to the homes of fraud victims.
Winifred Robinson presents.

MON 12:57 Weather (b0890k9d)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b0890k9g)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 Against the Grain (b08b7st7)
Series 1, Change on the Way

Brexit means Brexit. But what does it mean for British farmers? No other industry is so closely linked to Brussels as agriculture, which still gets nearly 40% of the EU's annual budget. In this ten part series, Charlotte Smith talks to farmers, politicians and policy experts. She explores the history of British farming, and the options for the UK after it has left the Common Agricultural Policy. In episode one, Charlotte joins the annual farming jamboree in London, the Farmers' Weekly Awards. The economist Dieter Helm lays out his vision for a post-CAP industry. And in Perthshire, cousins Martin and Roddy Kennedy explain the financial realities of hill farming.
Producer: Chris Ledgard.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b08b3kb8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Drama (b08b7szp)
Talk to Me

By Sara Davies

It's a risk to let a mild-mannered interviewer loose on your household. Karl Marx would never have agreed to it, unless he was drunk, which, it turns out, he was. It is April 1873 when our interviewer appears on the doorstep, ready to record whatever she witnesses. Marx and his adored 18-year old daughter Eleanor are packing for a trip to Brighton, but not just for their health. Just because he's the greatest political thinker of the century doesn't mean that Marx' family is immune to bourgeois aspirations and teenage tantrums. He also has a secret that no one in the family will ever reveal.

Our interviewer discovers that Marx can be terrifyingly confrontational and intolerant of fools, or fun-loving and kind. He delights in the press' description of him as the 'most dangerous man in Europe' even though it means his family have had to make so many sacrifices: chased out of mainland Europe and frequently penniless. Marx is a devoted husband and father and his youngest daughter Eleanor is especially beloved. She is also essential to Marx' work: one of the few people who can keep up with his extraordinary intellect, ignore his ranting and interpret his astonishingly bad writing.

But his housekeeper Helene is the only person who can calm Marx down when he is in a temper. And she has a secret of her own.

Music by Tom Constantine
Interviewer/Director...Mary Ward-Lowery.

MON 15:00 Brain of Britain (b08b7svh)
Heat 1, 2017

(1/17)
Russell Davies launches the 2017 season of the perennial general knowledge tournament, welcoming the first four contenders to the BBC's Maida Vale studios. In the opening contest they hail from London, Carlisle, Richmond in Surrey and Elgin on the Moray Firth. Over the next few months a total of 48 hopeful contestants will be whittled down to 16 semi-finalists and, eventually, four Finalists - the prize being the title of 64th BBC Brain of Britain.

Each week there'll also be a chance, as always, for a listener to win a prize by suggesting a pair of devious questions with which to 'Beat the Brains'.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b08b3k42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 John's Songs - A Day with a Music Hall Master (b07kpy3v)
Born near Euston Station in 1931, John Foreman is a singer of Music Hall songs, folk songs and more. He has been singing at clubs across Britain since the great folk revival of the 1950s.

Recovering well from a recent stroke, John has decided to clear out his North London home. We join him as he picks through a lifetime of memorabilia and his own beautiful self-printed songsheets, hearing him burst into song.

The golden era of the Music Hall had long gone by the time John was born, but he learned a vast number of songs from his parents, from neighbours and from friends. He went on to sing at folk clubs throughout the country and became one of the founding members of the British Music Hall Society.

John's forebears include clowns, circus ringmasters and dancers. After a childhood in the blitz, he worked as a teacher, busker and Punch and Judy man. As The Broadsheet King, he has printed and bound countless pamphlets, songsheets and books. We eavesdrop as John looks back on his life and the songs that he has loved.

Producer: Tom Woolfenden
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b08b7t20)
Series 15, How to Beat the House and Win at Games

How to beat the house and win at games.
Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined on stage by mathematicians Hannah Fry and Alex Bellos, psychologist Richard Wiseman and games enthusiast Helen Zaltzman, to get their top tips for winning games and solving puzzles. Do mathematicians make better Poker players, or is psychology the key to the ultimate poker face? Will a knowledge of probability give you the ultimate winning strategy for your next game of Monopoly? (the answer is yes!). How old are the oldest puzzles and why do they involve wolves and cabbages? And how have puzzles involving wolves, cabbages and bridges resulted in the development of whole new branches of mathematics.
PRODUCER: Alexandra Feachem.

MON 17:00 PM (b0890k9q)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0890k9s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b08b7t22)
Series 10, Episode 3

This week, Professor John Lloyd his curator Jo Brand welcome a fashion historian with a taste for nautical chic, Amber Butchart; a quizzer with a business head and 57 trillion entries in his address book, Jack Waley-Cohen; and a comedian who's as big Down Under as he is internationally, Jimeoin.
This week, the Museum's guests investigate a failed cure for malaria that made the world go crazy for mauve; an inventive use of adverbs that will obsess inventive punsters; and a new unit of velocity for compressed curd.
Researched by Anne Miller of QI and Mike Turner.

The production coordinator was Sophie Richardson.

The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b08b7ttk)
Susan has a lot to live up to, and Anisha needs to act fast.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b0890k9v)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08b7rv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 Aftermath (b08b7ttm)
Series 1, Hungerford

30 years on from the first mass shooting in modern British history, Alan Dein visits Hungerford. He investigates how the town has coped in the aftermath.

'Aftermath' is a new series which explores what happens to a community after it has been at the centre of a nationally significant event.

In August 1987, Hungerford was rocked to its core by a mass shooting. A local man killed 16 people and injured many more. The whole country was shocked, and as Hungerford tried to recover and grieve, the world's press camped out in this small Berkshire town. For a generation, the name of the town became synonomous with this event.

How did the town manage in the face of overwhelming attention, and how has it changed since? Alan Dein investigates the aftermath, meeting people involved at the time of the event, and asks what Britain has learned from Hungerford.

Produced by Melvin Rickarby.

MON 20:30 Analysis (b08b7ttp)
Hospital Trust?

Is public affection for the NHS preventing it from becoming fit for the future? Polling suggests that despite many complaints about the public health service, it is regarded as a much-loved and uniquely British institution. That's why for decades, it has been an article of faith among politicians that closing down hospitals or major medical services is close to electoral suicide. Received wisdom is that members of the public are dogmatically attached to their local hospitals. But could our attachment be more than just dogma? And what happens when politicians and professionals believe they know what needs to change - but the public come to an altogether different answer? Amid a time of rising demand, rising costs, and changing priorities, Sonia Sodha of The Observer explores the subtle relationship between public opinion and healthcare management.
Producer: Gemma Newby.

MON 21:00 Revisiting the 14-Day Rule (b088fch7)
Episode 1

For more than 25 years, since the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act came into force, it's been illegal in the UK to research on human embryos in the test tube beyond 14 days. But with recent scientific developments the debate over changing the limit has been rekindled. In the first of two programmes, Matthew Hill, the BBC's West of England Health Correspondent, looks back at the origins of the 14 day rule following the birth of the first baby by IVF, Louise Brown, in 1978.

From the archive, Dr Robert Edwards, explains how successful IVF followed many years of basic research. Professor Simon Fishel, who worked with Robert Edwards in his private clinic, Bourn Hall in Cambridge, looks back at how little was known about the science of human reproduction at this time.

There was much unease from politicians and the public about allowing this research to carry on unregulated and in 1982 the government asked Dame Mary Warnock to chair a committee of medics, social workers, lawyers and clerics to look into the future of IVF and embryo research. Matthew Hill talks to Dame Mary Warnock about why she chose a limit of 14 days for research on human embryos and why the report recommended that it should be a criminal offence to carry out research beyond that limit.

After six years of public discussion the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill was debated in parliament and the Act was passed. Juliet Tizzard, Head of Strategy at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, considers the benefits of a gap between the Warnock Report and the passing of the Act.

MON 21:30 Start the Week (b0890k94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b0890k9x)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b0890k9z)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08b7ttr)
Reading Europe - Norway: The Bird Tribunal, Episode 1

In the Norwegian writer Agnes Ravatn's haunting psychological thriller, two people, each with a secret, seek atonement for past sins. TV presenter Allis Hagtorn seeks solace in a remote house on an isolated fjord when she takes up a new job as a housekeeper and gardener. Her 44 year old employer is not what she is expecting. Sigurd Bagge is an enigmatic presence, and Allis, like a moth to a flame, finds she is simultaneously drawn to him and alert to his disquieting moods. Lydia Wilson is the reader.

Agnes Ravatn is a novelist and columnist and has published several collections of essays. The Bird Tribunal has won two awards in Norway, the NRK P2 Listener's Novel Prize and the Youth Critic's Award, and it has also been adapted for the stage.

Rosie Hedger is the translator of The Bird Tribunal, and has lived and worked in Scandinavia.

Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

MON 23:00 Mastertapes (b08b7ttt)
Series 6, Craig David (A-side)

John Wilson continues with the series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

CRAIG DAVID talks and plays his way back to 2000 and his debut album, "Born To Do It", which went on to sell 8 million copies world-wide.

Recorded and released when Craig David was only 18 years old, the album includes the hits, Fill Me In, Walking Away, Rendevous and 7 Days. Described as a '2-step garage' and R&B album, Born To Do It draws heavily on electro beats, garage and hip hop. It became (and remains) the fastest-selling debut studio album ever by a British male solo act.

Sixteen years later, a more mature Craig David released his 6th studio album, Following My Intuition, which followed in the footsteps of his debut and became his second record to debut at Number 1.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0890kb1)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


TUESDAY 24 JANUARY 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b0890kdm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b08b7rv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0890kdp)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0890kdr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0890kdt)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b0890kdw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08cs1bv)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b0890kdy)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qk90)
Jay

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the jay. This bird is a colourful member of the crow family. In September and October you'll often see jays flying around woodland with their bills and throats crammed with acorns. Many of these they bury as winter stores but not all are retrieved by Jays and many germinate and grow into young oaks, making the jay a tree-planter on a national scale.

TUE 06:00 Today (b08b7vyd)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b08b7vyg)
Sadaf Farooqi on what makes us fat

Is it true that some people put on weight more easily than others? And if so why? It's a question that's close to many of our hearts. And it's a question that medical researcher, Professor Sadaf Farooqi is trying to answer. In 1997, Sadaf noticed that two children she was studying lacked the hormone leptin. From there, she went on to discover the first single gene defect that causes obesity. For most us, how much we eat is within our control. But for children with this rare inherited condition and, it turned out, several other rare genetic disorders, the evidence is clear. A voracious appetite is not a lifestyle choice: it's a biological response to brains signalling starvation. Sadaf tells Jim how she discovered ten rare genetic disorders that cause severe childhood obesity and what this means for the rest of us.
Producer: Anna Buckley.

TUE 09:30 One to One (b08b7vyj)
Julia Bradbury on Emotionally Challenging Work

Julia Bradbury talks to Laura Rutherford, a volunteer with the Samaritans, about the challenges of her work as a listener. How does she cope with the emotional demands and the need to 'step back' after challenging calls? Producer Sarah Blunt.

TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b08bqwx3)
The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Miserables, Episode 2

While narrating Victor Hugo's fall from grace in France, David Bellos begins to decode his epic, exploring the meaning of colours and money in the context of Hugo's time.

There has never been a book like it. War and Peace, Great Expectations, Crime and Punishment were all published in the same decade, yet only Les Misérables can stand as the novel of the nineteenth century. How did Victor Hugo's epic work come to be the most widely read and frequently adapted story of all time? And why is its message just as important for our century as it was for his own?

Author David Bellos tells the compelling story of The Novel of the Century.

Reader: Daniel Weyman
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0890kf0)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08b7vyl)
Little Women, Amy's Adventures

Meg is busy with family life. Beth is as lovely and caring as always and Jo is making a small but independent living writing stories. Amy is now Aunt March's companion
and becoming an accomplished young lady but things are about to change for her in a way she would never have imagined. Louisa May Alcott's coming of age story dramatised by Rhiannon Tise.

TUE 11:00 Revisiting the 14-Day Rule (b08bqssd)
Episode 2

Since 1990 it has been illegal in the UK to research on human embryos beyond 14 days. With recent scientific developments, Matthew Hill asks if the 14-day limit should be extended.

TUE 11:30 Generation Grime (b08bl167)
Radio 4 explores why the music genre of Grime has blown up in the UK in the last few years by following Wales' Astroid Boys on their recent UK tour. Once just the sound of the London underground, Grime's popularity has spread all over the country and is now the biggest youth culture since Punk. Cardiff's Astroid Boys are set to become Grime's next big thing - they've just signed a record deal with Sony imprint Music For Nations and their track Dusted has been picked up by wrestling giants WWE as their new anthem. The band and their fans tell us in their own words how this very British music scene has influenced their lives and given them a much needed voice.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b0890kf2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 Home Front (b083lkjl)
24 January 1917 - Alan Lowther

On this day in 1917, German forces regained lost ground from Russia in an offensive near Riga, while in Tynemouth, Alan Lowther is besieged from all sides.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b0890kf4)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b0890kf6)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b0890kf8)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 Against the Grain (b08b7wcv)
Series 1, National Farming

Charlotte Smith visits Minette Batters, the deputy president of the National Farmers' Union, on her farm near Salisbury. Minette takes Charlotte to a water meadow which is flooding at the wrong time of year - but, she says there's nothing she can do. She has to comply with policy regulations. So when did the idea of national farming policy take hold, and where did it come from? These are questions Charlotte explores with the Professor of Landscape History from the University of East Anglia, Tom Williamson.
Producer: Chris Ledgard.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b08b7ttk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Drama (b05r6zxz)
Mrs Robinson, I Presume

A new play by Tracy-Ann Oberman, telling the story of the film that changed Hollywood - The Graduate. Starring John Simm as director Mike Nichols.

In 1963, fledgling producer Lawrence Turman read a novel by Charles Webb called The Graduate. He knew he had to make it into a movie, so he optioned it with his own money. He then persuaded Mike Nichols, who had only directed theatre at this point, to direct the film.

Everyone in Hollywood thought they were crazy when they cast the unknown Dustin Hoffman to play Benjamin Braddock, who was described in the book as tall, blond and athletic. But they went their own way and made a classic movie that defined a generation. How they did it and how Gene Hackman, Anne Bancroft and Mel Brooks got involved along the way is the subject of Tracy-Ann Oberman's drama.
Tracy-Ann's previous work for Radio 4 includes the Afternoon Dramas Bette And Joan And Baby Jane and Rock And Doris And Elizabeth.

Producer: Liz Anstee
A CPL production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b0890cv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]

TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b08b7wcy)
Series 6, Craig David (B-side)

John Wilson continues with the series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

Having discussed the making of "Born To Do It", the 8 million selling debut smash album (in the A-side of the programme, broadcast on Monday 16th January 2017 and available online), Craig David responds to questions from the audience and performs acoustic live versions of some to the tracks from his first No 1 album and the second which was a further 16 years in the waiting.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

TUE 16:00 Don't Log Off (b07knqy7)
Series 7, Episode 4

Alan Dein continues his nocturnal excursions via Facebook and Skype, hearing the real life dramas of random strangers.

Tonight he connects with a civil engineering student from Kathmandu two years on from the earthquake that devastated parts of Nepal, a Jamaican living in Panama City who is waiting to fulfil his childhood dream of joining the US army and a man in Tanzania, expecting the birth of his first child.

Producer: Clare Walker.

TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b08b7wd1)
Series 41, Chris Patten on Pope John XXIII

Chris Patten, Lord Patten of Barnes, nominates a great life who was born a peasant and became a Pope. Pope John XXIII did well at school but was no star. He wasn't a striking figure of a man and struggled to keep his weight under control. There was nothing about him that stood out. And his election to Pope took many by surprise. But he was the man who began to push the Roman Catholic church into the modern world.

Chris Patten is joined by Eamon Duffy, Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Cambridge. The presenter is Matthew Parris and the producer is Perminder Khatkar.

TUE 17:00 PM (b0890kfb)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0890kfd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b08b7wd3)
Series 6, Episode 5

John Finnemore, writer and star of Cabin Pressure and John Finnemore's Double Acts and regular guest on The Now Show and The Unbelievable Truth, returns for a sixth series of his multi-award-winning Souvenir Programme, joined as ever by Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin, and Carrie Quinlan.

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described by The Radio Times as "the best sketch show in years, on television or radio", and by The Daily Telegraph as "funny enough to make even the surliest cat laugh". Already the winner of a BBC Audio Drama Award and a Radio Academy Silver Award, John was named the 2016 Radio Broadcaster of the Year by the Broadcasting Press Guild for his work on Souvenir Programme.

5/6
This week on Souvenir Programme, we take another tip Behind Closed Doors; a famous author takes drastic measures to improve his sales; and we find out what a certain celebrity is really like.

Written by & starring ... John Finnemore
Cast ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Cast ... Simon Kane
Cast ... Lawry Lewin
Cast ... Carrie Quinlan

Original music composed and performed by ... Susannah Pearse.

Production Coordinator...Sophie Richardson

Producer ... Ed Morrish

A BBC Studios Production.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b08b7vck)
Tom gets the go-ahead, and Roy does a good deed.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b0890kfg)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08b7vyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b08b7wd7)
The Cost of a Kidney

In the UK three people die every day waiting for an organ transplant. People from ethnic minorities face a particular shortage of donors - the NHS aims to achieve 80% consent rates by 2020, but at the moment only 34% of families from ethnic minorities consent to donate organs when asked, and rates of living donation have started to fall.

File on 4 finds that a small number patients are so desperate they will risk their health by looking for a kidney abroad. Most British patients head to Pakistan, where an equally desperate group of people are coerced into giving up their kidneys, placing their lives in the hands of organ traffickers.

But now a new, sinister trade is emerging in Pakistan. In October Pakistani police raided an apartment building in Rawalpindi and behind a metal grill, found 24 terrified people locked inside. They had been lured with offers of jobs, but when they arrived were kidnapped and told a kidney would be removed.

As a worldwide shortage of organs fuels an increase in transplant tourism, Allan Urry, working in conjunction with local journalist Nosheen Abbas hears from the people caught up in this illegal trade and asks whether enough is being done to prevent it.

Reporters: Allan Urry with Nosheen Abbas
Producer: Ruth Evans.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b0890kfj)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b08b7wdb)
Dr Mark Porter presents a series that aims to demystify perplexing health issues.

TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b08b7vyg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b0890kfl)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08b7wdd)
Reading Europe - Norway: The Bird Tribunal, Balder's Destruction

In the Norwegian writer Agnes Ravatn's haunting thriller, Allis discovers that her secret cannot be kept. At home she captivates her emotionally distant employer, Bagge, with the story of the destruction of the Norse god, Balder. Lydia Wilson is the reader.

Translated from the Norwegian by Rosie Hedger
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b08b7t20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]

TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0890kfn)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


WEDNESDAY 25 JANUARY 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b0890khm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b08bqwx3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0890khp)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0890khr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0890kht)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b0890khw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08cs5lq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b0890khy)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Mark Smalley.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mj8ln)
Magpie

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the magpie. Magpies have always had a rascally streetwise image. They featured in anti-theft campaigns on television in the 1980s, and long before that, their kleptomaniac tendencies were celebrated by Rossini in his opera, 'The Thieving Magpie'. Their pied plumage isn't just black and white, but gleams with iridescent greens, blues and purples.

WED 06:00 Today (b08bb0gr)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Midweek (b0890kj0)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b08bqx38)
The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Miserables, Episode 3

Victor Hugo finds himself in exile in the Channel Islands and returns to the manuscript he had begun more than a decade earlier - a novel of the poor, with a working title of Les Misères.

There has never been a book like it. War and Peace, Great Expectations, Crime and Punishment were all published in the same decade, yet only Les Misérables can stand as the novel of the nineteenth century. How did Hugo's epic work come to be the most widely read and frequently adapted story of all time? And why is its message just as important for our century as it was for his own?

Author David Bellos tells the compelling story of The Novel of the Century.

Reader: Daniel Weyman
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0890kj2)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b08bb0q1)
Little Women, Jo and Laurie

As the family gather to celebrate Laurie's graduation from college, Jo is aware that Laurie has something he is desperate to say to her. Louisa May Alcott's coming of age story dramatised by Rhiannon Tise.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b08bb0q3)
Marian and Ray - Like a Light Had Gone Out

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who, remembering her stress-related breakdown, acknowledge the importance of their relationship in getting through it. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 Aftermath (b08b7ttm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 The Write Stuff (b04n2ksk)
Henry Fielding

Radio 4's literary panel show, hosted by James Walton, with team captains Sebastian Faulks and John Walsh and guests Jane Thynne and John O'Farrell. The author of the week - Henry Fielding.

Produced by Alexandra Smith.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b0890kj4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 Home Front (b083lkjx)
25 January 1917 - Sylvia Graham

On this day in 1917, 354 Canadian soldiers drowned when their ship hit a mine off the Irish coast, and at Collingwood Sylvia Graham does her best to steer her family through choppy waters.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b0890kj6)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b0890kj8)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b0890kjb)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 Against the Grain (b08bb202)
Series 1, The CAP Years

Charlotte Smith's investigation into British farming takes her to Brussels, where she asks what the Common Agricultural Policy has done for British farming. The Irish MEP Mairead McGuinness argues that it has held back the forces of large scale business and protected thousands of small farmers who preserve the character of the European countryside. True, says the respected commentator Professor Allan Buckwell, but that's a romantic idea and we need to ask how much longer we want to use public money to support unprofitable small farms.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b08b7vck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Drama (b08bb4qh)
The Giffnock Girls: Of the Dark Past

Gail and Bianca are two old school friends
facing the future without the men they married -
but their past lives are proving hard to leave
behind. Bittersweet comic drama set in a
comfortable Glasgow suburb. By Marcella
Evaristi.

BBC Scotland.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b08bb204)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.

WED 15:30 Inside Health (b08b7wdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b08bb20j)
Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b0890kjg)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b0890kjj)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0890kjl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 What Does the K Stand For? (b08bb33b)
Series 3, Working for a Living

Sitcom about comedian Stephen K Amos's teenage years in 1980s South London. Written by Jonathan Harvey with Stephen K Amos.
This week Stephen takes his first steps into working life.
Starring Ellen Thomas, Laurie Kynaston, Stephen K Amos, Frances Barber, Bola Okun, Emerald Crankson, Karen Bartke and David Sterne.
Produced by Paul Sheehan.
Production Coordinator Beverly Tagg.
A BBC Studios Production.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b08bb33d)
Rex leaves no stone unturned, and could Jazzer have met his match?

WED 19:15 Front Row (b0890kjn)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08bb0q1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 FutureProofing (b08bb33g)
Sport

Presenters Timandra Harkness and Leo Johnson investigate the future of sport in the digital age. How will physical activity and organised sport be viewed in the years to come?

FutureProofing looks at how new technology could change not just what it means to be an athlete but also athletes' actual bodies, and asks what role sports will play in our culture in the decades ahead.

Producer: Faizal Farook.

WED 20:45 Four Thought (b08bb33j)
Talks with a personal dimension.

WED 21:00 Farewell Doctor Finlay (b07k0k4m)
Episode 2

Dr Margaret McCartney, along with medical historians and GPs, tells the story of general practice from the troubled early years of the NHS to the still-troubled present day.

The NHS was a huge improvement for the general population, for hospitals and hospital doctors. But it was rather different for GPs as their private fees disappeared and their workload multiplied with all the chronic disease that had previously gone untreated. General practice was under-funded and under-loved. Scathing reports of dingy, ill-equipped surgeries, along with repeated bouts of GP unrest, finally brought about the Family Doctors Charter in 1966, leading to a much better period of subsidised health centres and staffing.

Modernisation came thick and fast from the late 1980s, with some GPs controversially given budgets to choose services for their patients. Relaxation of the "out of hours" obligation saw practices forming co-operatives to handle evening and weekend calls and, from 2004, the responsibility for providing 24 hour care was removed from GPs entirely.

But unrest has continued, with many training places unfilled, GP posts vacant, and some practices closing altogether. The programme explores how the profession evolved into its present state.

Presented by Dr Margaret McCartney
Produced by Mike Hally

A Square Dog Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 21:30 Midweek (b0890kj0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b0890kjq)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b0890kjs)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08bb33l)
Reading Europe - Norway: The Bird Tribunal, Elysium

In the Norwegian writer Agnes Ravatn's tautly told and award winning thriller, it's Allis's birthday and she's in a reflective mood. Later, Bagge disappears into the water. Lydia Wilson is the reader.

Translated from the Norwegian by Rosie Hedger
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

WED 23:00 Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme (b052jkxb)
Series 3, Love

In the first of a new series, Tim Key grapples with the concept of love by telling the story of one man's romance with a beautiful cashier. Musical accompaniment is provided by Tom Basden.

Written and presented by Tim Key
With Tom Basden and Katy Wix

Produced by James Robinson

A BBC Cymru Wales Production

The Edinburgh Comedy Award-winning comedian returns for a third series of his Late Night Poetry Programme. Since series two Tim has been busy touring his latest acclaimed live show, Single White Slut, thrilling audiences at the Old Vic in Daniel Kitson's Tree, as well as filming movies such as Steve Coogan's Alpha Papa and Richard Ayoade's The Double. But now he's back on late night Radio 4 doing what he does best - attempting to recite poetry whilst tormenting his friend and musician, the equally brilliant Tom Basden.

Praise for Tim Key

"...You never know when Key will suddenly toss you a fantastic joke or startlingly well-constructed line." Radio Times

"The show... has a kind of artistry and strange beauty that makes it unlike any other hour of stand-up you are likely to see." The Observer

"In any other sphere apart from comedy, we'd probably class this way of looking at the world as certifiable. Here it feels like genius." The Telegraph.

WED 23:15 James Acaster's Findings (b04nv97q)
Series 1, Fruit

Triple Foster's nominated comedian James Acaster presents the results of his research. This week, he's been investigating 'Fruit'. With Nathaniel Metcalfe ('Fresh from the Fringe') and Bryony Hannah ('Call the Midwife').

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0890kjv)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


THURSDAY 26 JANUARY 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b0890klx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b08bqx38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0890klz)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0890km1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0890km3)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b0890km5)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08cxbp8)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b0890km7)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03tht5z)
Chough

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison tells the story of the chough. Our healthiest chough populations are in Ireland, southwest and north Wales and western Scotland. The last English stronghold was in Cornwall and Choughs feature on the Cornish coat of arms. Even here they became extinct until wild birds from Ireland re-colonised the county in 2001. Now the birds breed regularly on the Lizard peninsula.

THU 06:00 Today (b08bb9cq)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 In Our Time (b08bb9cy)
Parasitism

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the relationship between parasites and hosts, where one species lives on or in another to the benefit of the parasite but at a cost to the host, potentially leading to disease or death of the host. Typical examples are mistletoe and trees, hookworms and vertebrates, cuckoos and other birds. In many cases the parasite species do so well in or on a particular host that they reproduce much faster and can adapt to changes more efficiently, and it is thought that almost half of all animal species have a parasitic stage in their lifetime. What techniques do hosts have to counter the parasites, and what impact do parasites have on the evolution of their hosts?

With

Steve Jones

Wendy Gibson

and

Kayla King.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b08bqx7q)
The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Miserables, Episode 4

Still exiled on Guernsey, as the author Victor Hugo tries to reconstruct Paris from memory, distance also complicates the revision and delivery of his final manuscript to Brussels.

There has never been a book like it. War and Peace, Great Expectations, Crime and Punishment were all published in the same decade, yet only Les Misérables can stand as the novel of the nineteenth century. How did Victor Hugo's epic work come to be the most widely read and frequently adapted story of all time? And why is its message just as important for our century as it was for his own?

Author David Bellos tells the compelling story of The Novel of the Century.

Reader: Daniel Weyman
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0890km9)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08bb9d4)
Little Women, Devoted Sister

Jo has enjoyed her adventure in New York but now she is home she is struck by the change in Beth. Louisa May Alcott's coming of age story dramatised by Rhiannon Tise.

THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b08bb9dc)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

THU 11:30 Inconspicuous Consumption (b08bb9wf)
Series 2, Listening and Driving

Laura Barton drives the highways and byways, seeking out the musical memories and stories of fellow drivers and passengers.

Childhood family holidays, first forays behind the wheel after the successful driving test, the daily commute - our journeys in cars are often measured, and remembered, by the music on the stereo. It's a common experience, but one that we rarely discuss once we leave the personal bubble of the car.

Why do we listen to what we do, and what does it add to the journey?

Laura meets the family who spent months living on the road in Morocco, their choice of listening enhancing the fantasy of the road trip. With the right thing on the stereo, it's easy to create a sense of being in your own film, and Laura explores this with sound psychologist Michael Bull.

But is what we choose to listen to always safe? Laura tries out some bespoke driving music, created with the help of psychologists to aid concentration, before heading to a motorway service station to sample the listening tastes and habits of the 21st-century driver.

As night draws in, Laura lets a cabbie take the wheel and reflect on mood, music and the road ahead.

A Testbed production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b0890kmc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 Home Front (b083lkk7)
26 January 1917 - Adeline Lumley

On this day in 1917, the Speaker's Conference report recommended women over 30 should get the vote, while in Tynemouth, Adeline makes sure she is heard loud and clear.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b0890kmf)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b0890kmh)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b0890kmk)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 Against the Grain (b08bb9wk)
Series 1, Farming Westminster

Charlotte Smith's investigation of modern British farming moves to Westminster, where she tackles the often tricky relationship between farmers and politicians. Former agriculture ministers Nick Brown and John Gummer look back on the late 1990s and early 2000s, a time when a series of farming crises made that relationship more fraught than ever. And, Charlotte asks, is this a particularly British problem? We hear from France and from Finland.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b08bb33d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Drama (b08bbcyx)
The Comets

"There are stories that are only meant to get you through the next few hours, and there are stories that are meant to last for your whole life."

Eleven year old Kirstie loves listening to the stories told to her by her mother, June. Kirstie's favourite is the story about an old and fragile pair of wings hidden in a box on a secret shelf. It's a story, her mum tells her, that is meant to last her whole life.

June has a terminal illness and as it reaches its final stages she brings Kirstie back to the town where she was born. There Kirstie meets Hagan, a solitary man who cares for scores of birds in his windswept house high on the cliff edge and Eddie, June's opportunistic ex-boyfriend who has tracked them down and offers to help care for June and Kirstie.

But not long after June dies Kirstie goes missing. What has happened to her and how might Hagan and Eddie be involved in her disappearance?
A fable of family secrets and the mysterious power of stories from acclaimed novelist and dramatist Eoin McNamee.

Writer ..... Eoin McNamee
Producer ..... Heather Larmour.

THU 15:00 Open Country (b08bbcyz)
Underground Bristol

Think of Bristol and the iconic Clifton Suspension Bridge and St Mary Redcliffe church may be on your list to visit. But what lies beneath? Tunnels, caves and waterways lie hidden, explored by some and missed by many. For those who know tickets on rare open days are snapped up like hot cakes. Helen Mark invites you to explore some of these gems that lie out of sight to explore the myth and history behind them.

She starts at the Redcliffe Caves whose 'rabbit warren' under the streets above reveals more about the city's ancient trades but has a modern life as a film set and theatre location. Yet the magical Goldney Grotto - lined with shells from faraway lands - could conjure images of fairytales but has its closest connection to Robinson Crusoe. While Clifton Rocks Railway - which had to remain hidden within the gorge cliffs - failed as a business, it had two new lives helping to save the lives of others.

No wonder there's so much curiosity about these hidden places!

Presented by Helen Mark
Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b08b3jws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (b08b3k7w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b08bbcz1)
Danny Boyle; Rebecca Hall

With Francine Stock

Danny Boyle revisits Trainspotting and Rebecca Hall reveals how she got under the skin of a newsreader who committed suicide live on air, for her real-life drama Christine.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b0890kmm)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b0890kmp)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0890kmr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 The Cold Swedish Winter (b06sg2mm)
Series 2, Winter

The second series of this sitcom from Danny Robins (co-creator Lenny Henry comedy Rudy's Rare Records), set and recorded in Sweden and starring Edinburgh Comedy Award-winner Adam Riches, Danny Robins and a cast of Sweden's most popular TV comedy actors.

Geoff has moved to Yxsjö in northern Sweden, to start a new life with his girlfriend Linda in the (frequently frosty) bosom of her family.

This year, new dad Geoff has plenty of fresh experiences to contend with, including three varieties of pickled cabbage, sinister Christmas elves and an unpleasant visit from Sweden's answer to the BNP. It's all worth it though for Linda (Sissela Benn, star of the Swedish version of The Office) and baby John.

While Geoff and Linda now have their own place, he still has to deal with her disapproving Dad, Sten (comedian Thomas Orredsson from Crimes of Passion), her alarmingly flirtatious mother Gunilla (comedian Anna- Lena Bergelin) and her apparently suicidal, arsonist brother, Anders (award-winning stand upFredrik Andersson).

Geoff is determined to be more Swedish than the Swedes as he takes to his new country with renewed enthusiasm, and he has help, in the form of fellow ex-pat, cynical Ian (Danny Robins), an unending source of (slightly misleading) information, and Soran (Farshad Kohlgi of The Killing), a Danish Kurd with Swedophobia.

Episode 1:
Geoff and the Anderssons celebrating baby John's first Christmas, as Geoff unwisely volunteers to organise the festivities for the whole family.

Writer: Danny Robins
Director: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b08b7vcm)
Toby gets a surprise invite, and Josh has his eyes on the prize.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b0890kmw)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08bb9d4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b08bbcz4)
Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.

THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b08bbcz6)
Negotiating a Trade Deal

Brexit means the UK government will have to negotiate trade agreements with the EU and the rest of the world. Trade deal experts share their tips with presenter Evan Davis.

Guests include:

Janice Charette, Canadian High Commissioner to the UK
Tim Cullen, founder and director of Oxford Programme on Negotiation

Producer: Julie Ball.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b0890kmm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 In Our Time (b08bb9cy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b0890kn0)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b0890kn2)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08bbddk)
Reading Europe - Norway: The Bird Tribunal, A Secret

In Agnes Ravatn's tautly told psychological thriller Allis reveals the secret that forced her to escape from her old life, and she discovers something new about Bagge's absent wife. Lydia Wilson reads.

Translated from the Norwegian by Rosie Hedger
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

THU 23:00 Hold the Front Page (b087p3ml)
Hold The Front Page. Sue Perkins and guests take a look back at the big news stories of 2016. No, not those ones - the real news, as found in local news headlines up and down the country

Producer: Richard Webb

A BBC Studios Production.

THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0890kn5)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


FRIDAY 27 JANUARY 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b0890kv0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b08bqx7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b0890kv2)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b0890kv4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b0890kv6)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b0890kv8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08c6hhz)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Ed Kessler, from the Woolf Institute in Cambridge.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b0890kvb)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Vernon Harwood.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mhyzf)
Raven

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the raven. Ravens are one of the most widely distributed birds in the world and can survive Arctic winters and scorching deserts. In the UK, Ravens were once widespread, even in cities but persecution drove them back into the wilder parts of our islands. Now they're re-colonising the lowlands and are even turning up on the outskirts of London where, since Victorian times, the only ravens were the ones kept at the Tower.

FRI 06:00 Today (b08bbg1g)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b08b3k40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b08bqxg2)
The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Miserables, Episode 5

As Victor Hugo finishes the book and it is launched to huge acclaim, David Bellos offers insights into the politics and morality of the novel - as serious and complex as it is perennially popular.

War and Peace, Great Expectations, Crime and Punishment were all published in the same decade, yet only Les Misérables can stand as the novel of the nineteenth century. How did Victor Hugo's epic work come to be the most widely read and frequently adapted story of all time? And why is its message just as important for our century as it was for his own?

Author David Bellos tells the compelling story of The Novel of the Century.

Reader: Daniel Weyman
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b0890kvd)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08bbg1j)
Little Women, Harvest Time

Meg has her family and Amy is enjoying her life abroad but Jo's heart aches with a ceaseless longing for what she has lost. The concluding episode of Louisa May Alcott's coming of age story dramatised by Rhiannon Tise. Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.

FRI 11:00 Gift of the Gods (b08bbg1l)
Beekeeper and classicist Martha Kearney travels to Greece to explore how honey, the sweetest thing known to humans for thousands of years, shaped our world mythically, socially and politically.

Martha visits the legendary birthplace of Zeus, a cave in Crete where the baby God was said to have been raised by bees, and the Archaeological Museums of Heraklion and Eleftherna to look at bee artefacts from the Bronze Age with Professors Katerina Kopaka and Nikos Stampolides.

She goes to the Ancient Agora in Athens to see where the fabled honey of Attica was sold and journeys to Mount Hymettus on the trail of beehives at an ancient farmhouse. She visits Cretan beekeepers Dimosthenis Issaakidis and Mihalis Tsigenis to compare modern beekeeping methods with those from antiquity, and discusses the impact of honey on society and politics with archaeologist Lucia Nixon over sacred honey drinks.

Producer Dixi Stewart.

FRI 11:30 Secrets and Lattes (b03zy1bw)
Series 1, In the Beginning

Arty Trisha and sensible sister Clare open their new Edinburgh cafe together. Polish chef, Krzysztof, and uninvited waitress, Lizzie, both help and hinder - but will they all even get through Day 1?

Hilary Lyon's new series sees erstwhile free spirit Trisha (played by Julie Graham) return to her native city of Edinburgh after years of living in London. Trisha, a generally relaxed and positive art teacher is coping with not only unexpectedly losing her job, but also trying to repair her bruised heart. Nonetheless, she arrives at Waverley Station enthusiastic and eager for the next chapter of her life to begin. Trisha's solvent big sister Clare (played by Hilary Lyon) is a non-practising qualified accountant, has been married for years, has two spoiled teenage children and has probably spent too much time on the school PTA. Clare struggles with a tendency towards suburban snobbery and an obsessive need to control but happily facilitates the opening of 'Cafe Culture' in leafy Bruntsfield, which marks the beginning of a whole new era for both sisters.

Throw in temperamental opera-loving Polish chef, Krzysztof (Simon Greenall) and a strangely forward teenage customer, Lizzie (Pearl Appleby), and you have the perfect recipe for volatile relationship tension, a lot of laughs and a few secrets for good measure.

Directed by Marilyn Imrie
Producers: Moray Hunter and Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b0890kvg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 Home Front (b083lkkh)
27 January 1917 - DR Walker

On this day in 1917, the King of Spain survived an assassination attempt, while in Tynemouth, Edie Chadwick is publicly recognised for heroism.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b0890kvj)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b0890kvl)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b0890kvn)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 Against the Grain (b08bbgj8)
Series 1, Pigs

The organic movement is over a hundred years old and it continues to divide farmers. And then there's the debate over whether specialized or mixed farming is best. In episode five of her series on modern British farming, Charlotte Smith explores these different farming systems. She visits Helen Browning, the chief executive of the Soil Association on her organic farm near Salisbury. And we hear the views of Charles Matts, a specialist arable farmer in Northamptonshire. Each believes they've got it right.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b08b7vcm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Drama (b08bbjnf)
Pleading

Pleading
by Rob Drummond

Freya and Michael - two Western teenagers - have been on a gap-year, travelling round the world. But now, during a stopover on the journey home, they have been arrested. What started out as a holiday has become a nightmare.

After spending some time in Australia they enter a country in the Far East and are found to have drugs in their luggage. After spending three weeks in prison their case is about to be heard in court, but first their defence barrister has to find out how they will plead and make them aware of the possible outcomes, including the death penalty. Can he broker a deal with the prosecution to save their lives?

Producer/director: David Ian Neville.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b08bbjvn)
Hull - City of Culture 2017

Eric Robson and the panel visit Hull, the UK's City of Culture 2017.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 Wedding Watcher (b08bbnbw)
by Danish writer, Helle Helle.
Part of Reading Europe: Scandinavia.
A woman gets off her bus too early and unexpectedly becomes a guest at a wedding. As she knows nobody there, she sees everything - including herself - very clearly.

Reader :Anita Vettesse.

Producer: Gaynor Macfarlane.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b08bbnby)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 Feedback (b08bbnc0)
Radio 4's forum for audience comment.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b08bbnc2)
Jayne and Karen - On the Beat

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about policing skills, from detection to traffic direction, between a former rookie and her now retired mentor. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b0890kvq)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b0890kvs)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b08bbnc4)
Series 92, Episode 4

Miles Jupp chews the headline fat with Jeremy Hardy, Zoe Lyons and Vicki Pepperdine.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b0890kvv)
Alan is none the wiser, while Lilian shares what she knows.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b0890kvx)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08bbg1j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b08bbpr3)
Martin Lewis, Paul Nuttall MEP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex, with a panel including the leader of UKIP Paul Nuttall MEP and the founder and chair of moneysavingexpert.com Martin Lewis.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b08bbpr5)
A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b083lkkk)
23-27 January 1917

In the week, in 1917, when the national press reported extensively on an explosion at an East London munitions factory, in Tynemouth, the workers are yet to have their story told.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole

Story-led by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Sound: Martha Littlehailes.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b0890kvz)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b0890kw1)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b08bbpr7)
Reading Europe - Norway: The Bird Tribunal, A Judgement

In the Norwegian writer Agnes Ravatn's haunting thriller Bagge tells Allis about standing before an extraordinary tribunal. Later, she makes a decision. Lydia Wilson reads.

Translated from the Norwegian by Rosie Hedger
Abridged by Richard Hamilton
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

FRI 23:00 Woman's Hour (b08bbpr9)
Late Night Woman's Hour

Are we all living in bubbles these days? Lauren Laverne challenges conservative commentator Laura Perrins and Labour MP Tulip Siddiq to swap social media and news feeds for forty-eight hours to find out.

"If you're tired of arguing with strangers on the internet", Barack Obama recently advised Americans, "try talking with one of them in real life." The outgoing US President was expressing an idea that's gained growing weight with commentators and politics watchers on both sides of the Atlantic: increasingly, we all exist in 'bubbles' that shield us from ideas and truths other sections of the population hold dear. The recent US elections, and the Brexit vote, both seem to suggest that common political ground is shrinking. How much do our online lives contribute to that sense of alienation?

Eli Pariser explained in his 2011 book The Filter Bubble how social media sites and search engines use algorithms to give us more of what we like to click on, increasingly confining us in an echo chamber of our 'likes' and 'follows', and shutting out alternative views. Charles Murray's book Coming Apart featured a quiz entitled "How Thick Is Your Bubble?", designed to reveal how a subject's work, class and cultural tastes might cut them off from mainstream society.

So what can we learn about the bubbles we may live in by putting aside our own online life for a day or two, and embracing someone else's?

FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b0890kw3)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b08bbprc)
Gilly and Sally - A Hole in the Head

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends about surviving a debilitating bleed in the brain and learning to live - and sing - again. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b08b7rv4)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b08b7rv4)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b08b7vyl)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b08b7vyl)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b08bb0q1)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b08bb0q1)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b08bb9d4)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b08bb9d4)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b08bbg1j)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b08bbg1j)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b088jj6l)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b08bbpr5)

Aftermath 20:00 MON (b08b7ttm)

Aftermath 11:00 WED (b08b7ttm)

Against the Grain 13:45 MON (b08b7st7)

Against the Grain 13:45 TUE (b08b7wcv)

Against the Grain 13:45 WED (b08bb202)

Against the Grain 13:45 THU (b08bb9wk)

Against the Grain 13:45 FRI (b08bbgj8)

America Rewritten 00:30 SAT (b08bl1kx)

America Rewritten 19:00 SAT (b08c04pz)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b08b7ttp)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b088b8y3)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b088jj6j)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b08bbpr3)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b0890f7j)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b0890kmm)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b0890kmm)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b08b3jry)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b08b3jry)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b08b7ttr)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b08b7wdd)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b08bb33l)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b08bbddk)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b08bbpr7)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b08b7rv2)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b08b7rv2)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b08bqwx3)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b08bqwx3)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b08bqx38)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b08bqx38)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b08bqx7q)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b08bqx7q)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b08bqxg2)

Brain of Britain 15:00 MON (b08b7svh)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b0890k5s)

Can yr Adar - Song of the Birds 16:30 SUN (b08b3k7y)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b08b3k40)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b08b3k40)

Don't Log Off 16:00 TUE (b07knqy7)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b08bbqhb)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b051r80b)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b08b3k7t)

Drama 14:15 MON (b08b7szp)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b05r6zxz)

Drama 14:15 WED (b08bb4qh)

Drama 14:15 THU (b08bbcyx)

Drama 14:15 FRI (b08bbjnf)

Farewell Doctor Finlay 21:00 WED (b07k0k4m)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b088b8xn)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b0890k8y)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b0890kdy)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b0890khy)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b0890km7)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b0890kvb)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b088jj6d)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b08bbnc0)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b088fg4b)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b08b7wd7)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b08b3k42)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b08b3k42)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b08bb33j)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b088b8xv)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b08bb9dc)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b0890k9v)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b0890kfg)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b0890kjn)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b0890kmw)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b0890kvx)

FutureProofing 22:15 SAT (b088fkyn)

FutureProofing 20:00 WED (b08bb33g)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b088jj66)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b08bbjvn)

Generation Grime 11:30 TUE (b08bl167)

Gift of the Gods 11:00 FRI (b08bbg1l)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b08b7wd1)

Hold the Front Page 23:00 THU (b087p3ml)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b083lkkk)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b083lkjf)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b083lkjl)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b083lkjx)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b083lkk7)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b083lkkh)

I, by the Tide of Humber 23:30 SAT (b088k0ls)

Ian Fleming's Thrilling Cities 00:30 SUN (b04lsxhf)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b088fx3g)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b08bb9cy)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b08bb9cy)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b0890kfj)

Inconspicuous Consumption 11:30 THU (b08bb9wf)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b08b7wdb)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b08b7wdb)

James Acaster's Findings 23:15 WED (b04nv97q)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 18:30 TUE (b08b7wd3)

John's Songs - A Day with a Music Hall Master 16:00 MON (b07kpy3v)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b088jj6b)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b08bbnby)

Laura Mvula's Miles Davis 15:30 SAT (b08b7wcs)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b088b8ym)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (b08b7ttt)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b08b7wcy)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b088b8x6)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b0890k4y)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b0890k8m)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b0890kdm)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b0890khm)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b0890klx)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b0890kv0)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b0890kj0)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b0890kj0)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b0890cvf)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0890cvf)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b08bb204)

Moving Pictures 13:30 SUN (b07wxc7t)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b088b8xg)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b0890k56)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b0890k8w)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b0890kdw)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b0890khw)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b0890km5)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b0890kv8)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b0890k58)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b088b8xx)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b0890k5x)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b0890k98)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b0890kf2)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b0890kj4)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b0890kmc)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b0890kvg)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b088b8xj)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b0890k5g)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b0890k5q)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b088b8z4)

News 13:00 SAT (b088b8y1)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b08b3js0)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b08b7vyj)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b08b3k7w)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b08b3k7w)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b088fx30)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b08bbcyz)

PM 17:00 SAT (b088b8y7)

PM 17:00 MON (b0890k9q)

PM 17:00 TUE (b0890kfb)

PM 17:00 WED (b0890kjj)

PM 17:00 THU (b0890kmp)

PM 17:00 FRI (b0890kvq)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b0890k6f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b0890736)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b08c3vjq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b08cs1bv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b08cs5lq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b08cxbp8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b08c6hhz)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b0890f7g)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b0890f7g)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b08b3jws)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b08b3jws)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b08b3jws)

Revisiting the 14-Day Rule 21:00 MON (b088fch7)

Revisiting the 14-Day Rule 11:00 TUE (b08bqssd)

Robert Newman's Entirely Accurate Encyclopaedia of Evolution 19:15 SUN (b06kgvcs)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b088f0nb)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b088b8xs)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b088b8yp)

Secrets and Lattes 11:30 FRI (b03zy1bw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b088b8xb)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b0890k52)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b0890k8r)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b0890kdr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b0890khr)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b0890km1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b0890kv4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b088b8x8)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b088b8xd)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b088b8yc)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b0890k50)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b0890k54)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b0890k65)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b0890k8p)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b0890k8t)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b0890kdp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b0890kdt)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b0890khp)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b0890kht)

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Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b0890km3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b0890kv2)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b0890kv6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b088b8yk)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b0890k6c)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b0890k9s)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b0890kfd)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b0890kjl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b0890kmr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b0890kvs)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b0890k5b)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b0890k5b)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b0890k94)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b0890k94)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b08b3jwv)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b0890k5l)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b0890k5v)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b08b3kb8)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b08b3kb8)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b08b7ttk)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b08b7ttk)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b08b7vck)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b08b7vck)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b08bb33d)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b08bb33d)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b08b7vcm)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b08b7vcm)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b0890kvv)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b08bbcz6)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b08bbcz4)

The Cold Swedish Winter 18:30 THU (b06sg2mm)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b088fx3b)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b08bbcz1)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b08b7t20)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b08b7t20)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b0890cv9)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b0890cv9)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b08b7vyg)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b08b7vyg)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b080py66)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b08bb0q3)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b08bbnc2)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b08bbprc)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b0890kjg)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:04 SUN (b088f2vz)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b08b7t22)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b088jj6g)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b08bbnc4)

The Poet and the Echo 19:45 SUN (b08b3kd4)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b08b7rv6)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b0890k61)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b0890k9z)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b0890kfl)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b0890kjs)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b0890kn2)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b0890kw1)

The Write Stuff 11:30 WED (b04n2ksk)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b088fmj9)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b08bb20j)

Tim Key's Late Night Poetry Programme 23:00 WED (b052jkxb)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b0890kb1)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b0890kfn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b0890kjv)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b0890kn5)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b0890kw3)

Today 07:00 SAT (b08907f9)

Today 06:00 MON (b0890k92)

Today 06:00 TUE (b08b7vyd)

Today 06:00 WED (b08bb0gr)

Today 06:00 THU (b08bb9cq)

Today 06:00 FRI (b08bbg1g)

Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups 11:30 MON (b04svfsc)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b01sbyj8)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03x474w)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b038qk90)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03mj8ln)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03tht5z)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03mhyzf)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b088b8xl)

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Wedding Watcher 15:45 FRI (b08bbnbw)

Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b0890cvc)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b0890k6m)

What Does the K Stand For? 18:30 WED (b08bb33b)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b088b8y5)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b0890k96)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b0890kf0)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b0890kj2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b0890km9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b0890kvd)

Woman's Hour 23:00 FRI (b08bbpr9)

World at One 13:00 MON (b0890k9g)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b0890kf8)

World at One 13:00 WED (b0890kjb)

World at One 13:00 THU (b0890kmk)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b0890kvn)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b0890k9b)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b0890kf4)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b0890kj6)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b0890kmf)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b0890kvj)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b0890738)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b0890738)