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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 05 NOVEMBER 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b080py1s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b080xp2f)
Keeping On Keeping On, 2014

Alan Bennett reads extracts from his recently published diaries.

Following on from Alan Bennett's bestselling, award-winning prose collections Writing Home and Untold Stories, Keeping On Keeping On is a newly-published third anthology featuring his unique observations, recollections and reminiscences.

In these entries, covering the years 2005 to 2014, Bennett looks back on a packed decade that included writing four highly-acclaimed plays - The Habit of Art, People, Hymn and Cocktail Sticks, all of which premiered at the National Theatre - as well as the screenplays for the hit films of The History Boys and The Lady in the Van.

In addition, he reflects on his 25 years of friendship and collaboration with director Nicholas Hytner, life with his partner Rupert Thomas and, radical views notwithstanding, his status as 'kindly, cosy and essentially harmless' - a view which these diaries do their best to disprove.

Today, Alan reflects on his dramatic experiences with pigs, boa constrictors and steaming - or not so steaming - manure.

Abridged and produced by Gordon House.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b080py1v)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b080py1x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b080py1z)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b080py21)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b080xyg0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Claire Campbell Smith.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b080xyjb)
Finding love at Hellfire Corner - Jenny Nater met a handsome sailor in wartime Dover - the relationship that began there has echoed powerfully through her long life. With Eddie Mair and Jennifer Tracey. Readings by Danny Millar. iPM@bbc.co.uk.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b080py23)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b080py25)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Open Country (b080wbwy)
Wild Boar in the Forest of Dean

Helen Mark travels to the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire to encounter some of the wild boar who have made a home there in the last ten years.

The Forest clearly suits them because their numbers are growing exponentially, with over 1500 feral animals at the last count. The population can almost triple in a year, and with no cold winters or culture of boar-hunting in the UK, the wild boar here have nothing to fear, except the Forestry Commission's marksmen. Adult males can reach twenty stone, run at thirty miles an hour, and can jump or barge through all but the strongest of fences. Also they are not afraid of humans, so unlike deer, you can't just shoo them out of your garden.

Helen meets Dr John Dutton of the University of Worcester, who has made a study of human/boar social interaction in the Forest of Dean, and Kevin Stannard and Ian Harvey from the Forestry Commission, who have been landed with the task of managing numbers on their land.

Then there's Simon Gaskell of the Real Boar Company, who farms boar and sells it as charcuterie. He knows exactly what they're capable of. He describes one of his boar, a beast called Julian, as 'the great white shark' of the woodland. Julian would appear out of nowhere and charge for no apparent reason. But they're not all so bad-tempered, even though they are classed as a 'dangerous wild animal' for farming purposes.

Along unfenced verges, in gardens and on common land, Helen finds evidence of the boar everywhere. And if you're out for a stroll in the heart of the Forest, it's hard not to imagine them watching you from the cover of the undergrowth.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b080py27)
Farming Today This Week: Farming and Food Marketing

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b080py29)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b081jn4k)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b080py2c)
Clare Balding

Clare Balding and Sir David Tang join Aasmah and Richard

Clare Balding was a horse mad girl who became a leading amateur flat jockey in her teens. She found success as a racing correspondent and since then has presented the Olympics 6 times, as well as numerous other chat shows, documentaries, and programmes about biking, walking. Now she's mined her own experience, and written a children's book about a horse mad girl.

Giles Chapman is a lover of Classic Cars and was Editor of Classic & Sports Car magazine. Recently the Reliant Robin caught his eye and he's written a book about it.

Listener Rebecca Peyton experienced the sudden losses of her father when she was aged 6 and her sister when she was 32. She joins us to tell us how she's so keen to talk about death that she wrote a show about it.

Sir David Tang grew up in Hong Kong before moving to the UK aged 13. After teaching philosophy for a short time, he went into business, and became an agony uncle for the Financial Times.

We have the inheritance tracks of Vogue editor, Alexandra Shulman who chooses Ladies who Lunch by Elaine Stritch and Blowing in the Wind performed by Stevie Wonder.

And we'll hear from Diary of a Wimpy Kid author, Jeff Kinney.

The Racehorse who wouldn't Gallop is by Clare Balding
The Reliant Robin, Britain's most bizarre car is by Giles Chapman
Rules for Modern Life, A connoisseur's Survival Guide is by Sir David Tang
Inside Vogue, a diary of my hundredth year is by Alexandra Shulman
Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Double Down is by Jeff Kinney

Producer Corinna Jones
Editor Karen Dalziel.

SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b081jn4m)
Series 14, Warwick

Jay Rayner and his panel of culinary experts visit Warwick. On the panel this week are Professor Peter Barham, Sophie Wright, Rob Owen Brown, and Andi Oliver.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant producer: Laurence Bassett

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b081jn4p)
Anushka Asthana of the Guardian looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The editor is Marie Jessel.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b080py2f)
Reading the Signs

Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b080py2h)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b081jn4r)
Energy prices, Car insurance, Interest-only mortgages, Peer-to-peer lending

The consumer organisation Which? says energy companies are still doing too little to ensure existing customers are on the best rates - costing them £100s a year. However, Energy UK, which speaks on behalf of the energy companies, says they are already working to implement remedies ordered by the Competition and Markets Authority. We hear from Which? and Energy UK.

In a flurry of publicity this week, Admiral announced, then postponed, then scaled back what would have been an innovative new way to calculate car insurance risk for young drivers based on their personalities. The original plan was to search the Facebook posts of first time car insurance customers to assess whether they were safe drivers, and then offer them discounted premiums. Facebook put the brake on that, but we look into the other new developments using social media in the insurance sector. Is it too Big Brother? Or is anything that helps personalise premiums a good thing? We hear from insurance tech expert Greg Brown of Oxbow Partners.

Money Box listeners have complained of problems with their interest only mortgages. We look at what the rules were, depending when you took out your mortgage, and what recourse you have now.

And the Financial Ombudsman has raised concerns about the peer to peer lending sector. Do investors fully understand what they're getting into? Should the sector be regulated like the banks? We hear from Rhydian Lewis of Ratesetter and Dr Roger Gewolb of the Campaign for Fair Finance.

Presenter: Adam Shaw
Producer: Paul Waters.

SAT 12:30 The Now Show (b080xx1d)
Series 49, Episode 1

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis are joined by Andy Zaltzman, Kiri Pritchard McClean, Adam Kay, Gemma Arrowsmith and Xenia Wickett to present the news via topical stand up and sketches.

Written by the cast with additional material from Jon Hunter, Liam Beirne, Robin Morgan and Dan Kiss.

Producer Alexandra Smith

BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b080py2k)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b080py2m)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b080xx1k)
Lord Ashdown, John Mann MP, Nicky Morgan MP, Laura Perrins

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion Wheatley Park School in Oxford with a panel including the Liberal Democrat peer Lord Ashdown, Labour MP John Mann, former Education Secretary Nicky Morgan MP and the co-editor of The Conservative Woman blogspot Laura Perrins.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b080py2p)
Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230
Call 03700 100 444. Email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Tweet,#BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.

SAT 14:30 Drama (b081jn4t)
The Thrill of Love

Maxine Peake plays Ruth Ellis, the last woman to be hanged in Britain.

Starring alongside a cast that includes Siobhan Finneran and Joe Armstrong, Amanda Whittington's hit stage transfer imagines the role played by the women close to Ruth during the months between Ruth's murder of her lover David Blakely and her subsequent death by hanging.

Framed with interviews and laced with the music of Billie Holiday, this is an intimate, evocative and thought provoking drama directed by Kate Chapman.

Writer Amanda Whittington
Director Kate Chapman
Producer Justine Potter
Executive Producer Melanie Harris
Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Music by Billie Holiday

A Savvy production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b080t7dh)
Series 23, The Star-Spangled Banner

America's national anthem was written by a lawyer, Francis Scott Key, after watching the British navy bombing Fort McHenry in 1814. It was set to an English social men's club song and recognized as the national anthem in 1889. Notoriously difficult to sing, and traditionally played at public sports events and orchestral concerts, the anthem has inspired emotion and attracted controversy. We hear from Dr John Carlos who along with Dr Tommie Smith, raised their fists on the Olympic podium in the Mexico City Olympics in 1968 as the anthem was played; Jose Feliciano who sang the anthem at the 1968 World series and provoked criticism; Conrad Netting IV who discovered the truth about his fighter pilot father's history which led him to a cemetery in Normandy; members of the Coldstream Guards band who played the anthem at the changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace the day after 9/11 and Leon Hendrix, Jimi's brother, who was in the army at the time of Woodstock, and was put on 'potato peeling duty' because of the 'dishonourable' version his brother had played.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b080py2r)
Kanya King, Claire Foy, Angel Olsen

The Mobo Awards are now in their 21st year. We hear from founder Kanya King about what they have achieved and why she believes they're still relevant today.

We hear from Josie Bevan whose husband is in prison for fraud. She describes the impact his prison sentence has had on her and her daughter's lives and why she's decided to write a blog about her experiences of the Justice system.

We hear about the influential women in the world of culture and arts who may be on this year's Woman's Hour Powerlist. The TV critic for the Guardian Julia Raeside, the literary critic Alex Clark and the artistic director of the South Bank Jude Kelly discuss who they would suggest and why.

Dr Anton Emmanuel, Consultant Gastroenterologist at University College Hospital, tells us why women may experience increased flatulence as they get older.

Acclaimed US folk and indie rock singer and guitarist Angel Olsen talks about her music and her new album, My Woman, and performs a unique solo performance, live in the Woman's Hour studio.

Plus the actor Claire Foy tells us about her latest role playing the young Queen Elizabeth ll in the new Netflix series 'The Crown'.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Produced by Rabeka Nurmahomed
Edited by Jane Thurlow.

SAT 17:00 PM (b080py2t)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b080xk99)
Selling to 18-24 year olds

Evan Davis and guests explore the fast moving world of selling to 18-24 year olds. Collectively, that age group has billions to spend. Individually, many are strapped for cash. So how do companies get their attention and their money? The answer seems to be: market your brand using social media. Link up with a celebrity with millions of followers and watch the money roll in. That's the theory. Forget old style television adverts. That age group isn't watching the box - they're on their mobiles. Joining the programme will be: Josephine Hansom from Youth Sight; Philip O'Ferrall, Viacom International Media Networks and Simon Beckerman from Depop.

Producer: Lesley McAlpine.

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b080py2w)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b080py2y)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b080py30)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b080py32)
Alison Lapper, DJ Semtex, Jack Monroe, Norma Winstone, Orkesta Mendoza, Clive Anderson, Sara Cox

Clive Anderson and Sara Cox are joined by Alison Lapper, DJ Semtex and Jack Monroe for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Norma Winstone and Orkesta Mendoza.

Producer: Sukey Firth.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b081jn5j)
Tom Ilube

Series of profiles of people who are currently making headlines.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b080py34)
Nocturnal Animals, Dead Funny, BBC's Black and British, Naomi Alderman, Emma Hamilton: seduction and celebrity

Tom Ford's new thriller film Nocturnal Animals stars Amy Adams and Jake Gyllenhaal
A revival of terry Johnson's play Dead Funny opens at London's Vaudeville Theatre; does it live up to its name?
David Olusoga presents BBC TV's Black and British part of a season of programmes under that title
Naomi Alderman's novel The Power imagines a world in which women can conjure electrical charges from their hands - how does it change the gender power balance?
Emma Hamilton - Seduction and Celebrity is a new exhibition in Greenwich looking at the life and career.
Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Rowan Pelling, Christopher Frayling and Helen Lewis. The producer is Oliver Jones.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b081jnp1)
Speaking in Public: Archive on 4 Goes Live!

So you think you're bad at public speaking?

Sir Isaac Newton was apparently so dull that no-one came to his lectures at all. Unperturbed, he gave them to an empty room.

You can also be too interesting. American architect and inventor Buckminster Fuller once gave a talk called 'Everything I Know'. It lasted for 42 hours, with the first short break only coming after 24 hours.

Lord Reith established his BBC lectures to 'enrich the intellectual and cultural life of the nation', which sounds old fashioned, but today public speaking is still a surprisingly big deal. Nightclubs may be closing but speaking events are thriving, and on-line lecturers get world-wide followings.

So, can anyone be a good public speaker?

Presenter David Bramwell thinks so. In front of a live audience, at the Catalyst Club in Brighton where he's been hosting speaking events for 12 years, he draws on guests - professional, experienced, novice and totally inexperienced - to prove his point, and provide some entertainment on the way.

With advice from star of Ken Campbell's Road Show (oh, and Dr Who) Sylvester McCoy; the 'Head of TED' talks Chris Anderson; actor and comedy writer Graham Duff; coach for the Speakers Trust Sarah Steed, comedian and QI 'Elf' Dan Schreiber and Catalyst Club regular Charlotte Ellis. Also, Dr Gillian Forrester and Dr Catherine Loveday will explore stage fright. Last but by no means least, (ladies and gentlemen, put your hands together!) we hear 'first timer' Clare Mackie, whose maiden speech encompasses her passion for exotic African animal poo.

What could possibly go wrong?

Presenter: David Bramwell

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

Photo: Lewis Thomas.

SAT 21:00 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b082rgdb)
Incarnations: India in 50 Lives - Omnibus, Amir Khusro, Kabir, Guru Nanak, Mirabai

An omnibus edition of Professor Sunil Khilnani's audio portraits of figures who have shaped Indian history over two thousand years. Today's programme focuses on four medieval poets whose influence continues to the present day.

The first is Amir Khusro, a 13th century warrior, prisoner of war, court poet and passionate Sufi devotee. A quick-witted literary survivor whose words would endure for 700 years, he described himself as 'The Parrot of India'. We also explore the life of Kabir. Born in India's holiest city, Benares, of a low-caste weaver's family, Kabir was a provoker whose poems and actions challenged religious orthodoxies.

Another poet established one of the great world religions: Guru Nanak, the 15th century founder of Sikhism. At its core, his religion was based on Discplined Worldliness - living and witnessing your faith within the world, rather than retreating from it.

Sunil Khinani's last subject is Mirabai, a Rajput princess who became a wandering religious singer devoted to the Hindu god Krishna. She composed many songs or bhajans which have been passed down through the centuries by oral tradition. Today some see Mirabai as a potent symbol of feminism, others as a passionate religious inspiration.

Producer: Jeremy Grange.

SAT 22:00 News Summary (b081jnp3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 22:15 The Reith Lectures (b080t63w)
Kwame Anthony Appiah: Mistaken Identities, Colour

The philosopher and cultural theorist Kwame Anthony Appiah argues for a world free of racial fixations.

He tells the story of Anton Wilhelm Amo Afer. He was five years old when he was brought from the Gold Coast to Germany in 1707, educated at a royal court and became an eminent philosopher. He argues that this elaborate Enlightenment experiment illuminates a series of mistaken ideas , including that there is a "racial essence" which all members of that race carry. Modern science long ago disproved this, as almost all of the world's genetic variation is found within every so-called racial group. Instead, "race is something we make; not something that makes us."

The lecture is recorded in front of an audience at the British Council in Accra, Ghana. The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley

The producer is Jim Frank.

SAT 23:00 Round Britain Quiz (b080r366)
Programme 1, 2016

(1/12)
Tom Sutcliffe is in the chair for a new series of the longest-established panel quiz game on British radio. Teams from around the UK compete to unpick the programme's notoriously cryptic and multi-layered questions which rely on a wide knowledge of culture, history and science.

The first programme pits the crime writer Val McDermid and photographer Alan McCredie, playing for Scotland, against writer and broadcaster Myfanwy Alexander and quiz guru David Edwards, appearing for Wales. Both pairs will be hoping they can wrest the series title back from the South of England team who pipped them to the greatest number of victories last season.

As always, Tom is on hand to give gentle clues and steer them out of blind alleys whenever necessary, but will be deducting points depending on how much help he has to provide before the penny drops. Listeners' question ideas always form an important ingredient in the quiz, and the questions are available to see on the webpage before each edition. Tom will also be setting plenty of teasers for listeners to try out between programmes.

Later in the series the teams from the North of England, the South of England, Northern Ireland and the Midlands join the fray. They include some more new participants taking part in Round Britain Quiz for the first time this year, including names already well loved by Radio 4 audiences.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

SAT 23:30 The Headline Ballads (b07mwqfr)
The Story of the Monkeys and the Fishes

A series in which poets and storytellers respond to stories underneath the world news headlines.

In part 2 of The Headline Ballads the Sierra Leonean storyteller, Usifu Jalloh, is inspired by the people rebuilding their communities after Ebola. His Headline Ballad - The Story of the Monkeys and the Fishes - is told with his drum and a traditional thumb piano. It runs through the programme and is interwoven with personal testimonies from those who experienced the crisis in Sierra Leone at first hand. We hear from Ebola survivors, from the leader of a burial team, from a nurse who kept a hospital running virtually single handedly, from a man who ran the government's emergency Ebola response room, and also from the children caught up in the crisis and now coping with its aftermath.

Producer: Penny Boreham.


SUNDAY 06 NOVEMBER 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b081l7vm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Annika Stranded (b048jcgg)
Series 2, Into the Ice

Annika Strandhed is a leading light in the murder squad of the Oslo police. Her neuroses - and she has a few - are mostly hidden by a boisterous manner and a love of speedboats. As fictional Scandinavian detectives go, she's not as astute as Sarah Lund or Saga Norén, perhaps, but probably better company.

In this second series of stories by Nick Walker - commissioned specially for Radio 4 - Annika is learning to juggle the demands of policing the Oslofjord with a new challenge. Namely, single motherhood.

Episode 1 (of 3): Into The Ice
A body is found in the ice on the Oslofjord. Annika can't place where she's seen it before - but the man is frozen in an oddly familiar pose.

Nick Walker is the author of two critically-acclaimed novels, Blackbox and Helloland. His plays and short stories are often featured on BBC Radio 4, including Arnold In A Purple Haze (2009), the First King of Mars stories (2007 - 2010), the Afternoon Drama Life Coach (2010) and the stories Dig Yourself (2011) and The Indivisible (2012). The first series of Annika Stranded was broadcast in 2013.

Reader: Nicola Walker

Producer: Jeremy Osborne
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b081l7vp)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b081l7vr)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b081l7vt)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b081l7vw)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b081l8q0)
St Mark's, Swindon

This week's bells on Sunday comes from St. Mark's in Swindon. The church was built in the 1840s to serve the workers of the Great Western Railway whose Swindon works were nearby. The tower contains a ring of 8 bells, Six of which were cast in 1904 by Llewellins and James and a further 2 in 1927 by Mears and Stainbank of the Whitechapel Foundry. The Tenor weighs eleven and a half hundredweight and is tuned to G. We hear now part of a full peal of 8 spliced Surprise Major.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b081jn5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b081l7vy)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b081l7w0)
Inside Out

Journalist Remona Aly uses music, prose and poetry to explore the experience of being both an insider and an outsider.

Having grown up in Britain as the child of Indian parents, Remona is familiar with the feeling of being on the outside. As a child she was the only brown girl in a white neighbourhood. She explains that, in Britain, she's still "not quite British enough" for some while, when visiting her relatives in India, she gets referred to as "the English one".

Muslims, Remona argues, have outsider blood flowing through their veins. The Prophet Muhammad himself was cast out from society in the land of his birth. Shunned and persecuted by his own people, he, along with a small band of early Muslims, became refugees, migrating from the trials of Mecca to the sanctuary of Medina in what is now Saudi Arabia. This experience of being an outsider, Remona explains, was vital to the leadership of the Prophet when he came to build a new community of followers.

According to Remona, the ability to traverse the worlds of the insider and outsider can be hugely beneficial. By embracing outsider status, we can step back from the action and gain crucial insights into the society to which we belong.

The programme features readings from psychologist Adrian Furnham and influential Muslim convert Leopold Weiss. Remona also draws upon the poetry of Rumi and the music of Yusuf Islam and Woody Guthrie.

Presenter: Remona Aly
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b081tpvw)
Wine Harvest

When the Chahal family bought 10 acres of land in Shropshire they originally planned an orchard but advisors told them the soil was better suited for grape vines. After planting and maturing, even early harvests have won the family awards at international level.
Sybil Ruscoe meets the family as they set about the harvest of their nine varieties and take the grapes to be transformed into wine. She learns the skills of picking - and tasting - but also how the venture has brought the family closer together. For the parents, a retirement venture has taken them from factory work in West Bromwich back to their agricultural roots in the Punjab. For the children, harvest time means balancing full-time jobs with working the land.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b081l7w2)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b081l7w4)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b081l7w6)
Canal chaplains, The religious vote in the US election, Epitaphs of the Great War

As towns and villages on the Nineveh Plain are liberated from IS forces, some priests are returning to their burnt out churches and crosses are being erected on to the buildings. Fr Georges Johola tells Edward about the first mass at their church in Qaraqosh.

Hazel Southam investigates a new scheme to boost the number of chaplains working on Britain's waterways.

Thomas Reese of the National Catholic Reporter and Sarah Pulliam Bailey, religion reporter for the Washington Post, discuss the importance of religion in next week's Presidential election, in particular the Catholic and Jewish vote.

A poll for the "Passing on Faith" project, by the religious think tank, Theos says the majority of parents in Britain do not believe that it is a priority for them to pass on their beliefs about God or a Higher Power to their children. Nick Spencer from Theos and Mark Russell, CEO of the Church Army discuss the findings.

The Church in Wales has appointed Canon Joanna Penberthy as the first woman Bishop of St Davids in Pembrokeshire. She tells Edward about her early days in the church when attitudes to women were very different.

This year's remembrance commemorations coincide with the centenary of the Battle of the Somme. A new book compiles some of the epitaphs written by the families of the dead. Edward speaks to Sarah Wearne, author of "Epitaphs of the Great War: The Somme".

This week sees the opening of the Tavener Centre for Music and Spirituality. The Director, the Rev June Boyce-Tillman and Dr Brian Inglis, composer and senior lecturer in music at Middlesex University explain why they see the relationship between music and spirituality as an important area for exploration.

Producers:
David Cook
Peter Everett

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b081tdp9)
Health Poverty Action

The comedian Shappi Khorsandi makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Health Poverty Action.

Registered Charity Number 290535
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Health Poverty Action.'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Health Poverty Action.'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b081l7w8)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b081l7wb)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b081l7wd)
Remember, remember...

From All Saints' Day, All Souls' Day, to National Remembrance of the two World Wars and other conflicts, this is the season of much reflection. "Do this in remembrance of me" Jesus told his followers as he shared a simple meal with them, but how important is it to 'remember'? That's the theme of today's service of Holy Communion from St Columba's Church, Knock in Belfast. The celebrant is Canon Ken Smyth, assisted by Canon Walter Laverty and the preacher is Canon Noel Battye.

Haggai 1:15b-2:9
Luke 20: 27-38

My God, how wonderful Thou art (WESTMINSTER)
A Celtic Eucharist (Martin White)
Psalm 98
Call to Remembrance (Farrant)
According to thy gracious word (GLOUCESTER)
Christ be with me (GARTAN)

Director of Music: Dr Joe McKee
Organist is Nigel McClintock

Producer: Etta Halliday.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b080xx1r)
America Votes

Adam Gopnik reflects on why he believes a victory for Donald Trump would be a disaster for America.

The American Presidential election "posits a simple eternal human confrontation between sensible and crazy", he writes.

He says we must not pretend that the rise of Trump is essentially a "people's revolt" or a movement of the dispossessed.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dwy1y)
Golden Plover

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Golden Plover. If, among a flock of lapwings circling over a ploughed field, you see smaller birds with wings like knife-blades and bell-like calls ... these are golden plovers.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b081l7wg)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b081l7wj)
Adam struggles to be heard, and Rex has the final word.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b081tflr)
Ali Smith

Ali Smith is a Scottish writer. Born in Inverness in 1962, the youngest of five children by seven years, she says, "I grew up completely alone but with all the comforts of knowing I had a cushioning family structure around me - and yet I could free myself from it."

After reading English at Aberdeen and nearly completing a PhD at Cambridge, she started down an academic path, winning a lectureship at Strathclyde University in Glasgow, but she soon decided that academia wasn't for her.

She gave herself three years in which to make it as a writer. By then she had moved from writing poems, for which she had discovered an aptitude aged eight, to short stories.

Her first collection, Free Love and Other Stories, was published in 1995.

Since then she has written novels, including How to Be Both, and The Accidental, as well as plays. Nominated three times for the Booker Prize, her fiction has won numerous literary awards including the Goldsmiths Award, the Whitbread Novel of the Year Award, and the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b081l7wl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (b080t0pc)
Series 17, Episode 5

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

John Finnemore, Frankie Boyle, Jeremy Hardy and Lucy Porter are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as Donald Trump, musicals, weddings and Oxbridge.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b081ldd4)
Gavin and the Chinese Food Olympics

Every four years, the most established names in Chinese cuisine pitch their skills against each other in an international competition which has become known as the Olympics of Chinese food. This year the World Championship for Chinese Cuisine was held in Europe for the first time in Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Teams of chefs descend on the competition from around the world and compete for highly prised gold, silver and bronze medals. The pressure and the standard are high.

In 2016, another first. The first UK based team are travelling to Rotterdam to take on the champions. Among them is 25 year old sous chef Gavin Chun. Gavin and his team are going for gold.

Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced by Clare Salisbury.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b081l7wn)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b081l7wq)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Blue Canvas: The Artist Miles Davis (b07c2w62)
Miles Davis remains one of the most influential musicians from the last century, despite his death 25 years ago. But what's less well known is that he dedicated the final years of his life to painting with the same fervent energy he had devoted to music.

"A painting is music you can see, and music is a painting you can hear." Miles Davis

To mark what would have been his 90th birthday, the New York artist Jo Gelbard, who became Miles Davis's companion during the last years of his life, tells the story of his little known life as a painter, alongside interviews with his friends and family.

The story begins with Davis' sudden stroke in 1982, when he took up art as a therapy after his illness. Soon after, he met Gelbard who was 24 years his junior and they embarked on a turbulent relationship which resulted in an extraordinary artistic collaboration.

Davis' son Erin recalls how his father always carried two things - his trumpet case and his paint brushes - and he sat surrounded by canvases in the apartment they shared, painting with a furious energy. We also hear from musician and painter Robert Wilburn III who spent alot of time with Davis during his final decades, discussing the relationship between art and music, rhythm, colour and space in his performances and his paintings. And the author George Cole, who wrote a book about the final years of the trumpeter's life, talks about the importance of his art.

Woven into the programme is a soundtrack of Davis' music, and clips from a never-before-broadcast interview with the writer Scott Gutterman, the author of a book about the trumpeter's art, and who recorded with Davis over several months shortly before he died in 1991.

Producer : Jo Wheeler
A Freewheel production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b080xx09)
Harthill

Eric Robson presents the show from Harthill in South Yorkshire. Joining Eric this week are Matthew Wilson, Bunny Guinness and Anne Swithinbank.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b081tpvy)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover with conversations about the benefits and disappointments that moving can bring, and the importance of self-belief, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b081tpw0)
Watership Down, Episode 1

Richard Adams' award-winning novel from 1972. Fearful that their home in Sandleford Warren is to be destroyed, a band of rabbits begins an epic and perilous journey to Watership Down.

Produced by Gemma Jenkins
Directed by Marc Beeby

Watership Down was Richard Adams' first novel and began life as improvised stories told to his two young daughters. Once published it became hugely successful, and won its author the Guardian Children's Fiction Award and the Carnegie Medal.

SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b081tdpc)
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson

November's edition is a Classic Bookclub as presenter James Naughtie chooses Robert Louis Stevenson's adventure story Kidnapped as his favourite from his own reading life, as part of the BBC's #LovetoRead Season. In the absence of Stevenson, our guide to the book is author Louise Welsh, who has written an opera inspired by him.

Kidnapped is one Stevenson's best loved titles. It's an historical adventure novel set in Scotland after the Jacobite rising of 1745 and tells the adventures of the recently orphaned sixteen year old David Balfour, as he journeys through the dangerous Scottish Highlands in an attempt to regain his rightful inheritance.

James Naughtie says : "As a young boy Robert Louis Stevenson was my guide to adventure. Kidnapped was always at hand and, like Treasure Island, it introduced me to great story-telling. A boy alone in a country torn apart by war, betrayed by a sad but wicked uncle, and a coming-of-age through adversity. Reading it again, I can still feel the thrill of the first time. That's what great books do".

Author Louise Welsh has said "I think if you were to stop any Scottish writer and ask them to list their top three writers that made them want to write they would mention Stevenson. He's always been number one for me."

Bookclub's #LovetoRead on Kidnapped is recorded as always with an audience of readers, including members of the RLS Club, local school children and university students, at the Hawes Inn, Queensferry, where Stevenson is thought to have started the novel in 1866.

Presenter James Naughtie
Interviewed guest : Louise Welsh
Producer : Dymphna Flynn

December's Bookclub Choice : Bright Lights, Big City by Jay McInerney.

SUN 16:30 Gone for a Burton (b081n8mj)
"These are the wild geographies of yeast..." Poet Jean Sprackland visits the breweries and tap-rooms of her home town, Burton-upon-Trent, to write a radio poem about the centuries-old art of brewing, and its rich linguistic legacy. She talks to brewers, beer-drinkers, coopers and landladies about Burton's place in brewing history, and the recent flowering of microbrewers and micropubs in the town.

Produced by Emma Harding.

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b080t8nn)
The Hidden Homeless

The number of people who are homeless is on the rise. In London it shot up almost 80 per cent in 4 years. Latest government figures show councils in England took on 15,000 new homeless households between April and June this year - a 10 per cent increase on the previous year.

Increasingly councils are having to use temporary accommodation and even bed and breakfasts to cope with a shortage of affordable accommodation. It has become an increasingly profitable business for landlords. Research this year for London councils found that they had spent over £650 million in the capital on temporary accommodation in just one year. Charities say changes to the benefit cap which comes into effect next week will make the situation for families looking for a home, even worse.

File on 4 reports from the front line of the homelessness crisis. The programme meets the families sent by councils to live in cramped, filthy conditions.

We hear from the doctors who claim emergency accommodation in one city is affecting people's mental health and contributing to an increase in deaths and the local authority keeping families in B&B accommodation longer than they are legally allowed to.

Reporter: Simon Cox
Producer: Nicola Dowling.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b081jn5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b081l7ws)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b081l7wv)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b081l7wx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b081l7wz)
Daljit Nagra

Radio 4 and Radio 4 Extra's Poet in Residence Daljit Nagra with the best of BBC Radio this week

No fireworks this week but in Daljit's tin box we have the star-spangled banner, a magical coat in the land of Neverwhere, and wild boars rocket through the Forest of Deane.
Dr John Cooper Clarke illuminates the stage. Cubans are in a spin over Queen Victoria, and the thought of being smacked on the bottom with a weekly mag sparks joy from quiz panellists.
There's a warm glow of poetry, a fountain of pop and a candle of comedians. Light the blue touch paper and stand back for Pick of the Week.

Producer: Stephen Garner
Pick Production Support: Kay Bishton.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b081ld36)
Toby has a new toy, and Susan is insulted.

SUN 19:15 Mark Thomas: The Manifesto (b01s0qnc)
Series 5, Episode 4

Activist comedian Mark Thomas considers policy suggestions for a People's Manifesto. Recorded in the BBC Radio Theatre, London. Producer: Colin Anderson.

SUN 19:45 Natural Histories: Short Stories (b081tq31)
Series 2, The Kill

Mark Haddon's new story vividly imagines the world of the neanderthals and their fierce struggle to survive. It's his first story for Radio 4, commissioned as part of the collaboration with the Natural History Museum. Mark Haddon's novels include The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time.
Reader Mark Haddon.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

SUN 20:00 More or Less (b081tq55)
Trump tells the Truth

The fact-checkers have been working overtime looking into the numbers used by Donald Trump during his campaign to become President of the USA. In the wake of the election next week, we take a look at some of Trump’s more outrageous statistical claims.

Is wildlife in decline?
Wildlife populations have plummeted by 58% since 1970, it has been reported. And if we continue this way the decline will be 67% 2020. But do these numbers stand up to scrutiny – can you really put a figure on wildlife decline and call it robust? Last time we looked at this topic we found problems. Have they been fixed?

Parliamentary seat boundaries
There have been many criticisms about the way the Boundary Commission has redrawn UK parliamentary seat boundaries. We look at what the critics have to say and see how the political parties may be affected.

Desk of Good News – women in parliament
The number of women in parliaments around the world is on the rise!

Escobar’s Cocaine Deaths
Pablo Escobar was one of the world’s most infamous drug traffickers. His story has been brought to life in the Netflix TV drama series ‘Narcos’. We find out the deadly truth behind the numbers in the Netflix series and the realities of Colombia’s drug trade in the early nineties.

Photo: Donald Trump at a Campaign Rally. Credit Darren McCollester/Getty

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b080xx0z)
Tom Hayden, Valerie Hunter Gordon, Carole Blake, Anne Pashley

Matthew Bannister on

American political activist Tom Hayden. He once said that people only knew four words about him: "Sixties, Radical, Jane and Fonda". He led anti Vietnam war protests and was married to the Hollywood star.

Valerie Hunter Gordon who invented the disposable nappy. Her prototypes were made from old wartime parachutes.

Literary agent Carole Blake who wrote a best selling guide for aspiring novelists.

And Anne Pashley, who won a silver medal at the 1956 Olympics, then became a leading opera singer.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b081jn4r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b081tdp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 Analysis (b080t0ph)
Trusting Inmates

Should we place more trust in prisoners to help them change their lives? "Trust is the only thing that changes people," says Professor Alison Liebling, the director of the Prisons Research Centre at the University of Cambridge. But, asks Lucy Ash, how can we encourage trust in prisons that are overcrowded, often understaffed, and blighted by rising rates of violence? Prisoners are locked up because they broke trust, and on the wings distrust, rather than trust, is an essential survival skill.

And yet Professor Liebling's latest evidence surprisingly shows that ultimately it is only staff-prisoner relationships built on trust that ensure better outcomes. "Values grow virtues", she argues. Treating prisoners with the same values as other people - dignity, respect, trust - will help them turn their lives around.

Producer: Arlene Gregorius

(Image: A knife with a blunted point, chained to a work surface. Credit: Rene Hut, of the Dutch Ministry of Justice).

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b081l7x1)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 TED Radio Hour (b081tq33)
Guy Raz presents a journey through ideas, based on talks by the speakers on the TED stage.

SUN 23:50 A Point of View (b080xx1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]


MONDAY 07 NOVEMBER 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b081l7yv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b080w5pr)
Drone warfare, Fitness instructors

Drone warfare: from soldiering to assassination? Laurie Taylor talks to the US philosopher, Laurie Calhoun, about her study of remote controlled killing. Has self defence become naked aggression in the Drone age. She argues that 'black ops' are now standard operating proceedure. Professor David Galbreath, Professor of International Security at the University of Bath, offers an alternative perspective.
Also, the precarity of personal trainers. Geraint Harvey, Senior Lecturer in Industrial Relations at the University of Birmingham, discusses a new study which claims that their working conditions represent a new form of hyper flexible and insecure work.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b081l8q0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b081l7yx)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b081l7yz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b081l7z1)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b081l7z3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b082qj87)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Claire Campbell Smith.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b081l7z5)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Vernon Harwood.

MON 05:56 Weather (b081l7z7)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03tht5z)
Chough

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison tells the story of the chough. Our healthiest chough populations are in Ireland, southwest and north Wales and western Scotland. The last English stronghold was in Cornwall and Choughs feature on the Cornish coat of arms. Even here they became extinct until wild birds from Ireland re-colonised the county in 2001. Now the birds breed regularly on the Lizard peninsula.

MON 06:00 Today (b081l7z9)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (b081ld2r)
Virtue and Vice

On Start the Week Andrew Marr hears stories of virtue and vice. Lucy Bailey is directing Milton's Comus, a masque in honour of chastity, in which a Lady, lost in the woods, is tempted by pleasure. In Berg's opera Lulu the eponymous heroine appears to be the epitome of seductive pleasure, an amoral seductress, but William Kentridge's production questions how much she is the real victim. The academic Simon Goldhill charts the transition from the high Victorian period into modernity through one family's relationship with sex, psychoanalysis and religion, while the very modern preoccupation with therapy is laid bare, as Susie Orbach reveals what happens behind the therapist's door.

Producer: Katy Hickman.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b081ld2t)
The Apple Orchard, Episode 1

Symbolically and nutritionally, the apple has played a significant role in human life for millennia. From its origins in Kazakhstan, its spread along the old spice roads and into mythology, it is now an all-year round supermarket staple.

In this four-part abridgement of his new book, Pete Brown follows the cycle of an orchard's year to illuminate the hand-in-hand-history of humanity and our most familiar fruit. Along the way, he turns his hand to the three most labour-intensive jobs in the orchard: grafting, picking and pruning.

Pete Brown has written several books on food and drink, including Man Walks into a Pub, Three Sheets to the Wind, and Shakespeare's Local. He is a judge for the Great Taste Awards and the Radio 4 Food and Farming Awards, and is a frequent contributor to the Food Programme.

Written and read by Pete Brown

Abridged by Laurence Wareing

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b081l7zc)
The 2016 Power List Judges, fiction writer Anakana Schofield

For the first time we hear from the 2016 Power List Judges who begin the daunting task of deciding which seven women have made the biggest impact on women's lives over the past seven decades.

Writer Anakana Schofield talks to Jane about her much acclaimed second novel, Martin John, in which she skilfully enters into the mind of a paranoid, compulsive sex offender. Martin John is on the shortlist of the 2016 Goldsmiths Prize. The winner will be announced on Wednesday 9th November.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b081ld2w)
Jezebel, Episode 1

Jezebel by Irène Némirovsky
Translated by Sandra Smith
Dramatised by Ellen Dryden
In a French courtroom in 1935, the trial of Gladys Eysenach is taking place - an old woman, still beautiful, elegant, and accused of shooting dead her much-younger lover. Némirovsky with her usual depth of insight and pitiless compassion, shows us the soul of a desperate woman obsessed with her lost youth. Throughout the week we dramatise key events in Gladys's life to discover the truth of why Gladys shot dead the young man.

Produced and Directed by Pauline Harris

Further Info:- Irène Némirovsky ( 24 February 1903 - 17 August 1942) was a novelist of Ukrainian Jewish origin born in Kiev Ukraine under the Russian Empire; she lived more than half her life in France and wrote in French, but was denied French citizenship. Arrested by the Nazis as a Jew under the racial laws - which did not take into account her conversion to Roman Catholicism - she died at Auschwitz at the age of 39. Successful in her day, she is now best known for the posthumously-published Suite française. Némirovsky's older daughter, Denise, kept the notebook containing the manuscript for Suite Française for fifty years without reading it, thinking it was a diary, which would be too painful to read. In the late 1990s, however, she made arrangements to donate her mother's papers to a French archive and so read the notebook first. Upon discovering what it contained, it was published in France, where it became a bestseller in 2004. It has since been translated into 38 languages and as of 2008 has sold 2.5 million copies.

MON 11:00 The Untold (b081ld2y)
Race Against Time

Twenty three year old May Brown needs a bone marrow transplant to survive: her sister's a perfect match but she lives in Nigeria and has been refused a visitors visa to enter the UK. For May and her husband, Mike, the Home Office decision is a huge set-back. They had their hopes resting on the transplant and fear what will happen next. There are no other matches for May on the register kept by the African and Caribbean Leukaemia Trust, where staff have mounted a social media campaign to challenge the Government's decision.

The Home Office reasoning is that May's sister, Martha, doesn't meet the income threshold for a visitor's visa - as a teacher her wages are only around £200 a month. For Orin Lewis, from the ACLT, this overlooks the compassionate grounds which he is urging the Minister to take into account. Grace Dent tracks May's private fight against acute myeloid leukaemia alongside the public pressure for a reversal of the decision

May is in an isolation unit in the hospital at the start of the recordings and hasn't seen her two year old daughter, Selina, for three months. With her chemotherapy underway she is discharged to be seen as an outpatient and goes back to Weymouth to be with Mike and Selina. The couple's marriage was investigated for more than two years before immigration officers were satisfied that it was genuine. Now it's another waiting game as the case for allowing Martha in is reconsidered: Grace Dent tracks what happens next.

MON 11:30 The Rivals (b081ld30)
Series 4, The Stanway Cameo Mystery

By Arthur Morrison.

Dramatised By Chris Harrald.

Inspector Lestrade was made to look a fool in the Sherlock Holmes stories. Now he gets his own back, with tales of Holmes' rivals. Lord and Lady Stanway win the auction for the priceless but cursed 'Stanway Cameo', but it is instantly stolen. Inspector Lestrade is less than pleased to be investigating alongside society detective Martin Hewitt.

Producer: Liz Webb.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b081l7zf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 In Therapy (b081ld32)
Series 2, Maureen

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. We join Susie in her consulting room, where she meets a different client each day.

Today, Susie meets 75 year old Maureen, whose husband has dementia.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed Jerusalem) and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learned about the characters' lives, backgrounds, and reasons for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on concealed microphones at Susie's surgery.

Throughout the encounters in this series, we get to hear the therapist at work, experiencing what it's like to eavesdrop on the most intimate of exchanges.

To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, giving us an insight into her role as a therapist and shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Psychotherapist: Susie Orbach
Maureen: Anna Calder-Marshall
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b081l7zh)
Consumer affairs programme.

MON 12:57 Weather (b081l7zk)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b081l7zm)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 Our Man in China: The Diaries (b081ld34)
A Man in a Hurry

The British made him a baronet, the King of Denmark awarded him the Grand Cross of the Order of the Dannebrog, the Germans gave him the Prussian Order of the Crown and the Chinese appointed him (among many other honours) an Iron Hatted Duke, but his nickname in Beijing mattered more than any of his titles; they called him, "our Hart". It was a tribute to his unique role in China's history and its relations with the West. Robert Hart lived through the death throes of a dynastic China that had existed for four thousand years, and he helped lay the foundations of the China we know today. He served as Inspector General of Maritime Customs for nearly half a century, transforming it in to an efficient well regulated organisation that helped fuel China's transformation in to a modern trading nation. Along the way he laid the foundations for a national postal service, railway, meteorological and navigation systems. Yet he is the only figure among the "foreign devils" of those days remembered with affection. He used his position to serve Chinese, not just British, interests. Hart knew everyone and saw everything. His diaries are an intimate and frank chronicle of his life during one of the most turbulent periods in China's history. The Robert Hart you find in his journals is also a figure of our age. He was tormented by conscience, and much given to introspection - endlessly debating faith and morals with his friends and himself. As a young man he was incurably sentimental and hopelessly addicted to sex and female affection. The dairies have only been partially translated and only published in academic circles. This is the first time extracts from Sir Robert Hart's diaries have been broadcast. Today Sir Robert arrives in Ningbo and discovers a world of brothels and opium.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b081ld36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Drama (b081ld38)
Wide Open Spaces

Wide Open Spaces

On the first anniversary of his daughter's death, Samuel is determined to keep his promise and visit her grave for the first time. All he has to do is get across London, which should be easy, except Samuel's agoraphobic. A bittersweet drama about a man who can't travel.

Written by Jane Wainwright
Directed by Charlotte Riches

This bittersweet drama explores the debilitating, and often comic, reality of living with agoraphobia in one of the world's busiest cities. A modern day love story, told through the eyes of Samuel, a young father determined to travel across London in order to bring his family back together.

MON 15:00 Round Britain Quiz (b081ldd2)
Programme 2, 2016

(2/12)
Tom Sutcliffe welcomes the teams from the North of England and the South of England to the book-lined room for their first clash of the 2016 season. Both teams include members taking part in Round Britain Quiz for the first time. Bestselling writer and BBC 6Music broadcaster Stuart Maconie joins novelist Adele Geras on the North of England team, while for the South the author and columnist Marcus Berkmann is joined for the first time by comedian Paul Sinha.

As always, the questions test their powers of lateral thinking as well as their general knowledge. Knowing the names of legendary Kings of Britain, cities in the Rocky Mountains and characters from Russian ballet is one thing, but connecting them is quite another - as the teams discover.

As always, the programme includes ingenious question ideas from Round Britain Quiz listeners, and Tom will be setting another teaser puzzle to think about before the next edition.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b081ldd4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 Short Cuts (b081ldd6)
Series 10, Losing Yourself

Josie Long hears stories of what can be found as we lose ourselves - from disappearing into anonymous environments to confronting existential threats.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 16:30 Digital Human (b081ldd8)
Series 10, 07/11/2016

Aleks Krotoski explores whether technology can allow us walk in another man's shoes.

MON 17:00 PM (b081l7zp)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b081l7zr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b081lddb)
Series 17, Episode 6

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

John Finnemore, Frankie Boyle, Jeremy Hardy and Lucy Porter are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as spies, fire, Norfolk and The Beatles.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b081lddl)
Lilian has an unwanted phone call, and Brian badgers Adam.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b081l7zt)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b081ld2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 The Vigil (b081lf8b)
Sitting with a dying, elderly parent can be a deeply emotional, challenging and impenetrable experience. It's natural and inevitable, yet we don't know what to expect, how long it might take, or what it will look and feel like when it happens. You just have to sit and wait and watch. There's no instruction booklet and every hour can be a surprise.

This programme was inspired by presenter Julia Eisner's vigil at her mother's bedside.

"I sat with my sisters for two and a half days. Actually we didn't sit, after the first hour, we made a cup of tea, we made phone calls, but what else were we supposed to do? My mother was unconscious and we'd been told she was going to die. We didn't know if we were allowed to go home for the night, or go out for lunch. We were worried about missing it, but what was 'it'?"

This is not something people talk about much.

But in this programme, people talk frankly about that taboo subject - describing their own experiences of watching an elderly parent die and how it feels hour after hour, day after day.

Interviewees include composer Sally Beamish, who composed a piece of music which sustained her during that time, and artist George Shaw, who drew his father during his death.

This is a moving programme about the search to find meaning during that final vigil, when even the mundane can become transformed into something beautiful.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 20:30 Analysis (b081lf8d)
How Did We Save the Ozone Layer?

On 30 June this year, a study was released in one of the world's top scientific journals. It explained how a group of scientists who had been measuring the amount of ozone in the stratosphere had made a startling observation: the hole in the ozone layer had shrunk. Here, they said, was the first clear evidence that the ozone layer had begun to heal. So how did this happen?

Helena Merriman tells a story that involves dogged scientific endeavour, the burgeoning green movement of the 1980s and the signing of what has been described as the most successful treaty ever created.

Producers: Lucy Proctor and Hannah Sander.

MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b080t7df)
Cricket

When Brett Westwood is invited to stroll around the streets of London with a 'singing cricket' as a companion he is following a tradition which can be traced back over a thousand years ago to before the Tang Dynasty in China when people kept crickets in cages and enjoyed their songs. This custom began in the Royal Courts when the Emperor's concubines placed caged crickets near their pillows so they could enjoy the songs during the night. The practise was soon taken up by local people who carried crickets around in tiny cages and in London, Brett meets Lisa Hall, a sound artist who has brought the tradition right up to date with a tiny audio player fitted with a set of speakers that are small enough to be concealed in a pocket. As Lisa explains the effect is like wearing 'a perfume' of song which masks the ugly urban sounds. Could this audio trend catch on? Producer Sarah Blunt.

MON 21:30 Start the Week (b081ld2r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b081l7zw)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b081l7zy)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b081lf8g)
Days Without End, Episode 6

A new novel by the Irish author and twice Man Booker Prize finalist Sebastian Barry.

Thomas McNulty recounts how he, having fled Ireland when orphaned during the Great Famine, made his way across America as part of the U.S. Cavalry. With his long-time friend and companion John Cole, Thomas witnesses the birth of America - from the atrocities committed against the Native Americans to the horrors of the Civil War - and, ultimately, finds his own family and identity.

MON 23:00 Book at Bedtime (b081lf8j)
Days Without End, Episode 7

A new novel by the Irish author and twice Man Booker Prize finalist Sebastian Barry.

Thomas McNulty recounts how he, having fled Ireland when orphaned during the Great Famine, made his way across America as part of the U.S. Cavalry. With his long-time friend and companion John Cole, Thomas witnesses the birth of America - from the atrocities committed against the Native Americans to the horrors of the Civil War - and, ultimately, finds his own family and identity.

MON 23:15 Clap Clap: A Brief History of Applause (b07lffnh)
Simon Callow explores one of the earliest and most universal systems people have used to interact with each other - the clapping of hands.

Applause in the ancient world was acclamation. But it was also communication. An early form of mass media, connecting people to each other and to their leaders - instantly, visually and, of course, audibly.

Applause today is much the same. In the studio, in the theatre, in places where people become publics, we still smack our palms together to show our appreciation - to create, in cavernous spaces, connection.

But we're also reinventing applause for a world where there are, technically, no hands. We clap for each others' tweets, we Like, we link and we share content to amplify the noise it makes.

Clapping was formalised, in Western culture at least, in the theatre. During the Roman Empire when theatre and politics merged, one of the chief methods politicians used to evaluate their standing with the people was by gauging the greetings they got when they entered the arena. In later times of course there came the role of the Claquer, hired to clap at the right times during a performance.

The programme concludes with an account of how applause is being reinvented by the digital age. With the help of trend forecaster Faith Popcorn (who coined the term cocooning in the 1990s) Simon explores how we have become an Audience of One - and what this means for applause.

This is the story of how we liked things before we Liked things.

Presenter: Simon Callow
Contributors: Megan Garber, Ian McMillan, Llyr Williams, Peter Jones, Faith Popcorn and Dr Richard Mann.
Producer: Llinos Jones

A Terrier production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b081lf8l)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


TUESDAY 08 NOVEMBER 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b081l81n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b081ld2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b081l81q)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b081l81s)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b081l81v)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b081l81x)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b0834wsy)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Claire Campbell Smith.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b081l81z)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mj8ln)
Magpie

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the magpie. Magpies have always had a rascally streetwise image. They featured in anti-theft campaigns on television in the 1980s, and long before that, their kleptomaniac tendencies were celebrated by Rossini in his opera, 'The Thieving Magpie'. Their pied plumage isn't just black and white, but gleams with iridescent greens, blues and purples.

TUE 06:00 Today (b082q27f)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (b081lkkj)
Kwame Anthony Appiah: Mistaken Identities, Culture

The philosopher and cultural theorist Kwame Anthony Appiah says the idea of "Western civilization" or "Western culture" is a mistaken one and that we should abandon it.

He uncovers the history of the idea from its roots at the time of the Crusades to its modern incarnation in the second half of the 20th century. However, we have very little culturally in common with our forebears in say the England of Chaucer's time. And indeed much of the knowledge supposedly at the heart of Western civilisation was actually transmitted via Islamic scholarship. No-one, he argues, can claim exclusive ownership of culture. "The values European humanists like to espouse belong just as easily to an African or an Asian who takes them up with enthusiasm as to a European," he says.

The lecture is recorded in front of an audience at New York University in Appiah's adopted home city. The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley

The producer is Jim Frank.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b081l821)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0824vdz)
Jezebel, Episode 2

Jezebel by Irène Némirovsky
Translated by Sandra Smith
Dramatised by Ellen Dryden
Gladys, an older woman, obsessed with her lost youth and looks, has been imprisoned for murdering a younger man. She delves into key moments in her past that led to the murder. Early 1900's, 18 year old Gladys, is left alone with her cousin's husband, Claude, and discovers for the first time her power as a woman.

Produced and Directed by Pauline Harris.

TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b081lkl2)
Raven

Our relationship with ravens can be traced back many thousands of years. According to Norse mythology the god Odin had two ravens named Huginn (meaning 'thought') and Munnin (meaning 'memory'). He would send them out each day to fly around the world and then return to perch on his shoulders and tell him of what they had seen and heard. With its black colouration, croaking calls and diet of carrion, the raven has long been considered a bird of ill omen , but this over-simplifies our relationship with these highly successful birds as Brett Westwood discovers when he eavesdrops on their conversations at night, meets a man who has reared a raven and talks to a scientist who has long been fascinated by their powers of intelligence. Ravens are more like us than you might like to think. Producer Sarah Blunt.

TUE 11:30 Steve Earle's Songwriting Bootcamp (b081lkl6)
Legendary country singer-songwriter Steve Earle unveils the secrets of composing a great song. Every year he runs a four-day intensive training session in the Catskill Mountains in upstate New York. Journalist and aspiring songwriter Hugh Levinson joined around 100 other would-be balladeers to see what they can learn both from Steve and his fellow teacher, Shawn Colvin. Listen in to stories of dreaming, methadone, guns, jail, death and betrayal. All the good stuff.

Producer: Smita Patel.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b081l823)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 In Therapy (b081lklg)
Series 2, Charles

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. We join Susie in her consulting room, where she meets a different client each day.

Today, Susie meets Charles. He's in his 50s and a partner in a successful advertising agency, which is undergoing a merger with a new media company.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed Jerusalem) and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learned about the characters' lives, backgrounds, and reasons for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on concealed microphones at Susie's surgery.

Throughout the encounters in this series, we get to hear the therapist at work, experiencing what it's like to eavesdrop on the most intimate of exchanges.

To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, giving us an insight into her role as a therapist and shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Psychotherapist: Susie Orbach
Charles: Simon Shepherd
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b081l825)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b081l827)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b081l829)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 Our Man in China: The Diaries (b081lklp)
A Servant of the Crown

The British made him a baronet, the King of Denmark awarded him the Grand Cross of the Order of the Dannebrog, the Germans gave him the Prussian Order of the Crown and the Chinese appointed him (among many other honours) an Iron Hatted Duke, but his nickname in Beijing mattered more than any of his titles; they called him, "our Hart". It was a tribute to his unique role in China's history and its relations with the West. Robert Hart lived through the death throes of a dynastic China that had existed for four thousand years, and he helped lay the foundations of the China we know today. He served as Inspector General of Maritime Customs for nearly half a century, transforming it in to an efficient well regulated organisation that helped fuel China's transformation in to a modern trading nation. Along the way he laid the foundations for a national postal service, railway, meteorological and navigation systems. Yet he is the only figure among the "foreign devils" of those days remembered with affection. He used his position to serve Chinese, not just British, interests. Hart knew everyone and saw everything. His diaries are an intimate and frank chronicle of his life during one of the most turbulent periods in China's history. The Robert Hart you find in his journals is also a figure of our age. He was tormented by conscience, and much given to introspection - endlessly debating faith and morals with his friends and himself. As a young man he was incurably sentimental and hopelessly addicted to sex and female affection. The dairies have only been partially translated and only published in academic circles. This is the first time extracts from Sir Robert Hart's diaries have been broadcast. Today Sir Robert arrives in Ningbo and discovers a world of brothels and opium.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b081lddl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Drama (b081lklw)
Flood Minimum

England has been ravaged by floods. Father Ford, a young vulnerable priest, has been sent by his Bishop to a particularly bleak and windswept part of England to assess the viability of continuing worship in a grim little village church, flood-ravaged and isolated. There he meets what seems to be the hamlet's one remaining resident, Perry. But, as time passes, the two men start to believe they are not alone after all.

A profound, poetic and haunting multi-layered drama by Neil Noon, a dramatist new to radio, starring Lee Ingleby as Perry and Blake Ritson as Ford.

Directed by Gordon House
A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b081jn4m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]

TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b081lkm1)
Putting the Fizz Back into Planet Earth

Can we find a use for all that pesky climate-changing carbon dioxide? If we can turn excess CO2 into something useful we might just be able to slow down the rate of global warming. It's a dream shared by lots of scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs.

At the ACI Carbon Utilisation conference in Lyon, Tom meets the Germans turning CO2 into a fuel and the French researchers aiming to mimic nature's photosynthesis process. In Oxford he talks to a company making fertiliser from waste and a chemist creating innovative plastics whilst in Avonmouth he sees CO2 transformed into concrete blocks that are already being used in house building around the country.

Producer: Alasdair Cross.

TUE 16:00 Law in Action (b081lkmf)
Brexit in the High Court

Joshua Rozenberg examines the ruling on the Brexit legal challenge at the High Court

Producer: Matt Bardo.

TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b081lkmp)
Sally Phillips and Julia Donaldson

Bridget Jones and Clare in the Community actress Sally Phillips and Gruffalo author Julia Donaldson talk about books they love with Harriett Gilbert. A surprising theme of angels emerges as Sally chooses John Irving's A Prayer for Owen Meany, Julia Donaldson's selection is The Visiting Angel by Paul Wilson, and Harriet picks Outline by Rachel Cusk. A scene in one of the books prompts Sally to talk about why she decided to become a comedian. Producer Sally Heaven.

TUE 17:00 PM (b081l82c)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b081l82f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b081lkn2)
Series 11, Episode 6

Comedy. The curmudgeonly author takes listeners through his week.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b081lkn4)
Justin comes clean, and Alistair has company.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b081l82h)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0824vdz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b081lkn6)
London Calling

With the Government claiming to lead the way in plans to crack down on global corruption, how come so little is being done in Britain to tackle the vast sums of money allegedly laundered through the UK by corrupt foreign officials and international crime gangs?

Allan Urry investigates claims that not enough is being done by the UK to tackle the laundering of corrupt assets or to assist nations who ask for help in getting their money back. The programme also hears complaints that British law enforcement is refusing to investigate cases.

Reporter: Allan Urry
Producer: David Lewis.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b081l82k)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (b081lkn8)
How Are Memories Formed?

The brain has billions of neurons interconnected by trillions of synapses. It is at these synapses where memories are made.

Ground-breaking research by Timothy Bliss, Graham Collingridge and Richard Morris has transformed our understanding of memory, and offered new insights into devastating effects of failing memory. This year they won the Brain Prize, the world's most valuable award in brain research. Claudia Hammond meets them in front of an audience at London's Royal Institution to discuss how memories are made.

TUE 21:30 Today in Parliament (b081lknb)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.

TUE 22:00 America Decides (b0824l9n)
James Naughtie and Bridget Kendall host coverage of the US presidential election as the results are announced.


WEDNESDAY 09 NOVEMBER 2016

WED 05:57 Prayer for the Day (b083bvk1)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Rev Dr Rob Marshall.

WED 06:00 Today (b082sy2w)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Midweek (b081lpj1)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b081lpj3)
The Apple Orchard, Episode 2

Writer Pete Brown follows the cycle of an orchard's year to illuminate the hand-in-hand history of humanity and our most familiar fruit.

From its origins in Kazakhstan, its spread along the old spice roads and into mythology, the apple is now an all-year round supermarket staple. Changing consumer tastes, and supermarket insistence upon 'perfect fruit', places huge stress upon growers. It also affects the ways in which scientists develop new apple varieties - a typical apple test trial can take twenty to twenty-five years, when, after vigorous testing, of the initial twenty-thousand seeds planted an average of six new commercial apple cultivars will emerge. But will the public like one them enough to change from buying Gala, Jazz or Pink Lady?

Pete Brown has written several books on food and drink, including Man Walks into a Pub, Three Sheets to the Wind, and Shakespeare's Local. He is a judge for the Great Taste Awards and the Radio 4 Food and Farming Awards, and is a frequent contributor to the Food Programme.

Written and read by Pete Brown

Abridged by Laurence Wareing

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b081l84t)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b0824xcp)
Jezebel, Episode 3

Jezebel by Irène Némirovsky
Translated by Sandra Smith
Dramatised by Ellen Dryden
In 1930's France, Gladys, obsessed with her looks and lost youth, has been jailed for murdering a younger man. She delves into key moments in her past that led to the murder. Aged 40, Gladys is having an affair with Sir Mark and for the first time in her life she is rejected by a man.

Produced and Directed by Pauline Harris.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b081lpz5)
Urvesh and Mohammed - Walking Is Next to Godliness

Fi Glover with a conversation between friends from different religious backgrounds who share a love of nature and the outdoors. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 The Vigil (b081lf8b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Gloomsbury (b05wz0kk)
Series 3, A Slanging Match Made in Heaven

Vera Sackcloth-Vest has promised her husband Henry, that her affair with Venus Traduces is at an end - but when Venus writes Vera a secret billet-doux, Vera is powerless to resist and makes hurried plans to meet Venus in London.

However, before she can leave Sizzlinghurst, Lady Utterline Amoral and Lytton Scratchy arrive unexpectedly to take a tour of the garden. Keen to see them leave, Vera's patience is put to the test in the face of Lady Utterline's snobbishness, insisting that Vera should follow her example and hold an annual garden party to raise money for the Red Cross.

Meanwhile, Henry is chased round the sofa by Lytton who, as an irrepressible gossip, lets slip that Vera and Venus are back together. His suspicions now confirmed, Henry insists on accompanying Vera down to London.

Produced by Jamie Rix
A Little Brother production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b081l84w)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 In Therapy (b081qxpv)
Series 2, Richard and Louise

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. We join Susie in her consulting room, where she meets a different client each day.

Today, Susie meets Richard and Louise. They are new parents struggling to make things work.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed Jerusalem) and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learned about the characters' lives, backgrounds, and reasons for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on concealed microphones at Susie's surgery.

Throughout the encounters in this series, we get to hear the therapist at work, experiencing what it's like to eavesdrop on the most intimate of exchanges.

To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, giving us an insight into her role as a therapist and shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Psychotherapist: Susie Orbach
Louise: Liz White
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b081l84y)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b081l850)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b081l852)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 Our Man in China: The Diaries (b081qxpx)
The Inspector General

Sir Robert is summoned to Peking to be appointed head of the Imperial Chinese Maritime Customs Service and declares his aim to 'do good work for China in every possible direction'.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b081lkn4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Drama (b081qyxf)
Michael & Boris: The Two Brexiteers

The story of one of the greatest political dramas of the age, staring Alistair McGowan as Boris Johnson and Luke Kempner as Michael Gove.

"The last thing I want," David Cameron said, "is for this to become some kind of Tory psycho-drama..."

David Morley's play is a lively tale of hubris, ambition and betrayal between two old friends. Very different characters who are driven apart by events and their own weaknesses.

The story spans the period from February to the end of June 2016 - from Boris Johnson's conversion to Leave, to his announcement that he will not stand for the Conservative leadership. Drawing on a range of sources and accounts - not always all in complete agreement - the play explores how Johnson and Gove might have managed to snatch personal defeat from the jaws of a collective triumph.


Written by David Morley
Directed by Dirk Maggs
A Perfectly Normal production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b081qyxh)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.

WED 15:30 All in the Mind (b081lkn8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b081qyxk)
Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b081l854)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b081l856)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b081l858)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 Rich Hall's (US Election) Breakdown (b081qz1f)
Episode 4

Multi award-winning comedian and US Citizen Rich Hall follows the closing stages of the US Presidential race, offering an acerbic look at the electoral system and the two candidates vying for the most important job in the world.

A combination of stand-up, sketch and interview, Rich Hall's (US Election) Breakdown broadcasts live from the fictional IBBC network in Washington to the whole of the United States.

Rich and his producer Nick Doody take calls from every corner of the United States to hear the concerns of voters, offering their take on the issues troubling the American electorate.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b081qz1h)
Johnny seeks out Freddie, and David lends an ear.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b081l85b)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0824xcp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b081qz1k)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Claire Fox, Melanie Phillips, Anne McElvoy and Matthew Taylor.

WED 20:45 Four Thought (b081qz1m)
Property Ownership

Chris Pierson makes the case for a radical rethinking of private property.

Arguing that we are currently in the midst of a property crisis, Chris challenges us to go back to basics, to ask whether 'property is theft' and to consider whether there might be another way of allocating property.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b081lkm1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]

WED 21:30 Midweek (b081lpj1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b081l85d)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b081l85g)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b081qztr)
Days Without End, Episode 8

A new novel by the Irish author and twice Man Booker Prize finalist Sebastian Barry.

Thomas McNulty recounts how he, having fled Ireland when orphaned during the Great Famine, made his way across America as part of the U.S. Cavalry. With his long-time friend and companion John Cole, Thomas witnesses the birth of America - from the atrocities committed against the Native Americans to the horrors of the Civil War - and, ultimately, finds his own family and identity.

WED 23:00 Dr John Cooper Clarke at the BBC (b081qztt)
Textiles

The Bard of Salford performs a mixture of classic and previously unheard poems, recorded at the BBC's Radio Theatre in London.

Ep 2 - Textiles

Set List:

To a Tikki Shirt
Smooth Operetta
George
Who Stole Bongo's Trousers?
21 Gun Salute Suit

Written and performed by Dr John Cooper Clarke
Introduction by Johnny Green
Produced by Joe Nunnery
A BBC Studios Production.

WED 23:15 Jigsaw (b04fc70t)
Series 2, Episode 1

Award-winning stand-up comedians Dan Antopolski, Tom Craine and Nat Luurtsema combine their talents to piece together a rapid-fire and surreal sketch show.

Produced by Colin Anderson.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b081qztw)
News from Westminster.


THURSDAY 10 NOVEMBER 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b081l875)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b081lpj3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b081l877)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b081l879)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b081l87c)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b081l87f)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b083c3jp)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Claire Campbell Smith.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b081l87h)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dwsb7)
Jackdaw

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the jackdaw. Jackdaws are scavengers with a reputation for stealing shiny or glittering objects. Martin Hughes-Games tells the story of a tame jackdaw he had as a child, which became a very colourful member of the family, with her very own store of costume jewellery to play with.

THU 06:00 Today (b082sy3l)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 In Our Time (b081r260)
The Fighting Temeraire

This image: Joseph Mallord William Turner, The Fighting Temeraire, 1839 (c) The National Gallery, London

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss "The Fighting Temeraire", one of Turner's greatest works and the one he called his 'darling'. It shows one of the most famous ships of the age, a hero of Trafalgar, being towed up the Thames to the breakers' yard, sail giving way to steam. Turner displayed this masterpiece to a public which, at the time, was deep in celebration of the Temeraire era, with work on Nelson's Column underway, and it was an immediate success, with Thackeray calling the painting 'a national ode'.

With

Susan Foister
Curator of Early Netherlandish, German and British Painting at the National Gallery

David Blayney Brown
Manton Curator of British Art 1790-1850 at Tate Britain

and

James Davey
Curator of Naval History at the National Maritime Museum

Producer: Simon Tillotson.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b081t6x1)
The Apple Orchard, Episode 3

Writer Pete Brown follows the cycle of an orchard's year to illuminate the hand-in-hand history of humanity and our most familiar fruit.

From its origins in Kazakhstan, its spread along the old spice roads and into mythology, the apple is now an all-year round supermarket staple. Customer demand means that the fruit industry must keep up-to-date with new trends and scientific discoveries. To see some of the work being done, Pete visits East Malling Research Station in Kent, the UK's biggest and most influential horticultural research station, which has been operating for over a hundred years. Then, keen to tune back into the natural rhythms of an orchard, he heads to Somerset to pick apples at Avalon Orchard, on the slopes of Glastonbury Tor.

Written and read by Pete Brown

Abridged by Laurence Wareing

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b081l87k)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b0824yvb)
Jezebel, Episode 4

Jezebel by Irène Némirovsky
Translated by Sandra Smith
Dramatised by Ellen Dryden
In 1930's France, Gladys, obsessed with her looks and lost youth, has been jailed for murdering a younger man. She delves into key moments in her past that led to the murder. When she discovers her daughter, Marie-Therese is in love, she is vehemently opposed to her desire to marry. This leads to devastating action for Marie-Therese.

Produced and Directed by Pauline Harris.

THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b081t6x3)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

THU 11:30 The French Culture War (b081t6x5)
A year after last November's terror attacks in Paris, journalist Nick Fraser explores the deeper culture war taking place between a new generation of French Muslims and the defenders of hard-line secular Republicanism in France.

As a country and a civilization, France prides itself on its own model of Frenchness - non-ethnic, republican, integrationist, based on legality and citizenship and, in cultural terms, emphatically secular.

It's based on a concept unique to France - laïcité.

But aversion to laïcité is now widespread among banlieue and Muslim young, and it would seem that integration on the scale advocated by its supporters hasn't happened. By common consent, French secularism has hidden the country's real and growing race and culture divisions - some argue it's exacerbated them.

The government takes matters seriously enough to be spending millions on a new programme of civic education designed explicitly to counter apathy and hostility to republican values, and promote secularism. This summer, PM Manuel Valls called for a pact. "Our country must prove boldly to the world that Islam is compatible with democracy," he told the press. Meanwhile the hard right talk of the Grand Remplacement - effectively a cultural takeover and an 'Islamisation' of France.

Even in mainstream cultural and political debate many Muslims feel laïcité and secularism are being targeted specifically against them - from the ban on the veil in public space to the burkini row earlier this summer. Secularism is being used as a weapon of anti-Islamic sentiment, they argue, even as a cover for racism. Liberal defenders of laïcité of point out that this is a political misuse of the idea but not its truth - arguing that separation of religion from the public space remains necessary and desirable in France.

Talking to writers, artists and cultural activists Muslim and secular, Nick Fraser asks if the French secular idea can survive.

Producer: Simon Hollis
A Brook Lapping production for the BBC.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b081l87m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 In Therapy (b081t6x7)
Series 2, Natalie

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. We join Susie in her consulting room, where she meets a different client each day.

Today, Susie meets Natalie. She works for an upmarket estate agent. Her faith is very important to her.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed Jerusalem) and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learned about the characters' lives, backgrounds, and reasons for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on concealed microphones at Susie's surgery.

Throughout the encounters in this series, we get to hear the therapist at work, experiencing what it's like to eavesdrop on the most intimate of exchanges.

To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, giving us an insight into her role as a therapist and shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Psychotherapist: Susie Orbach
Natalie: Vinette Robinson
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b081l87p)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b081l87r)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b081l87t)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 Our Man in China: The Diaries (b081t6x9)
The Heart of Empire

Sir Robert is called in to help with the fight against the Taiping rebels and decides it is time to get himself a British wife.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b081qz1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Drama (b081t6xc)
Superstar Me

By Jessica Mitic

Laura's come to Thailand for the parties and the selfies, while Mike's here for the culture. They make unlikely travelling companions. And before long Laura's quest for online approval lands them in hot water.

A romantic comedy about travel, social media and living in the moment. Starring Gwyneth Keyworth (Misfits), Liam Williams (Together) and William Thomas (Gavin and Stacey). Jessica Mitic (née Brown) is a graduate of the Royal Court Young Writers programme. Her debut play Chocolate Bounty won the Write Now New Writing Competition and premiered at The Brockley Jack Studio Theatre to great reviews. Jessica then won the competition for the second year running with her play Skinhead. Her first play for Radio 4, Lost or Stolen, was part of the Original British Dramatists season, broadcast in 2014.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.

THU 15:00 Open Country (b081t6xf)
Snowdonia Marathon

Helen Mark follows Snowdonia Marathon and meets some of the people tackling this challenging course. Starting and finishing in Llanberis, the race encircles Wales' highest mountain of Snowdon, and rises to over a thousand feet in places.

Andy John, Bishop of Bangor is taking on the Marathon for the third time, and he describes the sensation from running the course as being lost in the landscape but found in yourself. But he's dreading the twenty-two mile mark when he'll reach the 1200ft climb at Bwlch y Groes or "gap of the cross", before descending back into Llanberis for the finish.

Helen stops at the ten-mile mark to meet Arwyn Owen at Hafod y Llan farm to find out how Hydro-Electric Power is the new cash crop in this rugged environment. She also meets Paul Owen at Llechwedd Caverns to discover how the area became the slate-mining capital of the world. Both Paul's Father and Grandfather worked in the mine, but Paul became a musician and serenades Helen on his ukulele, three hundred feet below the surface.

Helen hands out water and energy gels with volunteers from the Snowdonia Society at the halfway point in Beddgelert and hears about Esme Kirby, the remarkable woman who set-up the organisation, before returning to Llanberis to greet a weary Andy John as he's crosses the finishing line.

Producer: Toby Field.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b081tdp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Bookclub (b081tdpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b081tdpf)
Napoleon and I

Historian Kevin Brownlow tells Francine Stock about his 50 year quest to restore Abel Gance's silent masterpiece Napoleon to its six hour glory, and why the search for missing scenes still continues even though the film is about to be released on DVD for the very first time.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b081l87w)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b081l87y)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b081l880)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 The Fair Intellectual Club (b081tdph)
A Rendezvous with Mr Voltaire

Lucy Porter's sitcom takes us to Edinburgh in the early 18th Century. Monsieur Voltaire (Lewis Macleod) has been thrown out of France for immorality and has come to see his old friend Robert (Simon Donaldson). He trades philosophical maxims with Ishbel (Caroline Deyga) and the fellow members of her secret society - Alison (Jessica Hardwick) and Marjory (Samara Maclaren).

The scholarly young ladies teach him the value of free speech and a brand new use for a broom handle.

Music by Aly Macrae
Director: Marilyn Imrie
Producer: Gordon Kennedy
An Absolutely production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b081tdpk)
Rob is forced to rethink, and Pip is made to be guinea pig.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b081l882)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b0824yvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 Law in Action (b081lkmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Tuesday]

THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b081tdpm)
The Future of the Car Industry

Business discussion show presented by Evan Davis.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b081l87w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 In Our Time (b081r260)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b081l884)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b081l886)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b081tdpp)
Days Without End, Episode 9

A new novel by the Irish author and twice Man Booker Prize finalist Sebastian Barry.

Thomas McNulty recounts how he, having fled Ireland when orphaned during the Great Famine, made his way across America as part of the U.S. Cavalry. With his long-time friend and companion John Cole, Thomas witnesses the birth of America - from the atrocities committed against the Native Americans to the horrors of the Civil War - and, ultimately, finds his own family and identity.

THU 23:00 Rich Hall's (US Election) Breakdown (b081qz1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:30 on Wednesday]

THU 23:30 A Portrait Of... (b07ffhf1)
Imtiaz Dharker

We follow artist Fiona Graham-Mackay as she paints the portrait of poet, artist and documentary film-maker Imtiaz Dharker.

Born in Pakistan and raised in Glasgow, Imtiaz was awarded the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry in 2014. She writes about freedom, cultural intolerance, gender politics, love and loss. Fellow poet Carol Ann Duffy has said, "If there were to be a World Laureate, then for me the role could only be filled by Imtiaz Dharker."

Fiona Graham-Mackay has painted hundreds of portraits, including Seamus Heaney and Sir Andrew Motion. Drawing is, she says, "the flow of life, the soul of life," and "you have to fall a little in love with your subject".

It's a revealing, intimate experience, peeling away the layers to capture the essence of the sitter as seen through the artist's eye. And in this, conversations meander in unexpected places.

Features readings of 'The Conversation' and 'Invisible' from Over the Moon; 'This room' from I Speak For the Devil, both published by Bloodaxe Books. With permission.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.


FRIDAY 11 NOVEMBER 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b081l89t)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b081t6x1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b081l89w)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b081l89y)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b081l8b0)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b081l8b2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b083cg9z)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Claire Campbell Smith.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b081l8b4)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkh4k)
Goldcrest

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Goldcrest. Goldcrests are, by a whisker, our smallest bird - roughly nine centimetres long and the weight of a ten pence coin. They migrate in October and November from Continental Europe and some people used to believe that because they arrived around the same time as wintering woodcock they'd travelled on the waders' backs and the tiny goldcrest became known as the 'woodcock pilot'.

FRI 06:00 Today (b082sy4h)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b081tflr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b081tflt)
The Apple Orchard, Episode 4

Writer Pete Brown follows the cycle of an apple orchard's year to better understand the hand-in-hand history of humanity and our most familiar fruit. From its origins in Kazakhstan, its spread along the old spice roads and into mythology, the apple is now an all-year round supermarket staple.

As the season turns from autumn to winter, Pete discovers the importance of cold dry weather and dormancy in the life cycle of an apple tree; then travels to Herefordshire to learn the careful art of tree pruning.

Written and read by Pete Brown

Abridged by Laurence Wareing

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b081l8b6)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b08250xy)
Jezebel, Episode 5

Jezebel by Irène Némirovsky
Translated by Sandra Smith
Dramatised by Ellen Dryden

In 1930's France, Gladys, obsessed with her looks and lost youth, has been jailed for murdering a younger man. She delves into her past and the mysterious events that led to the murder are revealed.

Produced and Directed by Pauline Harris.

FRI 11:00 Armistice Day Silence (b081tgsv)
The traditional two-minute silence to mark Armistice Day.

FRI 11:04 Recycled Radio (b081tflw)
Series 5, Magic

A fresh take on magic in the company of cartoonists Gerald Scarfe. We have conjurors, illusionists, prestidigitators and sleight of hand artists. Mountebanks, magi and mentalists. Conmen, snake oil salesman and politicians. Quite a lot of politicians.

The quickness of the hand deceives the eye as we chop, loop, scratch, mix and mash the radio archive to produce something from nothing.

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.

FRI 11:30 My Teenage Diary (b04vkgls)
Series 6, Alex Horne

Comedian Alex Horne's teenage diary focuses on his 1997 gap year, which he spent teaching English in China. But looking back, Alex wishes he'd spent more time teaching grammar, and less time worrying about girls and sampling the local nightlife.

Produced by Harriet Jaine
A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b081l8b8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 In Therapy (b081tgsx)
Series 2, John 1

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. We join Susie in her consulting room, where she meets a different client each day.

Today, Susie meets John. He is a retired railway worker who has always been closely involved with union affairs. In a previous meeting he has told Susie that he loves her.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed Jerusalem) and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learned about the characters' lives, backgrounds, and reasons for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on concealed microphones at Susie's surgery.

Throughout the encounters in this series, we get to hear the therapist at work, experiencing what it's like to eavesdrop on the most intimate of exchanges.

To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, giving us an insight into her role as a therapist and shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Psychotherapist: Susie Orbach
John: Peter Wight
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b081l8bb)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b081l8bd)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b081l8bg)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 Our Man in China: The Diaries (b081tgsz)
The Boxer Uprising

Sir Robert organises the defence of Peking against the Boxer rebels and issues some prophetic warnings to the west about the way it has treated China.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b081tdpk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Tommies (b081thls)
11 November 1916

Tommies celebrates the women combatants and drivers of the Serbian Army, in this story by Jonathan Ruffle.

Doctor Celestine de Tullio, like Flora Sandes, has gone from doctoring to fighting in Serbia, joining the legendary campaign of the Serbian Army to reclaim its homeland, in which 60% of the male population died.

Today she's commanding an offensive up a near-vertical mountain deep in snow. The military objective is at the top of the mountain. But Celestine has another target in her sights.

Meticulously based on unit war diaries and eye-witness accounts, each episode of TOMMIES traces one real day at war, exactly 100 years ago.

And through it all, we'll follow the fortunes of Mickey Bliss and his fellow signallers, from the Lahore Division of the British Indian Army. They are the cogs in an immense machine, one which connects situations across the whole theatre of the war, over four long years.

Series created by Jonathan Ruffle
Producers: David Hunter, Jonquil Panting, Jonathan Ruffle
Director: Jonquil Panting.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b081thlv)
West Midlands

Eric Robson and the panel are in the West Midlands. Answering the questions this week are Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew and Christine Walkden.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant producer: Hester Cant

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 The Transit of Mercury (b081tjh2)
A family heirloom provides the spark for a journey of self-discovery and an unexpected literary inheritance in this new story from acclaimed Northern Irish dramatist Anne Devlin.

Anne Devlin is a playwright, short story writer and screenwriter from Belfast. Her film and TV credits include 'Vigo', 'Titanic Town', 'The Venus de Milo Instead' 'Naming the Names' and dramatisations of 'Wuthering Heights' and 'The Rainbow', while her stage plays include 'After Easter', 'Heartlanders' and 'Ourselves Alone'. Anne adapted some of her screenplays for radio 'After Easter' (1997), 'Naming The Names' (1986) and 'The Long March' (1986).

Writer ..... Anne Devlin
Reader ..... Julia Dearden
Producer ..... Heather Larmour.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b0829dlw)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 More or Less (b081tjh4)
Tim Harford investigates the numbers in the news.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b081tjhc)
Christian and Nat - Sea Rowing

Fi Glover presents introduces a conversation between a couple who spend their leisure time rowing in Swansea Bay. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b081l8bj)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b081l8bl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The Now Show (b081tjhg)
Series 49, Episode 2

Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis present the week via topical stand-up and sketches.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b081tjhk)
Justin shows his cards, and Jazzer makes a point.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b081l8bn)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b08250xy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b081tkm9)
Emily Thornberry MP, Sir Nigel Sheinwald

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from the Cambridge Union Society with a panel including Emily Thornberry MP and Sir Nigel Sheinwald.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b081tkmc)
America Votes

Broadcasters reflect on the US presidential election.

FRI 21:00 Incarnations: India in 50 Lives (b083chtx)
Incarnations: India in 50 Lives - Omnibus, Akbar, Malik Ambar, Shivaji, Nainsukh

An omnibus edition of Professor Sunil Khilnani's audio portraits of figures who have shaped Indian history over two thousand years. Today he explores three lives from the world of power, politics and kingship in late medieval India - and another figure, more humbly born, an artist whose paintings reflected in a unique, intimate way, the life of a north Indian prince.

He begins in the 16th century with the greatest ruler of the Mughal Empire. Akbar showed no mercy in his pursuit of power and secured his gains with an iron fist. And yet he seems to have grasped the diversity of beliefs and culture across the land he ruled and propagated his own system of religious faith known as Din-I-Lahi.

On the Deccan plateau of central southern India Akbar - and later his son Jahangir - met their match from an unexpected source: an Ethiopian warlord who had originally come to India as a slave. His name was Malik Ambar but Jahangir had another name for him: The Dark-Fated One.

Malik Ambar's guerrilla tactics would be adopted and refined half a century later - again in the hill country of Maharashtra - by Sunil Khilnani's next subject. Shivaji was a warrior king who's still finding new incarnations as a symbol of regional pride and identity - and most recently as an inspiration for would-be entrepreneurs.

Sunil Khilnani also profiles Nainsukh, the 18th century artist whose intimate and engaging portraits of a prince's life created a new vision for Indian art. This is the story of two men: one a painter with a unique talent to express humanity and individuality; the other a prince who unselfconsciously gave himself to the artist as subject.

Producer: Jeremy Grange.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b081l8bq)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b081l8bs)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b081tkmf)
Days Without End, Episode 10

A new novel by the Irish author and twice Man Booker Prize finalist Sebastian Barry.

Thomas McNulty recounts how he, having fled Ireland when orphaned during the Great Famine, made his way across America as part of the U.S. Cavalry. With his long-time friend and companion John Cole, Thomas witnesses the birth of America - from the atrocities committed against the Native Americans to the horrors of the Civil War - and, ultimately, finds his own family and identity.

FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b081lkmp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:27 A Portrait Of... (b07gf9kx)
Lemn Sissay

In many ways a portrait painter is like a detective - looking for clues below the surface to capture the sitter's true likeness. In this programme we follow artist Fiona Graham-Mackay and her latest subject - the poet and playwright Lemn Sissay - through this sometimes emotional process.

"I feel like you've gone into me and looked out from behind my eyes."

Lemn Sissay MBE was an official poet for the London Olympics and his Landmark Poems are installed throughout Manchester and London. Born to Ethiopian parents, he was raised in Lancashire by strongly religious foster parents who, having had biological children of their own, put him into care aged 12. They told him neither they, nor any of their family, would contact him again.

On leaving care at 17, he self-published his first book of poetry while on the dole. Much of his work tells the story of his upbringing and search for his birth parents.

Fiona Graham-Mackay has painted hundreds of portraits, including Seamus Heaney and Sir Andrew Motion. "It's in the space between sentences that people reveal themselves," she says.

Recorded in Lemn's home and at the Foundling Museum in London, where Lemn is a fellow, the programme follows the portrait taking shape. It's an intimate experience, peeling away the layers to capture the essence of the sitter as seen through the artist's eye. And in this, conversations meander in unexpected places.

Features a reading of "Suitcases and Muddy Parks" from Rebel Without Applause by Lemn Sissay, published by Canongate. Used with permission.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b081tkmh)
Nazli and Mariam - The Sound of Magic

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between artists about the exciting synergy they have found in shared projects. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b081ld2w)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b081ld2w)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b0824vdz)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b0824vdz)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b0824xcp)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b0824xcp)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b0824yvb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b0824yvb)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b08250xy)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b08250xy)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b081lkmp)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b081lkmp)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b080xx1r)

A Point of View 23:50 SUN (b080xx1r)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b081tkmc)

A Portrait Of... 23:30 THU (b07ffhf1)

A Portrait Of... 23:27 FRI (b07gf9kx)

All in the Mind 21:00 TUE (b081lkn8)

All in the Mind 15:30 WED (b081lkn8)

America Decides 22:00 TUE (b0824l9n)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b080t0ph)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b081lf8d)

Annika Stranded 00:30 SUN (b048jcgg)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b080py2p)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b080xx1k)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b081tkm9)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b081jnp1)

Armistice Day Silence 11:00 FRI (b081tgsv)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b081l87w)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b081l87w)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b081l8q0)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b081l8q0)

Blue Canvas: The Artist Miles Davis 13:30 SUN (b07c2w62)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b081lf8g)

Book at Bedtime 23:00 MON (b081lf8j)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b081qztr)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b081tdpp)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b081tkmf)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b080xp2f)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b081ld2t)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b081ld2t)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b081lpj3)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b081lpj3)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b081t6x1)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b081t6x1)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b081tflt)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b081tdpc)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b081tdpc)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b081l7wg)

Clap Clap: A Brief History of Applause 23:15 MON (b07lffnh)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b081lkm1)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b081lkm1)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b081tflr)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b081tflr)

Digital Human 16:30 MON (b081ldd8)

Dr John Cooper Clarke at the BBC 23:00 WED (b081qztt)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b081jn4t)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b081tpw0)

Drama 14:15 MON (b081ld38)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b081lklw)

Drama 14:15 WED (b081qyxf)

Drama 14:15 THU (b081t6xc)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 TUE (b081lkn2)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b080py27)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b081l7z5)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b081l81z)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b081l87h)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b081l8b4)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b080t8nn)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b081lkn6)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b081ldd4)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b081ldd4)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b081qz1m)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b080py2f)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b081t6x3)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b081l7zt)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b081l82h)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b081l85b)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b081l882)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b081l8bn)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b080xx09)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b081thlv)

Gloomsbury 11:30 WED (b05wz0kk)

Gone for a Burton 16:30 SUN (b081n8mj)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b081r260)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b081r260)

In Therapy 12:04 MON (b081ld32)

In Therapy 12:04 TUE (b081lklg)

In Therapy 12:04 WED (b081qxpv)

In Therapy 12:04 THU (b081t6x7)

In Therapy 12:04 FRI (b081tgsx)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b081l82k)

Incarnations: India in 50 Lives 21:00 SAT (b082rgdb)

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Jigsaw 23:15 WED (b04fc70t)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b080xx0z)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b0829dlw)

Law in Action 16:00 TUE (b081lkmf)

Law in Action 20:00 THU (b081lkmf)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b080py32)

Mark Thomas: The Manifesto 19:15 SUN (b01s0qnc)

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Money Box 12:04 SAT (b081jn4r)

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Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b081qz1k)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b081tq55)

More or Less 16:30 FRI (b081tjh4)

My Teenage Diary 11:30 FRI (b04vkgls)

Natural Histories: Short Stories 19:45 SUN (b081tq31)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b080t7df)

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News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b080py21)

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News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b080py23)

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News 13:00 SAT (b080py2m)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b081tpvw)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b080wbwy)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b081t6xf)

Our Man in China: The Diaries 13:45 MON (b081ld34)

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Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b081l7wz)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b080xyg0)

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Profile 19:00 SAT (b081jn5j)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b081jn5j)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b081jn5j)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b081tdp9)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b081tdp9)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b081tdp9)

Recycled Radio 11:04 FRI (b081tflw)

Rich Hall's (US Election) Breakdown 18:30 WED (b081qz1f)

Rich Hall's (US Election) Breakdown 23:00 THU (b081qz1f)

Round Britain Quiz 23:00 SAT (b080r366)

Round Britain Quiz 15:00 MON (b081ldd2)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b080py2c)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b080py34)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b080py1x)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b081l7vr)

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Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b080py1v)

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Short Cuts 16:00 MON (b081ldd6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b080py30)

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Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b081l7w0)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b080t7dh)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b081ld2r)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b081ld2r)

Steve Earle's Songwriting Bootcamp 11:30 TUE (b081lkl6)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b081l7wd)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b081l7w6)

TED Radio Hour 23:00 SUN (b081tq33)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b081l7wj)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b081ld36)

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The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b080xk99)

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The Fair Intellectual Club 18:30 THU (b081tdph)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b081tdpf)

The French Culture War 11:30 THU (b081t6x5)

The Headline Ballads 23:30 SAT (b07mwqfr)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b081jn4m)

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The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b081tpvy)

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The Media Show 16:30 WED (b081l854)

The Now Show 12:30 SAT (b080xx1d)

The Now Show 18:30 FRI (b081tjhg)

The Reith Lectures 22:15 SAT (b080t63w)

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The Rivals 11:30 MON (b081ld30)

The Transit of Mercury 15:45 FRI (b081tjh2)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (b080t0pc)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b081lddb)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b081ld2y)

The Vigil 20:00 MON (b081lf8b)

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The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b081l7wq)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b081l7zy)

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Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b080w5pr)

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Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b081lf8l)

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Week in Westminster 11:00 SAT (b081jn4p)

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Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b080py2r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b081l7zc)

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World at One 13:00 MON (b081l7zm)

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You and Yours 12:15 MON (b081l7zh)

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