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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 07 JANUARY 2017

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b086ky27)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Imagining the New Truth (b088g3xk)
Oksana Zabuzhko

Oksana Zabuzkho writes and works in the Ukrainian capital Kyiv. The central streets of the city and the now famous Maidan square have seen their share of protest, violence and upheaval in recent years. Walking those streets that echoed with demonstrations, Oksana reflects on what happened back then and the subsequent state of war with Ukraine's northern neighbour Russia. But she sees the Truth of that conflict, and the broader global situation, not just in the gunshots now ringing out sporadically in the East of the country, but in the information warfare in which writers feel far more directly involved.

Oksana reads a brief extract from her novel 'The Museum of Abandoned Secrets'.

Producer: Tom Alban.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b086ky29)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b086ky2c)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b086ky2f)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b086ky2h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b086tj2x)
A short reflection and prayer with Tony Macaulay.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b086tjbm)
Relationship Therapy

The programme that starts with its listeners.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b086ky2k)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b086ky2m)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Open Country (b086t7tz)
Surfers in Cayton Bay

Helen Mark goes in search of the best surfing beach in England.

Forget Cornwall, she's off to Cayton Bay in Yorkshire, from where you can see Scarborough just to the north. It's a bit colder, a bit grittier and the water, though clean, is not so blue as down south. But there are waves to fall in love with, and a passionate collection of surfers who've done just that. There's even one, Steve Crawford, who was brought up overlooking the beach at Newquay. He moved north years ago, drawn by two specific waves and the lack of crowds. Those waves are still here, but now there are crowds too, as other surfers have begun to discover this hidden gem.

But don't imagine that surfing culture is new in this part of the world. There's recently-discovered evidence that the first surfing ever in the UK was demonstrated near here by two Hawaiian princes being educated in Yorkshire in 1890. All they needed was some bits of four-by-two and an extensive woolly bathing suit and they were off! As Helen discovers, surfing takes such a hold of some people that even the chilly waters of the North Sea do not deter them.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b086ky2p)
Thriving in 2017

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b086ky2r)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b087p13c)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b086ky2t)
Ed Balls

Former Shadow Chancellor, Ed Balls, joins Richard and Aasmah to discuss his surprise success on Strictly Come Dancing, passion for football, how he coped in public life with interiorised stammering and his life post politics "Gangnam style".

27 year old magician Troy has performed both street magic and for high profile audiences from Harry Styles to HRH Prince Harry. He describes how he overcame a fear of heights to perform tricks on a highwire!

JP meets Dr. Evadne Hinge (George Logan) - the surviving member of Hinge & Bracket, the comedy partnership that entertained the public in the guise of two elderly eccentric spinsters.

Jane Asher is an 85 year old grandmother of 11, and the Queen of masters swimming. She recalls how she swam competitively in her twenties, but didn't pursue racing until later in life when she lost her husband, and has gone on to win in excess of 100 world records.

Comedian Josie Long explains why she likes performing stand-up in people's living rooms, enjoys cold water swimming and her passion for 1930s film noir voices and playing Boggle.

Tom Chaplin, singer/songwriter and lead singer with the band Keane, shares his Inheritance Tracks: Bridge Over Troubled Water by Simon and Garfunkel and Charmed Life by The Divine Comedy.

Strictly Come Dancing Live is on tour around the country from 20 January.
Troy: The Highwire is available to watch on Channel4.com
Josie Long is on tour during February and March with her new show Something Better.
Tom Chaplin will be touring in May and his album The Wave is out now.

Producer: Louise Corley
Editor: Eleanor Garland.

SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b087p13f)
Series 15, Banqueting House

Jay Rayner kicks off a new series in style at Banqueting House on London's Whitehall. Tim Anderson, Rachel McCormack, Tim Hayward and Dr Annie Gray are this week's panellists.

Underneath the breathtaking Rubens' ceiling, the panel uncover the more unusual foodie traditions of Twelfth Night and engage in a little revelry of their own. They are joined in the audience by Jennie Walton from the Drury Lane Theatrical Fund, where eighteenth century Twelfth Night practices are still honoured.

As well as digging into the fascinating history of Banqueting House, the only surviving building of the Palace of Whitehall, the panel offers up a bounty of practical cooking tips, including interesting savoury uses for leftover Christmas cake.

Produced by Miranda Hinkley
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b087p2k2)
In a special edition of The Week In Westminster, Steve Richards discusses politics and satire with Rory Bremner, Jan Ravens, and Matt Forde.
The editor is Marie Jessel.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b086ky2w)
"May it Pass"

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b086ky2y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b087p2k4)
Cheaper energy when it rains

The latest news from the world of personal finance.

SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b086tg0g)
Series 92, Episode 1

New Year, News Quiz. Jeremy Hardy, Danny Finkelstein, Angela Barnes and Andy Parsons join Miles Jupp to scrutinize the goings-on behind the week's headlines.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b086ky30)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b086ky32)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b086tgyl)
Matthew Elliott, Alan Johnson MP, Sean McAllister, Anna Soubry MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Hymers College in Hull with a panel including the former Chief Executive of the Vote Leave campaign Matthew Elliott, the Labour MP Alan Johnson, documentary film maker Sean McAllister who has curated "Made In Hull" - a week long programme of events to launch Hull's tenure as UK City of Culture in 2017, and the Conservative MP Anna Soubry.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b087p2k6)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?
Presented by Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell

Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230
Call 03700 100 444. Email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Tweet,#BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.

SAT 14:30 The Now Show (b087p2k8)
Now The Twelfth Night Show

The Now Show does Shakespeare!

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present their unique take on Shakespeare's comedy, Twelfth Night. One of them has been able to put his degree in English literature to good use in adapting the play. The other has a degree in Geography.

As they've been busy with the Now Show, Punt and Dennis haven't had much time to adapt the play so are presenting it in a totally unique way to the Radio 4 listener through the use of 'archive' extracts from stage, television and radio productions of the play alongside commentary from theatrical and academic experts and some of the greatest Shakespearean actors.

We'll hear a BBC Schools production of the play in which a famous soap actress plays the role of Olivia's maid; a 1994 production where the role of Feste was played by Billy Connolly; an excerpt from the 2002 off-Broadway urban musical version 'The Chick Wears Pants', and the 1948 film noir movie version.

Punt and Dennis will guide us through the play with historical notes and explanations, and they may even get a bit of geography in!


Written by Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis with additional material from Gareth Gwynn and Pippa Evans.
Performed by Steve Punt, Hugh Dennis, Lewis MacLeod, Ronni Acona, Pippa Evans and Simon Dylan-Kane.
Produced by Dawn Ellis

A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 15:30 Alone (b087p3mj)
A sitcom, written by Moray Hunter and starring Angus Deayton, about five single, middle aged neighbours living in flats in a converted house in North London.

Mitch (Angus Deayton) is a widower and part-time therapist who is looking to put his life back together now that he is single and living, supposedly temporarily, with Will (Pearce Quigley), his younger, more volatile and unhappily divorced half-brother. Elsewhere in the building are schoolteacher Ellie (Abigail Cruttenden) who is shy, nervous and desperately missing her ex-boyfriend, as well as overly honest, frustrated actress Louisa (Kate Isitt), and socially inept IT nerd, Morris (Bennett Arron).

In this pilot episode, The Only Way is Ethics, Mitch struggles to maintain professional confidentiality when Ellie arranges a date with one of his clients, womanising Rob (Alastair McKenzie). Meanwhile, Will and Louisa are in bitter competition as they try to give up smoking together. Quitting 'buddies' they are not, and poor Morris is very much caught in the crossfire.

An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 16:00 Hold the Front Page (b087p3ml)
Hold The Front Page. Sue Perkins and guests take a look back at the big news stories of 2016. No, not those ones - the real news, as found in local news headlines up and down the country

Producer: Richard Webb

A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 16:30 Time Spanner (b087p3mn)
A mind-bending time-travelling comic adventure which sees Martin Gay's 40th birthday disrupted by two very important moments: one is meeting Gabbie, the girl of his dreams who he might possibly have just said totally the wrong thing to; and the other is being forced at gunpoint through a supernatural mirror into a world of angels, robots and the most powerful tool in the universe, the Time Spanner, which gives the holder the power to span time.

Will Martin use the time spanner to save humanity from destruction? Or will he use it to try and make sure Gabbie doesn't think he's an idiot?

Written by and starring Simon Kane as Martin Gay, narrated by John Finnemore as Laika the space dog, and starring David Mitchell as billionaire occultist Daniel Kraken, London Hughes as disconcertingly optimistic charity worker Gabbie, Jeremy Limb as the world's most irritating robot and Belinda Stewart-Wilson as the Angel.

Produced by Gareth Edwards

A BBC Studios production.

SAT 17:00 PM (b086ky36)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 iPM (b086tjbm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b086ky38)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b086ky3b)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b086ky3d)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b086ky3g)
Hugh Dennis, Bridget Christie, Liz Carr, Arinzé Kene, L.A Salami, Ciaran Lavery, Nikki Bedi, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson and Nikki Bedi are joined by Hugh Dennis, Bridget Christie, Liz Carr and Arinzé Kene for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from L.A Salami and Ciaran Lavery.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.

SAT 19:00 Life on Egg (b087p3sm)
Inspection

Harry Hill runs Britain's remotest prison, The Egg, along with his two assistants, Peter and Anne. But escape rates have gotten out of control and so the government has decided to send two inspectors to look things over. Will Harry and his team survive their strenuous checks? Find out in "Life on Egg".

Written by Dan Maier

Produced by Sam Michell

A BBC Studios production.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b086ky3j)
Trackers of Oxyrhynchus, Endless Poetry, Taboo, History of Wolves, On Kosovo Field.

Tony Harrison's play The Trackers of Oxyrhynchus is revived at London's Finborough Theatre
87 year old Chilean film director Alejandro Jodorowsky's latest film Endless Poetry is the second instalment of a planned five part autobiographical series
Tom Hardy stars in BBC TV's new drama Taboo,
Emily Fridlund's History of Wolves is the growing-up tale of a lonely Minnesota schoolgirl
BBC Radio drama On Kosovo Field is a 5-part fantasy play by Finn Kennedy which includes a score by PJ Harvey, whose notes, photos, poetry and songs helped to inspire it
Tom Sutcliffe is joined by Viv Groskop, Ekow Eshun and Louise Doughty
The producer is Oliver Jones.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b087p473)
Asa Briggs: The Last Victorian Improver

Tristram Hunt MP tracks the life's work of the historian Asa Briggs, who was instrumental in the founding of the University of Sussex and the Open University.

By the time of his death last year, Asa Briggs had come a long way.

From a childhood helping run his dad's struggling shop in Depression-era West Yorkshire, he began his career at amazing speed. At 16, he arrived at Cambridge University from his grammar school. At 21, he was cracking codes at Bletchley Park. In 1945, he turned down the offer of a safe Labour seat. In his late twenties, he had a fellowship at Oxford. In 1951, he went on a road trip round Syria and Turkey with a young student of his - Rupert Murdoch.

Briggs became the official historian of the BBC, where he learned to run institutions - and then grabbed the chance to build one himself. At the new University of Sussex, he was there from the start, helping to make it the most visible of the new universities of the 1960s. And then he played a major role in shaping the Open University.

In this programme, Tristram Hunt explores the energetic life of one of his heroes. He argues that Briggs was steeped in the Victorian era.

First, through his Victorian grandfather, who took him on tours of the architectural glories of the North of England.

Second, Briggs was a leading historian of the Victorian era, and played a huge role in rescuing it from negative stereotypes.

But third, Asa Briggs was a Victorian himself - in the sense that he wanted to sustain their great effort to improve life. His mission to open up access to education modernised and built on the Victorians' legacy.

With: Dan Briggs, Jean Seaton, David Kynaston, Miles Taylor, Bill Cash MP.

Produced by Phil Tinline in association with the Open University.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b086l8m9)
Reading Europe - Sweden: Britt-Marie Was Here, Episode 1

Exploring the best in contemporary literature, Reading Europe reaches Scandinavia and begins with Sweden.

Britt-Marie needs purpose in her life and she takes the brave step of going out to look for it. She ends up in Borg, a typical Swedish, run-down, small town. Her part-time job leads her to an extraordinary turn of events, beyond anything she might have imagined. But she finds that bringing people into her life also brings problems and she's soon in the midst of a football drama, involved in a family crisis and at the corner of an unexpected love triangle, in this warm and humorous drama.

In part one, Britt-Marie finds herself in a new town, with a job and a lot of things to clean. She soon finds a way to let people know she's here and is thrust unexpectedly into the heart of the community, thanks to a game she doesn't understand.

Adapted for radio by Charlotte Jones
From a translation by Henning Koch

Directed by Janine H. Jones
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production

Fredrik Backman is the New York Times bestselling author of the novel A Man Called Ove and his books are published in more than thirty-five languages worldwide.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b086ky3l)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Life on Egg (b087tx29)
CCTV

Harry Hill is the governor of the UK's remostest prison, The Egg. However, his resources are limited, so when there is an incident within the prison he is forced to record it in watercolours. That's why he is delighted when he receives a brand new CCTV system to monitor goings-on within The Egg. But the system soon malfunctions...and Harry has to think quickly to save the sanity of his team.

It is written by Dan Maier

The producer is Sam Michell

It's a BBC Studios Production.

SAT 22:30 Jake Yapp Saves Humanity in 28 Minutes (b087p7m4)
Satirist Jake Yapp attempts to save humanity from its ills though the power of stand-up and sketch comedy.

In this pilot episode Jake turns his attention to the pernicious evil of TV advertisements, breaking down the five main formats used to peddle us products.

Performed by Jake Yapp, George Fouracres and Susan Wokoma
Written by Jake Yapp with additional material from Liam Beirne and Robin Morgan
Produced by Joe Nunnery
A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b086nzgd)
Programme 10, 2016-17

(10/12)
'Why might Richard Wilson be incredulous at a motorbike, a boys' comic, Dr Frankenstein and the Radio Corporation of America?'

This, and other even more impenetrable puzzles, are among Tom Sutcliffe's challenges for the teams in this tenth contest of the current series. It's the last chance for Scotland and the South of England to add to their final tally of victories this season. Last time these two teams met it was a victory for the Scots - can Marcus Berkmann and Paul Sinha of the South turn the tables on Val McDermid and Alan McCredie this time?

As usual, the programme includes several questions suggested by RBQ listeners hoping their ingenious ideas will wrong-foot the panellists. Tom will also have the answer to the question he set for listeners at the end of last week's edition.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

SAT 23:30 Ability (b087p7m6)
Lost Voice Guy (real name Lee Ridley) won the BBC Radio Stand-Up Comedy Award in 2014. He is a funny guy. He also has cerebral palsy and can only speak via a computer. Ability uses Lee's experiences of coping with this disability and weaves them into a sitcom. It is based around Matt, who is leaving home for the first time to move in with Jess, his best friend from school. Matt's parents are worried, particularly his dad - they have always done everything for him. But Matt is determined even though his new carer, Bob, is not all he should be. Bob is new to the role, and although willing, he somehow manages to spend more time dealing weed and flogging knocked off TVs than cooking Matt's tea. But he treats Matt like an equal, and not all his previous carers have done that, and so the two form a bond. A bond that could lead Matt into an awful lot of trouble. Especially as Matt has never been above exploiting his circumstances if the situation arises - he's always known he could get away with murder (although he's never actually tried that of course.) But who would suspect the disabled guy? Could Matt and Bob become the new Del boy and Rodney? And if so, which is which?

Allan Mustafa plays Bob, Matt's carer. Best know for People Just Do Nothing, which he also co-created, Allan has never actually acted in anyone else's work. But he read this script and immediately got it. He loved the dark comedy and is indeed, the perfect Bob.

The sitcom is co-written by Sony nominated Katherine Jakeways and produced and directed by Jane Berthoud. Jane Berthoud says: "Katherine has brought her great expertise as a writer to this project, and always been careful to make sure Lee's voice in it was clear. Together they make a great team and have turned out an excellent script - funny, fast moving and even a touch poignant at times. Allan Mustafa is the perfect Bob, the rest of the cast were also brilliant and I can see a great future for these characters."

Lee says:"I'm really pleased with how Ability has turned out. I've had the idea behind this sitcom in my head for a few years now, so to finally get the chance to make it is an amazing feeling. Ever since winning the BBC New Comedy Award, the BBC have been very supportive and I'm lucky to have had the opportunity to work with some great people while writing this. It has been wonderful to hear my ideas come alive. Allan Mustafa is exactly how I imagined Bob to be.".


SUNDAY 08 JANUARY 2017

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b087pdsx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Ian Fleming's Thrilling Cities (b04kfk20)
Hong Kong

In 1959, Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond, was commissioned by the Sunday Times to explore some of the world's most exotic cities. Travelling to the Far East and then to America, he left the bright main streets for the back alleys, abandoning tourist sites in favour of underground haunts, and mingling with celebrities, gangsters and geishas. The result is a series of vivid snapshots of a mysterious, vanished world.

Fleming wote, 'On November 2nd, armed with a sheaf of visas...one suitcase...and my typewriter, I left humdrum London for the thrilling cities of the world. All my life I have been interested in adventure and abroad. I have enjoyed the frisson of leaving the wide, well-lit streets and venturing up back alleys in search of the hidden, authentic pulse of towns. It was perhaps this habit that turned me into a writer of thrillers.'

In today's episode, Fleming flies to Hong Kong - the most vivid and exciting city he had ever experienced. He enjoys a massage at the hands of an expert, and his senses are enchanted by the smells of the streets at night - from the 'exciting dash of sandalwood' in a joss-stick factory to the scent of frying onions and 'sweet perspiration'.

Read by Simon Williams
Abridged by Mark Burgess

Copyright Ian Fleming Publications Ltd 1963

Produced by David Blount
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b087pdsz)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b087pdt1)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b087pdt3)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b087pdt5)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b087pjss)
St. Andrew's Church, Hurstbourne Priors in Hampshire

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from St. Andrew's Church, Hurstbourne Priors in Hampshire. The tenor was cast in 1741 by Henry Bagley and is tuned to F. In 1998 two trebles were added by the Whitechapel Foundry to make up the present ring of eight. They were re-hung clockwise in a new steel frame by Whites of Appleton. We hear them now ringing a plain course of Plain Bob Major.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b087pjsv)
Dippy the Diplodocus

It's the end of an era.

Dippy the dinosaur has left the building.

Gifted to King Edward VII in 1905, a 70 foot long cast of a fossilised dinosaur skeleton discovered in America has been on display at London's Natural History Museum for more than a century.

It's become the country's most recognisable museum exhibit - seen by an estimated 90 million people.

Now it's being replaced by the real skeleton of a giant blue whale...Dippy's 292 plaster cast bones setting off instead on a nationwide tour.

On Profile this week, Mark Coles examines how Dippy the replica Diplodocus has become a national treasure.

Producer Smita Patel
Researcher Beth Sagar-Fenton.

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b087pdt7)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b087pdt9)
Immortality

Rabbi Shoshana Boyd Gelfand explores our fascination with immortality, its significance within both the scientific and faith communities and the desirability of life eternal.

According to Shoshana, our yearning for immortality shapes the world and drives civilisation. She examines the desire to leave a legacy that motivates writers, artists and musicians. The music of Mozart is described as "a gift to the world", his enduring cultural impact allowing him to achieve a form of immortality.

Shoshana suggests that a longing for immortality may be fuelling our current obsession with celebrity culture as we strive for the fame that will ensure that we're not forgotten. However, the fiction of neuroscientist David Eagleman warns us that eternal life through fame may not be as desirable as we first imagine.

Drawing upon the work of gerontologist Aubrey de Grey, Shoshana discusses the latest scientific research into "age-reversal" and "life extension". She goes on to examine the different approaches to immortality in several faiths including Christianity, Hinduism and her own Jewish tradition.

The programme draws to a close with a striking conclusion - that mortality is not a punishment to humankind, but a gift. For Shoshana, our mortality is a vital catalyst that encourages us to seize the day.

Drawing upon a wide range of music, Shoshana introduces us to the haunting Jewish prayer for the dead, El Malei Rachamim, and picks out blues singer Washington Phillips' stunning recording of What Are They Doing In Heaven Today?. Readings include the philosopher Stephen Cave and the poet Robert Frost.

Presenter: Shoshana Boyd Gelfand
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b087pjsx)
Gathering Nuts in Wicklow

Ella McSweeney meets a dairy farmer who's branching out into hazelnuts in the Wicklow Mountains.

Producer: Sarah Swadling.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b087pdtc)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b087pdtf)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b087pdth)
Clergy nursing home closure, The ethics and effectiveness of foreign aid and The Knights of Malta

Plans by the Church of England to shut a flagship care home for retired clergy could split up elderly couples when part of it closes in the spring. The church's Pensions Board blames a difficulty in recruiting and retaining trained nursing staff. Trevor Barnes meets the residents who are campaigning to stop Manormead Nursing Home closing.

William Crawley discusses the ethics and effectiveness of foreign aid with guests Jonathan Foreman Senior research fellow at Civitas, David Hulme, Executive Director, Global Development Institute and Kevin Watkins, Save the Children CEO.

Pope Francis has appointed a commission to investigate the recent removal of a top Knights of Malta official who allegedly oversaw the distribution of condoms in the developing world. Christopher Lamb from The Tablet has been investigating.

In the wake of Jill Saward's death, theologian Elaine Storkey asks whether Churches can build a movement to liberate the country from the scourge of violence against women.

India's top court has banned religion and caste from election campaigns. William Crawley asks Rahul Tandon about how and if will work?

A number of women are thought to be being considered to replace the Right Rev Richard Chartres, the Bishop of London. Ruth Gledhill, Contributory Editor of Christian Today takes a look at the runners and riders.

The British Museum recently acquired a remarkable artifact that brings to life the religious world that would have been familiar to church goers centuries ago - a fourteenth century alabaster statue of the Virgin and Child. Edward Stourton went along to have a look.

Producers
Carmel Lonergan
Rosie Dawson

Editor
Christine Morgan.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b087pjsz)
Pump Aid

The singer Corinne Bailey Rae makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Pump Aid.

Registered Charity Number 1077889
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Pump Aid'.
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Pump Aid'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b087pdtk)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b087pdtm)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b087pjt2)
Celebrating Epiphany at St Margaret's Episcopal Church, Glasgow, with the Rector, the Rev Scott Robertson.

Glasgow Chamber Choir conducted by Michael Bawtree.

Producer: Mo McCullough.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b086th59)
The fun of work - really?

"I haven't been visiting schools and drowsing during headteachers' PowerPoint presentations for nothing this past quarter century", writes Will Self.

"I know full-well that the purpose of both British education and British employment is the same: to keep us busy and purposive from cradle to grave".

Will Self explores how the worlds of work and education have become seamlessly merged with each other.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qk3x)
Mistle Thrush: Part One

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the Mistle Thrush. Loud rattling calls, like someone scraping a comb across wood, tell you that Mistle Thrushes are about. From midsummer to early autumn, bands of Mistle Thrushes roam the countryside, where they feed on open pastures, among stubble or on moorland. These birds are very fond of the white sticky berries of mistletoe and spread the seeds into cracks of tree bark when they wipe their bills or defecate.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b087pmd1)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b087pdtr)
Tom wants to make changes, and Susan asserts herself.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b087pl4j)
Pinky Lilani

Pinky Lilani, who was awarded a CBE in 2015 for services to women in business, is the founder of the annual Asian Women of Achievement Awards and the Women of the Future Awards. She also runs her own company, which uses Indian food as a means of team-building, and has published two cook books.

Pinky was born in Calcutta, now Kolkata, where her parents were affluent and very sociable. They employed one of the best cooks in the city, so Pinky grew up surrounded by people and food. While she enjoyed eating, she had no experience of cooking. When she moved to London with her husband, who she married three weeks after their first meeting, she was unable to cook. After many culinary disasters, she returned to India and the kitchen in her family home, where the household cook shared his expertise.

Back in the UK, she started teaching evening cookery classes which in turn led to a role consulting for one of Britain's best-known food companies, who manufacture Asian staples including chutneys, breads and curry pastes.

In 2001, she published her first cookery book and set up in business to satisfy the two great loves of her life: food and people. In 1999, she founded the Asian Women of Achievement Awards and seven years later she added the Women of the Future Awards to her portfolio. Both of these have continued to be held annually, drawing high-profile support from, among others, Theresa May, Cherie Blair, the Duchess of York and the Countess of Wessex.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b087pdtt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 The Tim Vine Chat Show (b07hj0q6)
Series 1, Episode 1

A new show from the internationally acclaimed master of the one-liner Tim Vine sees Tim interview members of his live audience as he embarks on a quest to hear the life stories of the Great British public while simultaneously showcasing his trademark gleeful wordplay and preposterous songs.

In this first episode of the series Tim talks to a death-defying parachutist, hears about a hair-raising brush with a Royal Protection Officer and tells at least two jokes about chickens.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b087pmd3)
Belfast: Creating a New Food Tradition

In this series of four programmes broadcast over Christmas and the New Year, Sheila Dillon explores the link between tradition and food.

Sheila ends the series by exploring the creation of a new food culture - in Northern Ireland. It started with the revival of the St George's market in Belfast - now in full swing, and hundreds of young businesses are now thriving. Sheila tours the market with chef Paula McIntyre and meets people with a new take on traditional Irish food. She catches up with butter and cheese producers who were in the vanguard of this new movement, and asks how you carry on innovating - and what they've learned on the way. And she travels to the island of Rathlin off the north coast of Ireland, to meet a family who are making an international business out of growing kelp, and exporting it to Japan.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b087pdty)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b087pdv0)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Moving Pictures (b07w9jg5)
The Harvesters by Pieter Bruegel the Elder

A three-part series offering the chance to take a long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in incredible detail.

In this first episode, immerse yourself in Pieter Bruegel the Elder's masterpiece The Harvesters, in the company of Cathy FitzGerald and experts from the artist's Flemish homeland. Follow the link to explore a high-resolution image of the painting and you'll be able to zoom in to see the tiniest details as you listen - even examine Bruegel's brushstrokes.

It's a hot, dry day in 16th century Flanders. Labourers grab a break from bringing in the harvest, they eat lunch and snooze under a tree. Behind them, the peaceful countryside is full of life. Scrumpers steal from an orchard, villagers enjoy harvest games on the green, monks escape the heat with a wild-swim.

Cathy FitzGerald takes a walk through the landscape and then hears how the masterpiece may have brightened up a wealthy Antwerp merchant's dinner parties.

Image: The Harvesters by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1565, from the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Photographed by Google Arts and Culture.

Presenter and producer: Cathy FitzGerald
Original music: Joe Acheson and Tomas Dvorak
A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b086tfbv)
Somerset

Eric Robson is in Somerset with this week's panellists - Chris Beardshaw, Anne Swithinbank and Bunny Guinness.

The panel trades theses on a mysterious case of missing slugs, offer up reasons for the continual use of classical nomenclature in horticulture, and lay out the best way to prune a wild wisteria.

Also, Chris and Anne enjoy a trip to the beach in order to discuss the best uses for seaweed in the garden.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b07z3hpm)
Sunday Omnibus - A Positive Outlook

Fi Glover with some enthusiastic conversations between friends, partners and siblings determined to get the best out of life, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b087pn05)
Reading Europe - Sweden: Britt-Marie Was Here, Episode 2

Exploring the best in contemporary literature, Reading Europe reaches Scandinavia and begins with Sweden.

Britt-Marie needs purpose in her life and she takes the brave step of going out to look for it. She ends up in Borg, a typical Swedish, run-down, small town. Her part-time job leads her to an extraordinary turn of events, beyond anything she might have imagined. But she finds that bringing people into her life also brings problems and she's soon in the midst of a football drama, involved in a family crisis and at the corner of an unexpected love triangle, in this warm and humorous drama.

In part two, Britt-Marie has to rely on the people of Borg to come through for her and the team, but suddenly the January Cup is the least of her worries as a family in crisis need her help.

Adapted for radio by Charlotte Jones
From a translation by Henning Koch

Britt-Marie ... Pippa Haywood
Sven ... Matthew Gravelle
Kent ... Simon Greenall
Sami ... Justin Davies
Vega ... Maddison Daye
Omar ... Christopher Benning
Pirate ... Jacob Foot
Bank ... Carys Eleri
Somebody ... Wanda Opalinska
Girl at the Unemployment Office ... Alexandria Riley
The Narrator ... Gunnar Pettersson

Directed by Janine H. Jones
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production

Fredrik Backman is the New York Times bestselling author of the novel A Man Called Ove and his books are published in more than thirty-five languages worldwide.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (b087pn07)
Nadeem Aslam

Mariella Frostrup talks to Nadeem Aslam about his new book The Golden Legend, a powerful and disturbing look at contemporary religious intolerance, and an intense love story.
Richard Kelly argues that unhappy books can help us have a Happy New Year; a publisher recommends a great read for 2017 and Sam Winston and Janne Teller talk about adapting and translating their books for readers around the world.

SUN 16:30 The Echo Chamber (b087pn09)
Series 8, Matthew and Michael Dickman

Twin American poets Matthew and Michael Dickman read poems and talk to Paul Farley about brotherliness. Both have written series of poems inspired by the death of their non-twin brother, Darin. Producer: Tim Dee.

SUN 17:00 Climate Change: The Trump Card (b086s95f)
In April delegates from 171 delegates, including the US and China, signed the Paris climate agreement at UN headquarters in New York. The agreement is to limit the rise in global temperatures to less than 2C.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said: "Paris will shape the lives of all future generations in a profound way - it is their future that is at stake."

Speaking at the opening ceremony, he said the planet was experiencing record temperatures: "We are in a race against time. I urge all countries to join the agreement at the national level. Today we are signing a new covenant for the future."

China and the Obama administration took the lead in endorsing Paris, and it came into force with astonishing speed.

Then, in the follow up meeting in November in Marrakesh, whilst delegates met to celebrate a remarkable year of progress and to thrash out ways of implementing the Paris accords, something happened that briefly took the wind out of many sails. Donald Trump was elected the next president of the United States.

Mr Trump and his cabinet nominees to the offices of environment, energy and state, are all confirmed Climate skeptics, or currently work for fossil-fuel industries.

Will the next US government undo what the rest of the world has been trying to do? With political unease in many member states, is the EU backsliding and what is the current UK government doing about climate change?

Roger Harrabin gets some answers to these questions and asks if it really can all unravel.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b087pjsv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b087pdv2)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b087pdv4)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b087pdv6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b087pdv8)
Lemn Sissay

The best of BBC Radio with Poet Lemn Sissay
We are only a week into the year and the airwaves are fizzing with life. We've a birth in Bound the best drama of the whole year. We've ex prisoners who fell in love and formed a sanctuary. We've the women of Poland standing up against the state, and the waves crashing down on the beach ridden by Yorkshire Surfers who swear the greatest waves in Britain are in ... we'll you'll have to tune in and find out.
From Revolution in Addis Ababa to comedy by Harry Hill, and if, at the start of the year, you are still in sleep mode there's also a bear snoring gently in Hibernation waiting for spring.
Lemn's BBC Radio iPlayer choice comes from Witness from The World Service
Producers Stephen Garner and Cecile Wright
Production Support: Kay Bishton.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b087pp0c)
Tom needs to offload his concerns, and Roy has some explaining to do.

SUN 19:15 Robert Newman's Entirely Accurate Encyclopaedia of Evolution (b06gwnx2)
One of Britain's finest comedians, Rob Newman, with a witty, fact-packed series mixing stand-up and sketches, challenging notions of Survival of the Fittest and The Selfish Gene with a new theory that's equal parts enlightening and hilarious.

Rob is our guide on a journey through a unique audio A-Z of nature that takes in everything from altruistic amoebae and dancing squid to Richard Dawkins wrestling naked with a postal worker.

Piecing these fragments together allows Rob to correct some major distortions of Darwinism, as well as rejig the theory of natural selection in the light of what we now know about epigenetics, mirror neurons and the Flintstones.

Written by Rob Newman
Starring Claire Price, with Jenni Murray as the voice of the Encyclopaedia.

Producer: Jon Harvey
Executive Producer: Richard Wilson
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 19:45 Drama (b087ppbn)
Reading Europe: Scandinavia, Sweden: Nuestra Senora de la Asuncion

A chance meeting at a party, a call in the early morning, and a day trip to the dry Spanish Interior - one sightseer is profoundly moved by her experience on the day.

Originally commissioned for a short story festival in Croatia, Swedish writer Lina Wolff's tale takes us from Madrid to Granada and back again, highlighting the different cultural views of northern and southern Europe and their attitudes to superstition, and leaving our narrator shaken and profoundly moved by her experience.

Lina Wolff has lived and worked in Italy and Spain. During her years in Valencia and Madrid she began to write her short story collection Many People Die Like You (2009). Bret Easton Ellis and the Other Dogs, her first novel, was awarded the prestigious Vi Magazine Literature Prize and shortlisted for the 2013 Swedish Radio Award for Best Novel of the Year. She now lives in southern Sweden.

The translator, Saskia Vogel, is from Los Angeles and lives in Berlin where she works as a writer and Swedish-to-English literary translator. She has written on the themes of gender, power, and sexuality for publications such as Granta, The White Review, The Offing and The Quietus. Her translations include work by leading female authors such as Katrine Marcal, Karolina Ramqvist and the modernist eroticist Rut Hillarp.

This story is part of Radio 4's Reading Europe project and continues an exploration of contemporary writing from Scandinavia.

Written by Lina Wolff
Translated by Saskia Vogel
Read by Olivia Darnley

Produced by Lizzie Davies
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:00 The Sprung Floor (b079njxk)
Dancer and choreographer Dane Hurst has bought a former Rambert Company vinyl dance floor to take back to his home in South Africa, for under-privileged children to dance on.

Dance is like a magic carpet - it transported young Dane out of the volatility and violence and poverty of his childhood in segregated Port Elizabeth to life as a Rambert student and dancer in London. He believes it can transport other young people.

Buying the floor was the start of a larger dream that Dane calls the Moving Assembly Project (MAP). In the next few years, Dane plans to construct a prototype dance space out of shipping containers in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, and to install the floor in it - to give dance training to thousands of underprivileged children, transporting them for a moment out of their frustrations and grief.

This programme follows Dane as he starts on his dream, visiting MAP's pilot project - workshops with vulnerable children at the Ubuntu Centre in the old township of Zwide in the northern areas of Port Elizabeth. We hear modern dance touch local teenagers and Dane visits his childhood dance school in another part of the city's northern areas where he finds children in severe need.

Photograph credit: Karl Schoemaker

Producer: Frances Byrnes
A Rockethouse production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b086tfbz)
John Berger, Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher, Henry Heimlich, Patsy Crampton, Brian Widlake and George Michael

Julian Worricker on:

The writer and art critic John Berger

Mother and daughter actresses, Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher

The surgeon who came up with the life-saving heimlich manoeuvre, Henry Heimlich

The linguist Patsy Crampton, who worked at the Nuremberg trials before going on to translate more than 200 children's books

Broadcaster Brian Widlake, well known for the Money Programme and the World at One

And one of the biggest names in popular music, George Michael.

Producer: Neil George.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b087p2k4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b087pjsz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 In Business (b086t9n8)
Mexico and Mr Trump

How is Mexico preparing for the presidency of Donald Trump?
During the election campaign Mr Trump promised to tear up trade agreements with Mexico, build a border wall and send back millions of illegal Mexican immigrants. Caroline Bayley travels to Mexico to find out how the country feels about the US's new president and what impact his policies might have on Mexico.

Producer: Anna Meisel.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b087pq8l)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Moth Radio Hour (b087pq8n)
True stories told live in the USA.

SUN 23:50 A Point of View (b086th59)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]


MONDAY 09 JANUARY 2017

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b087pdx7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b086s8yv)
Super Rich: the 1% of the 1%

The 'Super Rich' - Laurie Taylor presents a special programme on the 1% of the 1%. Rowland Atkinson, Research Chair in Inclusive Society at the University of Sheffield, Roger Burrow, Professor of Cities at Newcastle University and Emma Spence, PhD Researcher at Cardiff University explore the origins of this wealthiest of elites and their impact on our cities and lives.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b087pjss)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b087pdx9)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b087pdxc)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b087pdxf)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b087pdxh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b088s7yg)
A short reflection and prayer with Tony Macaulay.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b087pdxk)
Avian Flu Housing Order extended; National Parks struggling with reduced funding; DIY broadband

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Mark Smalley.

MON 05:56 Weather (b087pdxm)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztpd)
Great Tit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the Great Tit. That metallic 'tea-cher, tea-cher' song of the great tit is instantly recognisable and you can hear it on mild days from mid-December onwards. It's the origin of the old country name, 'Saw-Sharpener'.

MON 06:00 Today (b087pdxp)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (b087pr2w)
Chibundu Onuzo and Martin Sixsmith on corruption and family drama

Andrew Marr talks to the best-selling author Martin Sixsmith about his latest book which tells the story of a daughter's search for the truth about her beloved father. Secrets, corruption and political intrigue are uncovered as they travel from Britain to Pakistan. There's more political scandal and family drama from the Nigerian author Chibundu Onuzo in her latest novel, Welcome to Lagos, and the playwright Oladipo Agboluaje imagines a political revolution in 21st century Nigeria and the moral compromises made in the pursuit of power and political change. Laurence Cockcroft is the co-founder of Transparency International in the UK and in his latest work turns his attention to the flavour of corruption in the West.

Producer: Katy Hickman.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b087pr2y)
The Reformation, Unfinished Business

500 years after the Reformation, Diarmaid MacCulloch examines how the announcement of a university seminar in Germany led to the division of Europe. He examines the ideas of Martin Luther, where they came from and why they proved so revolutionary, tracing their development and influence, and reflecting on what they mean for us today.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b087pdxr)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b087prhb)
On Kosovo Field, Chain of Keys

Fin Kennedy's drama inspired by PJ Harvey's notebooks, poetry and songs from her travels in Kosovo with her unreleased song demo of 'Chain of Keys' woven through.

Siblings Rebeka and Dardan return to Kosovo after a mass grave is discovered close to their native village. They discover a young nation striving to forge a path for hope and reconciliation and realise that they too must journey into their past to move on.

Songs and music composed and performed by PJ Harvey

Sound design by Steve Brooke

Directed by Nadia Molinari

PJ Harvey latest album 'The Hope Six Demolition Project' and her book of poetry 'The Hollow of the Hand' draw from several journeys undertaken by Harvey from 2011-2014; one of those journeys was to Kosovo. The inspiration for the drama 'On Kosovo Field' came from Harvey's Kosovan notebooks, her poems and her Kosovan song demos. Writer Fin Kennedy undertook extensive research, including travelling to Kosovo with producer Nadia Molinari where they retraced some of Harvey's steps and talked to journalists, politicians and human rights activists working on conflict resolution and reconciliation. One of these was Kushtrim Koliqi who was the cultural consultant on the script. 'On Kosovo Field' is the search for an identity via a road trip back through a lost heritage for a young, Kosovan born brother and sister. The story is told in five episodes. The 'play cycle' as an idea takes its inspiration from the traditional song cycles of the Albania/Kosovo region. By the end of the cycle we understand that the siblings are a metaphor for Kosovo itself, the newest country in Europe, poignantly searching for an identity after centuries of conflict.

MON 11:00 The Untold (b087prhd)
Leaving Prison

With unique access to Craig and the team working with him in Forest Bank, Producer Sue Mitchell records for six months before the October release date. Drug worker Paul Curran helps Craig navigate some of the issues behind his heroin and cocaine use and equips him with new ways of coping with the pressures he might face when he's free. He is now 36 and has been in and out of custody for most of his life, starting with an eight year sentence when he was just seventeen.

Forest Bank, on the outskirts of Manchester, prides itself on the close links between the drug unit in the prison and the community team ready to take over on release. Craig's partner has had enough of raising three children on her own and wants him to finally get settled: some of the work involves family meetings as the couple discuss what life might be like. Another strong element rests with two former prisoners, themselves ex-addicts, who now work mentoring Craig and others as they detox on the wing and embark on therapy and group work.

The recordings reveal the struggle Craig faced following the murder of his older brother and how drugs became his way of coping with the pain. On his last release he was doing well until he lost his job and after that things quickly deteriorated. This time round he feels better able to cope with knock-backs and is working on his temper, his expectations and how his hopes for a normal life can be realised. As his release date draws near listeners are taken into his cell as he packs and waits: will this be the time he finally manages to start his life in earnest.

MON 11:30 Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups (b04p85z2)
Series 2, Point of No Return

After a mere twenty-one years of service the Wrigglesworth dishwasher has finally packed in, so Mr Wrigglesworth is bringing Tom's mum and his gran down to London to have it out with the manufacturers at the Ideal Home Show. A visit which is made inordinately complicated by Mr Wrigglesworth's ambitious travel plans...

MON 12:00 News Summary (b087pdxt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 Home Front (b083lh91)
9 January 1917 - Anthony Yates

On this day in 1917, Germany resumed her policy of unrestricted submarine warfare, and despite efforts to smooth the waters, tensions continue to run high at Marshall's.

Written by Claudine Toutoungi
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b087pdxw)
Consumer affairs programme.

MON 12:57 Weather (b087pdxy)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b087pdy0)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 All in a Chord (b087ps60)
Ivan Hewett examines a chord from Beethoven's Eroica Symphony to test the idea that harmony is a reflection of history. He's joined by Beethoven expert John Suchet and writer and historian Professor Andrew Roberts who has special interest in Napoleon.

Music is never created in isolation - it's conceived in relation to what's going on around a composer in terms of personal and historical events, new technologies, new ideas and artistic endeavours in other fields. In this series, Ivan Hewett is looking at five very different chords which amply demonstrate the concept that harmony is a reflection of history.

Each programme is a bite size portion of rich musical and historical investigation - and each chord has had far reaching influence on other music and is emblematic of its era.

Beethoven's Eroica Chord of 1804 is the climax of the composer's attempt to capture the fervour of revolution. Strident trumpets scream out above the orchestra, forming a clash of harmony that no-one could mistake as anything but a great musical rallying cry for freedom.

Ivan Hewett is a writer on music for the Daily Telegraph, broadcaster on BBC Radio 3, and teacher at the Royal College of Music.

Producer: Rosie Boulton
A Monty Funk production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b087pp0c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b087psl5)
Series 3, Episode 1

It's the 1970's and Brian Oldman is still in jail - desperate to get out. Joseph Oldman (Toby Jones) is pulling every corrupt string possible to help him.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.



Written by G F Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b087psl7)
Programme 11, 2016-17

(11/12)
Tom Sutcliffe is in the chair for the penultimate clash of the 2016-17 season, with David Edwards and Myfanwy Alexander of Wales taking on Polly Devlin and Brian Feeney of Northern Ireland. If Wales take the victory today they will have won all four of their games in this series, and will be looking unstoppable in their bid to become RBQ champions. Northern Ireland will be going all out to prevent them - but it all depends how the questions fall.

The panel will need all their powers of recall and logic, as they struggle to connect apparently random elements from history, cinema, classic children's television, politics and natural history into some sort of pattern. The winners will be the pair who find the answers with the minimum need for clues and guidance from Tom.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b087pmd3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b087psl9)
Sara Pascoe

Sara Pascoe presents her favourite and funniest readings - including some killer putdowns by Tina Fey - to the audience at the BBC Radio Theatre. Sara is a stand-up comedian, writer and actor. A regular panellist on TV quiz shows like QI and Mock the Week, she also appeared in In the Thick of It and Twenty Twelve. Her readers are Olivia Poulet and John Robins, and the extracts are from Bossypants by Tina Fey, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, Henry and June by Anais Nin and My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b087psvz)
Religion and numbers

Maths and religion are both ways of seeking order and understanding in the world. Numerologists who like to find significance in every number believe that 2016 was always going to be a bad year because of that combination of numbers - 2 0 1 6. Mainstream religious traditions have often set great store by numbers. Certain ones recur repeatedly in their scriptures, 3, 7, 40. What's that all about?

Ernie Rea discusses religion's obsession with numbers with Marcus du Sautoy, Professor for the Public Understanding of Science and Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford: Alex Bellos, science writer and journalist and author of the book, "Can you solve my problems?" and Rabbi Debbie Young-Somers a Community Educator at the Movement for Reform Judaism.

MON 17:00 PM (b087pdy2)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b087pdy4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b087pvqk)
Series 10, Episode 1

This week, the Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his new curator Jo Brand welcome the science communicator, musician and comedian Helen Arney; a man who has lived as a goat in the Alps for 6 days and built his own toaster from the ground up; and the captain of a fourteen storey £350 million pound cruise ship, The Queen Elizabeth, Captain Aseem Hashmi.

This week, the Museum's Guest Committee catch up on the latest 4 elements to be added to the periodic chart, flip through a history book from the future, which is all about now; and the thing that keeps a sea captain grounded, figuratively as well as literally, his 12-ton anchor.

The show was researched by Anne Miller of QI and Mike Turner.

The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.

The production coordinator was Sophie Richardson.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b087pvqm)
Toby is quick to react, and Pip and Rex catch up.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b087pdy6)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b087prhb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 On a Knife Edge (b087pvqp)
This hospital based youth violence work is taking place in the four London major trauma centres and Producer Sue Mitchell was given exclusive access to follow what happens. The charity, Redthread, now has teams in each of the trauma centres and their youth workers will be alongside victims from the point that they walk, or are stretchered, in. They're away from their communities and alienated from peers and this surreal period - 'the teachable moment,' as it's known - is seen as being an effective time because the young person is vulnerable, shocked and forced to confront assumptions of invincibility.

Becky Calnan is a Redthread team leader at one of the London trauma centres and allows listeners to follow her work with nineteen year old Liam. He's been attacked on the street and turns up at Accident and Emergency with blood soaking into his coat and trousers. He tells her that he's been punched, kicked and stamped on as he was making his way to court for a scheduled appointment. She knows him already: just months earlier he was stabbed in his legs in a planned attack. Becky's been working with Liam ever since. His latest injuries don't surprise her: "He doesn't eat properly; he doesn't sleep as he's out at night, and he's paranoid because of how he's living: this all feeds into making these incidents much more likely to happen."

Liam tells listeners about his life of court appearances, street violence and lack of ambition. He traces the start of his problems back to 2010, when he moved to a new area of London with his Mum and sisters. He knows he could make something of himself if he puts his mind to it, but there's too much daily pressure for him to even try: "I don't know what can happen next. There are young youth running around with big knives and my Mum and Nan are scared. I'm not scared. I spat blood on them when they attacked me." But Liam's bravado cracks slightly as he acknowledges the work that Becky's doing: "She's helped me, I do appreciate that. If there are things I need to get off my chest she listens and she doesn't judge me. I don't have anyone else like that to talk to."

For Redthread the work is aimed at interrupting the cycle of violence which all too often sees the victim become the perpetrator. Liam describes being stabbed, jumped on and other attacks with a calm that would be more normally placed describing a shopping trip, say, not repeated street violence. He thinks he will end up dead unless he can change, but it's a hard task. Alongside Liam, Becky is helping others admitted every day. There's George, stabbed as he sat in his car, there are two victims who have yet to regain consciousness and a youngster who appears to have been paralysed in an attack. His long hospital stay provides a good opportunity to both tackle any possible acts of retribution and to begin considering the changes as he adapts to a very different life.

Redthread's hospital programme launched in 2006 and the idea has been in play in America for longer. There is an international network of hospital based intervention programmes and the idea is gaining ground, with Nottingham and Basildon being the latest areas for this approach. In London alone there were more than 1,236 victims of knife crime under the age of 25 in the year ending April 2016 according to the Metropolitan Police. The workers are called as ambulances are en route and will be there from the start, getting alongside the young person and helping them navigate the hospital system. They're trying to build the kind of relationships which many of these young people won't have had in their communities and the organisation also offer gang exit work and mental health support.

Dr Emer Sutherland, consultant clinical lead for the Emergency Department at King's College Hospital, said: "We set up the scheme at King's because we wanted to do more than just patch young people up and send them on their way. Hospitals have a unique opportunity to help try and stop the victim-perpetrator cycle. This is why talking to young people, at this key moment in their lives can help steer them away from the world of gang violence many find themselves in." Once they're in hospital they have a very private space for very private conversations: "Pain in some ways is a great mind opener.

"It's so powerful to the medical team, we can remember before we had Red Thread, we would see some of these young people who come in with trivial injuries and then come back with more severe injuries. We see youth violence as like any other disease, so we might see them on their way to school when they've been mugged or beaten up, then what could happen is they could join a gang to try and make them safe, even though the exact opposite is the case, then we see them going from stabbed in arms or legs to being quite viciously targeted and very vicious attacks - we find those very worrying.

MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b086t1xh)
Poland: Behind the Black Protests

Thousands of women - and men - took to the streets in Poland recently in protest against attempts to ban all abortions-and the issue seems to have crystallised a growing unease with the country's move to the right and the power of the Catholic Church. 'We are not putting our umbrellas away' went one of the slogans as women stood in the pouring rain to voice their concerns. The size of the protest surprised even the participants; organised by the feminist movement, it attracted women and men from many different backgrounds. Where did this surge of activism come from? Some argue that the revolution that began with Solidarnosc in the 1980s ignored the needs and voices of Polish women. Communism may have been defeated, they say, but it's been replaced by a different kind of repression. Maria Margaronis investigates. Mark Savage producing.

MON 21:00 Human Hibernation: The Big Sleep (b086s64v)
Ever wished you could miss an entire cold dark winter like bears or dormice? Kevin Fong explores the possibilities than humans could hibernate. This ability could help us recover from serious injury or make long space flights pass in a flash.

The first report on human hibernation in a medical journal was in the BMJ in 1900. It was an account of Russian peasants who, the author claimed, were able to hibernate. Existing in a state approaching "chronic famine", residents of the north-eastern Pskov region would retreat indoors at the first sign of snow, and there gather around the stove and fall into a deep slumber they called "lotska". No-one has ever found these peasants but there is serious research into putting humans into suspended animation, for long distance space travel or for allowing the body to recover from major injury.

The greatest clues into how to pull off hibernation comes from the American Black Bear. Dr Kevin Fong, an expert in trauma medicine, talks to Dr Brian Barnes, Director of the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska. He's done the most extensive study of black bears and observed how they slow down their metabolism. Fat-tailed lemurs are the only primates to hibernate. Duke University's Lemur Research Centre has discovered that they breathe just once every 20 minutes at their deepest torpor. These lemurs live longer than other animals of similar size. Could we find a way to use this trick of suspended animation? We could slow down out physiology ,cool down our bodies and hibernate during long space journeys. NASA too is working on how humans can survive trips to other solar systems.

Kevin Fong goes to the lab of Professor Robert Henning at the University Medical Centre in Groningen where he's worked out how animals protect their organs when they slow their body metabolism , enter a state of torpor and then return to normal physiology. Rob Henning wants to apply this to humans, on earth and in space. Already doctors use cooling in patients who have serious head injuries. Could this technique be applied further to allow us to fight disease and buy time for surgeons in the hospital trauma unit?

Producer: Adrian Washbourne.

MON 21:30 Start the Week (b087pr2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b087pdy8)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b087pdyb)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b087qd1y)
Reading Europe - Norway: A Death in the Family, Episode 1

A Death in the Family is the first book in the six volume cycle of autobiographical novels, My Struggle. Karl Ove Knausgaard's memoir has been described, in many countries, as a masterpiece.

With searing honesty, and an unflinching gaze turned upon himself and those around him, he writes about his teenage years in Norway. Later, he looks back on the writing of this book, the changes in his life and his second marriage to Linda, and the arrival of their children. Becoming a father prompts further reflections on family life and his relationship with his own father.

Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in December 1968. He published two novels, in 1998 and 2004, which both won prizes in Norway. The six volume series of novels, titled Min Kamp in Norwegian, were published between 2009 and 2011, totalling over 3,500 pages. The sixth and final volume is due out in English, translated by Don Bartlett, in 2017. He lives in Sweden with his wife, the writer Linda Boström Knausgåard, and their four children.

Written by by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Translated by Don Bartlett
Read by David Threlfall
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 23:00 Mastertapes (b087qd23)
Series 6, Graham Nash (A-side)

John Wilson returns with a new series of Mastertapes, in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios. Each edition includes two episodes, with John initially quizzing the artist about the album in question, and then, in the B-side, the audience puts the questions. Both editions feature exclusive live performances.

A-side: 'Songs For Beginners' with Graham Nash.

Graham Nash has twice been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of fame - once with The Hollies and then with Crosby, Stills and Nash. In May 1971 he released Songs For Beginners as a solo project (it was one of four solo albums released by each member of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young in the wake of their hit album Deja Vu). Made directly following his breakup with Joni Mitchell, many of the songs are about their time together. But it's an album that also reflects his poltical activism and so the confessional "Simple Man" and wistful "Better Days" sit alongside the still prescient "Military Madness" and the heartfelt "Chicago".

The B-side of the programme, where it's the turn of the audience to ask the questions, can be heard tomorrow at 3.30pm

Complete versions of the songs performed in the programme (and others) can be heard on the 'Mastertapes' pages on the Radio 4 website, where the programmes can also be downloaded and other musical goodies accessed.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b087qd25)
News from Westminster.


TUESDAY 10 JANUARY 2017

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b087pf02)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b087pr2y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b087pf04)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b087pf06)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b087pf08)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b087pf0b)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b088s96h)
A short reflection and prayer with Tony Macaulay.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b087pf0d)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkgqv)
Carrion Crow

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Carrion Crow. The crow is defined in Samuel Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language as "a large black bird that feeds upon the carcasses of beasts." Crows have always suggested an element of foreboding. They are arch-scavengers and black mobs of them crowd our rubbish tips but they're also birds we admire for their intelligence and adaptability.

TUE 06:00 Today (b087qh9h)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b087qjcw)
Michele Dougherty

The Cassini mission into deep space has sent back some wonderful colour images of Saturn. It's witnessed raging storms, flown between its enigmatic rings and revealed seven new moons. And, thanks in no small part to Professor Michelle Dougherty - it's made some astonishing discoveries. For example, jets of water vapour and organic material shooting out of the south pole of one of Saturn's smaller moons, Enceladus, generating tremendous excitement that this tiny moon might be able to support microbial life underneath its icy surface.

For the past 20 years Michelle has been responsible for one of the key instruments on board Cassini - the magnetometer. And it was thanks to her insistence that mission control divert the spacecraft to carry out several close-up flybys of Enceladus in 2005, that the discovery was made that the moon had an atmosphere, as well as those remarkable vapour jets. Michelle was awarded the hugely prestigious Hughes medal for her work - an honour last given to a woman in 1906! She was also voted by the UK Science Council as one of the country's top 100 living scientists.

Michele Dougherty talks to Jim al-Khalili about growing up in South Africa, moving from mathematics to astronomy and what it will be like when Cassini crashes into Saturn.

TUE 09:30 One to One (b087qjcy)
Julia Bradbury on Emotionally Challenging Work

Julia Bradbury talks to Dr Martin McKechnie, a Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Vice President of The Royal College of Emergency Medicine, about the challenges of working in an Emergency Department. Every day he is faced with intense mental and emotional situations as part of his working life. So how he does he switch off at the end of the day?
Producer Sarah Blunt.

TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b087tw38)
The Reformation, Virgin Mary: Mother of God or Whore of Babylon?

500 years after the Reformation, Diarmaid MacCulloch considers the problem of The Virgin Mary in the Protestant Reformation. He explores why Mary became such a divisive figure in the church, how attitudes towards her shaped religious thought and what that means for us today.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b087pf0g)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b087qjd2)
On Kosovo Field, Pity for the Old Road

Fin Kennedy's drama inspired by PJ Harvey's notebooks, poetry and songs from her travels in Kosovo, with her unreleased song demo 'Pity for the Old Road' woven through.

Siblings Rebeka and Dardan left Kosovo as unaccompanied minors during the conflict in 1999 and were brought up in care in the UK. Following the discovery of a mass grave near their native village they have returned to Kosovo after 17 years searching for information on their parents.

Songs and music composed and performed by PJ Harvey

Sound Design by Steve Brooke.

Directed by Nadia Molinari

PJ Harvey album 'The Hope Six Demolition Project' and her book of poetry 'The Hollow of the Hand' draw from several journeys undertaken by Harvey from 2011-2014; one of those was to Kosovo. The inspiration for the drama came from Harvey's Kosovan notebooks, her poems and her Kosovan song demos. Writer Fin Kennedy undertook extensive research, including travelling to Kosovo with producer Nadia Molinari where they talked to journalists, politicians and human rights activists working on conflict resolution and reconciliation. One of these was Kushtrim Koliqi who was the cultural consultant on the script. 'On Kosovo Field' is the search for an identity via a road trip back through a lost heritage for a young, Kosovan born brother and sister. The story is told in five episodes. The 'play cycle' as an idea takes its inspiration from the traditional song cycles of the Albania/Kosovo region. By the end of the cycle we understand that the siblings are a metaphor for Kosovo itself, the newest country in Europe, poignantly searching for an identity after centuries of conflict.

TUE 11:00 The Human Hive (b087qjd4)
The honey bee. Superficially they are aliens; 6 legs, antennae, mandibles, compound eyes - there isn't much to relate to. But like the other social insects if you take the time to look into the honey bee's world, we've more in common than first appears. Step inside the Human Hive with evolutionary biologist - Dr Ben Garrod.

TUE 11:30 Making the Grade (b087qjd6)
Why are more and more older people taking up instruments and putting themselves through music exams? Presenter and terrible musician James Peak follows the stories of several candidates as they try for their ABRSM piano exam.

James is aiming for Grade 1 piano and discovers that everyone has their own reasons for trying to make the grade. Along the way he meets Carroll who has Parkinson's Disease and Nicola who suffers from stage fright.

Written and presented by James Peak
Produced by Lucinda Mason Brown

A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b087pf0j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 Home Front (b083lh96)
10 January 1917 - JJ Saltz

On this day in 1917, "The Silent Sentinels" began their suffrage protest outside the White House, which would last over two years, and in Tynemouth Mr Saltz is feeling insubordinate.

Written by Claudine Toutoungi and Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b087pf0l)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b087pf0n)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b087pf0q)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 All in a Chord (b088972d)
Wagner's Tristan Chord

Ivan Hewett examines Wagner's Tristan Chord to test the idea that harmony is a reflection of history. He's joined by Professor John Deathridge and Professor Tim Blanning.

Music is never created in isolation - it's conceived in relation to what's going on around a composer in terms of personal and historical events, new technologies, new ideas and artistic endeavours in other fields. In this series, Ivan Hewett is looking at five very different chords which amply demonstrate the concept that harmony is a reflection of history.

Each programme is a bite size portion of rich musical and historical investigation - and each chord has had far reaching influence on other music and is emblematic of its era.

Wagner's Tristan Chord is called the most significant chord in Western music as it is said to mark the beginning of the breakdown of tonality. Within itself, it contains not one but two dissonances, so creating a double desire, agonising in its intensity for resolution. The chord to which it then moves resolves one of these dissonances but not the other, so providing resolution - but not resolution. Written in 1859, the same year as Origin of the Species and around the same time as Madame Bovary, Wagner's Tristan Chord reflects a time when the anchor was being pulled up many old certainties.

Ivan Hewett is a writer on music for the Daily Telegraph, broadcaster on BBC Radio 3, and teacher at the Royal College of Music.

Producer: Rosie Boulton
A Monty Funk production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b087pvqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b087qjd8)
Series 3, Episode 2

Brian Oldman has managed to gain release from Brixton prison through various nefarious means, while Joseph (Toby Jones) continues to move in ever higher circles in the Tory party.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill Production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b087p13f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]

TUE 15:30 Mastertapes (b087qjdb)
Series 6, Graham Nash (B-side)

John Wilson returns with a new series of Mastertapes, in which he talks to leading performers and songwriters about the album that made them or changed them. Recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC's iconic Maida Vale Studios.

B-side: Having discussed the making of "Songs for Beginners" (in the A-side of the programme, broadcast on Monday 9th January and available online), Graham Nash responds to questions from the audience. He also performs acoustic live versions of some to the tracks from his new album, which reflects back on a sonwriting career that has (so far) spanned more than five decades.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

TUE 16:00 Don't Log Off (b07j47q4)
Series 7, Clean Slate

Alan Dein continues his series of nocturnal conversations with random strangers. Settling down for the night, he locks the studio door and opens the microphone to people he encounters online.

As he crisscrosses the world, he hears from a Kenyan pilot who lives her childhood dream of flying helicopters over hammerhead sharks in Key West, a Parisian designer stopped in his tracks by meningitis and a man in Pennsylvania accused of bewitching his wife.

Producer: Sarah Bowen.

TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b087qjzg)
Series 41, Akram Khan on Srinivasa Ramanujan

In 1914, a self-taught Mathematics student called Ramanujan left India for Trinity College Cambridge where, alongside the celebrated English mathematician GH Hardy, he completed some extraordinary work on Pi and prime numbers. What was even more extraordinary was that he couldn't prove a lot of his work, and attributed many of his theories to a higher power.

For the renowned UK choreographer Akram Khan, there is a beauty in patterns and maths, and he sees Ramanujan's genius as a clash between Eastern and Western cultures. Together with presenter Matthew Parris, he explores the mathematician's life. Guest Professor Robin Wilson, who once visited Ramanujan's home, takes them through some of the maths, and explains why you'll never look at the number 1729 in the same way again.

Producer: Toby Field.

TUE 17:00 PM (b087pf0s)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b087pf0v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b087qjzk)
Series 6, Episode 3

John Finnemore, writer and star of Cabin Pressure and John Finnemore's Double Acts and regular guest on The Now Show and The Unbelievable Truth, returns for a sixth series of his multi-award-winning Souvenir Programme, joined as ever by Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin, Carrie Quinlan and, at the piano, Susannah Pearse.

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described by The Radio Times as "the best sketch show in years, on television or radio", and by The Daily Telegraph as "funny enough to make even the surliest cat laugh". Already the winner of a BBC Audio Drama Award and a Radio Academy Silver Award, John was named the 2016 Radio Broadcaster of the Year by the Broadcasting Press Guild for his work on Souvenir Programme.

3/6
This week's Souvenir Programme has sketches about the worst of the bad coppers; a frustrated one hit-wonder; and the return of Patsy Straightwoman in an exciting new format.

Written by & starring ... John Finnemore
Cast ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith
Cast ... Simon Kane
Cast ... Lawry Lewin
Cast ... Carrie Quinlan

Original music composed and performed by ... Susannah Pearse

Producer ... Ed Morrish

A BBC Studios Production.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b087qh35)
Justin's diary needs attention, and Pat raises a glass.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b087pf0x)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b087qjd2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b087qjzm)
A Greek Tragedy

File on 4 sets off on a new series to find the forgotten children of Europe's refugee crisis.

As winter sets in, Phil Kemp heads to Greece in search of the teenagers who have arrived alone from Syria and Afghanistan, living by their wits on the streets of Athens.

The controversial deal struck between the EU and Turkey to return migrants who don't claim asylum or who have their claims rejected - and the closing of borders with Greece - has been blamed for making the situation worse for many migrants who now find themselves in limbo in Greece. The millions pledged by the EU don't seem to be bringing relief on the ground either.

The programme hears from the lucky ones who have found spaces at shelters for unaccompanied children in Greece's capital. Here they are fed, clothed and supported in their legal cases.

Others, on the island of Samos, are celebrating securing asylum in Greece. But most children on the island are not celebrating. They feel stuck in a system that cannot cope and held in a country that was meant to be a transit point, not a place to stay.

Increasingly the locals in Samos don't want them to say either. Tensions are flaring in the area around the vastly overcrowded camp, with Golden Dawn active nearby. Around 3,000 residents turned out to protest about their sense of abandonment by the Greek government and the EU. Local officials describe the island as 'trembling on a bridge above troubled water.'

With an estimated 2300 unaccompanied migrant children in Greece, more than half of whom are on the waiting list for shelter, File on 4 asks whether the EU is doing enough to care for those most in need of protection.

Reporter: Phil Kemp
Producer: Sally Chesworth
Editor: Gail Champion.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b087pf11)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b087qjzp)
Dr Mark Porter presents a series that aims to demystify perplexing health issues.

TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b087qjcw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b087pf13)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b088kxd5)
Reading Europe - Norway: A Death in the Family, Episode 2

A Death in the Family is the first book in the six volume cycle of autobiographical novels, My Struggle. Karl Ove Knausgaard's memoir has been described, in many countries, as a masterpiece.

With searing honesty, and an unflinching gaze turned upon himself and those around him, he writes about his teenage years in Norway. Later, he looks back on the writing of this book, the changes in his life and his second marriage to Linda, and the arrival of their children. Becoming a father prompts further reflections on family life and his relationship with his own father.

Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in December 1968. He published two novels, in 1998 and 2004, which both won prizes in Norway. The six volume series of novels, titled Min Kamp in Norwegian, were published between 2009 and 2011, totalling over 3,500 pages. The sixth and final volume is due out in English, translated by Don Bartlett, in 2017. He lives in Sweden with his wife, the writer Linda Boström Knausgåard, and their four children.

Written by by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Translated by Don Bartlett
Read by David Threlfall
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 23:00 Sweats (b087qk45)
'The January Rush'

A brand new sitcom for BBC Radio 4 written by and starring Kieran Hodgson.

Set in a micro-gym in Worthing, the team at Dawson Fitness are trying to spearhead an exercise revolution from their base in a former charity shop.

Personalities clash, ambitions outstrip capabilities, and people who sign up for a free session in January stubbornly refuse to commit to a membership in spite of all the psychological bullying. In this pilot episode, Lucy Dawson is determined to turn around the business, and revitalise her own career prospects in the process. Sadly the rest of her team - Kate, Frankie and Jake- don't take too kindly, or competently, to change. But if they can just retain their January customers, then they're surely onto a winner.

Written by
KIERAN HODGSON

Producer Alexandra Smith
A BBC Studios Production.

TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b087qjzr)
News from Westminster.


WEDNESDAY 11 JANUARY 2017

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b087pf2x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b087tw38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b087pf2z)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b087pf31)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b087pf33)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b087pf35)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b088s9dl)
A short reflection and prayer with Tony Macaulay.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b087pf37)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkfmv)
Brambling

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Brambling. Bramblings are the northern equivalent of the chaffinch and breed across huge areas of Scandinavia and Russia. In autumn they migrate south in search of seeds and are particularly fond of beech-mast. The largest recorded gathering of any living bird species in the world is of a flock of over 70 million bramblings at a roost in Switzerland in the winter of 1951.

WED 06:00 Today (b088sbmx)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Midweek (b087rk62)
Peter Willcox; Rikki Beadle-Blair

Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b087tw5k)
The Reformation, The Pope's Reformation

500 years after the Reformation, Diarmaid MacCulloch investigates the effect of the Reformation on the Catholic church. He explores the Vatican's response to Protestant ideas, and explains how it continues to shape religious thinking today.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b087pf39)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b087rk64)
On Kosovo Field, The Wheel

Fin Kennedy's drama inspired by PJ Harvey's notebooks, poetry and songs from her travels in Kosovo, with her unreleased song demos of 'The Wheel' and 'The Red Road' woven through.

Kosovan born siblings Dardan and Rebeka have returned to Kosovo to find out the truth of what happened to their parents during the Kosovo conflict of 1999. They carry a set of keys, given to them by a neighbour before they left, offering the chance to unlock their home and, with it, their memories.

Songs and music composed and performed by PJ Harvey

Sound design by Steve Brooke

Directed by Nadia Molinari

PJ Harvey album 'The Hope Six Demolition Project' and her book of poetry 'The Hollow of the Hand' draw from several journeys undertaken by Harvey from 2011-2014; one of those journeys was to Kosovo. The inspiration for the drama came from Harvey's Kosovan notebooks, her poems and her Kosovan song demos. Writer Fin Kennedy's research also included travelling to Kosovo with producer Nadia Molinari where they talked to journalists, politicians and human rights activists working on conflict resolution and reconciliation, including Kushtrim Koliqi who was the cultural consultant on the script. 'On Kosovo Field' is the search for an identity via a road trip back through a lost heritage for young, Kosovan born siblings. The story is told in five episodes. The 'play cycle' as an idea takes its inspiration from the traditional song cycles of the Albania/Kosovo region. By the end of the cycle we understand that the siblings are a metaphor for Kosovo itself, the newest country in Europe, poignantly searching for an identity after centuries of conflict.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b076prgn)
Joanna and Freddie - Coming of Age

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between an 11 year old and his mother about the challenges of single-parenting and of puberty. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 On a Knife Edge (b087pvqp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 The Write Stuff (b04lpdb6)
Gerard Manley Hopkins

Radio 4's literary panel show, hosted by James Walton. Recorded at the Hay Festival with team captains Sebastian Faulks and John Walsh and guests Russell Davies and Sue Limb.

This week's author is Gerard Manley Hopkins.

Produced by Alexandra Smith.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b087pf3c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 Home Front (b083lh9d)
11 January 1917 - Lester Reed

On this day in 1917, an explosion at a New Jersey munitions factory raised fears of German saboteurs, and Lester Reed continues to point the finger at Tynemouth's enemies within.

Written by Claudine Toutoungi
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b087pf3f)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b087pf3h)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b087pf3k)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 All in a Chord (b0889734)
A Chord from Mahler's 10th Symphony

Ivan Hewett examines a chord from Mahler's 10th Symphony to test the idea that harmony is a reflection of history. He's joined by composer David Matthews and psychoanalyst Anthony Cantle.

Music is never created in isolation - it's conceived in relation to what's going on around a composer in terms of personal and historical events, new technologies, new ideas and artistic endeavours in other fields. In this series, Ivan Hewett is looking at five very different chords which amply demonstrate the concept that harmony is a reflection of history.

Each programme is a bite size portion of rich musical and historical investigation - and each chord has had far reaching influence on other music and is emblematic of its era.

In 1910, the first movement of Mahler's 10th Symphony finally lands on a chord of terrifying dissonance, as he surveyed the wreckage of his personal life. Mahler had discovered his wife was having an affair with the architect Walter Gropius - a discovery which left him distraught. He was in the middle of composing his 10th Symphony and suddenly this cry of anguish appears seemingly out of nowhere in the music. Mahler made a famous visit to see Freud which resulted in a 6 hour walk during which they discussed all of these matters in the context of the newly "discovered" unconscious.

The chord in question can't be found anywhere in else music. Perhaps it's just too much to bear. However, what follows this chord is music which suggests resolution, acceptance and great peace.

Ivan Hewett is a writer on music for the Daily Telegraph, broadcaster on BBC Radio 3, and teacher at the Royal College of Music.

Producer: Rosie Boulton
A Monty Funk production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b087qh35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b087rkx2)
Series 3, Episode 3

Joseph Oldman (Toby Jones) is expanding his business by doing deals with a Colombian drugs cartel, while Jack threatens violence when he thinks he is missing out.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

Cast:
Joey Toby Jones
Brian Joe Armstrong
Tony Wednesday Alec Newman
Cath Izabella Urbanowicz
Jack Jacob FL
Julian Tyrwhitt Jonathan Tafler
Jack Jacob Fortune Lloyd
Pongo David Ajao
Lord Goodman Edward Max
Sir Ralph Courtney Nick Sampson
Leah Jasmine Hyde
Jose picado Will Harrison-Wallace
Yvonne Susie Emmett
Margaret Courtney Flora Montgomery
DCI Robertson Lucas Hare
John Redvers Joseph Kloska
George Fenwick Theo Fraser Steele
DCS Slipper Mark Perry

Written by G F Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b087rkx4)
Money Box Live: The problem with passwords

Financial phone-in.

WED 15:30 Inside Health (b087qjzp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b087rky1)
Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b087pf3m)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b087pf3p)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b087pf3r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 State of the Nations (b087rky3)
Northern Ireland

Star of BBC3's Josh and Radio 4 News Quiz regular Elis James hosts four stand-up shows from the four nations of the United Kingdom which explore what it means to be variously Welsh, English, Scottish and Northern Irish in today's United Kingdom.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b087qh37)
David tries to make amends, and Brian looks to cheer up Adam.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b087pf3t)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b087rk64)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 FutureProofing (b087rky5)
Series that explores the big ideas that are set to shape our future.

WED 20:45 Four Thought (b087rky7)
Talks with a personal dimension.

WED 21:00 Science Stories (b087rm0b)
Series 4, Birth of Photography

Series looking at amazing events and characters from science history.

WED 21:30 Midweek (b087rk62)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b087pf3w)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b087pf3y)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b088ky7z)
Reading Europe - Norway: A Death in the Family, Episode 3

A Death in the Family is the first book in the six volume cycle of autobiographical novels, My Struggle. Karl Ove Knausgaard's memoir has been described, in many countries, as a masterpiece.

With searing honesty, and an unflinching gaze turned upon himself and those around him, he writes about his teenage years in Norway. Later, he looks back on the writing of this book, the changes in his life and his second marriage to Linda, and the arrival of their children. Becoming a father prompts further reflections on family life and his relationship with his own father.

Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in December 1968. He published two novels, in 1998 and 2004, which both won prizes in Norway. The six volume series of novels, titled Min Kamp in Norwegian, were published between 2009 and 2011, totalling over 3,500 pages. The sixth and final volume is due out in English, translated by Don Bartlett, in 2017. He lives in Sweden with his wife, the writer Linda Boström Knausgåard, and their four children.

Written by by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Translated by Don Bartlett
Read by David Threlfall
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:00 Sam Simmons Is Not a People Person (b087rm0d)
Episode 3

Comedy. Sam and Henry are trying to make a show about birds, but Sam keeps being distracted.

WED 23:15 15 Minute Musical (b085z3hm)
Xmas 2016, Cabarexit

Come join the Cabarexit! Cabaret meets Brexit - can we turn the EU referendum into a sexy, sassy, sensationalised, sublime sounding musical? Yes we can with Jess Robinson, Dave Lamb and Richie Webb.

A satirical, barbed, bittersweet fifteen-minute comedy musical.

In true West End style, artistic licence is well and truly taken and stretched, as easily identifiable public figures are dressed up, gilded, fabricated and placed against a random musical backdrop for sugar coated consumption. The stories are simple and engaging but with an edge - allowing the audience to enjoy all the conventions of a musical (huge production numbers, tender ballads and emotional reprises) whilst we completely re-interpret events in major celebrities' lives.

Beautifully crafted with astronomically high production values 15 Minute Musical does for your ears what Christmas dinner does for your taste buds. All in fifteen minutes!

Winner of the Writers Guild of Great Britain Radio Comedy Award this series provides an energy boost and a seasonal treat at 1815 over the Christmas week.

Cast: Richie Webb, Dave Lamb and Jess Robinson.
Written by; Dave Cohen, David Quantick and Richie Webb
Music Composed, Performed and Arranged by: Richie Webb
Music Production: Matt Katz
Producer: Katie Tyrrell.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b087rm0g)
News from Westminster.


THURSDAY 12 JANUARY 2017

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b087pf60)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b087tw5k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b087pf62)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b087pf64)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b087pf66)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b087pf69)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b088scv4)
A short reflection and prayer with Tony Macaulay.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b087pf6d)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztqr)
Collared Dove

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the Collared Dove. Although these attractive sandy doves grace our bird-tables or greet us at dawn almost wherever we live in the UK, their story is one of the most extraordinary of any British bird.

THU 06:00 Today (b088scv6)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 In Our Time (b087rt4z)
Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Nietzsche's On The Genealogy of Morality.

With

Stephen Mulhall

Fiona Hughes

and

Keith Ansell-Pearson.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b087tw8z)
The Reformation, The English Reformation: A Language for the World

500 years after the Reformation, Diarmaid MacCulloch reveals the importance of the Book of Common Prayer and shows how its words have changed the way we speak and worship today.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b087pf6j)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b087rt51)
On Kosovo Field, Dance on the Mountain

Fin Kennedy's drama inspired by PJ Harvey's notebooks, poetry and songs from her travels in Kosovo, with her unreleased song demo 'Dance on the Mountain' woven through.

Siblings Rebeka and Dardan return to their native village with the set of keys, given to them by a neighbour before they left, offering the chance to unlock their home and, with it, their memories. They are forced to confront the painful truth of what happened to their parents.

Songs and music composed and performed by PJ Harvey

Sound Design by Steve Brooke

Directed by Nadia Molinari

PJ Harvey's album 'The Hope Six Demolition Project' and book of poetry 'The Hollow of the Hand' draw from several journeys undertaken by Harvey from 2011-2014; one of those journeys was to Kosovo. The inspiration for the drama came from Harvey's Kosovan notebooks, her poems and her Kosovan song demos. Writer Fin Kennedy also travelled to Kosovo with producer Nadia Molinari where they retraced some of Harvey's steps and talked to journalists, politicians and human rights activists working on conflict resolution and reconciliation, including Kushtrim Koliqi who was the cultural consultant on the script. 'On Kosovo Field' is the search for an identity via a road trip back through a lost heritage for a young, Kosovan born brother and sister. The 'play cycle' as an idea takes its inspiration from the traditional song cycles of the Albania/Kosovo region. By the end of the cycle we understand that the siblings are a metaphor for Kosovo itself, the newest country in Europe, poignantly searching for an identity after centuries of conflict.

THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b087rt53)
Siege at the Holey Artisan Bakery

On the night of the 1st July 2016, five young Bangladeshi Islamist militants stormed a Dhaka restaurant popular with foreign residents and visitors. The siege at the Holey Artisan Bakery was an unprecedented attack in Bangladesh. 29 people lost their lives that night - the majority of them non-Bangladeshis, shot or butchered with machetes. But not everyone was killed. For Crossing Continents, Linda Pressly together with local journalist, Morshed Ali Khan, tell the story of what happened inside the restaurant over 11 hours - the chef forced to cook sea bass by the killers, the kitchen worker locked for hours in a single toilet cubicle with 7 other people. There are tales of escape and resistance. Above all, there is courage amidst the carnage, and in the face of bloody adversity.

THU 11:30 Hull Before Culture (b087rv9h)
Episode 2

Playwright John Godber has been absorbing and interpreting the city's culture in his work at Hull Truck and in his plays for over thirty years. One of the most-performed playwrights in the English language, his work has travelled all over the world, but it is perhaps most fiercely loved by people in Hull: 'you're not proper 'ull if you 'ent seen 'Bouncers'.

John is well-placed to take a closer look at the city he's made his home in this series of conversations with the people who make culture happen in Hull. Hull is a sprawling sliver of a city, built along the banks of the Humber, so it makes sense to talk and drive, visiting key places in the cultural life of the place along the way. It's like carpool karaoke but without the karaoke, although there is a bit of singing.

John discovers why Hull is 'defensively self-deprecating' with a BS alarm which means that you can't get away with talking about things you don't really understand, compares 'results-based' funding in tough economic times with the continental model of subsidized arts; and compares tactics on how you reach audiences that see theatre as alien as the moon. And he finds a beating, passionate heart determined to keep on making culture in Hull even when the City of Culture circus has left town.

Restlessly sharp, charismatic and funny, John is a breath of fresh air as a presenter.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b087pf6n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 Home Front (b083lh9k)
12 January 1917 - Marion Wardle

On this day in 1917, riots erupted in Hamburg over food shortages, and in Tynemouth too there is unrest on the streets.

Written by Claudine Toutoungi
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b087pf6q)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b087pf6s)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b087pf6v)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 All in a Chord (b088973x)
A Stravinsky Chord

Ivan Hewett examines a chord from Stravinsky's Rite of Spring to test the idea that harmony is a reflection of history. He's joined by musicologist Gerard McBurney and Professor Valentine Cunningham.

Music is never created in isolation - it's conceived in relation to what's going on around a composer in terms of personal and historical events, new technologies, new ideas and artistic endeavours in other fields. In this series, Ivan Hewett is looking at five very different chords which amply demonstrate the concept that harmony is a reflection of history.

Each programme is a bite size portion of rich musical and historical investigation - and each chord has had far reaching influence on other music and is emblematic of its era.

Stravinsky wrote his ballet The Rite of Spring for the 1913 Paris season of Diaghilev's Ballets Russes company with choreography by Nijinsky. The ballet famously caused a riot at its premiere, largely because of the dance and the music - but partly also because the sense of clash that we hear in this famous chord was, in some senses, a reflection of tensions in the air.

Ivan Hewett is a writer on music for the Daily Telegraph, broadcaster on BBC Radio 3, and teacher at the Royal College of Music.

Producer: Rosie Boulton
A Monty Funk production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b087qh37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b087rx64)
Series 3, Episode 4

Jack and Brian are back in prison after a kilo of cocaine was found in Jack's flat. Joseph (Toby Jones) is determined to get legal help to get Brian out again. But Jack can stay.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 15:00 Open Country (b087rx66)
Barton-upon-Humber Clay Pits

Helen Mark finds out about the flooded clay pits that make up the landscape around Barton-upon-Humber.
Standing on the south side of the Humber Bridge, the pits look like a series of holes punched into the landscape, or a piece of lace attached all the way along the Humber bank. The pits were excavated for the fine clay they contain, to make beautiful red bricks to build local houses that are still so typical here, and tiles which were packed into barges and taken off to London to feed the housing boom of the nineteenth century.
There are two tile-works alive and kicking at Barton, still making traditional tiles in exactly the same way they have for the past two hundred years. The clay digging that used to take half a year of hard labour with a wheel barrow is now done in a couple of weeks by a digger, so it's not quite the task it once was. For a small town, Barton has a vibrant present and a big industrial past, manifested by the Ropewalk, a museum and cultural space housed in what the managing director, Rachel Benet, calls the town's 'cultural quarter mile'. It is a narrow red brick-and-tile building a quarter of a mile long, designed to allow the manufacture of rope in one long, straight piece.
But it's the clay pits that have made the biggest mark on the landscape around Barton-upon-Humber. Many of them are now wildlife reserves run by the Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust, home to bearded tit, bittern and marsh harriers.
Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b087pjsz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (b087pn07)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b087rx68)
La La Land

Francine Stock meets two contenders for Oscar success. Emma Stone is the star of La Land, a hymn to the old-fashioned movie musical. Kenneth Lonergan is the writer/director of modern tragedy Manchester By The Sea.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b087pf71)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b087pf73)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b087pf75)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 The Cold Swedish Winter (b04f9frm)
Series 1, Summer

A sitcom from Danny Robins, writer of the Lenny Henry comedy Rudy's Rare Records. This series is set and recorded in Sweden and stars Adam Riches, Danny Robins and some of Sweden's most popular TV comedy actors.

Geoff, a marginally successful stand-up comic from London, is moving to the tiny, cold and unpronounceable village of Yxsjö in northern Sweden - a culture shock forced on him by his Swedish girlfriend Linda's decision to move home to raise their child.

Geoff has to contend with snow, moose, pickled herring, unemployment, snow, Maypole dancing, snowmobiles, snow, meatball rolling, saunas, social democracy, snow, the weirdest pizzas in Europe, bears, deep forests, death metal, illegal alcohol, snow.

Above all, he has a new family to contend with. The Andersson's bewilder him - from father Sten who has a worrying tendency to growl like a bear and threaten him with any blunt instrument to hand, to Gunilla who threatens him with naked folk-dancing.

It's worth it all for Linda, of course - apart from her new found urge to conform with everything and except for her brother, a Goth with a propensity to set fire to things.

Episode 3: Summer
In which Geoff is forced to lead the Maypole dancing at Yxsjö's Midsummer festivities and go skinny dipping.

Writer: Danny Robins
Director: Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b087qh3f)
Helen picks her moment, and Freddie wants to keep a low profile.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b087pf77)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b087rt51)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b086t9n6)
Series looking at important issues in the news. Presented by David Aaronovitch.

THU 20:30 In Business (b087rx6b)
The NHS and Productivity

The NHS is facing a sustained squeeze. An ageing population, the rising cost of new treatments and increasing patient demand on the one hand, and the impact of continued austerity on the other. What can it do? One answer might lie in improving productivity. In the first of two programmes on the NHS, Louise Cooper explores its productivity puzzle. What does increased productivity look like in the health service? She meets clinicians, across the country, who are trying to do more for less. Can their efforts be replicated across the NHS? And, if so, will it ever be enough?
Presenter: Louise Cooper
Producer: Rosamund Jones.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b087pf71)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 In Our Time (b087rt4z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b087pf79)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b087pf7d)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b088kyx1)
Reading Europe - Norway: A Death in the Family, Episode 4

A Death in the Family is the first book in the six volume cycle of autobiographical novels, My Struggle. Karl Ove Knausgaard's memoir has been described, in many countries, as a masterpiece.

With searing honesty, and an unflinching gaze turned upon himself and those around him, he writes about his teenage years in Norway. Later, he looks back on the writing of this book, the changes in his life and his second marriage to Linda, and the arrival of their children. Becoming a father prompts further reflections on family life and his relationship with his own father.

Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in December 1968. He published two novels, in 1998 and 2004, which both won prizes in Norway. The six volume series of novels, titled Min Kamp in Norwegian, were published between 2009 and 2011, totalling over 3,500 pages. The sixth and final volume is due out in English, translated by Don Bartlett, in 2017. He lives in Sweden with his wife, the writer Linda Boström Knausgåard, and their four children.

Written by by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Translated by Don Bartlett
Read by David Threlfall
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 23:00 KULT (b087rxkb)
From Diet of Worms, the Irish Sketch troupe behind the acclaimed BBC4 series The Walshes, comes KULT, a radio show about a group of five lowly but loveable Irish employees of a massive global furniture corporation based in Dublin (due to tax purposes, obviously) - a modern Nordic company which resembles more of an insane religion sect than a traditional business.

THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b087rxkz)
News from Westminster.


FRIDAY 13 JANUARY 2017

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b087pf99)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b087tw8z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b087pf9c)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b087pf9f)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b087pf9h)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b087pf9k)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b088sh80)
A short reflection and prayer with Tony Macaulay.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b087pf9m)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03ths74)
Wren

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the wren. You'll often see the male wren, with its tail cocked jauntily, singing from a fence-post or shrub, bill wide and trembling with the effort of producing that ear-splitting territorial advertisement. It's the extrovert side of what can be an introvert bird that normally creeps, like a mouse, among banks of foliage or in crevices between rocks. They can live almost anywhere from mountain crags and remote islands to gardens and city parks.

FRI 06:00 Today (b088sh82)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b087pl4j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b087twdf)
The Reformation, The United States: Protestant World Power

500 years after the Reformation, Diarmaid MacCulloch describes its journey from Europe to America and explores its continuing influence on life and politics in the United States.

Producer: Dixi Stewart.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b087pf9p)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b087ts6w)
On Kosovo Field, Where Is Our City?

Fin Kennedy's drama inspired by PJ Harvey's notebooks, poetry and songs from her travels in Kosovo, with her unreleased song demos 'Where is Our City?' and 'Clothes of Grief' woven through.

Siblings Rebeka and Dardan have returned to their native Kosovo to find out the truth about their parents and now they must reconcile themselves with their past in order to forge a path for the future.

Songs and music composed and performed by PJ Harvey

Sound Design by Steve Brooke

Directed by Nadia Molinari

PJ Harvey latest album 'The Hope Six Demolition Project' and her book of poetry 'The Hollow of the Hand' draw from several journeys undertaken by Harvey from 2011-2014; one of those journeys was to Kosovo. The inspiration for the drama 'On Kosovo Field' came from Harvey's Kosovan notebooks, her poems and her Kosovan song demos. Writer Fin Kennedy undertook extensive research, including travelling to Kosovo with producer Nadia Molinari where they retraced some of Harvey's steps and talked to journalists, politicians and human rights activists working on conflict resolution and reconciliation. One of these was Kushtrim Koliqi who was the cultural consultant on the script. 'On Kosovo Field' is the search for an identity via a road trip back through a lost heritage for a young, Kosovan born brother and sister. The story is told in five episodes. The 'play cycle' as an idea takes its inspiration from the traditional song cycles of the Albania/Kosovo region. By the end of the cycle we understand that the siblings are a metaphor for Kosovo itself, the newest country in Europe, poignantly searching for an identity after centuries of conflict.

FRI 11:00 The Headline Ballads (b084wzjn)
Whilst the Water Weeps Next to the Water

A series in which poets and storytellers respond to stories underneath the world news headlines.

In part 3 of The Headline Ballads: Whilst the Water Weeps Next to the Water, the writer and poet, Kamal Kaan, explores the impact of flooding on the lives of people in Bangladesh and the UK. His ballad begins with the story of his own parents move from Bangladesh to escape the poverty and the floods of their native homeland and is interwoven with personal testimonies from those who have experienced first hand the devastation caused by flooding. We hear from villagers in Northern Bangladesh whose homes and livelihoods are continually destroyed by floods; from one Cumbrian resident whose home has been inundated by flood water four times in the last ten years, and from the people of Carlisle who live in constant fear that global warming will bring a return of the floods that overwhelmed the city in December 2015.

Producer: Cecile Wright.

FRI 11:30 All Those Women (b087ts6z)
Series 2, Episode 3

Comedy series by Katherine Jakeways about four generations of women living under one roof.

An unexpected death leads all four of the family to consider what's really important, as well as giving David a chance to spend some quality time (of sorts) with Maggie, much to Hetty's disapproval.

All Those Women explores familial relationships, ageing, marriages - it's about life and love and things not turning out quite the way that you'd expected them to. Every week we join Hetty, Maggie, Jen and Emily as they struggle to resolve their own problems, and support one another.

Written by KATHERINE JAKEWAYS
Producer Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b087pf9r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 Home Front (b083lh9w)
13 January 1917 - Alan Lowther

On this day in 1917, a new German peace note laid full responsibility for the continued bloodshed on the Allies, and Alan Lowther struggles under his own burden of responsibility.

Written by Claudine Toutoungi
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b087pf9t)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b087pf9w)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b087pf9y)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 All in a Chord (b088974y)
Terry Riley In C

Ivan Hewett examines the chord of C major as found in Terry Riley's In C to test the idea that harmony is a reflection of history. He's joined by musicologist Pwyll ap Sion and pianist Joanna MacGregor.

Music is never created in isolation - it's conceived in relation to what's going on around a composer in terms of personal and historical events, new technologies, new ideas and artistic endeavours in other fields. In this series, Ivan Hewett is looking at five very different chords which amply demonstrate the concept that harmony is a reflection of history.

Each programme is a bite size portion of rich musical and historical investigation - and each chord has had far reaching influence on other music and is emblematic of its era.

In 1964, the Californian composer Terry Riley wrote a piece which changed the face of classical music - and it was entirely based on the chord of C major. The piece is called In C and its composition is said to mark the beginning of the Minimalist movement in music. After the complexity of the other chords in this series, this final episode explores how In C reflects the era in which it was written and, in particular, how employing the seemingly simple chord of C major was so appropriate for its time.

Ivan Hewett is a writer on music for the Daily Telegraph, broadcaster on BBC Radio 3, and teacher at the Royal College of Music.

Producer: Rosie Boulton
A Monty Funk production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b087qh3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 GF Newman's The Corrupted (b087ts73)
Series 3, G F Newman's The Corrupted Ep 5

Joseph Oldman (Toby Jones) continues to juggle his life around two Margarets - one is his lover, the other wants to lead the Conservative Party and run the country.

GF Newman's The Corrupted weaves fiction with real characters from history, following the fortunes of the Oldman family - from small-time business and opportunistic petty crime, through gang rivalries, to their entanglement in the highest echelons of society. It's a tale revealing the nexus of crime, business and politics woven through the fabric of 20th century greed as even those with hitherto good intentions are sucked into a web of corruption.

Joey Oldman, an uneducated Jewish child immigrant from Russia, has a natural instinct for business and a love of money - coupled with a knack for acquiring it. His wife Cath is as ruthless in both the pursuit of money and the protection of her son, Brian. Joey built his empire with the help of a corrupt bank manager in the 1950s, starting with small greengrocer shops before moving into tertiary banking and property development, dealing with many corrupt policemen on the way - and befriending both Lord Goodman and Margaret Thatcher.

Written by G F Newman
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b087ts76)
Correspondence Edition

Peter Gibbs hosts a correspondence edition of the horticultural panel programme. Christine Walkden, James Wong and Pippa Greenwood delve into the GQT postbag with Peter.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 A Chip off the Old Block (b087ts7b)
A former professional footballer-turned-pundit is working with a ghost-writer on a book about his life and experiences but things don't quite go to plan and he ends up revealing a little more about himself than he intends or realises.

A new short story from Arthur Mathews the co-writer of Father Ted and Toast of London

Reader ..... Simon Day
Writer ..... Arthur Mathews
Producer ..... Heather Larmour.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b087ts7g)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 A Good Read (b0742d38)
Marian Keyes and Nikki Bedi

Bestselling author Marian Keyes and broadcaster Nikki Bedi talk about their favourite reads with Harriett Gilbert. They've chosen The Poisonwood Bible, Barbara Kingsolver's tale of American missionaries in the Congo, Nick Hornby's first novel High Fidelity, and Imtiaz Dharker's poetry collection Over the Moon, which deals with themes of grief and loss. But which protagonist does Marian Keyes realise she identifies with? Producer Sally Heaven.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b076prh5)
Linda and Johnathon - A New Family

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a mother of four and her fifth child, the 16 year old neighbour she gave a home to when his own family proved too disruptive. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b087pfb0)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b087pfb2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b087ts7k)
Series 92, Episode 2

Mark Steel, Michael Deacon and Zoe Lyons are amongst the guests accompanying Miles Jupp in his weekly dissection of the news headlines.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b087qh3h)
Rob has a visitor, and Lilian is ready to party.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b087pfb4)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b087ts6w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b087ts7p)
Margaret Beckett MP, Jeremy Browne, Lucie Green, Owen Paterson MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from the National Space Centre in Leicester with a panel including the Labour MP and former Foreign Secretary Margaret Beckett, former Liberal Democra MP and Minister Jeremy Browne who is now the Special Representative for the City to the EU, the Space Scientist Professor Lucie Green and the former cabinet minister Owen Paterson MP.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b087ts7s)
A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b083lh9y)
9-13 January 1917

In the week, in 1917, when Sylvia Pankhurst was threatened with libel for reporting the conditions of female munitions workers, emotions run high for those remaining at Marshall's factory.

Written by Claudine Toutoungi
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole

Story-led by Sebastian Baczkiewicz
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b087pfb6)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b087pfb8)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b088kz6m)
Reading Europe - Norway: A Death in the Family, Episode 5

A Death in the Family is the first book in the six volume cycle of autobiographical novels, My Struggle. Karl Ove Knausgaard's memoir has been described, in many countries, as a masterpiece.

With searing honesty, and an unflinching gaze turned upon himself and those around him, he writes about his teenage years in Norway. Later, he looks back on the writing of this book, the changes in his life and his second marriage to Linda, and the arrival of their children. Becoming a father prompts further reflections on family life and his relationship with his own father.

Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in December 1968. He published two novels, in 1998 and 2004, which both won prizes in Norway. The six volume series of novels, titled Min Kamp in Norwegian, were published between 2009 and 2011, totalling over 3,500 pages. The sixth and final volume is due out in English, translated by Don Bartlett, in 2017. He lives in Sweden with his wife, the writer Linda Boström Knausgåard, and their four children.

Written by by Karl Ove Knausgaard
Translated by Don Bartlett
Read by David Threlfall
Abridged by Isobel Creed and Jill Waters
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b087qjzg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b087tt71)
News from Westminster.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b076mlls)
Zachary and Jacqui - Testing Times with Dyslexia

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a mother and her 16 year old son; as he faces his GCSEs, he shares his anxiety with his mother. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b087prhb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b087prhb)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b087qjd2)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b087qjd2)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b087rk64)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b087rk64)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b087rt51)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b087rt51)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b087ts6w)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b087ts6w)

15 Minute Musical 23:15 WED (b085z3hm)

A Chip off the Old Block 15:45 FRI (b087ts7b)

A Good Read 16:30 FRI (b0742d38)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b086th59)

A Point of View 23:50 SUN (b086th59)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b087ts7s)

Ability 23:30 SAT (b087p7m6)

All Those Women 11:30 FRI (b087ts6z)

All in a Chord 13:45 MON (b087ps60)

All in a Chord 13:45 TUE (b088972d)

All in a Chord 13:45 WED (b0889734)

All in a Chord 13:45 THU (b088973x)

All in a Chord 13:45 FRI (b088974y)

Alone 15:30 SAT (b087p3mj)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b087p2k6)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b086tgyl)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b087ts7p)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b087p473)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b087pf71)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b087pf71)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b087pjss)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b087pjss)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b087psvz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b087qd1y)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b088kxd5)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b088ky7z)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b088kyx1)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b088kz6m)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b087pr2y)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b087pr2y)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b087tw38)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b087tw38)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b087tw5k)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b087tw5k)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b087tw8z)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b087tw8z)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b087twdf)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b087pmd1)

Climate Change: The Trump Card 17:00 SUN (b086s95f)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b086t1xh)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b087rt53)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b087pl4j)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b087pl4j)

Don't Log Off 16:00 TUE (b07j47q4)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b086l8m9)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b087pn05)

Drama 19:45 SUN (b087ppbn)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b086ky2p)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b087pdxk)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b087pf0d)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b087pf37)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b087pf6d)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b087pf9m)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b087qjzm)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b087pmd3)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b087pmd3)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b087rky7)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b086ky2w)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b087pdy6)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b087pf0x)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b087pf3t)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b087pf77)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b087pfb4)

FutureProofing 20:00 WED (b087rky5)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 MON (b087psl5)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 TUE (b087qjd8)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 WED (b087rkx2)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 THU (b087rx64)

GF Newman's The Corrupted 14:15 FRI (b087ts73)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b086tfbv)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b087ts76)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b087qjzg)

Great Lives 23:00 FRI (b087qjzg)

Hold the Front Page 16:00 SAT (b087p3ml)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b083lh9y)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b083lh91)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b083lh96)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b083lh9d)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b083lh9k)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b083lh9w)

Hull Before Culture 11:30 THU (b087rv9h)

Human Hibernation: The Big Sleep 21:00 MON (b086s64v)

Ian Fleming's Thrilling Cities 00:30 SUN (b04kfk20)

Imagining the New Truth 00:30 SAT (b088g3xk)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b086t9n8)

In Business 20:30 THU (b087rx6b)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b087rt4z)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b087rt4z)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b087pf11)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b087qjzp)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b087qjzp)

Jake Yapp Saves Humanity in 28 Minutes 22:30 SAT (b087p7m4)

John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme 18:30 TUE (b087qjzk)

KULT 23:00 THU (b087rxkb)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b086tfbz)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b087ts7g)

Life on Egg 19:00 SAT (b087p3sm)

Life on Egg 22:15 SAT (b087tx29)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b086ky3g)

Making the Grade 11:30 TUE (b087qjd6)

Mastertapes 23:00 MON (b087qd23)

Mastertapes 15:30 TUE (b087qjdb)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b086ky27)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b087pdsx)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b087pdx7)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b087pf02)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b087pf2x)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b087pf60)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b087pf99)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b087rk62)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b087rk62)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b087p2k4)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b087p2k4)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b087rkx4)

Moving Pictures 13:30 SUN (b07w9jg5)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b086ky2h)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b087pdt5)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b087pdxh)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b087pf0b)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b087pf35)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b087pf69)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b087pf9k)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b087pdt7)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b086ky2y)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b087pdtt)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b087pdxt)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b087pf0j)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b087pf3c)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b087pf6n)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b087pf9r)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b086ky2k)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b087pdtf)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b087pdtm)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b086ky3l)

News 13:00 SAT (b086ky32)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b087pjsx)

On a Knife Edge 20:00 MON (b087pvqp)

On a Knife Edge 11:00 WED (b087pvqp)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b087qjcy)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b087pn07)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b087pn07)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b086t7tz)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b087rx66)

PM 17:00 SAT (b086ky36)

PM 17:00 MON (b087pdy2)

PM 17:00 TUE (b087pf0s)

PM 17:00 WED (b087pf3p)

PM 17:00 THU (b087pf73)

PM 17:00 FRI (b087pfb0)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b087pdv8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b086tj2x)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b088s7yg)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b088s96h)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b088s9dl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b088scv4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b088sh80)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b087pjsv)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b087pjsv)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b087pjsz)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b087pjsz)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b087pjsz)

Robert Newman's Entirely Accurate Encyclopaedia of Evolution 19:15 SUN (b06gwnx2)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b086nzgd)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b087psl7)

Sam Simmons Is Not a People Person 23:00 WED (b087rm0d)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b086ky2t)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b086ky3j)

Science Stories 21:00 WED (b087rm0b)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b086ky2c)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b087pdt1)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b087pdxc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b087pf06)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b087pf31)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b087pf64)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b087pf9f)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b086ky29)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b086ky2f)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b086ky38)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b087pdsz)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b087pdt3)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b087pdv2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b087pdx9)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b087pdxf)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b087pf04)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b087pf08)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b087pf2z)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b087pf33)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b087pf62)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b087pf66)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b087pf9c)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b087pf9h)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b086ky3d)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b087pdv6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b087pdy4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b087pf0v)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b087pf3r)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b087pf75)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b087pfb2)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b087pdt9)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b087pr2w)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b087pr2w)

State of the Nations 18:30 WED (b087rky3)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b087pjt2)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b087pdth)

Sweats 23:00 TUE (b087qk45)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b087pdtr)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b087pp0c)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b087pp0c)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b087pvqm)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b087pvqm)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b087qh35)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b087qh35)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b087qh37)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b087qh37)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b087qh3f)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b087qh3f)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b087qh3h)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b086t9n6)

The Cold Swedish Winter 18:30 THU (b04f9frm)

The Echo Chamber 16:30 SUN (b087pn09)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b087rx68)

The Headline Ballads 11:00 FRI (b084wzjn)

The Human Hive 11:00 TUE (b087qjd4)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b087p13f)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b087p13f)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b087qjcw)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b087qjcw)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b07z3hpm)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b076prgn)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b076prh5)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b076mlls)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b087pf3m)

The Moth Radio Hour 23:00 SUN (b087pq8n)

The Museum of Curiosity 18:30 MON (b087pvqk)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b086tg0g)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b087ts7k)

The Now Show 14:30 SAT (b087p2k8)

The Sprung Floor 20:00 SUN (b079njxk)

The Tim Vine Chat Show 12:04 SUN (b07hj0q6)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b087prhd)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b087pdv0)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b087pdyb)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b087pf13)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b087pf3y)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b087pf7d)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b087pfb8)

The Write Stuff 11:30 WED (b04lpdb6)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b086s8yv)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b087rky1)

Time Spanner 16:30 SAT (b087p3mn)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b087qd25)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b087qjzr)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b087rm0g)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b087rxkz)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b087tt71)

Today 07:00 SAT (b087p13c)

Today 06:00 MON (b087pdxp)

Today 06:00 TUE (b087qh9h)

Today 06:00 WED (b088sbmx)

Today 06:00 THU (b088scv6)

Today 06:00 FRI (b088sh82)

Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups 11:30 MON (b04p85z2)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b038qk3x)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03mztpd)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03bkgqv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03bkfmv)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03mztqr)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03ths74)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b086ky2m)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b086ky2r)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b086ky30)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b086ky3b)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b087pdtc)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b087pdtk)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b087pdty)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b087pdv4)

Weather 05:56 MON (b087pdxm)

Weather 12:57 MON (b087pdxy)

Weather 21:58 MON (b087pdy8)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b087pf0n)

Weather 12:57 WED (b087pf3h)

Weather 21:58 WED (b087pf3w)

Weather 12:57 THU (b087pf6s)

Weather 21:58 THU (b087pf79)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b087pf9w)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b087pfb6)

Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b087p2k2)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b087pq8l)

With Great Pleasure 16:00 MON (b087psl9)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b087pdxr)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b087pf0g)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b087pf39)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b087pf6j)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b087pf9p)

World at One 13:00 MON (b087pdy0)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b087pf0q)

World at One 13:00 WED (b087pf3k)

World at One 13:00 THU (b087pf6v)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b087pf9y)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b087pdxw)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b087pf0l)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b087pf3f)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b087pf6q)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b087pf9t)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b086tjbm)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b086tjbm)