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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 14 JANUARY 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b087pfdv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b087twdf)
The Reformation, The United States: Protestant World Power

500 years after the Reformation, Diarmaid MacCulloch describes its journey from Europe to America and explores its continuing influence on life and politics in the United States.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b087pfdx)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b087pfdz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b087pff1)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b087pff3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b087ttn3)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Terry Waite, CBE.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b087ttn5)
The programme that starts with its listeners.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b087pff6)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b087pff8)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Open Country (b087rx66)
Barton-upon-Humber Clay Pits

Helen Mark finds out about the flooded clay pits that make up the landscape around Barton-upon-Humber.
Standing on the south side of the Humber Bridge, the pits look like a series of holes punched into the landscape, or a piece of lace attached all the way along the Humber bank. The pits were excavated for the fine clay they contain, to make beautiful red bricks to build local houses that are still so typical here, and tiles which were packed into barges and taken off to London to feed the housing boom of the nineteenth century.
There are two tile-works alive and kicking at Barton, still making traditional tiles in exactly the same way they have for the past two hundred years. The clay digging that used to take half a year of hard labour with a wheel barrow is now done in a couple of weeks by a digger, so it's not quite the task it once was. For a small town, Barton has a vibrant present and a big industrial past, manifested by the Ropewalk, a museum and cultural space housed in what the managing director, Rachel Benet, calls the town's 'cultural quarter mile'. It is a narrow red brick-and-tile building a quarter of a mile long, designed to allow the manufacture of rope in one long, straight piece.
But it's the clay pits that have made the biggest mark on the landscape around Barton-upon-Humber. Many of them are now wildlife reserves run by the Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust, home to bearded tit, bittern and marsh harriers.
Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b087pffb)
National Parks

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b087pffd)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b088b2hf)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b087pffg)
Martin Clunes

Actor and presenter Martin Clunes, best known for his roles in Men Behaving Badly and Doc Martin, joins Rev Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir to discuss discovering the islands of Australia, his love of animals and life on his farm.

Gemma Todd is a mobile librarian who has just published her first novel, as GX Todd. She talks about getting her HGV licence and her love of Lego.

JP Devlin meets listener Jean Rawson, 93, who describes how her family dog comforted her in a time of great need.

Della O'Sullivan runs the Dulwich Wing Tsun Academy. She explains how she got into Chinese martial arts.

Great British Bake Off winner Nadiya Hussain shares her Inheritance Tracks. She has chosen Blackbird by The Beatles and Michael Jackson's Black or White.

DIY SOS presenter Nick Knowles talks about his early music and sporting ambitions, love of cooking and passion for motorbikes.

Martin Clunes: Islands of Australia continues on ITV at 8pm on Tuesday.
Defender by GX Todd is out now.
Nadiya Hussain's debut novel The Secret Lives of the Amir Sisters is out now.
Proper Healthy Food book by Nick Knowles is out now.

Producer: Claire Bartleet
Editor: Eleanor Garland.

SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b0889xzm)
Series 15, Southampton

Jay Rayner takes a trip to Southampton along with regular panellists Tim Anderson, Sophie Wright and Dr Annie Gray, as well as the chef and writer Paula McIntyre, who has flown in from Northern Ireland to join the discussion.

The panel offers a keen cyclist recipes to reinvigorate his mid-ride energy snacks. They also discuss the best nighttime snacks, homemade fish fingers and what to do with a surplus of peanuts.

Dr Annie Gray reveals the eating habits of those on board the Titanic, which set sail from Southampton on April 10th 1912.

Produced by Miranda Hinkley
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b0889xzp)
George Parker of the Financial Times looks back at a political week in which Theresa May launched her vision of a "shared society" and Labour MP Tristram Hunt announced his resignation.

Producer: Mandy Baker.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b087pffj)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b087pffl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b0889xzt)
Can't pay, won't pay, will pay

More information related to stories featured in this week's edition of Money Box can be found in the Related links section below.

Money Box hears from David who paid £3,400 for a motor home he'd found online. Only he hadn't. Instead his cash ended up in a TSB bank account controlled by criminals. His attempts to get his money back from his own bank failed as did two appeals to the Financial Ombudsman. TSB also initially rejected him twice but have now paid him back. Why has that finally happened and what can, or can't, the Financial Ombudsman do when a victim of fraud tries to reclaim their cash from an account that's been set up by scammers?

It's been a record-breaking week for the FTSE 100. London's main share index marked the longest run of closing highs. The last time it did that was 1997 when it managed eight days in a row. Russ Mould, Investment Director at AJ Bell and independent market analyst Brenda Kelly discuss whether it's a cause for celebration or concern.

Just over 4 million couples qualify for the marriage allowance tax break. It allows people who are married or in a civil partnership, who don't pay tax, to transfer some of their unused personal allowance to their spouse who does. The latest figures from HMRC reveal that 1.39 million couples have claimed. Robin Williamson, Technical Director of the Low Incomes Tax Reform Group outlines how it works and how you can get it.

SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b087ts7k)
Series 92, Episode 2

Mark Steel, Michael Deacon, Zoe Lyons and Katy Brand accompany Miles Jupp in his weekly dissection of the news headlines.

An American chap called Donald Trump has rather dominated this week's news agenda but that doesn't mean to say that the NHS, Jeremy Corbyn, Martin McGuinness and an intriguing story about Stonehenge don't get a look-in as well. More power to all their elbows!

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b087pffn)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b087pffq)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b087ts7p)
Margaret Beckett MP, Jeremy Browne, Lucie Green, Owen Paterson MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from the National Space Centre in Leicester with a panel including the Labour MP and former Foreign Secretary Margaret Beckett, former Liberal Democrat MP and Minister Jeremy Browne who is now the City of London's Special Representative to the EU, the Space Scientist Professor Lucie Green and the former cabinet minister Owen Paterson MP.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b087pffs)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?
Presented by Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell
Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230
Call 03700 100 444. Email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Tweet,#BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.

SAT 14:30 Drama (b0889yrm)
April in Paris

John Godber's comedy was commissioned for the Hull 1992 Festival. 25 years on, John and Jane Godber revisit the roles they played in the original stage production. Bet wins a 'Romantic Break' in Paris and drags a reluctant Al along with her as they sample life outside England for the first time.

Directed by Toby Swift

April in Paris is the third of John Godber's stage plays to come to BBC Radio 4 following September in the Rain (2011) and Happy Jack (2015). All three have been performed by Jane and John, just as the original theatre productions were. In 2015 they toured the UK together in a new play, Shafted!, for The John Godber Company, in partnership with Theatre Royal Wakefield.

SAT 15:30 Making the Grade (b087qjd6)
Why are more and more older people taking up instruments and putting themselves through music exams? Presenter and terrible musician James Peak follows the stories of several candidates as they try for their ABRSM piano exam.

James is aiming for Grade 1 piano and discovers that everyone has their own reasons for trying to make the grade. Along the way he meets Carroll who has Parkinson's Disease and Nicola who suffers from stage fright.

Written and presented by James Peak
Produced by Lucinda Mason Brown

A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b086ky34)
Open water swimming, Women's march on Washington, Cook the perfect tuna with preserved lemon, avocado and olives

Alexandra Heminsley tells us about her new book about becoming an open water swimmer.

Women will be taking to the streets in Washington and London on 21st of January to take a stand on a range of social justice and human rights issues. We hear from an organiser of the London march Emma McNalley, Kelly Dittmar Assistant Research Professor at the Centre for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University and from Jan Halper-Hayes who is part of the Trump transition team.

The financial journalist Michelle McGagh set herself a challenge to spend nothing for a whole year? She tells us what she found the hardest things to live without and Helga Dittmar a psychologist who studies the link between consumer culture and happiness tells us why we can sometimes feel addicted to buying new things.

We hear from the American opera singer Renee Fleming about her new album which includes re-versioned Bjork tracks.

It is estimated that one in five children are affected by their parents drinking. Tracey West of the National Association for Children of Alcoholics and Emma Spiegler a Family Support Manager at Adfam the charity for families affected by drugs and alcohol discuss how to cope and deal with the situation.

Diana Henry's new book 'Simple' offers everyday recipes with the minimum of effort. She cooked the perfect Seared Tuna with Preserved Lemon, Olives and Avocado.

Isla Rowntree tells us why she decided to use her name for a brand of bikes she's designed for children.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.

SAT 17:00 PM (b087pffv)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 iPM (b087ttn5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b087pffx)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b087pffz)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b087pfg1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b087pfg3)
Emily Watson, Lord John Bird, Rick Wakeman, Eliza Carthy and The Wayward Band, Phil Gayle, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Phil Gayle are joined by Emily Watson, Lord John Bird and Rick Wakeman for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Rick Wakeman and Eliza Carthy & The Wayward Band.

Producer: Sukey Firth.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b088b0tl)
Arlene Foster

Arlene Foster had been hoping to celebrate her first twelve months in charge of Northern Ireland this week.

Instead, she's found herself forced out of office.

It's got little to do with religion, constitution or the almost four THOUSAND people who've lost their lives during political conflict over the decades.

The DUP leader and Northern Ireland First Minister has had to step down in a bitter row over renewable energy subsidies.

On Profile, Mark Coles looks back at Arlene Foster's life and career and the reasons behind this week's political upheavals.

Producer Smita Patel
Researcher Jordan Dunbar.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b087pfg5)
La La Land, Manchester By The Sea, Michael Chabon, Wish List at The Royal Court, Charles Avery

We can help you to decide between two films touted for Oscars glory: La La Land revives The Hollywood musical and Manchester By The Sea starring Casey Affleck- If you have to choose, which one deserves your custom?
Michael Chabon's latest novel Moonglow is sort-of autobiographical - the lies, deception, rumours, legends, confessions and confusions that all families create are explored through a life lived in The American Century.
Katherine Soper (a 24-year-old former perfume seller) won The UK's biggest playwriting competition with Wish List; a play informed by what she calls the government's "systematic assault" on disabled and mentally ill people. It's being staged at London's Royal Court Theatre
Artist Charles Avery's work is an ongoing evolving depiction of an imaginary island. Through drawings, sculptures and texts. he has created its topology, cosmology and inhabitants. He has a new exhibition of his imaginings.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Kate Williams, Maria Delgado and David Benedict. The producer is Oliver Jones.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b088b0tn)
The Politician and the Judge

When the head of Charles I fell from his body outside the Banqueting House in Whitehall it provided the most dramatic example of the strained relationship between England's courts and the government of the day.

The first judges were directly appointed by the King and expected to uphold the King's laws throughout the land. From the 17th century onwards there was a growing tendency of judges to act independently, upholding the law rather than slavishly following the wishes of the King. That judicial independence has now developed to the point where some political commentators see the judiciary as challenging the supremacy of Parliament. When the Daily Mail described High Court judges as 'Enemies of the People' it was a sure sign that a polite, esoteric debate was now a live and vital political issue.

The distinguished and highly entertaining lawyer, Geoffrey Robertson QC is our guide to the development of this charged relationship, from Magna Carta to Brexit.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b087pn05)
Reading Europe - Sweden: Britt-Marie Was Here, Episode 2

Exploring the best in contemporary literature, Reading Europe reaches Scandinavia and begins with Sweden.

Britt-Marie needs purpose in her life and she takes the brave step of going out to look for it. She ends up in Borg, a typical Swedish, run-down, small town. Her part-time job leads her to an extraordinary turn of events, beyond anything she might have imagined. But she finds that bringing people into her life also brings problems and she's soon in the midst of a football drama, involved in a family crisis and at the corner of an unexpected love triangle, in this warm and humorous drama.

In part two, Britt-Marie has to rely on the people of Borg to come through for her and the team, but suddenly the January Cup is the least of her worries as a family in crisis need her help.

Adapted for radio by Charlotte Jones
From a translation by Henning Koch

Britt-Marie ... Pippa Haywood
Sven ... Matthew Gravelle
Kent ... Simon Greenall
Sami ... Justin Davies
Vega ... Maddison Daye
Omar ... Christopher Benning
Pirate ... Jacob Foot
Bank ... Carys Eleri
Somebody ... Wanda Opalinska
Girl at the Unemployment Office ... Alexandria Riley
The Narrator ... Gunnar Pettersson

Directed by Janine H. Jones
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production

Fredrik Backman is the New York Times bestselling author of the novel A Man Called Ove and his books are published in more than thirty-five languages worldwide.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b087pfg7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 FutureProofing (b087rky5)
Cities

Presenters Leo Johnson and Timandra Harkness discover how new forms of city living could dominate the 21st century. How will our cities look and feel, and what will life be like in the transformed cities of the future?

Current forecasts indicate that as many as 70% of the world's population will be living in cities by 2030, up from around 55% today. FutureProofing examines the big shifts in our societies that may follow from the rapid growth in urban living, and what the digital revolution will bring to the way cities are designed and governed. The programme visits Singapore to experience some of the features which cities of the 21st century may adopt, such as self-driving vehicles and ubiquitous data monitoring of all residents' movements. Will this reduce or enhance the freedom of citizens in future?

Producer: Jonathan Brunert.

SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b087psl7)
Programme 11, 2016-17

(11/12)
Tom Sutcliffe is in the chair for the penultimate clash of the 2016-17 season, with David Edwards and Myfanwy Alexander of Wales taking on Polly Devlin and Brian Feeney of Northern Ireland. If Wales take the victory today they will have won all four of their games in this series, and will be looking unstoppable in their bid to become RBQ champions. Northern Ireland will be going all out to prevent them - but it all depends how the questions fall.

The panel will need all their powers of recall and logic, as they struggle to connect apparently random elements from history, cinema, classic children's television, politics and natural history into some sort of pattern. The winners will be the pair who find the answers with the minimum need for clues and guidance from Tom.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

SAT 23:30 The Echo Chamber (b087pn09)
Series 8, Matthew and Michael Dickman

Twin American poets Matthew and Michael Dickman read poems and talk to Paul Farley about brotherliness. Both have written series of poems inspired by the death of their non-twin brother, Darin. Producer: Tim Dee.


SUNDAY 15 JANUARY 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b088b7vb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Ian Fleming's Thrilling Cities (b04l3lxw)
Tokyo

In 1959, Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond, was commissioned by the Sunday Times to explore some of the world's most exotic cities. Travelling to the Far East and then to America, he left the bright main streets for the back alleys, abandoning tourist sites in favour of underground haunts, and mingling with celebrities, gangsters and geishas. The result is a series of vivid snapshots of a mysterious, vanished world.

Fleming wrote, 'On November 2nd, armed with a sheaf of visas...one suitcase...and my typewriter, I left humdrum London for the thrilling cities of the world. All my life I have been interested in adventure and abroad. I have enjoyed the frisson of leaving the wide, well-lit streets and venturing up back alleys in search of the hidden, authentic pulse of towns. It was perhaps this habit that turned me into a writer of thrillers.'

In today's episode, Fleming flies to Tokyo where he witnesses an astonishing ju-jitsu demonstration, has his fortune told and is attended in a bath-house by one of the prettiest girls he has ever seen.

Read by Simon Williams
Abridged by Mark Burgess

Copyright Ian Fleming Publications Ltd 1963

Produced by David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b088b7vx)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b088b7w5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b088b7wh)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b088b7wm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b088dlky)
All Saints, Maidstone

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from All Saints Church in Maidstone, Kent. Overlooking the River Medway the 15th Century Church, with its tower standing over the South West Porch, houses a peal of 10 bells with a tenor weighing 32 hundred weight. It's tuned to C sharp, and is the heaviest tenor bell in the County. In 1959 Taylor's Foundry of Loughborough recast the present ring of 10 from the metal of a similar ring cast by the Whitechapel Foundry of London in 1784.
We hear them now ringing Spliced Plain & Little Bob Royal.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b088b0tl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b088b7wy)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b088b7x2)
Remember You Are Dust

Writer and priest Malcolm Doney examines the cyclical nature of our existence on earth, how we are made of stardust and will one day become dust again.

Malcolm explores the fact that we are composed of the same matter as the cosmos, arguing that this gives us a vital connection with the stars above our heads and the earth beneath our feet. He suggests that the earth builds us and we in turn shape the world; our actions leave a mark. This can have a profound effect on how we think of mind, body and soul.

The programme features the poetry of Derek Walcott who highlights how rooted we are to the earth, alongside readings from Guy Claxton which capture the wonder of having independent creative thought. Musical selections include Joni Mitchell's Woodstock and Jeff Buckley's haunting Corpus Christi Carol.

Presenter: Malcolm Doney
Producer: Jonathan O'Sullivan
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b088jz07)
Halal Lamb

Ruby and Lufti Radwan have strong views about the way meat is produced in this country. They believe that any meat they sell from their Oxfordshire farm should come from animals raised, and slaughtered, with the utmost respect. As Muslims they want their meat to be Halal; 'lawful' or 'permissible', but they believe that the definition of Halal shouldn't just refer to the method of slaughter. They strongly promote the idea that Halal meat must have enjoyed a good life as well as a moment of death as prescribed in the Qur'an.

Rahil Sheikh meets the Radwan family and their sheep and poultry to hear more about the journey that took them from the world of academia to their muddy patch of the Cotswolds.

Producer: Rahil Sheikh.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b088b7x8)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b088b7xg)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b088b7xn)
Peterborough Cathedral cash crisis; Charleston revisited; Did God create humanism?

The majority of government money to improve security at places of worship went to Christian applicants. Edward Stourton asks Nick Tolson who sits on the Places of Worship Security Panel if this indicates that hate crime against Christians in the UK is under reported.

Dylann Roof, the convicted shooter in the assault on a church in Charleston, South Carolina was sentenced to death on Tuesday. The Rev Anthony Thompson lost his wife in the attack but he publicly forgave the killer. Edward asks him if this helped and what he thinks of the sentencing.

Twelve people at Peterborough Cathedral have been made redundant as the bishop seeks to resolve a "cash flow crisis" there. Rosie Dawson investigates how serious levels of debt were allowed to build up.

Yolande Knell reports on the implications of a proposal by President elect Trump to move the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

The Church of England has announced grants of £9 million to renew the church across 7 dioceses. The Bishop of Birmingham explains how he intends to use his cash and Sarah Major reports from one project at the heart of the initiative.

Theo Hobson's new book 'God Created Humanism', argues for the need to acknowledge humanism's Christian roots to create a more united society. Theo Hobson debates this with Julian Baggini from Philosophers' Magazine.

Jane Haining worked for the Scottish Mission School in Budapest and looked after Jewish girls at the Kirk run school. She was arrested by the Nazis in 1944 and died in Auschwitz. Her niece Deirdre McDowell tells Edward why a long lost ring that belonged to Ms Haining was featured on BBC 1's Antiques Roadshow.

Producers:
David Cook
Dan Tierney

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox

Photo by David Iliff. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b088fx32)
Lepra

Author Victoria Hislop makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Lepra.

Registered Charity Number 213251
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Lepra'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Lepra'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b088b7xv)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b088b7y1)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b088jz09)
Living in God's Kingdom

We join the congregation of Wade Street Church, an ecumenical Baptist and United Reformed Partnership in Lichfield, to consider what it means to be a disciple of Jesus and bring the values of the Kingdom of God into the local community. The minister, the Rev Ian Hayter, and members of the church will lead us in our worship and reflection. The producer is Andrew Earis.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b087ts7s)
Re-launching National Service

"We're constantly being reminded that this is a democracy", writes Will Self "one, indeed, which we should take back control of".

But in the arena of national defence, he says, the role of the citizen "is relegated to that of a guilty bystander, his fate in the hands of the state's hirelings".

Will Self argues for the re-introduction of National Service to invigorate British democracy.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztpd)
Great Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the Great Tit. That metallic 'tea-cher, tea-cher' song of the great tit is instantly recognisable and you can hear it on mild days from mid-December onwards. It's the origin of the old country name, 'Saw-Sharpener'.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b088b7yf)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b088b7yj)
Tom needs to offload his concerns, and Toby is quick to react.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b088jj5y)
Wayne McGregor

Kirsty Young's castaway is the choreographer Wayne McGregor.

Despite his background in contemporary dance, he has been resident choreographer at the Royal Ballet - the first from outside the company - for the past ten years. He has brought to Covent Garden a fascination with technology, a passion for collaborative efforts with visual artists and musicians, and he is renowned for drawing inspiration particularly from the field of science.

Born in Stockport in 1970 to Scottish parents, he was inspired by the John Travolta films he watched and took ballroom, disco and Latin American dance classes. After studying choreography at the University of Leeds and spending a year at the José Limón dance school in New York, he returned to the UK and at the age of 22, founded his own company. He made his first professional piece in 1993, and choreographed Dame Judi Dench in Sondheim's A Little Night Music at the National Theatre in 1995. He received his first commission from the Royal Ballet in 2000 and it was his 2006 work Chroma which clinched him the job as resident choreographer.

He works on a wide range of projects away from the stage, including films, music videos, and opening and awards ceremonies, and continues to choreograph for his own company and others around the world including Paris Opera Ballet, San Francisco Ballet, La Scala Milan, New York City Ballet and the Australian Ballet. He has won numerous prizes for his work, including two Olivier Awards, and was appointed a CBE for Services to Dance in 2011.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b088b7yp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 The Museum of Curiosity (b087pvqk)
Series 10, Episode 1

This week, the Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his new curator Jo Brand welcome the science communicator, musician and comedian Helen Arney; a man who has lived as a goat in the Alps for 6 days and built his own toaster from the ground up; and the captain of a fourteen storey £350 million pound cruise ship, The Queen Elizabeth, Captain Aseem Hashmi.

This week, the Museum's Guest Committee catch up on the latest 4 elements to be added to the periodic chart, flip through a history book from the future, which is all about now; and the thing that keeps a sea captain grounded, figuratively as well as literally, his 12-ton anchor.

The show was researched by Anne Miller of QI and Mike Turner.

The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.

The production coordinator was Sophie Richardson.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b088f0nd)
Introducing... The BBC Food and Farming Awards 2017

The BBC Food & Farming Awards are back. Based on public nominations, the awards celebrate the unsung heroes of UK food and farming; From school cooks to chip shops, from cider makers to supermarkets, corner shops to carrot farmers.

In the awards' 17th year, Giorgio Locatelli and Yotam Ottolenghi are part of a national appeal by chefs, cooks, food writers and food producers from across the country, calling on you to nominate the people who make food great where you live.

And in 2017, the BBC Food & Farming Awards are going global. For the first time, the judges will be honouring someone who has changed the way the world thinks about food and farming.

Let the search commence...

Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced by Clare Salisbury

NB. The BBC Food & Farming Awards will open for public nominations on Sunday 15th January for 2 weeks, closing on Sunday 29th January. Details can be found at bbc.co.uk/foodawards.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b088b7yy)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b088b7z4)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Moving Pictures (b07wpgjm)
A Flower Painting by Rachel Ruysch

A three-part series for BBC Radio 4 offering the chance to take a long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in incredible detail.

What's hiding in the undergrowth of Rachel Ruysch's bold and beautiful flower painting? Follow the link to explore the picture and you'll be able to zoom in and see the tiniest details as you listen. This is a world where buds hiss like snakes, poppies twirl and tiny insects devour - a vibrant, fecund jungle, full of uncanny life.

Cathy FitzGerald hears how this great Dutch artist was influenced by her unusual childhood as the daughter of Frederik Ruysch, maker of one of the world's great curiosity cabinets. Frederik Ruysch's weird tableaux - created from human skeletons and embalmed bodies, insects and plants - were hugely popular in 17th century Amsterdam and his young daughter Rachel was almost certainly involved in their creation. Is this what brings a touch of strangeness to her brilliantly observed vases and bouquets?

Cathy talks to art-experts, garden historians and artists and asks why this brilliant painter - one of the most sought-after of her age - is so little known today.

Image: Roses, Convolvulus, Poppies, and Other Flowers in an urn on a Stone Ledge by Rachel Ruysch, c.1680s, from the collection of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. Photograph by Google Arts and Culture.

Presenter and Producer: Cathy FitzGerald
A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b087ts76)
Correspondence Edition

Peter Gibbs hosts a correspondence edition of the horticultural panel programme. Christine Walkden, James Wong and Pippa Greenwood join him to delve into the GQT postbag.

The panel discusses growing annuals from seed, how best to reduce a large clump of bananas and what to do if your snowbells are covered in leaves.

They also advise on making your own compost and debate the advantages and disadvantages of privacy in the garden.

And Matthew Wilson visits Peter Murray at his place of work, the Yorkshire Sculpture Park.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b0773ldg)
Sunday Omnibus - Mothers and Sons

Fi Glover introduces conversations which reveal the close bond between mothers and sons, from Cumbria, Northern Ireland and Scotland, all in the Omnibus of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b088k0lq)
Reading Europe - Italy: The Story of a New Name, Episode 1

From one of Italy's most acclaimed authors, Elena Ferrante, the continuing story of Lila and Lena, two bright young girls who have grown up in the tough, rough streets of post war Naples.

Striving to make a better life for themselves, they work hard at school but Lila is stopped in her tracks when forced to give up her education and work for the family shoe making business. It's not long before their worlds are pushed apart and Lila ends up marrying a local businessman and son of the murdered local loan shark Don Achille.

Written by Elena Ferrante
Dramatised by Timberlake Wertenbaker
Producer: Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (b088fx36)
James Lasdun, Writers in Hollywood, Crime round-up, Bestsellers.

Mariella Frostrup talks to American novelist James Lasdun whose new book The Fall Guy is a suspense thriller about four characters on an apparently idyllic holiday, which goes dangerously wrong.
Also on the programme, Jake Kerridge picks some of his favourite new crime novels, Tim Walker looks at the history of novelists in Hollywood and a new scheme to recognise top selling authors.

SUN 16:30 I, by the Tide of Humber (b088k0ls)
BBC coverage of Hull City of Culture will be extensive across 2017. At its very start, the award-winning poet Sean O'Brien reflects upon why his native city, its waterscape and landscape, have inspired poets past and present.

The programme features a specially commissioned new poem from Sean - a three-part memory-piece, which is also a love-song for Hull, its surroundings and their metaphorical resonance:

........The great void
Where the land loses track of itself,
And the water comes sidling past at the roadside

Awaiting the signal to flood, is a kind of belief
Where there is no belief, is the great consolation
Of knowing that nothing will follow but weather and tides,

Yet also that when the world ends
There must be a Humber pilot keeping watch
As the great ships are passing silently away

Through the estuary's mouth and the saw-toothed marriage
Of river and sea, and out past the fort at Bull Island
And over the edge, and away.............

Sean also celebrates the work of poets who have made the city their home: Andrew Marvell, a line from whose 17th Century poem, To His Coy Mistress, gives this programme its title; Philip Larkin, Stevie Smith and others. He brings in an eclectic range of music, including his personal favourite, Dirty Water, by local band The Fabulous Ducks.

He hears from the Hull-based geographer Chris Skinner, and poet Sarah Stutt.

Starting with memories of digging holes in the garden of the house where he grew up, via flood-cellars, culverts and drains, the smaller river Hull and the great estuarine river Humber itself, this highly-textured programme culminates with Sean at the top of the disused lighthouse at Spurn Point, gazing out into the North Sea.

Producer Beaty Rubens.

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b087qjzm)
A Greek Tragedy

File on 4 sets off on a new series to find the forgotten children of Europe's refugee crisis.

As winter sets in, Phil Kemp heads to Greece in search of the teenagers who have arrived alone from Syria and Afghanistan, living by their wits on the streets of Athens.

The controversial deal struck between the EU and Turkey to return migrants who don't claim asylum or who have their claims rejected - and the closing of borders with Greece - has been blamed for making the situation worse for many migrants who now find themselves in limbo in Greece. The millions pledged by the EU don't seem to be bringing relief on the ground either.

The programme hears from the lucky ones who have found spaces at shelters for unaccompanied children in Greece's capital. Here they are fed, clothed and supported in their legal cases.

Others, on the island of Samos, are celebrating securing asylum in Greece. But most children on the island are not celebrating. They feel stuck in a system that cannot cope and held in a country that was meant to be a transit point, not a place to stay.

Increasingly the locals in Samos don't want them to say either. Tensions are flaring in the area around the vastly overcrowded camp, with Golden Dawn active nearby. Around 3,000 residents turned out to protest about their sense of abandonment by the Greek government and the EU. Local officials describe the island as 'trembling on a bridge above troubled water.'

With an estimated 2300 unaccompanied migrant children in Greece, more than half of whom are on the waiting list for shelter, File on 4 asks whether the EU is doing enough to care for those most in need of protection.

Reporter: Phil Kemp
Producer: Sally Chesworth
Editor: Gail Champion.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b088b0tl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b088b7zn)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b088b7zv)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b088b803)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b088b807)
Stewart Henderson

The best of the weeks radio with Stewart Henderson

Sequins and constellations are on the celestial bill as we attend a costume fitting for Danny La

Rue - 'breathe in dear' - and then we head heavenwards, wondering 'Is anybody out there?'

The story behind Mahler's unfinished symphony is told and we hear the contemplations of one

poet as she scales the imperious crags of The Peak District.

There's Bowie, a classical one hit wonder and a sporty iPlayer pick from the World Service.

Also, Stewart attempts to write the perfect opening line, ......Jane Austen has got nothing to worry about.....

Producer: Stephen Garner
Production support from Kay Bishton.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b088dx4d)
It gets awkward at Willow Farm, and Jennifer's memory is jogged.

SUN 19:15 Robert Newman's Entirely Accurate Encyclopaedia of Evolution (b06j5qr3)
One of Britain's finest comedians, Rob Newman returns to Radio 4 with a witty, fact-packed series mixing stand-up and sketches, challenging notions of Survival of the Fittest and The Selfish Gene with a new theory that's equal parts enlightening and hilarious.

Rob is our guide on a journey through a unique audio A-Z of nature that takes in everything from altruistic amoebae and dancing squid to Richard Dawkins wrestling naked with a postal worker.

Piecing these fragments together allows Rob to correct some major distortions of Darwinism, as well as rejig the theory of natural selection in the light of what we now know about epigenetics, mirror neurons and the Flintstones.

Written by Rob Newman
Starring Claire Price, with Jenni Murray as the voice of the Encyclopaedia.

Producer: Jon Harvey
Executive Producer: Richard Wilson
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 19:45 Drama (b088k0rv)
Reading Europe: Scandinavia, Denmark: The Bra

A tale of designer domesticity in a stylish Copenhagen apartment - where being a low-paid cleaner can sometimes mean being presented with a dilemma.

From the recently published anthology Copenhagen Tales, the mood of the Danish capital is explored in this story of cleaning and clothing, and how the other half lives.

Written by Jakob Ejersbo, a Danish journalist and writer who authored the immensely popular novel Nordkraft. It was a huge hit in Denmark, selling over 100,000 copies and making Ejersbo an established writer who continued to write several more novels until his early death in 2008.

This story is part of Radio 4's Reading Europe project and continues an exploration of contemporary writing from Scandinavia.

Written by Jakob Ejersbo
Translated by Lotte Shankland
Read by Lizzy Watts

Produced by Lizzie Davies
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:00 The Inevitable (b07lg6hm)
We are encouraged to face the inevitable, bow to it, accept it. In this witty and personal exploration, the writer, poet, and professor of Modern Languages at Oxford University, Patrick McGuinness, delves behind the rhetoric to explore just what is inevitable.

Should we bow to it, or defy it?

Patrick begins by digging into the classical roots of The Inevitable to uncover how the Romans wielded Providence as a political weapon. He takes a spin on the medieval Wheel of Fortune, when concepts of Fate became a little less fixed.

Today, it's in the area of new technology where The Inevitable is invoked most often. Patrick mounts a defence of old technologies and media, such as paper and printed books, condemned to "inevitable" obsolescence. Why, he asks, should people abandon materials that have served them for centuries just because the tech companies have new gizmos to sell and are keen to consign their competitors to oblivion?

But surely there are some things that are genuinely and unarguably inevitable? Intrigued to discover if his own ageing process can be kept at bay, Patrick consults a leading cosmetic surgeon about double chins, puffy eyes, and the future of rejuvenation. Are we heading towards a time when the inevitable is not only delayed but transcended?

He meets a technologist at the cutting edge of medical research who believes it won't be too long before we potentially live to a thousand, repairing and upgrading our bodies as we go. So if the ageing process can be overcome, what about the ultimate inevitable, death itself?

Given a rare sighting of the skull of the only dodo remains that still contain soft tissue, Patrick learns about the radical possibilities of "de-extinction".

Produced by Paul Quinn
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b087ts7g)
Lord Snowdon, Graham Taylor, Jill Saward, Peter Sarstedt, Clare Hollingworth

Matthew Bannister on

Lord Snowdon - renowned photographer and Princess Margaret's former husband.

Graham Taylor - the football manager who had success with Watford and Aston Villa, but was lampooned for his performance with England.

Jill Saward, the rape survivor who campaigned for the rights of those who suffer sexual violence.

Iranian President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani.

The singer and songwriter Peter Sarsdedt, best known for the song "Where Do You Go To My Lovely?"

And Clare Hollingworth, the war reporter who broke the story of the Nazi invasion of Poland.

Producer: Neil George.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b0889xzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b088fx32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 In Business (b087rx6b)
The NHS and Productivity

The NHS is facing a sustained squeeze. An ageing population, the rising cost of new treatments and increasing patient demand on the one hand, and the impact of continued austerity on the other. What can it do? One answer might lie in improving productivity. In the first of two programmes on the NHS, Louise Cooper explores its productivity puzzle. What does increased productivity look like in the health service? She meets clinicians, across the country, who are trying to do more for less. Can their efforts be replicated across the NHS? And, if so, will it ever be enough?
Presenter: Louise Cooper
Producer: Rosamund Jones.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b088b809)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b087rx68)
La La Land

With Francine Stock

Francine takes a trip to La La Land, the musical which has just swept the board at the Golden Gobes, with critics Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey.

Another awards contender Manchester By The Sea is released this week, and Francine talks to its writer/director Kenneth Lonergan, who explains why he thinks Hollywood scripts are getting worse and have to explain everything to audiences "as if they're idiots".

Comedian Lucy Porter discusses her love for Colleen Moore, the highest paid actress in Hollywood in 1927, whose lasting legacy is a fourteen foot dolls house she carefully designed, which is now preserved in a museum.

SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b088b7x2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]


MONDAY 16 JANUARY 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b088b83r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b087rky1)
Sexual violence in the Bangladeshi War of Independence - Global danger and the risk to research

Sexual violence in the Bangladeshi War of Independence. Laurie Taylor talks to Nayanika Mookherjee, Reader in Socio-Cultural Anthropology at Durham University, about the internationally unprecedented state designation of raped women as birangonas (brave women) in 1971. Her groundbreaking study was shortlisted for the 2016 BSA/Thinking Allowed Ethnography Award. She analysed the pubic memory or wartime rape perpetrated by the West Pakistani army and local Bengali men in East Pakistan (now Bangladesh) during that conflict. This national commemoration of the women's suffering counters the assumption of silence and shame amongst victims of rape in war. But what did it mean to the women themselves? Has their elevation to the status of heroines ensured their integration into their communities and acceptance by their menfolk?
Also, Ruben Andersson, Associate Professor at Oxford University's Department of International Development, discusses the expansion of 'no go' areas of the world since 9/11. He argues that alleged regions of 'risk' are seen as posing a particular danger to Western states and citizens. How can ethnographers who, by definition, do not wish to observe from a distance, address this challenge to their research? Professor Andersson was the winner of the 2015 Ethnography Award for his study of clandestine migration on the borders of Europe.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b088dlky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b088b83y)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b088b84g)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b088b84n)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b088b84v)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08bgqgn)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Terry Waite, CBE.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b088b84z)
Reducing antibiotics in farming; the agricultural machinery industry; Nominations open for Food and Farming Awards

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

MON 05:56 Weather (b088b851)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01sbyj8)
Tawny Owl

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents young Tawny Owls. Most of us know the "hoot" and "too-wit" of Tawny Owls but might be puzzled if we heard wheezing in the woods, the sound of the young.

MON 06:00 Today (b088b853)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (b088b855)
Sara Khan: the battle within Islam

Tom Sutcliffe talks to the Ambassador of the United Arab Emirates to Russia, Omar Saif Ghobash, about the letters he sent to his sons explaining what it means to be a Muslim in a world full of difference and diversity. It's an issue taken up by Sara Khan as she campaigns to reclaim her faith from extremism. Graeme Wood has spent his career getting to know Islamist fundamentalists to try to understand the apocalyptic ideology and theology at the heart of the so-called Islamic State. While Loretta Napoleoni 'follows the money' to uncover the millions made by those exploiting the destabilisation of Syria and Iraq and the rise of ISIS.
Producer: Katy Hickman.

MON 09:45 America Rewritten (b08946j2)
Marilynne Robinson

All this week Robert McCrum's talking to six great writers about how they will make the transition from Obama to Trump including Richard Ford, Walter Mosley, Ariel Levy, Lionel Shriver and Malcolm Gladwell. First up is double Pulitzer prize winning author of Home and Gilead, Marilynne Robinson. She is one of outgoing President Obama's favourite writers, and she talked to Robert about making sense of her country in 2017 and how the arrival of President Trump will shape her work.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b088b857)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b088dpzt)
Little Women, A Merry Christmas

It is the time of The American Civil War and in New England the March family are facing a frugal Christmas without their father. Four young women forging their path into the adult world, tell of the challenges of a woman's life in a male dominated society. Each of them is very different but in all four of the March sisters the 'All-American girl' emerges for the first time. Louisa May Alcott's coming of age story about love, destiny and freedom, in new version dramatised by Rhiannon Tise.


Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale

As the episodes progress we learn more about each of the sisters. They love and value each other but a couple of them are really feisty and there are lots of funny incidents. All the ups and downs of family life are realistically drawn. There are truly heartbreaking moments during the story too. This new dramatisation by Rhiannon Tise has a pacy, updated and energetic feel to it. Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy each take a turn in telling the story and this focus gives a much stronger voice to each of the sisters. And to give a male dynamic to the piece, Laurie, their neighbour and friend, also takes up the narration at particular moments too.

Louisa May Alcott's Little Women is highly autobiographical, and in Jo's character Alcott portrays a strong-minded and independent woman, determined to control her own destiny in a little town in New England at the height of the American Civil War.

The Dramatist, Rhiannon Tise, has written nine radio plays. Her first won the Richard Imison Award. Her most recent dramatisation work was Georgy Girl for the British New Wave Season. She is currently developing a 3 part drama for television. Rhiannon's East Prussian paternal ancestors arrived in America around the same time Little Women was written so she has a passion for both the novel and America of that time because of her own family history.

MON 11:00 The Untold (b088dpzw)
Holding the Baby

Charlotte and husband Ian really want a baby, but she has epilepsy and pregnancy is likely to be fraught with difficulties. There is a balancing act between drugs that will keep Charlotte seizure-free but can pose risks to her unborn child. And if all goes well, then even after the birth, Charlotte has been advised that she will need to be careful: she's been told it's best she doesn't hold her baby when she's alone. For example, she should feed the baby on the floor and when she needs to go upstairs, carry her baby up and down in a secure car-seat. Even the pram she's going to use has a dead-man's brake, in case she has a seizure while out and about.

Charlotte has had epilepsy since she was eleven years old, and her seizures meant she had to leave University and has been unable to hold down a job. But Charlotte is determined to have a baby, and says: ' I won't let epilepsy take away my chance to be a mother.'

Producer in Bristol: Sara Conkey.

MON 11:30 Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups (b04ps720)
Series 2, Running on Empty

Tom is worried for his health when he's invited on an adventure-packed stag weekend of "coasteering", an activity that involves hurling oneself off tall rocks and into the sea. But that's nothing compared with what his dad is preparing himself for: the Sheffield marathon. An event he's decided to enter to, in his eyes, get one over on the next door neighbour.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b088b859)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 Home Front (b083lhyg)
16 January 1917 - Sylvia Graham

On this day in 1917, the Zimmerman Telegram was intercepted, proposing a German-Mexican alliance, and in Tynemouth, Sylvia Graham finds an unlikely ally.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b088b85p)
Nuisance call solutions; Online shopping addiction; Cavity wall insulation problems

Struggling with Christmas debts? We'll hear about the new device that aims to stop you making impulse purchases online.
BT's new clampdown on nuisance calls.
The fresh steps to clean up the cavity wall insulation industry.
Shari Vahl presents.

MON 12:57 Weather (b088b85w)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b088b86g)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 Trump: The Presidential Precedents (b088dwtd)
Andrew Jackson

Adam Smith compares Trump's win to past Presidents who divided America even as they promised radical change.

On at least five previous occasions, a candidate has been elected President who promised a crunching 180 degree turnabout in policy.

Each man was swept into power by people who had felt themselves excluded or scorned by the previous administration - and each inspired similar fear and loathing.

And in all five of these cases, the winning revolutionary candidate appealed to the "silent majority", or to "the great body of the people", attacking "elites" and feeding conspiracy theories. And they were not all men of the right. What's more, all five won a second term with a thumping majority.

So in this series, Adam revisits the arrival in the White House of each of these Presidents - and examine what their fate can tell us about what awaits America today.

Adam begins the series in 1828, with the victory of Andrew Jackson, a duellist and Indian-fighter, born in poverty and raised in the frontier West.

To the east coast establishment he was an uncouth demagogue, to his supporters he was the tribune of the people, the embodiment of white masculinity.

When he was inaugurated in 1829, Jackson invited anyone who fancied a cup of grog to drop by the White House - and they did, ripping up curtains to take bits home as souvenirs. In office, Jackson up-ended the financial system by dismantling the Bank of the United States (which he depicted as an anaconda sucking money from the people), causing a financial panic. He flouted the Supreme Court, allegedly responding to a ruling in favour of Native Americans trying to protect their land, "[Chief Justice] Marshall has made his judgement, now let him enforce it!"

Jackson was dubbed 'King Andrew I' by his enemies, but to his supporters his willingness to veto laws passed by Congress or ignore the courts, was the right kind of authoritarianism - on behalf of the people.

People still call themselves "Jacksonians" today. When Newt Gingrich wanted to reassure people during the 2016 campaign, he said Trump would be not be any more dangerous than Jackson.

Series features contributions from: HW Brands, Eric Foner, Eric Rauchway, Heather Richardson

Producer: Phil Tinline.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b088dx4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b088dzb7)
Series 3, Episode 6

Joseph (Toby Jones) is still being stymied by lack of progress in his building project - while in Brixton prison, Jack is attempting to take over the drug deliveries.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b088f0nb)
The Final, 2016-17

(12/12)
The current Round Britain Quiz series comes to a close with the last clash between the North of England and the Midlands. Back in the autumn when these two teams last met, the North won. Can the Midlands claw back some honour today?

Rosalind Miles and Stephen Maddock are the regulars on the Midlands team, while Stuart Maconie and Adele Geras appear for the North of England.

As usual they'll have to muster all of their arcane knowledge in such diverse fields as literature, geography, cinema, music and politics to make the right connections between the apparently random clues. Tom will be on hand to steer them away from the blind alleys: but the more help he has to give them, the fewer points they'll accumulate.

By the end of the contest the final rankings for the 2016-17 series will have been decided.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b088f0nd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b088f0ng)
John Harris

Journalist and author John Harris welcomes you into his home as he rummages through his shelves and digs in his record collection for music by The Jam and poetry from The Mersey Sound. Settle down with John and reader Pippa Haywood as they present writing on Fleet Street from Michael Frayn and take you on a Rural Ride to the Country with the writing of William Cobbett and Philip Larkin via a stop-off in suburbia and a tour of Orwellian socialism.

MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b088f2vv)
Series 15, The Science of Everyday Life

The Science of Everyday Life
Robin Ince and Brian Cox return for a new series. They are joined on stage, at the Manchester Museum of Science and Industry, by comedian Russell Kane, physicist Helen Czerski and engineer Danielle George as they discuss the science to be discovered in everyday life. They discover how the humble cup of tea displays fundamental laws of nature that also govern our climate. How dropping raisins in a bottle of lemonade reveal how the Titanic sunk, and a robot orchestra, created from household objects, plays some familiar tunes.
PRODUCER: Alexandra Feachem.

MON 17:00 PM (b088b873)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b088b875)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b088f2vz)
Series 10, Episode 2

This week, the Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Jo Brand welcome the feel-good writer and comedian, Lucy Porter; the etymologist, self-proclaimed pedant and "Inky Fool" Mark Forsyth; and the lipsmackin' thirstquenchin' acetastin' motivatin' goodbuzzin' cooltalkin' highwalkin' fastlivin' evergivin' coolfizzin' advertising creative legend, Dave Trott.

This week, the Museum's Guest Committee stretch their minds over the subject of Lycra, revive an old word for a printer's day off; and explore the surprisingly recent cultural heritage of the Ploughman's Lunch.

The show was researched by Anne Miller of QI and Mike Turner.

The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.

The production coordinator was Sophie Richardson.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b088dwtb)
Kirsty has unwanted company, and Freddie is full of regret.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b088b877)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b088dpzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 La Frontera (b088f2w1)
Journalist and historian Carrie Gibson asks what Donald Trump's Presidency could mean for Mexican Americans in the US.

Donald Trump's pledge to build, as he put it, a big, beautiful wall on the border between the United States and Mexico, is one of the most controversial and emotive policies to emerge from the 2016 Presidential campaign. For some it's a welcome stand against what many regard as an out of control immigration problem. For others it's unnecessary, overblown and toxic rhetoric that stokes fear and xenophobia.

In southern Arizona, where a tall fence already cuts the border, this debate plays out daily. It's home to Mexican Americans with family history that stretches back before this state was claimed by the US, as well as the most recent immigrants, some of whom risk their lives to evade the Border Patrol and cross the deadly desert. Arizona is also home to many of the most stringent immigration policies in the nation.

In the border towns of Nogales and Naco, and further north in Tucson and Phoenix, Carrie Gibson explores the historic roots of these issues and meets the people who are living the complexities of the immigration debate today.

Carrie meets an undocumented Mexican mother whose four children are US citizens and fears being separated from her family. A rancher whose land stretches to Mexico shows us the repairs needed to the border fence after drug traffickers broke it down to drive their wares across his land. A Latino politician explains why he's supporting Trump. And an American whose Mexican heritage in the region stretches back further than that of many white Arizonians, tells us about being told to go back 'home'.

Presenter: Carrie Gibson
Producer: Peggy Sutton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b087rt53)
Siege at the Holey Artisan Bakery

On the night of the 1st July 2016, five young Bangladeshi Islamist militants stormed a Dhaka restaurant popular with foreign residents and visitors. The siege at the Holey Artisan Bakery was an unprecedented attack in Bangladesh. 29 people lost their lives that night - the majority of them non-Bangladeshis, shot or butchered with machetes. But not everyone was killed. For Crossing Continents, Linda Pressly together with local journalist, Morshed Ali Khan, tell the story of what happened inside the restaurant over 11 hours - the chef forced to cook sea bass by the killers, the kitchen worker locked for hours in a single toilet cubicle with 7 other people. There are tales of escape and resistance. Above all, there is courage amidst the carnage, and in the face of bloody adversity.

(Photo L to R: Delwar Hossain, Sumon Rezar, Shishir Sarker. Credit: Linda Pressly/BBC copyright)

MON 21:00 The Human Hive (b087qjd4)
The honey bee. Superficially they are aliens; 6 legs, antennae, mandibles, compound eyes - there isn't much to relate to. But like the other social insects if you take the time to look into the honey bee's world, we've more in common than first appears. Step inside the Human Hive with evolutionary biologist - Dr Ben Garrod.

MON 21:30 Start the Week (b088b855)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b088b879)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b088b87c)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b088jnw6)
Reading Europe - Norway: A Death in the Family, Episode 6

A Death in the Family is the first book in the six volume cycle of autobiographical novels, My Struggle. Karl Ove Knausgaard's memoir has been described, in many countries, as a masterpiece.

With searing honesty, and an unflinching gaze turned upon himself and those around him, he writes about his teenage years in Norway. Later, he looks back on the writing of this book, the changes in his life and his second marriage to Linda, and the arrival of their children. Becoming a father prompts further reflections on family life and his relationship with his own father.

Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in December 1968. He published two novels, in 1998 and 2004, which both won prizes in Norway. The six volume series of novels, titled Min Kamp in Norwegian, were published between 2009 and 2011, totalling over 3,500 pages. The sixth and final volume is due out in English, translated by Don Bartlett, in 2017. He lives in Sweden with his wife, the writer Linda Boström Knausgåard, and their four children.

Written by by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Translated by Don Bartlett
Read by David Threlfall
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 23:00 Mastertapes (b088f9zq)
Series 6, Shirley Collins (A-side)

John Wilson returns with another edition of Mastertapes, the series in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios.

A-side: "Love, Death and the Lady" with Shirley Collins

Released in 1970 on the Harvest label (also home to Deep Purple, Kevin Ayers and Pink Floyd), Love Death & the Lady exuded a darkness that reflected Shirley's own personal loneliness at the time. With tracks like The Outlandish Knight, The Oxford Girl and Geordie, the album revolves around the themes of murder, class conflict and betrayal.

Shirley Collins began the 1970s releasing what is now regarded by many as one of her finest albums... and she ended the decade by losing her singing voice through dysphonia. Yet she remains revered today by the likes of Graham Coxon, Billy Bragg, Stewart Lee, Jonny Greenwood and Angel Olsen.

The B-side of the programme, where it's the turn of the audience to ask the questions, can be heard tomorrow at 3.30pm

Complete versions of the songs performed in the programme (and others) can be heard on the 'Mastertapes' pages on the Radio 4 website, where the programmes can also be downloaded and other musical goodies accessed.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b088b87f)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


TUESDAY 17 JANUARY 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b088b89z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 America Rewritten (b08946j2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b088b8b5)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b088b8bj)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b088b8bq)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b088b8bv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08bhf7h)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Terry Waite, CBE.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b088b8bz)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrccd)
Little Owl

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the little owl. Little owls really are little, about as long as a starling but much stockier with a short tail and rounded wings. If you disturb one it will bound off low over the ground before swinging up onto a telegraph pole or gatepost where it bobs up and down, glaring at you fiercely through large yellow and black eyes. Today, you can hear the yelps of the birds and their musical spring song across the fields and parks of much of England and Wales.

TUE 06:00 Today (b08bg0g9)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b088fcgz)
Jan Zalasiewicz

Jan Zalasiewicz, professor of Palaeobiology at Leicester University, talks to Jim Al-Khalili about the Anthropocene, the concept that humans now drive much geology on the earth.

TUE 09:30 One to One (b088fch1)
Julia Bradbury on Emotionally Challenging Work

Julia Bradbury talks to Dr Rory Conn, a Specialist Registrar in Psychiatry. Rory works in a Mental Health In-Patient Unit for adolescents, and he discusses the challenges of regularly dealing with intense mental and emotional situations as part of your working life, and how you switch off at the end of the day.

TUE 09:45 America Rewritten (b08bhytx)
Malcolm Gladwell

American writers talk to Robert McCrum about the transition from Obama to Trump. 2/5. Malcolm Gladwell: Robert McCrum talks to the author of cult bestseller The Tipping Point.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b088b8c7)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b088fch5)
Little Women, Pickled Limes

In between attending to Aunt March, Jo is determined to get to know Laurie more and Amy gets into trouble at school. Louisa May Alcott's coming of age story dramatised by Rhiannon Tise.

TUE 11:00 Revisiting the 14-Day Rule (b088fch7)
Episode 1

For more than 25 years, since the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act came into force, it's been illegal in the UK to research on human embryos in the test tube beyond 14 days. But with recent scientific developments the debate over changing the limit has been rekindled. In the first of two programmes, Matthew Hill, the BBC's West of England Health Correspondent, looks back at the origins of the 14 day rule and its impact on understanding the earliest stages of pregnancy.

TUE 11:30 Laura Mvula's Miles Davis (b08b7wcs)
Singer-songwriter and composer Laura Mvula meets jazz musicians Jason Yarde and Laura Jurd, and music broadcaster journalist Kevin Le Gendre, to discuss her musical inspiration, the visionary American jazz musician Miles Davis.

'He has always been and will always remain one of the greatest inspirations of my musical life. To me he was and is an icon, a pioneer, the unique innovator. He never held himself back - maybe that's what first attracted me to him and his sound'.

Picking up on these opening remarks, and in the company of three contributors with contrasting perspectives on the man and his music, Mvula and her guests consider the impact and legacy of Miles Davis, a unique musician who repeatedly reinvented himself musically, and single-handedly shape-shifted the language of jazz, for nearly half a century. With glimpses of music from Miles Davis's vast discography, the programme paints a unique and personal portrait of one of the 20th century's greatest musical creators and iconclasts.

Laura Mvula is one of the most exciting music talents to emerge in Britain in recent years. Growing up in Birmingham's Kings Heath to parents from Jamaica and St Kitts, Mvula cut her musical teeth singing in and directing local church and gospel choirs, and performing with soul group Judyshouse, before going on to Birmingham Conservatoire to study composition with, among others, composer Joe Cutler. After working as a music supply teacher in Birmingham schools, she sent demo recordings of her songs to record labels; the result has been spectacular international success that ranges from touring the world with her band, to composing for the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Laura Mvula cites Miles Davis as one of her greatest influences - first urged by her father to watch documentaries about him, then given albums by a relative, her initial puzzlement grew into unbounded admiration for a black musician who refused utterly to be bounded by musical style or social position. His appetite for musical innovation and experiment, his dismissal of the idea of musical mistakes, his vision for successful creative collaboration - all of these characteristics and more combined to create a template for the sort of musician Laura Mvula has aspired to become. In this documentary feature, Laura sounds out her thoughts in the company of three guests, all of whom are equally great admirers of Miles Davis, but who approach him from different perspectives.

Mvula's guests are:

Kevin Le Gendre is a journalist and broadcaster with a special interest in black music. Deputy editor of Echoes, he contributes to a wide range of publications that include Jazzwise, MusicWeek, Vibrations and The Independent On Sunday and also appears as a commentator and critic on radio programmes such as BBC Radio 3's Jazz On 3 and BBC Radio 4's Front Row.

Laura Jurd is a British award-winning trumpet player, composer and bandleader and BBC New Generation Jazz Artist for 2015-2017. Highly active throughout the UK scene, Laura has developed a formidable reputation as one of the most creative young musicians to emerge from the UK in recent years.
In 2015 Laura received the Parliamentary Jazz Award for 'Instrumentalist of the Year' and in the past has been shortlisted for a BASCA British Composer Award, received the Dankworth Prize for Jazz Composition and the Worshipful Company of Musician's Young Jazz Musician of the Year award. Her band Dinosaur is one of the most vital and creative new ensembles in the UK today, and in September 2016, the band's debut album 'Together, As One' was released on Edition Records.

Jason Yarde is a saxophonist, composer, arranger, producer, and musical director who writes music across various styles including jazz, classical, hip-hop, fusion, free improvisation, broken beats, R&B, reggae, soul, song writing and for a variety of media: his BBC Proms compositional debut 'Rhythm and Other Fascinations' won the first ever BASCA award for 'Contemporary Jazz Composition' in 2010.

Yarde began playing alto and soprano saxophones with the Jazz Warriors while a teenager, and went on to MD this landmark orchestra. He is a longtime sideman of Louis Moholo, and has appeared in the big bands of Sam Rivers, Hermeto Pascoal, McCoy Tyner, Manu Dibango, Roy Ayers, and Andrew Hill.

Producer: Lyndon Jones for Music Department, BBC Wales.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b088b8cc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 Home Front (b083lhym)
17 January 1917 - Iris Reed

On this day in 1917, an appeal was issued in the Times for women workers to help at YMCA recreation huts in France, and in North Shields, Iris Reed plans some entertainment of her own.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b088b8ch)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b088b8cq)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b088b8cv)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 Trump: The Presidential Precedents (b08bhbcp)
Abraham Lincoln

Historian Adam Smith compares Trump's win to past Presidents who divided America even as they promised radical change.

In the 1850s, Abraham Lincoln's new Republican Party promised a new kind of politics, with candidates "fresh from the loins of the people" who would sweep away the old establishment, the cronyism and corruption of the Democratic Party and its collusion with the slave states of the South.

To his enemies, Lincoln's election in 1860 was utterly intolerable. He called slavery wrong, he wanted to stop its extension, he pledged to return to the revolutionary values of the founding fathers (as he saw them) and set the institution of slavery on the path to extinction. Parts of the country, and demographic groups, who had been the outsiders of American politics, suddenly had a winner.

Lincoln was a hugely successful revolutionary president at a massive cost. He was so polarising that eleven states seceded and civil war resulted. But Lincoln won re-election and by the time he was assassinated he had reunified the country on his own terms. His Republican Party dominated national politics for the next 50 years.

Series features contributions from: HW Brands, Eric Foner, Eric Rauchway, Heather Richardson

Producer: Phil Tinline.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b088dwtb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b088fg42)
Series 3, Episode 7

Brian makes a friend in the Kensington planning department, whilst Tony Wednesday takes new information about the paedophile ring to his commanding officer.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b0889xzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]

TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b088fg44)
Series 6, Shirley Collins (B-side)

John Wilson returns with another edition of Mastertapes, the series in which he talks to leading performers about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios.

B-side: Having discussed the making of "Love, Death and the Lady" (in the A-side of the programme, broadcast on Monday 16th January and available online), Shirley Collins responds to questions from the audience and performs acoustic live versions of songs from her new album, the first she has released in 38 years.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

TUE 16:00 Don't Log Off (b07jyrdv)
Series 7, A Message from Hank and Norma

Alan Dein presents the moving story of three years in the life of Hank & Norma, a couple in their 60s from Arkansas, USA - told entirely by the messages left by Hank for Alan on Skype.

Alan first spoke to harp-playing Hank three years ago for Don't Log Off. Shortly afterwards, Hank started to leave Alan occasional messages and audio recordings. As the months went by, the recordings became more intimate and revealing, charting Hank's major heart surgery and Norma's experiences with cancer. Entirely on his own initiative, Hank started to record every detail of the couple's lives - including the final hours of Norma's life.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b088fg46)
Series 41, Len Goodman on Lionel Bart

Len Goodman's great life was one of the biggest figures in creating British musicals and pop music in the 1960's. The writer and lyricist behind the hit musical Oliver, knew everybody who was anybody, made a fortune and partied with Royalty. But like many who flourished in that era he also lost everything in a blitz of booze, drugs and bad behaviour.
Len Goodman makes a case for why he regards Bart as a genius and helping him to unravel the story of his hero the expert witness is author and broadcaster David Stafford who has co-written a biography on Lionel Bart named after Bart's second most famous musical: Fings Aint Wot They Used T'Be . The presenter is Matthew Parris and the producer is Perminder Khatkar.

TUE 17:00 PM (b088b8d1)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b088b8d3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b088fg48)
Series 6, Episode 4

John Finnemore, writer and star of Cabin Pressure and John Finnemore's Double Acts and regular guest on The Now Show and The Unbelievable Truth, returns for a sixth series of his multi-award-winning Souvenir Programme, joined as ever by Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin, and Carrie Quinlan.

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described by The Radio Times as "the best sketch show in years, on television or radio", and by The Daily Telegraph as "funny enough to make even the surliest cat laugh". Already the winner of a BBC Audio Drama Award and a Radio Academy Silver Award, John was named the 2016 Radio Broadcaster of the Year by the Broadcasting Press Guild for his work on Souvenir Programme.

4/6
In this week's Souvenir Programme, we meet a man on the way to St Ives; a President is given two speeches; and we hear from a couple who get on like a house on fire. And, well... Since you ask him for a tale of love...

Written by & starring ... John Finnemore
Cast ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Cast ... Simon Kane
Cast ... Lawry Lewin
Cast ... Carrie Quinlan

Producer ... Ed Morrish

A BBC Studios Production.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b088dwtg)
Toby searches for a helping hand, and Ian won't be fooled.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b088b8d9)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b088fch5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b088fg4b)
Breaking Into Britain

Revealed: the secret UK immigration dodges on offer on the high street.

Theresa May has promised to stick to a promise to bring down net migration to the tens of thousands, and post the vote for Brexit, is under pressure to be tough on immigration.

But File on 4 has found a market in fake documentation is helping some migrants who aren't eligible to come here, to get the necessary visas.

High street immigration advisers, and even a solicitor tell the programme's undercover researcher how to buy their way in using fake documentation.

The programme asks what the authorities are doing to catch the crooks.


Reporter: Jane Deith
Producer: Paul Grant
Editor: Gail Champion.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b088b8df)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b088fmp7)
Dr Mark Porter presents a series that aims to demystify perplexing health issues.

TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b088fcgz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b088b8dk)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b088jmyj)
Reading Europe - Norway: A Death in the Family, Episode 7

A Death in the Family is the first book in the six volume cycle of autobiographical novels, My Struggle. Karl Ove Knausgaard's memoir has been described, in many countries, as a masterpiece.

With searing honesty, and an unflinching gaze turned upon himself and those around him, he writes about his teenage years in Norway. Later, he looks back on the writing of this book, the changes in his life and his second marriage to Linda, and the arrival of their children. Becoming a father prompts further reflections on family life and his relationship with his own father.

Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in December 1968. He published two novels, in 1998 and 2004, which both won prizes in Norway. The six volume series of novels, titled Min Kamp in Norwegian, were published between 2009 and 2011, totalling over 3,500 pages. The sixth and final volume is due out in English, translated by Don Bartlett, in 2017. He lives in Sweden with his wife, the writer Linda Boström Knausgåard, and their four children.

Written by by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Translated by Don Bartlett
Read by David Threlfall
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b088f2vv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]

TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b088b8dm)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


WEDNESDAY 18 JANUARY 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b088b8hx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 America Rewritten (b08bhytx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b088b8j0)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b088b8j2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b088b8j4)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b088b8j6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08bl7ck)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Terry Waite, CBE.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b088b8jb)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Sally Challoner.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkg3b)
Short-Eared Owl

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Short-eared Owl. Short-eared owls, one of our most spectacular birds of prey, are nomads, roaming over vast areas of open countryside and breeding where they find their favourite habitat of moorland or long grass.

WED 06:00 Today (b08bhpbs)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Midweek (b088fkyg)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.

WED 09:45 America Rewritten (b08bl2km)
Walter Mosley

In the week of the Presidential inauguration Robert McCrum talks to great writers about making the transition from Obama to Trump. In a series of wide-ranging interviews he asks Marilynne Robinson, Richard Ford, Malcolm Gladwell and others how they will write about the New America. Today he meets the black American crime writer Walter Mosley who grew up during a time of social unrest in the Watts area of Los Angeles in the 1960s. How does he assess the new President of the United States and what does he make of the issues to do with race that have dominated Obama's final years in office?

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b088b8jg)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b088fkyj)
Little Women, Fashionable Life

Meg, the eldest of the March sisters, is excited to be travelling away from home for the first time. It's Annie Moffat's coming out party and a fortnight of fun is planned. But when Laurie arrives he brings Meg down to earth with a bump. Louisa May Alcott's coming of age story dramatised by Rhiannon Tise.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b08c6zd6)
Alice and Adi - Growing Up with President Trump

Fi Glover with a conversation between friends who are still in their first decade of life, about their future careers and what Trump in the White House will mean for the world. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 Bursting the Social Network Bubble (b083p4lw)
Bobby Friction has started to realise that his day-to-day online activities are not only being monitored but in some senses manipulated. How often he interacts with specific friends, pages or sites sculpts and filters everything and everyone he comes into contact with online. Since the Brexit vote and the US election these bubbles have become a really big issue - with talk of fake news, post-truth politics and online communities increasingly divided.
When, like Bobby, you decide you've had enough of living in a social media bubble, what can you do to change things? Is it possible for an ordinary person a user of social media to beat the system or is it only technology nerds who can do it? And really - is there any benefit to breaking out of the bubble? The Producer is Perminder Khatkar.

WED 11:30 The Write Stuff (b04mh919)
Jerome K Jerome

Radio 4's literary panel show, hosted by James Walton, with team captains Sebastian Faulks and John Walsh and guests Mark Billingham and Lynne Truss. The author of the week - Jerome K Jerome.

Produced by Alexandra Smith.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b088b8jm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 Home Front (b083lhyt)
18 January 1917 - DR Walker

On this day in 1917, the headline in the Daily Mirror was "Women Must make Greater Effort", and in Tynemouth, journalist D R Walker finds that all the stories she pursues come back to one thing.,

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b088b8jp)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b088b8jr)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b088b8jt)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 Trump: The Presidential Precedents (b08923tk)
Warren Harding and Franklin Roosevelt

Adam Smith compares Trump's win to the victories of past Presidents who divided America even as they promised radical change.

In 1932, Franklin Delano Roosevelt swept to power promising strong government action amid economic crisis.

He was born rich and grew up in the social elite. But FDR played on populist themes in his 1932 landslide win against incumbent Herbert Hoover at the height of the Great Depression. Roosevelt promised a "New Deal" but said little about what that would actually mean. He won because he tapped into a desire to get rid of the people who had been in power when the economy crashed.

At times Roosevelt ran against Wall St and the special interests. He was painted as a dangerous demagogue, even a dictator. And he was shaky on the Constitution and civil liberties - he engaged in court packing, as well as massive expansion of executive authority.

FDR offered action - ANY action - and hope. His new coalition of blue collar workers, African Americans (where they could vote) and urban intellectuals was an enduring one. The meaning of his revolution altered several times after 1932, eventually developing a Keynesian rationale which had not been present at the beginning - an approach Trump is now echoing. But the stock of images and the emotions he appealed to made him the most electorally successful president ever.

And Adam also explores the parallels between Trump and a President who was the political opposite of FDR - Warren G. Harding, whose 1920 promise totake the country back to 'normalcy' finds an echo in Trump's 'America First' approach.

Series features contributions from: HW Brands, Eric Foner, Eric Rauchway, Heather Richardson

Producer: Phil Tinline.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b088dwtg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b088fmj5)
Series 3, Episode 8

Joseph (Toby Jones) is recovering from a burst ulcer and is desperate to get back to work and save his building development.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b088fmj7)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.

WED 15:30 Inside Health (b088fmp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b088fmj9)
Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b088b8jw)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b088b8jy)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b088b8k0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 State of the Nations (b088fp46)
Scotland

Star of BBC3's Josh and Radio 4 News Quiz regular Elis James hosts four stand-up shows from the four nations of the United Kingdom which explore what it means to be variously Welsh, English, Scottish and Northern Irish in today's United Kingdom.

For the final programme in the series, Elis is at The Stand Comedy Club in Glasgow where he is joined by Jim Smith, Fern Brady and Scott Gibson.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b088dwtj)
Elizabeth shares some memories, and Tom makes a vow.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b088b8k3)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b088fkyj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 FutureProofing (b088fkyn)
Art

Art may not survive the 21st century as a separate, meaningful category - according to one of the UK's foremost art teachers. Both cultural change and massively increased accessibility to the tools with which to create will have a huge impact on the nature of art itself. Presenters Timandra Harkness and Leo Johnson explore the impact that technological change will have on art, and speak to artists at the forefront of the digital revolution.

Producer: Jonathan Brunert.

WED 20:45 Four Thought (b088fp48)
Talks with a personal dimension.

WED 21:00 Farewell Doctor Finlay (b07j7nty)
Episode 1

Doctor Margaret McCartney tells the story of general practice in the UK from the surgeon-apothecaries of the 18th century to the troubled early years of the NHS.

"The history of medicine is the history of general practice," declares historian Martin Edwards - and this programme shows why, starting with the first golden age of general practice in the 18th century when growing affluence meant people could afford to seek out surgeon-apothecaries who did primitive surgery and bloodletting, and dosed patients with powerful purgative drugs.

In 1858, the Medical Act introduced the registration of doctors and created the General Medical Council, which still regulates GPs today.

Legendary GP and medical author Julian Tudor Hart describes how the National Insurance Act of 1911 meant GPs could "prescribe money" in the form of benefits to sick and injured men, at a time when most medicine was ineffective. Only in the 1930s - the period when Dr Finlay's Casebook was set - did a new generation of effective medicines come into being.

The programme also considers how the 1911 Act, the Medical Aid Societies, the Highlands and Islands Medical Service and World War Two laid the foundations for the National Health Service.

Presented by Dr Margaret McCartney
Produced by Mike Hally

A Square Dog Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 21:30 Midweek (b088fkyg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b088b8k7)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b088b8kb)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b088jmh2)
Reading Europe - Norway: A Death in the Family, Episode 8

A Death in the Family is the first book in the six volume cycle of autobiographical novels, My Struggle. Karl Ove Knausgaard's memoir has been described, in many countries, as a masterpiece.

With searing honesty, and an unflinching gaze turned upon himself and those around him, he writes about his teenage years in Norway. Later, he looks back on the writing of this book, the changes in his life and his second marriage to Linda, and the arrival of their children. Becoming a father prompts further reflections on family life and his relationship with his own father.

Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in December 1968. He published two novels, in 1998 and 2004, which both won prizes in Norway. The six volume series of novels, titled Min Kamp in Norwegian, were published between 2009 and 2011, totalling over 3,500 pages. The sixth and final volume is due out in English, translated by Don Bartlett, in 2017. He lives in Sweden with his wife, the writer Linda Boström Knausgåard, and their four children.

Written by by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Translated by Don Bartlett
Read by David Threlfall
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:00 Sam Simmons Is Not a People Person (b088fp4b)
Glenn

Glenn

Sam Simmons Is Not a People Person Episode 4 of 4

Comedian. Writer. Ex-Zoo Keeper. Bird Watcher. Definitely NOT a people person.

Sam and Henry are making a documentary series about birds, each week - armed with Sam's 'Big Book of Birds' they seek out different species. Despite Henry's best efforts, Sam is continually aggravated by the people they run into. Each encounter sparks an investigation into Sam's past, because once they've sorted out his issues, they'll really be able to focus on the bird-watching.

This week finds Sam trudging through the desert in search of the Steppe Eagle.

The unique talents of the multi-award winning comedian Sam Simmons have landed on BBC Radio 4.

"If you can imagine someone combining the rage of Basil Fawlty with the lunacy of Spike Milligan you are getting somewhere close to Simmons. Painfully frank, riotously inventive and a deserving award winner." The Evening Standard (UK)

Written by and starring Sam Simmons
With:
Henry Paker
Sarah Kendall
Mike Wilmot
Freya Parker

Sound design by Craig Schuftan
Music by Craig Schuftan with Lani Bagley

Producers Joe Nunnery
Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios Production.

WED 23:15 James Acaster's Findings (b04n611k)
Series 1, Wood

Triple Foster's nominated comedian James Acaster presents the results of his research. This week, he's been investigating 'Wood'. With Nathaniel Metcalfe ('Fresh from the Fringe') and Bryony Hannah ('Call the Midwife').

Produced by Lyndsay Fenner.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b088b8kd)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


THURSDAY 19 JANUARY 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b088b8mp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 America Rewritten (b08bl2km)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b088b8mr)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b088b8mt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b088b8mw)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b088b8my)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08bhnmv)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Terry Waite, CBE.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b088b8n0)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thsc6)
Long-Eared Owl

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the long-eared owl. The low moaning hoot of a long-eared owl filters through the blackness of a pine wood. Long-eared owls are nocturnal and one of our most elusive breeding birds. They nest in conifer woods, copses and shelter-belts of trees near wide open grasslands and heaths where they hunt for rodents.

THU 06:00 Today (b08bhnmx)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 In Our Time (b088fs7z)
Mary, Queen of Scots

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the history of Mary, Queen of Scots, who had potential to be one of the most powerful rulers in Europe, yet she was also one of the most vulnerable. In France, when she was the teenage bride to their future king, she was seen as rightful heir to the thrones of England and Ireland, as well as Queen of Scotland and one day of France, which would have been an extraordinary union. She was widowed too young, though and, a Catholic returning to Protestant Scotland, she struggled to overcome rivalries in her own country. She fled to Protestant England, where she was implicated in plots to overthrow Elizabeth, and it was Elizabeth herself who signed Mary's death warrant.

With

David Forsyth
Principal Curator, Scottish Medieval-Early Modern Collections at National Museums Scotland

Anna Groundwater
Teaching Fellow in Historical Skills and Methods at the University of Edinburgh

And

John Guy
Fellow of Clare College, University of Cambridge

Producer: Simon Tillotson.

THU 09:45 America Rewritten (b08bl2kp)
Ariel Levy

In the week of the Presidential inauguration Robert McCrum talks to great writers about making the transition from Obama to Trump. In a series of wide-ranging interviews he asks Marilynne Robinson, Richard Ford, Malcolm Gladwell and others how they will write about the New America. Today it's the turn of the feminist New Yorker writer Ariel Levy to express her views on the President elect and what he will mean for America

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b088b8n2)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b088fs81)
Little Women, Dark Days

Jo has a secret but so has Laurie too. And there are troubling days ahead for the March family. Louisa May Alcott's coming of age story dramatised by Rhiannon Tise.

THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b088fs83)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

THU 11:30 Inconspicuous Consumption (b088fs85)
Series 2, Eating and Watching

Peter Curran investigates the history and psychology of our 100 year-old compulsion to consume snacks and movies at the same time.

Peter hangs about cinemas finding out how eating and watching interact in the dark. Why popcorn? Why eat at all? Among those answering the questions, Game of Thrones star Iain Glen reveals how he deals with noisy eaters and Andi Oliver, cook and great British menu judge, creates a bespoke 21st century cinema snack with a delicious, but hefty calorie tariff, aimed at silent scoffing.

On a visit to the Popcorn Museum Peter discovers how the yellow stuff, originally a street food, was brought into cinema foyers during the great American depression of the early 1930s. The arrival of the "talkie" helped the cravers of the crunchy. A new breed of hungrier, less literate cinemagoer could enjoy movies now that the ability to read cue cards was a thing of the past.

The idea of unhealthy cinema food is a post-War concept and, in 1939, The Ritz cinema in Belfast offered Dover sole, roast beef and a wide selection of vegetables for lunch, dinner and supper - a far cry from the nachos and chemically enhanced cheese available today.

A Testbed Production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b088b8n4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 Home Front (b083lhz1)
19 January 1917 - Marion Wardle

On this day in 1917, a munitions factory explosion in Silvertown, East London, killed 73 workers, and damaged 70,000 properties, and in North Shields, Marion is still shaken by recent events.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b088b8n6)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b088b8n8)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b088b8nb)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 Trump: The Presidential Precedents (b08923tm)
Richard Nixon

Historian Adam Smith compares Trump's win to the victories of past Presidents who divided America even as they promised radical change.

In the mid-1960s, Lyndon Johnson had forced through epoch-making civil rights legislation.

But it led to a deeply-felt reaction, driven both by racism and working-class cultural resentment. There was a widespread feeling that the radical left was transforming America - from school curricula to women's rights via new liberal approaches to crime and policing.

In the 1968 presidential election, two figures competed to be the champion of the backlash - both of whose campaigns find echoes in Trump's last year.

George Wallace, the segregationist ex-Governor of Alabama, took his barnstorming independent campaign into America's industrial north and found wide support among white working class voters who normally backed the Democrats.

Richard Nixon pursued a subtler version of this approach as the Republican candidate. He was less charismatic and outspoken than Wallace - but he rode the 'backlash' all the way to the White House.

Trump, Adam suggests, has revived elements of both men's appeal, from Wallace's plays on race to Nixon's appeal to what he called the 'silent majority'.

Series features contributions from: HW Brands, Eric Foner, Eric Rauchway, Heather Richardson

Producer: Phil Tinline.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b088dwtj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b088fs87)
Series 3, Episode 9

The police have found a tape proving who started the fire at Joseph's buildings, while Tony Wednesday takes his proof on the paedophlie ring to a high ranking MP.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for Radio 4.

THU 15:00 Open Country (b088fx30)
London: A National Park City?

There's a campaign gaining ground to make London a National Park City. But what exactly does that mean? David Lindo meets the campaign founder Dan Raven-Ellison to find out and goes on a journey across London to see for himself why anyone would think the UK's biggest city could qualify for such a title. Along the way he finds a ghost of a river, an enthusiastic ornithologist, and some paddlers who call Regents Canal their breathing space.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b088fx32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (b088fx36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b088fx3b)
Cinema magazine programme.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b088b8nn)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b088b8nq)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b088b8ns)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 The Cold Swedish Winter (b04fyjqb)
Series 1, Autumn

Episode Four and it's a new season of the year in this Englishman abroad sitcom from Danny Robins (the writer of the Lenny Henry comedy 'Rudy's Rare Records') This series is set and recorded in Sweden and stars Adam Riches, Danny Robins and some of Sweden's most popular TV comedy actors. Geoff, a marginally successful stand-up comic from London, is moving to the tiny, cold and unpronounceable village of Yxsjö in northern Sweden; a culture shock forced on him by his Swedish girlfriend Linda's decision to move home to raise their child. This series follows his first year attempting to settle in his new home, each episode set in a different season.

Geoff has to contend with snow, moose, pickled herring, unemployment, snow, Maypole dancing, snowmobiles, snow, meatball rolling, saunas, social democracy, snow, the weirdest pizzas in Europe, bears, deep forests, death metal, illegal alcohol, snow... Above all he has a new family to contend with. The Andersson's bewilder him - from father Sten (Thomas Oredsson - Crimes of Passion to be broadcast on BBC Four this year), who has a worrying tendency to growl like a bear and threaten him with any blunt instrument to hand to Gunilla (playwright and comedian Anna-Lena Bergelin), who threatens him with naked folk-dancing. It's worth it all for Linda, of course, apart from her new found urge to conform with everything and except for her brother, a Goth with a propensity to set fire to things. And his fellow immigrants are no less unsettling: Ian (Danny Robins), a divorcee, who has been depressed for the last eight years and Soran (Farshad Kohlgi - The Killing), a Danish Kurd with Swedophobia.

Episode 4 -"Autumn": In which Geoff tries to be different, a heavily pregnant Linda throws a "fika" party and Sten campaigns for re-election

Writer: Danny Robins
Director: Frank Stirling
A Unique Production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b088dwtl)
Johnny needs a wingman, and Ian worries if he has done the right thing.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b088b8p7)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b088fs81)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b088fx3d)
Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.

THU 20:30 In Business (b088fx3g)
The NHS: The Recruitment Dilemma

Since its inception, the National Health Service has always relied on doctors and nurses who have been trained overseas. How does it plan for the workforce it requires? In the second of two programmes exploring today's health service, doctor-turned-journalist Smitha Mundasad, asks why the NHS is currently facing a recruitment crisis on so many fronts. She'll ask what impact Brexit could have. Can pharmacists, physician associates and other health workers do the work of doctors, who take longer to train and cost more to employ? And will the NHS start training more of its workforce?

Presenter: Smitha Mundasad
Producer: Rosamund Jones.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b088b8nn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 In Our Time (b088fs7z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b088b8p9)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b088b8pc)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b088j7hh)
Reading Europe - Norway: A Death in the Family, Episode 9

A Death in the Family is the first book in the six volume cycle of autobiographical novels, My Struggle. Karl Ove Knausgaard's memoir has been described, in many countries, as a masterpiece.

With searing honesty, and an unflinching gaze turned upon himself and those around him, he writes about his teenage years in Norway. Later, he looks back on the writing of this book, the changes in his life and his second marriage to Linda, and the arrival of their children. Becoming a father prompts further reflections on family life and his relationship with his own father.

Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in December 1968. He published two novels, in 1998 and 2004, which both won prizes in Norway. The six volume series of novels, titled Min Kamp in Norwegian, were published between 2009 and 2011, totalling over 3,500 pages. The sixth and final volume is due out in English, translated by Don Bartlett, in 2017. He lives in Sweden with his wife, the writer Linda Boström Knausgåard, and their four children.

Written by by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Translated by Don Bartlett
Read by David Threlfall
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 23:00 The Chastity Butterworth Show (b088fxdv)
Chat show pilot starring Gemma Whelan as her comedy character Chastity Butterworth.

THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b088b8pf)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


FRIDAY 20 JANUARY 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b088b8rj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 America Rewritten (b08bl2kp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b088b8rr)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b088b8rv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b088b8rx)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b088b8s4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b08bm4rj)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Terry Waite, CBE.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b088b8s6)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020tp7c)
Barn Owl

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Barn Owl. Barn owls are mainly nocturnal hunters. They are ghostly creatures, with rounded wings and a large head which acts as a reflector funnelling the slightest sound from their prey towards their large ear openings.

FRI 06:00 Today (b08bhpdc)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b088jj5y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 America Rewritten (b08bl1kx)
Richard Ford

Robert McCrum talks to eminent writers, including Marilynne Robinson and Malcolm Gladwell, about making the transition from Obama to Trump. Today he talks to Richard Ford whose novels include The Sportswriter, Independence Day and the Lay of the Land. Ford's characters are often middle class white men living in traditional Republican worlds. It's a demographic that helped put Trump in the White House.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b088b8sb)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b088jj60)
Little Women, Aunt March Settles the Question

Winter brings snow and the bitter cold to New England and deep and worrying times for the family. Jo turns to Laurie for support. Louisa May Alcott's coming of age story dramatised by Rhiannon Tise. Produced and Directed by Tracey Neale.

FRI 11:00 La Frontera (b088f2w1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

FRI 11:30 All Those Women (b088jj62)
Series 2, Episode 4

Comedy series by Katherine Jakeways about four generations of women living under one roof.

Layla and Stu are having their new baby Barclay christened and have asked Maggie to be the godmother. She's thrilled. Jen's 'completely fine' with that. Add in a newly released prison penpal, some impulsive behaviour, and a free bar and inevitably it's not a party that runs very smoothly...

All Those Women explores familial relationships, ageing, marriages - it's about life and love and things not turning out quite the way that you'd expected them to. Every week we join Hetty, Maggie, Jen and Emily as they struggle to resolve their own problems, and support one another.

Written by KATHERINE JAKEWAYS
Producer Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b088b8sh)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 Home Front (b083lhzf)
20 January 1917 - Adeline Lumley

On this day in 1917, the Daily Mail launched a campaign against spiritualism, ridiculing the notion that people could communicate with the dead, but in Collingwood, Adeline has some wonderful news.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b088b8sl)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b088b8sn)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b088b8sq)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 Trump: The Presidential Precedents (b08923tp)
Ronald Reagan

Historian Adam Smith compares Trump's win to the victories of past Presidents who divided America even as they promised radical change.

When Ronald Reagan won in 1980, consternation swept parts of America. Here was a wayward 70 year old, running on an anti-politics, anti-Washington ticket - and known mainly, insisted his opponents, for his mix of onscreen entertaining and extremist views. Some feared giving him power over America's nuclear weapons could lead to catastrophe.

Yet today, Reagan is often cited as being rather more moderate than current Republicans. And many credit his approach to the communist bloc with contributing not to the end of the world but the end of the Cold War.

In this programme Adam considers the degree to which Trump has rebuilt the Reagan white working-class 'base' - and what actually happened to Reagan, his attitude to government and his radical policy platform once he was in power. Can this teach us anything about the possibilities for the age of President Trump?

Series features contributions from: HW Brands, Eric Foner, Eric Rauchway, Heather Richardson

Producer: Phil Tinline.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b088dwtl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b088jj64)
Series 3, Episode 10

Brian faces a life sentence for a murder he says he didn't commit, while Joseph (Toby Jones) claims to be pulling every string he can to get him off.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.


Written by G F Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b088jj66)
Aldershot and District Allotment Association

Eric Robson and his panel are guests of the Aldershot and District Allotment Association.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 The Village (b088jj68)
In this special commission by the acclaimed short story writer, Krys Lee, a beautiful stranger visits a remote South American village and beguiles the menfolk. Joseph Balderrama reads.

Krys Lee was born in South Korea and grew up in California and Washington. Her debut short story collection was the haunting, Drifting House, which includes The Goose Father, shortlisted for the BBC International Short Story Award 2012. Her debut novel How I Became A North Korean was published in 2016.

Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b088jj6b)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 Feedback (b088jj6d)
Radio 4's forum for audience comment.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b07zzr8p)
Dalbinder and Dara - Football Talk

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a mother and son about football. Her knowledge may not be quite as extensive as his, but his mum has clearly absorbed some facts. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b088b8t3)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b088b8t6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b088jj6g)
Series 92, Episode 3

Miles Jupp's house guests for his weekly news-based shindig are Andy Hamilton, Andrew Maxwell, Angela Barnes and Susan Calman

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b088b8t8)
Rob has a meeting to attend, and Elizabeth questions the twins.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b088b8tb)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b088jj60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b088jj6j)
Lionel Barber, Jess Phillips MP, Jacob Rees Mogg MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from the Cotswold School Academy Trust in Bourton on the Water, Gloucestershire, with the Editor of the Financial Times, Lionel Barber, Labour MP Jess Phillips, and the Conservative Party MP Jacob Rees-Mogg MP.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b088jj6l)
A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b083lhzh)
16-20 January 1917

In the week in 1917 when a munitions factory explosion in Silvertown, East London, killed 73 workers, and damaged 70,000 properties, the aftereffects of the Marshalls factory explosion are still rippling through every level of people's lives in Tyneside.

Written by Sarah Daniels
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

Story-led by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b088b8td)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b088b8tg)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b088jmcw)
Reading Europe - Norway: A Death in the Family, Episode 10

A Death in the Family is the first book in the six volume cycle of autobiographical novels, My Struggle. Karl Ove Knausgaard's memoir has been described, in many countries, as a masterpiece.

With searing honesty, and an unflinching gaze turned upon himself and those around him, he writes about his teenage years in Norway. Later, he looks back on the writing of this book, the changes in his life and his second marriage to Linda, and the arrival of their children. Becoming a father prompts further reflections on family life and his relationship with his own father.

Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in December 1968. He published two novels, in 1998 and 2004, which both won prizes in Norway. The six volume series of novels, titled Min Kamp in Norwegian, were published between 2009 and 2011, totalling over 3,500 pages. The sixth and final volume is due out in English, translated by Don Bartlett, in 2017. He lives in Sweden with his wife, the writer Linda Boström Knausgåard, and their four children.

Written by by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Translated by Don Bartlett
Read by David Threlfall
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b088fg46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b088b8tj)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b0801l13)
Bill and Madeleine - The Proposal

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a couple who have spent a lifetime apart but are now looking at a future together. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b088dpzt)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b088dpzt)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b088fch5)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b088fch5)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b088fkyj)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b088fkyj)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b088fs81)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b088fs81)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b088jj60)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b088jj60)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b087ts7s)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b088jj6l)

All Those Women 11:30 FRI (b088jj62)

America Rewritten 09:45 MON (b08946j2)

America Rewritten 00:30 TUE (b08946j2)

America Rewritten 09:45 TUE (b08bhytx)

America Rewritten 00:30 WED (b08bhytx)

America Rewritten 09:45 WED (b08bl2km)

America Rewritten 00:30 THU (b08bl2km)

America Rewritten 09:45 THU (b08bl2kp)

America Rewritten 00:30 FRI (b08bl2kp)

America Rewritten 09:45 FRI (b08bl1kx)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b087pffs)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b087ts7p)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b088jj6j)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b088b0tn)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b088b8nn)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b088b8nn)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b088dlky)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b088dlky)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b088jnw6)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b088jmyj)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b088jmh2)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b088j7hh)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b088jmcw)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b087twdf)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b088b7yf)

Bursting the Social Network Bubble 11:00 WED (b083p4lw)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b087rt53)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b088jj5y)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b088jj5y)

Don't Log Off 16:00 TUE (b07jyrdv)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b0889yrm)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b087pn05)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b088k0lq)

Drama 19:45 SUN (b088k0rv)

Farewell Doctor Finlay 21:00 WED (b07j7nty)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b087pffb)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b088b84z)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b088b8bz)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b088b8jb)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b088b8n0)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b088b8s6)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b088jj6d)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b087qjzm)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b088fg4b)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b088f0nd)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b088f0nd)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b088fp48)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b087pffj)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b088fs83)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b088b877)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b088b8d9)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b088b8k3)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b088b8p7)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b088b8tb)

FutureProofing 22:15 SAT (b087rky5)

FutureProofing 20:00 WED (b088fkyn)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 MON (b088dzb7)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 TUE (b088fg42)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 WED (b088fmj5)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 THU (b088fs87)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 FRI (b088jj64)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b087ts76)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b088jj66)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b088fg46)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b088fg46)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b083lhzh)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b083lhyg)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b083lhym)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b083lhyt)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b083lhz1)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b083lhzf)

I, by the Tide of Humber 16:30 SUN (b088k0ls)

Ian Fleming's Thrilling Cities 00:30 SUN (b04l3lxw)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b087rx6b)

In Business 20:30 THU (b088fx3g)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b088fs7z)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b088fs7z)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b088b8df)

Inconspicuous Consumption 11:30 THU (b088fs85)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b088fmp7)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b088fmp7)

James Acaster's Findings 23:15 WED (b04n611k)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 18:30 TUE (b088fg48)

La Frontera 20:00 MON (b088f2w1)

La Frontera 11:00 FRI (b088f2w1)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b087ts7g)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b088jj6b)

Laura Mvula's Miles Davis 11:30 TUE (b08b7wcs)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b087pfg3)

Making the Grade 15:30 SAT (b087qjd6)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (b088f9zq)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b088fg44)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b087pfdv)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b088b7vb)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b088b83r)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b088b89z)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b088b8hx)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b088b8mp)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b088b8rj)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b088fkyg)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b088fkyg)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b0889xzt)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b0889xzt)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b088fmj7)

Moving Pictures 13:30 SUN (b07wpgjm)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b087pff3)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b088b7wm)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b088b84v)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b088b8bv)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b088b8j6)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b088b8my)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b088b8s4)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b088b7wy)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b087pffl)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b088b7yp)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b088b859)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b088b8cc)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b088b8jm)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b088b8n4)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b088b8sh)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b087pff6)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b088b7xg)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b088b7y1)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b087pfg7)

News 13:00 SAT (b087pffq)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b088jz07)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b088fch1)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b088fx36)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b088fx36)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b087rx66)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b088fx30)

PM 17:00 SAT (b087pffv)

PM 17:00 MON (b088b873)

PM 17:00 TUE (b088b8d1)

PM 17:00 WED (b088b8jy)

PM 17:00 THU (b088b8nq)

PM 17:00 FRI (b088b8t3)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b088b807)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b087ttn3)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b08bgqgn)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b08bhf7h)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b08bl7ck)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b08bhnmv)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b08bm4rj)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b088b0tl)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b088b0tl)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b088b0tl)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b088fx32)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b088fx32)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b088fx32)

Revisiting the 14-Day Rule 11:00 TUE (b088fch7)

Robert Newman's Entirely Accurate Encyclopaedia of Evolution 19:15 SUN (b06j5qr3)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b087psl7)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b088f0nb)

Sam Simmons Is Not a People Person 23:00 WED (b088fp4b)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b087pffg)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b087pfg5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b087pfdz)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b088b7w5)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b088b84g)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b088b8bj)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b088b8j2)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b088b8mt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b088b8rv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b087pfdx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b087pff1)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b087pffx)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b088b7vx)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b088b7wh)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b088b7zn)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b088b83y)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b088b84n)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b088b8b5)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b088b8bq)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b088b8j0)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b088b8j4)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b088b8mr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b088b8mw)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b088b8rr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b088b8rx)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b087pfg1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b088b803)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b088b875)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b088b8d3)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b088b8k0)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b088b8ns)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b088b8t6)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b088b7x2)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b088b7x2)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b088b855)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b088b855)

State of the Nations 18:30 WED (b088fp46)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b088jz09)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b088b7xn)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b088b7yj)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b088dx4d)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b088dx4d)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b088dwtb)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b088dwtb)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b088dwtg)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b088dwtg)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b088dwtj)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b088dwtj)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b088dwtl)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b088dwtl)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b088b8t8)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b088fx3d)

The Chastity Butterworth Show 23:00 THU (b088fxdv)

The Cold Swedish Winter 18:30 THU (b04fyjqb)

The Echo Chamber 23:30 SAT (b087pn09)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b087rx68)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b088fx3b)

The Human Hive 21:00 MON (b087qjd4)

The Inevitable 20:00 SUN (b07lg6hm)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 16:30 MON (b088f2vv)

The Infinite Monkey Cage 23:00 TUE (b088f2vv)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b0889xzm)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b0889xzm)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b088fcgz)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b088fcgz)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b0773ldg)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b08c6zd6)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b07zzr8p)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b0801l13)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b088b8jw)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:04 SUN (b087pvqk)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b088f2vz)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b087ts7k)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b088jj6g)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b088dpzw)

The Village 15:45 FRI (b088jj68)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b088b7z4)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b088b87c)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b088b8dk)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b088b8kb)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b088b8pc)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b088b8tg)

The Write Stuff 11:30 WED (b04mh919)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b087rky1)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b088fmj9)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b088b87f)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b088b8dm)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b088b8kd)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b088b8pf)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b088b8tj)

Today 07:00 SAT (b088b2hf)

Today 06:00 MON (b088b853)

Today 06:00 TUE (b08bg0g9)

Today 06:00 WED (b08bhpbs)

Today 06:00 THU (b08bhnmx)

Today 06:00 FRI (b08bhpdc)

Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups 11:30 MON (b04ps720)

Trump: The Presidential Precedents 13:45 MON (b088dwtd)

Trump: The Presidential Precedents 13:45 TUE (b08bhbcp)

Trump: The Presidential Precedents 13:45 WED (b08923tk)

Trump: The Presidential Precedents 13:45 THU (b08923tm)

Trump: The Presidential Precedents 13:45 FRI (b08923tp)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03mztpd)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b01sbyj8)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03zrccd)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03bkg3b)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03thsc6)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b020tp7c)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b087pff8)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b087pffd)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b087pffn)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b087pffz)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b088b7x8)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b088b7xv)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b088b7yy)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b088b7zv)

Weather 05:56 MON (b088b851)

Weather 12:57 MON (b088b85w)

Weather 21:58 MON (b088b879)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b088b8cq)

Weather 12:57 WED (b088b8jr)

Weather 21:58 WED (b088b8k7)

Weather 12:57 THU (b088b8n8)

Weather 21:58 THU (b088b8p9)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b088b8sn)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b088b8td)

Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b0889xzp)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b088b809)

With Great Pleasure 16:00 MON (b088f0ng)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b086ky34)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b088b857)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b088b8c7)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b088b8jg)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b088b8n2)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b088b8sb)

World at One 13:00 MON (b088b86g)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b088b8cv)

World at One 13:00 WED (b088b8jt)

World at One 13:00 THU (b088b8nb)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b088b8sq)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b088b85p)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b088b8ch)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b088b8jp)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b088b8n6)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b088b8sl)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b087ttn5)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b087ttn5)