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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 15 OCTOBER 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b07x19sc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b07y9rtv)
The Invention of Angela Carter, Being Loved

Edmund Gordon's vivid and illuminating portrait of Angela Carter is the first biography of her since her death almost twenty five years ago. Today, motherhood, and publishing her last two joyous and comic novels.

Read by Emma Fielding
Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07x19sf)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07x19sh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07x19sk)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b07x19sm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07z29pn)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Tim Hughes.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b07z29py)
The programme that starts with its listeners.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b07x19sp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b07x19sr)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b07x6j4v)
Series 34, The South Downs Way

Clare Balding walks the The South Downs, from Bo Peep to Alfriston, in the company of writers June Goodfield and Lynne Truss. They've both been involved in a project for local people to write a new version of Eleanor Farjeon's poem, A Sussex Alphabet. Eleanor may be best known for the words to the much loved hymn Morning Has Broken. June and Lynne adore the South Downs although Lynne admits to being something of a timid walker, happier to be in a group and to carry a big stick. The day's walk inspired Clare to add her own contribution to the enterprise, after Amanda Elms of the South Downs National Park, explains the lifecycle of the Damselfly

D is for Damselfly

Summer's golden glow started to fade
With a walk ancient footsteps had made
Regular steps along the grassy path
To the rythmic beat of a wooden staff.
Gentle chat as we looked far beyond
When we spotted a stray from the nearby pond

A long insect lying on the ground
Not making a movement or a sound.
Pairs of bright blue spots along its back
Like eyes shining on a cloth of black.

Wings open, their delicate filigree
Paused and framed for all to see.
"What is it doing?" I began,
Ignorant of their brief lifespan.

"It's dying" came the instant reply
I swallowed hard and tried not to cry.
A beautiful creature swift and fast
Living the day that would be its last.

Without a whimper, minus a mess
A Damselfly in silent distress.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b07x19st)
Farming Today This Week

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Vernon Harwood.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b07x19sw)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b07z2f3l)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b07x19sy)
Aasmah Mir and the Rev. Richard Coles are joined by Michael Ball. JP Devlin visits Aberfan, and Ben Fogle shares his Inheritance Tracks.

SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b07z2f3n)
Series 14, Faversham

Jay Rayner and his culinary panel visit Faversham in Kent.

Joining Jay this week are the restaurateur and school food tsar Henry Dimbleby, an expert in the multi-sensory perception of flavour Professor Barry Smith, pop star-turned chef Andi Oliver, and the food writer Sophie Wright.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant producer: Hannah Newton

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b07z2f3q)
Steve Richards consults Conservative MPs on what they want from the Brexit debate. He talks to the head of the left-wing Momentum movement about Labour's future. And to Alastair Campbell about the party's past.

The editor is Peter Mulligan.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b07x19t0)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b07x19t2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b07z2f3s)
Be warned! Many of the growing number of online estate agents will charge customers even when they fail to sell the property. It's a business model which catches some customers unawares - they may be more used to the "commission-on-sale" system of charging used by more traditional estate agents.

John Cridland the former head of the business organisation the CBI is currently reviewing State Pension Age for the Government. He's just published his interim report. We look at what his proposed changes may mean for the pensioners of the future.

The leading debt charity StepChange is calling on the Financial Conduct Authority to cap fees on unarranged overdrafts. Research by consumer group Which? has recently shown that overdrafts can be more expensive than payday loans. We speak to Labour MP Rachel Reeve who has been campaigning on this issue.

Plus, we attempt to solve the mystery of the disappearing Nationwide posters. Could it be that their savings rates are so low they're too embarrassed to display them in public?

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Andrew Smith.

SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b07yszwt)
Susan Calman, Vicki Pepperdine, Francis Wheen and Simon Evans join Chairman Miles Jupp for the latest edition of the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

Producer: Paul Sheehan.
A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b07x19t4)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b07x19t6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b07yqp3s)
David Frost, Rhea Wolfson, David Mundell MP, Mike Russell MSP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the University of Glasgow with the CEO of the Scottish Whisky Association David Frost, Labour NEC member Rhea Wolfson, the Secretary of State for Scotland David Mundell MP,and the Brexit Minister in the Scottish government Mike Russell MSP.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b07x19t8)
Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

SAT 14:30 Drama (b05spk05)
Happy Jack

John Godber's modern stage classic from 1982 re-unites its original cast to tell the touching and funny story of Liz and Jack's life together. A 60 year roller-coaster of a marriage lived in a Yorkshire mining village unfolds from end to beginning.

Liz ..... Jane Godber
Jack ..... John Godber

Directed by Toby Swift.

SAT 15:30 Soul Music (b07x2zd2)
Series 23, A Change Is Gonna Come, by Sam Cooke

Soul Music explores a song that has become synonymous with the American Civil Rights Movement, Sam Cooke's A Change Is Gonna Come released in December 1964 two weeks after he was shot dead in Los Angeles. Contributors include Sam Cooke's brother LC, singer Bettye Lavette who sang it for Barack Obama at his inaugural ceremony and civil rights activists from the Freedom Summer of 64, Jennifer Lawson and Mary King.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b07x19tb)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Jess Gillam - saxophonist and BBC Young Musician finalist, 70th birthday highlights.

Jess Gillam made history as the first ever saxophonist to win the Woodwind Final of BBC Young Musician of the Year 2016. She'll be part of of WHYdentity the BBC Concert Orchestra Young Programmers Takeover at the Royal Festival Hall next weekend. She performs live in the studio.

As it's announced that 21 of the 250 girls abducted more than two years ago in Northern Nigeria have been released, Theresa Ikoko discusses her play 'Girls' telling the story of a friendship between three young women who are abducted by a militant group.

Highlights from our 70th Anniversary Programme and the results of a poll specially commissioned to find out about UK women's lives in 2016.

The Bad Sex Award has been running since 1983. Founded by the Literary Review, it honours the author who's written the worst sex scenes of the year. Alice Leveen and Lisa Moylett discuss if we need a Good Sex Award.

French cook Eugenie Brazier gave her name to La Mère Brazier - once the most famous restaurant in France. Food writer Drew Smithk tells us why he thinks her food started modern French gastronomy.Plus should you be allowed longer maternity leave if your baby is premature. And Author Professor Emma Tarlo talks about the trade in human hair that's become a billion dollar industry.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Sophie Powling
Editor: Beverley Purcell.

SAT 17:00 PM (b07x19td)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b07x6jz2)
Careers without College

Why are more top employers offering school leavers a fast track career without the need to go to university? Applicants for the top Degree Apprenticeships need to get good A level grades and pass a rigorous selection process. Their reward is the opportunity to earn a living while they gain a degree and qualify as a professional. Evan Davis discusses the pros and cons of such schemes with a high flying apprentice and two employers who are competing with universities for the brightest and best school leavers.

GUESTS

Dr. Andy Palmer, CEO, Aston Martin Lagonda

Lara Wynn, Barclays Higher Apprentice

Gaenor Bagley, Head of People, PwC.

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07x19tg)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b07x19tj)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07x19tl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b07x19tn)
Clive Anderson, Nikki Bedi, Ron Howard, Noah Hawley, Gordon Ramsay, Barrie Rutter, Martin Taylor, Scritti Politti

Clive Anderson is joined by Ron Howard, Noah Hawley, Gordon Ramsay and Barrie Rutter for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Martin Taylor and Scritti Politti.

Producer: Sukey Firth.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b07z2j37)
Lee Kun-Hee (Chairman, Samsung)

Samsung started out as a tiny exporter of dried fish. Today it's one of the world's biggest tech giants; the family-run business accounts for about a quarter of South Korea's entire GDP.

This week Samsung was forced to stop production of its new Galaxy Note 7 smartphone after a number of them apparently exploded or caught fire.

Samsung's chairman Lee Kun-Hee - son of the firm's founder - saw the value of his company plummet. You'd think he'd be fuming. But he hasn't been seen since he suffered a heart attack in 2014. Some in South Korea think he could be dead.

Mark Coles tells the story of Lee Kun-Hee - one of the world's most enigmatic and fascinating business leaders.

Researcher: Kirsteen Knight
Producer: Smita Patel.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b07x19tq)
One Night in Miami, The Mountaintop, Black Mirror, Ali Smith, Beyond Caravaggio

A review of the week's cultural highlights.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b07z2j3r)
Song of the Singer Sewing Machine

The song of the Singer has whirred its way through more than 160 years. There is not a town in the world where this machine has not made its presence felt. Maria Margaronis considers the might of the sewing machine to make empires and change lives for better or worse.

Isaac Singer patented his machine in 1851. That bald fact alone doesn't even begin to describe the individual behind this perfection of technologies and processes. Impresario, inventor, actor and millionaire and father of 22 children with six wives, the last of whom was the model for the Statue of Liberty. There was skull duggery and power play at work in his ability to capture the market - the rise of the first multi-national. As the slogan goes 'Sewing made easy'.
By the late nineteenth century Singer had 86,000 employees and 5,000 branch offices in 190 countries--a reach second only to the Catholic Church.

But we begin on a busy North London road. The shop simply says SINGER, inside is a nest of sewing machines. It is here that Maria Margaronis has brought her mother's old machine and it is here she begins her story, unpicking the threads of time. This machine was one of millions made on Glasgow's Clyde Side. Singer's European heartland until 1980. A place that produced some 36 million machines. Maria Margaronis travels to both Glasgow and to the site of the vast American Singer factory in Elizabethport New Jersey to piece together the story of a once all powerful empire. From the Amazon river where they were traded for emeralds to St Petersburg where the Bolsheviks had the temerity to nationalize the Singer factory. Drawing on oral history, newly recorded interviews and rare gems Maria follows the many threads of Singers presence in the world.

Producer: Mark Burman.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b07x1rct)
Graham Greene - The Confidential Agent, Episode 1

Dramatised by Nick Perry

Directed by Sally Avens

Graham Greene's masterful tale of suspense. When Edgar Dominguez is sent to England on a mission to arrange a supply of coal for the Republicans in the Spanish Civil War it seems a straightforward business negotiation; but no sooner does he set foot on English soil than he finds himself a hunted man, with seemingly no one he can trust and implicated in murder.

Greene wrote The Confidential Agent at the same time as his masterpiece The Power and The Glory. It was written in six weeks in 1938 as England stood on the brink of war, and the story is suffused with paranoia, distrust and urgency. He wrote it as an 'Entertainment' with the hope of getting a film made of the book and therefore providing much needed income for his family, in which he succeeded. A tense thriller where the hero must avoid trap after trap that is set for him haunted by the memory of his dead wife and his own time in prison awaiting execution.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b07x19ts)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b07x5vsc)
Privacy

For Donald Trump it was an 11 year old dusty tape that appeared from the archives. For Sam Allardyce it was a sting by undercover reporters. For the Olympic gymnast Louis Smith it was a video leaked on to the internet. All of them conversations they thought were private becoming embarrassingly public, with varying degrees of consequences. We all say things in private we wouldn't want made public, so what right to privacy should those in the public eye be entitled? Is it a simple case that we have a right to know if it tells us about the character of people who have power or who are asking us to trust them? If that's the case how do explain the myriad of examples from minor sporting celebrities to victims of stings by fake sheiks? Should we put them in the same category? We may think their views are unattractive, even offensive, but shouldn't they be allowed to express them in private, like the rest of us, with some confidence that they'll remain private? What right do we have to know? Would the world be a better place if we never said anything privately we wouldn't want made public? In our clamour to expose and condemn are we creating an unhealthy reality gap between what our leaders and politicians are allowed to say and what they actually think? Or has the digital age rightly blown apart the tight and elitist clubbable privacy that was once so much part of our society? Chaired by Michael Buerk with Anne McElvoy, Michael Portillo, Giles Fraser and Matthew Taylor. Witnesses are Prof Steven Barnett, Prof Josh Cohen, Paul Connew and Tom Chatfield.

SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b07x2s1y)
Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, returns for its 40th anniversary series.

For forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian KcKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 4

Children's author Cressida Cowell
Journalist, biographer and crime novelist Ruth Dudley Edwards
Podcaster, broadcaster and writer Helen Zaltzman
Autor and arts critic Michael Billington

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Reader ... Sally Grace
Producer ... Carl Cooper
Production Co-ordinator ... George Pierpoint

This is a BBC Studios Production.

SAT 23:30 Conversations on a Bench (b07x1rxf)
Anna Scott-Brown returns to hear more stories from the people who stop to sit beside her on benches around the country. In this episode, she is joined on a bench overlooking Beadnell Harbour in Northumberland by holiday-makers, environmentalists and some members of the last remaining fishing families of Beadnell.

Throughout the programme, a specially commissioned work by poet and Beadnell resident, Katrina Porteous draws on the voices of locals and passers by.

The harbour was once a thriving departure point for the lime produced in the kilns behind the bench, and for the traditional coble fishing boats, now almost completely gone.

Today, the village has one of the highest percentages of holiday homes in Britain, and traditional ways of making a living are under threat, but Anna is joined by those whose communal memory goes back to the heyday of a once close-knit working community.

Now the only viable industry is tourism, and the beach below the bench throbs with the noise of watersports during the summer months. As migrations of salmon, arctic tern and human incomers ebb and flow, Katrina Porteous's poem evokes the cycles of seasons and millennia, the history locked within a disappearing dialect, and the constant reincarnation of communities, landscapes and ways of being.

Hidden lives are revealed and common threads recur as Anna Scott-Brown's gentle - but insistent and sometimes extremely direct - questions elicit poignant and profound responses from those sitting on the bench.

Presenter: Anna Scott-Brown
Producer: Adam Fowler
An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.


SUNDAY 16 OCTOBER 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b07z3byf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 If I Only Had... (b04cfw3k)
If I Only Had a Brain

Stories inspired by the iconic MGM film adaptation of L. Frank Baum's classic novel The Wizard of Oz.

Inspired by the Tin Man, Scarecrow, and Cowardly Lion's quest to find Brains, Heart and Courage, Ian Sansom, Morwenna Banks and Colin Carberry bring us a series of three stories about people who find themselves in unexpected situations, which challenge them to display qualities they never realized they had all along, or which find them looking at their lives in a new light in their own personal quests for a brain, a heart, and the nerve.

If I Only Had a Brain
Read by Mark Heap
Novelist and broadcaster Ian Sansom takes us into the daily routine of a scientist who in his quest for new discoveries rarely tells the people he meets exactly what his job entails.

Writer ...... Ian Sansom
Reader ...... Mark Heap
Producer ..... Heather Larmour.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07z3bys)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07z3bz9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07z3bzf)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b07z3bzh)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b07z3fjm)
St Leonard's Church, Shipham

This week's Bells on Sunday, comes from St. Leonard's Church, Shipham in Somerset. The church, with its unusual octagonal tower, is a Victorian rebuild of 1842. The first recorded peal of the present bells was on the 28th January 1928. We hear them ringing Plain Bob Major.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b07z2j37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b07z3bzl)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b07z3bzn)
Peace of Mind

Poet Michael Symmons Roberts questions the nature and appeal of having peace of mind.

According to Michael, "There seems to be something close to a peace of mind industry out there, complete with its own sales force. Nothing makes me want to cancel my life insurance like those smug inhabitants of magazine adverts and billboards, lying back in hammocks or staring out at the ocean, at peace with themselves because they have the right kind of insurance policy, or pension scheme, or investment fund."

Such promotion, he argues, threatens the art of being fully alive in the here and now.

The bible he says is full of contradiction about peace. Isaiah 55 sets out a very loud and pretty alarming vision: 'You will go out in joy, and be led forth in peace; the mountains and hills, will burst into song before you, and all the trees of the field will clap their hands." Enough to tip an investor out of their hammock, however well insured they are.

Michael examines whether it's actually possible to find complete stillness and peace. He says, "Even the two minute silence broadcast every year on 11th November is not completely silent, since it contains all the incipient and suppressed noise of people, breathing, coughing, shifting from foot to foot, a silence broken by the active effort to maintain it."

We hear John Cage's 4'33" as Michael tries to prove the impossibility of silence but, in the end, he says the best evocation of silence comes at the start of Dylan Thomas' play Under Milk Wood, famously read by Richard Burton, "where Thomas describes the small town of Llaregyb just before dawn, before it is about to wake up."

Presenter: Michael Symmons Roberts
Producer: Michael Wakelin
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b07z3fjp)
Cornish Lobster

Ruth Sanderson joins a Cornish lobster fisherman as a busy summer season comes to an end. Calum Greenhalgh fishes out of Port Isaac with his son, William, and brings the catch straight from the sea to the family cafe.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b07z3bzy)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b07z3c00)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b07z3c02)
Patriarch Kirill, The Nun from Aleppo, England's Cathedrals

Religious and ethical news.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b07z3fjr)
National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society

Amy Devereux, a volunteer for National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society, makes the Radio 4 Appeal on their behalf.
Registered Charity Number 1134859
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'N.R.A.S.'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'N.R.A.S.'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b07z3c09)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b07z3c0j)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b07z3c0n)
Aberfan

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the disaster in the South Wales mining village of Aberfan which killed 144 people. 116 of the victims were children just starting their day in Pant Glas Junior School. News of the catastrophe, one of the first to be televised, sent shockwaves of grief and sorrow around the world. A generation of children were wiped out, controversy raged in the aftermath and the small tight-knit community of Aberfan would never again be the same. Roy Jenkins meets some of the people who were there at the time, and reflects on the event in the light of Christian faith. With music by the BBC National Chorus of Wales, directed by Adrian Partington. Organist Jeffrey Howard. Producer Karen Walker.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b07yszww)
In Praise of Difficulty

A reflection on a topical issue.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztpj)
Ring-Necked Parakeet

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the ring-necked Parakeet. These long-tailed emerald-green parakeets from Africa and Asia first appeared in the wild in the UK in 1969. Forty years on ring-necked parakeets are here to stay and their progress is being carefully monitored.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b07z3c0r)
News with Paddy O'Connell. Including - should we give money to beggars? and what's it like to just miss winning a gold Olympic medal. Reviewing the Sunday papers - columnist Andrew Pierce, philanthropist Sigrid Rausing and broadcaster Shelagh Fogarty.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b07z3fjt)
Ian has got an offer to consider, and Alistair wants to make it work.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b07z3fvy)
Dr Robert Langer

Kirsty Young's castaway is the scientist Dr Robert Langer. Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he is the most cited engineer in history, and was awarded the prestigious US medals of both Science and of Technology and Innovation. A pioneer of many new technologies including controlled release drug delivery systems and nanotechnology, Langer is also regarded as the founder of tissue engineering in regenerative medicine where synthetic structures are used to provide the scaffolding on which new skin, muscle, bone and potentially entire organs can be grown.

Born in Albany, New York, in 1948, Langer's interest in science was kindled by the Gilbert chemistry, microscope and building sets he was given as birthday presents by his parents. He studied chemical engineering at Cornell University before getting his Doctor of Science from MIT in 1974. His enthusiasm wasn't fired up by the many job offers from oil companies he received, preferring to apply to work in the medical sector. After many unsuccessful applications, he was hired by Dr Judah Folkman, a surgeon at Harvard, who tasked Langer with isolating a compound to restrict blood vessel growth in order to stop a tumour from growing. His work at the interface of medicine and engineering led to him being awarded the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering in 2015. He attributes his success to "a combination of stubbornness, risk taking, perhaps being reasonably smart and wanting to do good".

Producer: Christine Pawlowsky.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b07z3c1f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (b07x2s22)
Series 17, Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Henning Wehn, Rich Hall, Lloyd Langford and Holly Walsh are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as Tom Cruise, basketball, wood and McDonald's.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b07z3fw0)
Terra Madre Part 1: A Global Food Gathering

Dan Saladino reports from the global food event Terra Madre with stories from Africa.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b07z3c1p)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b07z3c1v)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Hardeep's Sunday Lunch (b07z3fw2)
Series 5, Radicalised Sons

Over the past few weeks Hardeep Singh Kohli has been travelling the country cooking for people and in return hearing some extraordinary stories. This week Hardeep takes a back seat in the kitchen as he is treated to a wonderful Sudanese meal. The "chef" for the day is the poet and translator Rashid El Sheikh, who fled Sudan as a political refugee and came to live in London. Whilst Rashid shows Hardeep how to cook a typical Sudanese meal he tells the tragic story of two of his sons who despite his best efforts went to fight in Syria with tragic consequences. Over lunch Hardeep talks to Rashid and Ibrahim Asmary, a youth worker, about the problems of identity for young people whose parents have settled in this country and the predatory tactics of those trying to recruit people to join so-called IS.

Producer: Amanda Hancox.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07x6rr8)
East Ruston Old Vicarage Postbag

Peter Gibbs hosts a postbag edition of the show from East Ruston Old Vicarage. Joining him this week are Pippa Greenwood, Matthew Wilson, Bob Flowerdew and the Old Vicarage's own Alan Gray.

The panellists give advice on how to use a mini greenhouse over the winter, the best way to take care of hydrangeas and how to heal a wound on a plum tree. Also Christine Walkden meets the cyclamen expert, Vic Aspland, at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b07z3hpm)
Sunday Omnibus - A Positive Outlook

Fi Glover with some enthusiastic conversations between friends, partners and siblings determined to get the best out of life, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b07z3hpp)
Graham Greene - The Confidential Agent, Episode 2

Dramatised by Nick Perry

Directed by Sally Avens

Graham Greene's masterful tale of suspense. When Edgar Dominguez is sent to England on a mission to arrange a supply of coal for the Republicans in the Spanish Civil War it seems a straightforward business negotiation; but no sooner does he set foot on English soil he finds himself a hunted man, with seemingly no one he can trust and implicated in the murder of a young girl. Determined to avenge her murder and complete his deal Dominguez turns from the hunted to the hunter.

Greene wrote The Confidential Agent at the same time as his masterpiece The Power and The Glory. It was written in six weeks in 1938 as England stood on the brink of war, and the story is suffused with paranoia, distrust and urgency. He wrote it as an 'Entertainment' with the hope of getting a film made of the book and therefore providing much needed income for his family, in which he succeeded. A tense thriller where the hero must avoid trap after trap that is set for him haunted by the memory of his dead wife and his own time in prison awaiting execution.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (b07z3hpr)
Graham Norton, Close reading Henry James, Michelle Paver on the Himalayas

Mariella talks to BAFTA award winning broadcaster Graham Norton about his debut novel Holding, a bittersweet love story set in Ireland. It features PJ, an overweight and underconfident local Garda officer, who is catapulted from small town inertia when human bones are dug up in a local field. This leads to the unravelling of many long held secrets from the past.

Bestselling novelist Michelle Paver and writer and adventurer Robert Twigger discuss how the awe inspiring landscape of the Himalayas inspired both of their new books, Thin Air: a Ghost Story and the non-fiction White Mountain.

And we explore the challenging writing of Henry James in the latest in our series of Close Readings. Dr Sarah Dillon scrutinises his gothic masterpiece Turn of the Screw.

SUN 16:30 Conversations on a Bench (b07z3hpt)
Anna Scott-Brown hears more stories from the people who stop to sit beside her on benches around the country. In this edition she is joined in Mumbles, on a bench overlooking Swansea Bay, by locals, holidaymakers and the family of the person to whom the bench is dedicated.

Throughout the programme, a specially commissioned work by poet Owen Sheers draws on the voices and stories of those who sit and contemplate the inscription, "Born to be Wild - Dinks Nash -Loved Forever."

The views from the bench of the Gower Peninsula and the threatened Tata Steelworks evoke stories of migration and community, of division and cohesion, and of grief for what has gone we well as celebration for what lives on.

Hidden lives are revealed and common threads recur as Anna Scott-Brown's gentle - but insistent and sometimes extremely direct - questions elicit poignant and profound responses from those sitting on the bench.

Presenter: Anna Scott-Brown
Producer: Adam Fowler
An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b07x2zp8)
How Safe Is Your Pension?

Following the BHS scandal, Allan Urry investigates other cases in which employees claim they've lost out because companies have ditched their full pension fund commitments.

It's the job of the Pensions Regulator to ensure employers follow the rules and to protect the benefits of those who've been paying in. So how good are they at keeping your pension safe?

The programme untangles the complex financial engineering that goes on as some foreign investors try to wash their hands of any on-going obligations to their UK workforce.

And one former director whose actions cost a pension fund millions of pounds is confronted at his home.

Producer: Paul Grant
Reporter: Allan Urry.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b07z2j37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07z3c22)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b07z3c2p)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07z3c2r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b07z3c2v)
Simon Parkes

Simon Parkes chooses the best of BBC Radio this week
Pick of the Week is jam-packed with moments of seismic upheaval. Such as the moment Gibraltarians realised the Britain they obstinately cling to is the Britain of the 1970's; the way Sam Cooke heard a Bob Dylan song and decided to write his own version and the effects of hearing Sylvia Plath's voice for the first time.
There's composers, chameleons, comedy and Simon's iplayer pick comes from Great Lives.
Producer: Stephen Garner
Production support: Kay Bishton.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b07z3hpw)
Rex is argumentative, and Alice wants to make amends.

SUN 19:15 Mark Thomas: The Manifesto (b01rlrjj)
Series 5, Episode 1

Comedian and activist Mark Thomas travels to Bridport, Dorset to compile a People's Manifesto using policies suggested by his studio audience. Producer: Colin Anderson.

SUN 19:45 Balm of Hurt Minds (b07z3jl6)
Even in Good Men, by MJ Hyland

The last of our commissioned short stories on the theme of rest and sleep for the series Balm of Hurt Minds. The writer M J Hyland, who is herself an ex lawyer, tells the story of a young policeman who is himself awaiting trial in prison. Can his defence of sleepwalking convince a court that he was in fact not in charge of his faculties? M J Hyland has been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and twice for the National Short Story Award.

Even In Good Men is read by Trystan Gravelle - a Welsh actor who has recently appeared in the ITV drama Mr Selfridge as Victor Colleano.

The producer is Julian Wilkinson.

SUN 20:00 Feedback (b07ysy1r)
With the US presidential elections less than 3 weeks away the BBC's North America Editor, Jon Sopel talks to Roger about the challenges of covering a campaign dominated by personalities rather than policies. He responds to listeners' suggestions that the BBC has been too focused on Donald Trump and too soft on Hillary Clinton.
The Radio 4 documentary Body Count Rising argued that modern fiction is increasingly portraying violence against women in a voyeuristic way. Listeners were divided over the arguments. The programme's producer Gemma Newby answers her critics.
And after a bumper summer of sport, the Controller of Radio 5Live Jonathan Wall defends his network against the accusation that its news brief is being swamped by too much sport.

Producer: Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b07x6rrd)
King Bhumibol Adulyadej, Dario Fo, Jean Bloxam, Andrew Vicari, Don Buchla

Matthew Bannister on

The world's longest reigning monarch - King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand.

The Nobel prize winning playwright and satirist Dario Fo. Griff Rhys Jones pays tribute.

The pioneering racing driver Jean Bloxam She took on the men - and often beat them.

Andrew Vicari, the painter from Port Talbot in Wales who made millions through commissions from the Saudi Royal family.

And the musician Don Buchla who invented the first modern synthesiser in 1963.

Producer: Neil George

Interviewed guest: Paul Handley
Interviewed guest: Griff Rhys Jones
Interviewed guest: Dan Rebellato
Interviewed guest: Nick Tassoni
Interviewed guest: Michael Scott
Interviewed guest: Andrew Vaccari
Interviewed guest: Georgina Adam
Interviewed guest: Mark Vail
Interviewed guest: Geeta Dyal.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b07z2f3s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b07z3fjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 Analysis (b07x2xlj)
Gentrification

Can the process of gentrification be controlled? It is often hailed as a sign of social and economic progress. Places which were originally poor and downtrodden are transformed into prosperous and vibrant neighbourhoods. The phenomenon applies to large swathes of London and other cities across the country. David Baker asks whether gentrifying urban areas can retain their diversity and vibrancy. Is there a danger that in the latter stages of gentrification these places become the preserve of the very wealthy, losing much of their original character in the process? What tools are available to urban planners, local and national politicians to avoid this happening? Are there any lessons to be learned from cities in Europe and North America? Is there a new model of urban development emerging or will the British obsession with owning bricks and mortar define the way places become gentrified?
Producer: Peter Snowdon.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b07z3c2y)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b07x6j4x)
Andrea Arnold

With Francine Stock.

British director Andrea Arnold discusses her own trip across the United States that inspired her road movie American Honey, and reveals how she discovered her star, Sasha Lane, on a beach in Miami.

Critics Tim Robey and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh get their motors running and head out on the highway as they chart the progress of the American road movie.

Producer Rebecca O'Brien discusses her collaboration with Ken Loach that has spanned a quarter of a century and is marked by a new, typically hard-hitting and award-winning drama I, Daniel Blake.

SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b07z3bzn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]


MONDAY 17 OCTOBER 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b07z3c6b)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b07x5vs1)
Rentier capitalism - Protest camps

The Corruption of Capitalism & the rise of the rentiers. Laurie Taylor talks to Guy Standing, Professor at the School of Oriental and African Studies, who claims we're living through a Second Gilded Age, one which mirrors the vast inequality and concentration of wealth in the hands of the few which characterised late 19th century America. The difference now is that it's global and its beneficiaries are mainly the owners of property. So is capitalism now rigged in favour of a rentier class? They're joined by David Smith, the Economics Editor of The Times.

Also, Protest camps: Anna Feigenbaum, Senior Lecturer in Digital Storytelling at Bournemouth University, charts the transnational history of tents pitched for political change.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b07z3fjm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07z3c6d)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07z3c6g)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07z3c6j)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b07z3c6l)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b080cn3d)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Tim Hughes.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b07z3c6n)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

MON 05:56 Weather (b07z3c6q)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k7177)
Knot

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the knot. Knot are dumpy waders which breed in the high Arctic but winter in hundreds of thousands on our estuaries and salt-marshes. Crammed together shoulder to shoulder at the water's edge, you can see how they got their scientific name Calidris canutus...a tribute to King Canute who discovered, despite his best attempts, that he didn't have the power to turn back the tides.

MON 06:00 Today (b07z3c6s)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (b07z3zfk)
Identity Politics in New York

In a special edition of Start the Week recorded in New York, Tom Sutcliffe explores the impact of identity politics in America. This year's BBC Reith Lecturer Kwame Anthony Appiah explores the shifting sands of identity through creed, country, colour and culture, and considers the mistakes we make when we think of them as fixed. The US best-selling novelist Colson Whitehead turns to the question of race, the founding of America, and the history of slavery with The Underground Railroad. The political commentator Heather Mac Donald describes herself as a secular conservative and warns that race-based attacks on the criminal justice system are eroding the authority of the law and putting more lives at risk, while the lawyer Jim Zirin attacks the make-up of the Supreme Court, arguing that the judges are informed more by their political identity, than Constitutional law.
Producer: Katy Hickman.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b07z3zfn)
The Good Immigrant, Namaste, by Nikesh Shukla

A collection of essays in which writers explore what it means to be Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic in Britain today.

In this first essay, the author Nikesh Shukla addresses his baby daughter on the importance of language and identity. His reflections are prompted by his frustration at how the word namaste has become 'a bastardised metaphor for spiritualism'.

The music used in the programme is Englistan by the actor and rapper Riz Ahmed, whose essay Airports and Auditions also features in the collection, The Good Immigrant.

Written and read by Nikesh Shukla
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07z3c6v)
Woman's Hour Powerlist 2016

Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07z3zfq)
Incredible Women, Astrid

Rebecca Front and Jeremy Front bring us 5 new incredible women.

Today they introduce us to the uncannily realistic robot, known simply as 'Astrid', who recently made headlines when she co-presented The One Show.

Jeremy gets to spend 24 hours in the company of Astrid the robot, to see whether he can distinguish her from a real woman. But will the calm and unemotional Astrid learn some less-than-perfect behaviour from Jeremy?

With a special guest appearance by Professor Noel Sharkey, Professor of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics at the University of Sheffield.

Starring Rebecca Front, Jeremy Front, Professor Noel Sharkey, Clare Perkins, Karen Bartke and a robotic cat.
Series created by Rebecca Front and Jeremy Front.
Written by Jeremy Front with additional material by Rebecca Front.
Producer: Claire Jones.

MON 11:00 The Untold (b07z3zft)
The Trials of Gunner John Gough

With Grace Dent.

Since leaving the army, John's never slept in his bed. He barely sleeps at all, but when he does, it's on the floor of the living room in the sheltered accommodation for army veterans suffering post-traumatic stress disorder - PTSD.

Now it's closing. And John has no idea what to do. He fears he could end up on the streets.

John left school at 16 and trained as a bricklayer, but after a fortnight of work being rained off and his girlfriend breaking up with him, he headed to the army careers office to sign up. He was 18 and went on to serve in Northern Ireland and both Gulf wars. It's been 20 years since he left, but he hasn't been able to move on.

Like the other war veterans in the house in Wolverhampton where he lives, PTSD has scarred his life. In the past decade he has shut out friends and family. Panic attacks, injuries sustained in service and drug addiction have left him unable to work, and he has served prison sentences. And now he is about to lose his home - purpose-built accommodation for army veterans with mental health issues. He fears he'll end up on the streets.

Grace Dent follows John as he tries to arrange somewhere to live, and as he makes the first tentative steps towards reconnecting with old friends and family, seeking help, and starting to live again.

Producer Georgia Catt.

MON 11:30 Lemn Sissay's Origin Stories (b07z3zfw)
Is It a Bird?

Batman was an orphan; Lisbeth Salander, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, was an orphan; Superman was an orphan and a foundling. Cinderella was a foster child. Darth Vader - well, they can't all be winners. Lemn Sissay returns to BBC Radio 4with a comic and poetic look at the treatment of children raised in care, orphans and foster children in popular culture, comparing them with reality. Because it surely says something about how we view them that we create so many for fiction.

Lemn will explore the gap between fiction and reality, based on his own experiences of growing up in care as well as those of some special guests.

3. Is It A Bird

The most important thing that John and Martha Kent taught Clark, the boy they found in a strange-looking pod that crash-landed on their Kansas farm, was to keep his true self secret. People wouldn't understand that you can lift cars, melt steel beams with your eyes, or fly. People will be scared of you because you are different. Every adoptee and every care leaver knows this feeling. Lemn examines how he hid his feelings, his experiences, his identity, in order to fit in better with the world around him.

Lemn also talks to comedian and adoptee Deborah Frances-White about secret identities - and how to go about reinventing yourself.

Written and performed by ... Lemn Sissay
Guest ... Deborah Frances-White
Producer ... Ed Morrish

LEMN SISSAY'S ORIGIN STORIES IS A BBC STUDIOS PRODUCTION.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b07z3c6x)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 The Listening Project (b07z3zfy)
The Listening Project: Referendum Tales, We're Still Friends

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between Lisa and Nicola from Doncaster, friends who share a commitment to youth work and tackling poverty, yet used their Referendum vote in different ways, to explore the aftermath of the EU Referendum for the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b07z3c6z)
Teeth whitening, Fatty livers, Fur farming

Who should administer teeth whitening treatments? We look at who's qualified and who isn't.
Also, why we are lagging behind our European neighbours in tackling fatty liver disease.
We go to a fur farm in Lithuania to see how the industry is changing.
We catch up with the people hoping to bring the first class action in UK history.
And can gadgets check your mood swings - and help to cheer you up?

PRESENTER: WINIFRED ROBINSON
PRODUCER: PETE WILSON.

MON 12:57 Weather (b07z3c71)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b07z3c73)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 The Robber Barons (b07z3zg0)
Cornelius Vanderbilt

In the 19th century, so-called 'Robber Barons' - men like Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jay Gould, Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller and J.P. Morgan - seized the great new opportunities thrown up by the United States' Industrial Revolution.

The Robber Barons built vast businesses, and helped forged a radically new country - the basis of the America we know today. But did they sow the seeds of amazing progress, or did they steal the American Dream? Historian Adam Smith tells their stories and confronts their legacy.

In the opening episode, Adam tells the story of Cornelius Vanderbilt and his battle to wrest control of the shipping route from New York to San Francisco.

Vanderbilt was a farmboy from Staten Island who faced down the East Coast Establishment in the name of the Revolution.

He fought his way up until he dominated New York shipping.

He took on government-backed monopolies to win a part of the lucrative shipping route from New York to San Francisco, ferrying thousands of prospectors to the Gold Rush.

But then an adventurer seized his steamboats and threatened his whole business. Vanderbilt's astoundingly violent - and astoundingly effective - response secured his position as the first of America's great 'robber barons'.

And then, aged 69, he sold his ships and went into railroads...

With: TJ Stiles, Joanna Cohen

PRODUCER: PHIL TINLINE.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b07z3hpw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Drama (b07z3zg2)
Leaving

by Gregory Evans.

As a consequence of the Brexit vote a dying man adds a codicil to his will - a final wish that threatens to tear his family apart.

Directed by Marc Beeby.

MON 15:00 Quote... Unquote (b07z414v)
Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, returns for its 40th anniversary series.

For forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian KcKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 5

Comedian and writer Arnold Brown
Director, producer and author Lissa Evans
Educationalist and writer Christopher Frayling
Author and critic Erica Wagner

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Reader ... Charlotte Green
Producer ... Carl Cooper
Production co-ordinator ... George Pierpoint

This is a BBC Studios Production.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b07z3fw0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 Short Cuts (b07z414x)
Series 10, The Deep End

Josie Long hears short documentaries and true stories from people who have fallen in the deep end.

From the man who sets out to scam the con artists trying to exploit him, to the hypnotist who finds himself face to face with Uday Hussein, we hear true tales of falling down the rabbit hole into unsettling situations - including the moment when the poet Ross Sutherland accidentally crossed the boundary between fiction and reality and found himself being dragged into a wrestling match.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 16:30 Digital Human (b07z414z)
Series 10, Jennifer

In the spring of 1996, an enterprising American college student named Jennifer Ringley connected a webcam to her computer and began seven years of uninterrupted self-exposure. JenniCAM, as she eventually named it, was the first no-holds-barred lifelogging experiment on the world wide web. Every 15 seconds, the webcam uploaded another still image - from the mundane to the erotic - exposing the uncensored life of a young woman coming of age.

The web at the time of JenniCAM was still in its infancy: this was before Google made it navigable, before the dotcom bubble began to inflate, and before Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was out of short trousers. Compared with the modern world of universal broadband access, instant feedback and streaming video, it was achingly slow: websites with pictures took entire minutes to download, and publishing anything required expert knowledge in at least one computer language.

JenniCAM represented our self-aware future, the place we inhabit in the second decade of the 21st century, now that 82% of American adults use the web, and the average amount of time we spend online doubles every five years. We have evolved into the people that JenniCAM represented: both the voyeur and the viewed.

Twenty years after Jennifer first switched on her webcam, we retrace some of her steps and wonder why, at a time when everyone else has gone online, she's switched off...

MON 17:00 PM (b07z3c75)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07z3c77)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b07z4151)
Series 17, Episode 3

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Tony Hawks, Richard Osman, Clive Anderson and Vicki Pepperdine are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as chairs, medicine, prisons and video games.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b07z4153)
Pat wants Helen to think again, and Eddie calls on Ed for help.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b07z3c79)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07z3zfq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 Green Cities from Bricks and Mortar (b07z4155)
Historian Dan Cruickshank discovers whether the governments proposed new Garden Cities programme - hailed as an idyllic alternative to generic commuter towns - is the answer to our housing crisis or a toxic blight on lifestyle and landscape.

Pioneered in Letchworth, Hertfordshire by Ebenezer Howard in 1898, garden cities were originally imagined as a philosophy as much as a plan for urban development.

Initially aimed at addressing the problems of an increasingly urban and dysfunctional society and offering an antidote to an overcrowded and polluted Victorian London, Howard's dream was to create "planned, self-contained communities surrounded by greenbelts, containing proportionate areas of residences, industry and agriculture with a cluster of nearby cities linked by road and rail".

His vision of the way people should live - by combining the best aspects of both cities and the countryside - gave birth to the Garden City Movement which set the standards and principles of housing for the 20th century.

Presented by Dan Cruikshank
Produced by Angela Hind
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 20:30 Analysis (b07z4157)
Brexit and Northern Ireland

Is the island of Ireland where Brexit will matter most? Edward Stourton visits Londonderry, right on the Irish border, to explore what's at stake as the UK leaves the EU. Some locals fear the border across Ireland - as the EU's new external border - will harden, causing great practical and economic difficulty and even threatening the Northern Ireland peace process. Others say change the will matter far less, and that peace is now guaranteed. While people in Derry ask anxious questions, we'll hear too how policy makers in London and Dublin face a particular challenge in making Brexit work.
Producer: Chris Bowlby.

MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b07x2zd0)
Chameleon

Brett Westwood spots a chameleon and investigates how this master of disguise has led us to ask big questions about how we adapt to the environments we find ourselves in. John Keats coined the term 'the camelion poet' to describe a curiosity to explore situations and settings outside of usual experience that may be at odds with expected morals and personality. He argued that being chameleon was to take on poetic guises separate from the 'self'. Shakespeare was said to embody his characters to the extent that it was hard to know his own personality. Throughout his life, David Bowie was described as a 'musical chameleon' but was frustrated at the description, while the poet Jack Mapanje embraced the chameleon's ability to camouflage and used it as a way of voicing his political views under a cloak of ambiguity in his collection 'Of Chameleons and Gods'. Brett talks to reptile expert Rob Pilley, colouration scientist Devi Stuart-Fox, poet Jack Mapanje, English lecturer Stacey McDowell, sociologist Eoin Devereux and folklore expert Marty Crump. Readings by Finlay Robertson and Michael Flanders. Producer: Tom Bonnett.

MON 21:30 Start the Week (b07z3zfk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b07z3c7c)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b07z3c7h)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07zx1m4)
Conrad and Eleanor, Episode 6

The story of a marriage.

When Conrad fails to return from a science conference, Eleanor wonders if it is because of the affair she is having. But he has known about it for years.

Perhaps it's because his research into transgenic monkey hearts is stalling; perhaps he is sick of having the less successful career of the two of them?

While he has been the main carer for the children, Eleanor's work with stem cells has forged ahead. And now the children are all grown up. They suspect Eleanor of murdering their father, but El secretly fears that what has driven Con away is his discovery of their daughter Cara's parentage.

While his family in Manchester scrabble for clues and reasons, Conrad - alone, confused, and on the run from a crazed animal rights activist - loses himself in the cold foggy streets of Bologna, and revisits the stages of his long marriage to El, from the happiness of the year of Cara's birth to the grief and anger he now feels.

Both partners are forced to re-examine their marriage, and become aware of the shifting balance of power between them. In the process, they move closer to an understanding of what it is that matters most to each of them.

Read by Penny Downie, Robert Glenister and Jasmine Hyde
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b07x2zdb)
Reading: The Science and the Pleasure

As part of the BBC LovetoRead campaign, Michael Rosen talks about his first experience in reading, with Dr Laura Wright, and how and what he reads now. They're joined by cognitive psychologist Professor Kathy Rastle to explain the amazing process by which we read, and to find out how fast the average reader reads, and how many words they know..
Producer Beth O'Dea.

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07z4159)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


TUESDAY 18 OCTOBER 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b07z3c9n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b07z3zfn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07z3c9q)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07z3c9s)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07z3c9v)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b07z3c9x)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b080txkl)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Tim Hughes.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b07z3c9z)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mzv7x)
Shoveler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the story of the shoveler. Swimming in circles, their huge beaks trawling the surface, shovelers do the job of baleen whales on our lakes and ponds. In winter our shoveler population is boosted by Continental birds. They're rather shy though and you're not likely to see them taking bread on the park lake!

TUE 06:00 Today (b080dynn)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Reith Lectures (b07z43ds)
Kwame Anthony Appiah: Mistaken Identities, Creed

Philosopher and cultural theorist Kwame Anthony Appiah argues that when considering religion we overestimate the importance of scripture and underestimate the importance of practice.

He begins with the complexities of his own background, as the son of an English Anglican mother and a Ghanaian Methodist father. He turns to the idea that religious faith is based around unchanging and unchangeable holy scriptures. He argues that over the millennia religious practice has been quite as important as religious writings. He provides examples from Jewish, Christian, Islamic and Buddhist texts to show that they are often contradictory and have been interpreted in different ways at different times, for example on the position of women and men in Islam. He argues that fundamentalists are a particularly extreme example of this mistaken scriptural determinism.

The lecture is recorded in front of audience at the London School of Economics and Political Science. The series is presented and chaired by Sue Lawley. Future lectures will examine identity in the contexts of country, colour and culture.

The producer is Jim Frank.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07z3cb1)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07z43f4)
Incredible Women, Bella Hayman

Jeremy Front spends 24 hours with the enfant terrible of British Theatre, Bella Hayman.

She has recently announced her intention to direct a classic comedy in London's West End and Maureen Lipman has been signed up by the genius theatre director who, Maureen says, 'always defies expectation'.

Jeremy gains unprecedented access to Bella's inner sanctum, the rehearsal room. There, he witnesses the process which produces some of theatre's most controversial productions, famous for repulsing and occasionally hospitalising audience members.

Will the latest production be brilliant or a complete and utter disaster?

Starring Rebecca Front, Jeremy Front, Maureen Lipman, Alison Belbin, Natasha Cowley, Karen Bartke, Luke MacGregor, Finlay Robertson, Gavi Singh Chera, and a lot of stage blood.
Series created by Rebecca Front and Jeremy Front.
Written by Jeremy Front with additional material by Rebecca Front.
Producer: Claire Jones.

TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b07z43f8)
Honeyguide

The greater honeyguide is unique: it is the only wild animal that has been proven to selectively interpret human language. Brett Westwood tells the sweet story of a bird that leads human honey hunters to wild bees' nests in order to share the rewards - perhaps one of the oldest cultural partnerships between humans and other animals on Earth. With biologist Claire Spottiswoode, anthropologist Brian Wood, and honey hunters, Lazaro Hamusikili in Zambia and Orlando Yassene in Mozambique, and the calls of the honeyguide. Producer: Tim Dee.

TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b07z43fm)
Series 23, Jerusalem

"Jerusalem" has become a quintessentially middle-class and very English song, but it is held in the hearts and memories of people from different backgrounds and cultures.

There is a bit of cricket - Aggers discusses England's stunning and unexpected victory in the 2005 Ashes. Jerusalem reminds of that extraordinary summer.

We hear from Pamela Davenport, the daughter of a man who felt that the words of Jerusalem highlighted inequality in society; lack of money prevented him fulfilling his academic potential and he died in a care home that didn't care well enough for him.

For the American poet, Ann Lauterbach, the unusual and little-known Paul Robeson version was the theme-tune to her escape from the difficult years of Nixon and Vietnam to 1960s London.

The singer, Janet Shell, recalls the burial of her Great Uncle who was killed during World War One, but whose body was only discovered in 2009.

Susanne Sklar - a scholar of William Blake - discusses the inspiration behind the words of the poem. Probably, she says, he wrote them while awaiting his trial for sedition; he was in trouble for fighting with a soldier who had urinated in his garden.

The composer and writer, Paul Spicer, plays, sings and talks through the tune which was composed by Sir Hubert Parry.



Producer: Karen Gregor.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b07z3cb3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 The Listening Project (b07z441z)
The Listening Project: Referendum Tales, The Signs Were There If You Knew Where to Look

Fi Glover introduces bemused politics lecturers from Swansea University, siblings too young to vote but not to hold strong views, and a Vote Leave campaigning couple from Tyneside, to explore the aftermath of the EU Referendum for the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b07z3cb5)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b07z3cb7)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b07z3cb9)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 The Robber Barons (b07z7g0g)
Jay Gould

In the 19th century, so-called 'Robber Barons' - men like Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jay Gould, Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller and J.P. Morgan - seized the great new opportunities thrown up by the United States' Industrial Revolution.

The Robber Barons built vast businesses, and helped forged a radically new country - the basis of the America we know today. But did they sow the seeds of amazing progress, or did they steal the American Dream? Historian Adam Smith tells their stories and confronts their legacy.

In this episode, Adam tells the story of the most rascally of the Robber Barons: Jay Gould.

As railroad companies raced each other to spread across America, they presented a great chance for wealth and power to anyone brave and ruthless enough to join the competition.

Gould got a stake in the Erie Railroad Company, and warded off a takeover bid from the first of the Robber Barons, Cornelius Vanderbilt, by printing endless stock certificates to soak up Vanderbilt's huge spending power.

He fled the New York police by rowing to New Jersey, won bail, and went to New York's state capital to bribe as many politicians as he could gets his hands on.

And then he decided to corner the Gold Market, by means of his connections with the Vice-Presidency.

He was so successful he needed bodyguards. Yet he was also one of the great railroad pioneers - helping to transform his country.

With: TJ Stiles, Joanna Cohen, Steve Fraser

PRODUCER: PHIL TINLINE.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b07z4153)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b04l10j7)
Home

When you're a child your home feels like the centre of the universe. As a teenager it starts to feel claustrophobic. You begin to hate all it represents with a passion and can't wait to leave. Until one day, when you're faced with losing it for good, you find you're going to miss it with all your heart. Paul Dodgson's drama is about what makes a home, what sustains a home and what happens when it's about to disappear forever.

A BBC/Cymru Wales production, directed by Kate McAll.

TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b07z2f3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]

TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b07z4421)
The British Countryside after Brexit

Tom Heap hears four radical visions for the future of the British countryside after Brexit. He's joined by Baroness Young, Chair of the Woodland Trust and former head of the Environment Agency and the RSPB, the writer and Guardian columnist George Monbiot, economist Michael Liebreich and by Welsh hill farmer Gareth Wyn Jones.

Can they come up with a plan for the British landscape once the Common Agricultural Policy and European environmental legislation are consigned to history?

Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.

TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b07z4423)
Susie Dent on Language

Michael Rosen and Laura Wright talk to Susie Dent, lexicographer and word lover known for her expert contribution to Countdown and 8 Out of 10 Cats Does Countdown. She has been uncovering the secret language tribes of Britain: the words used only between themselves by groups like publicans, binmen and builders..what on earth is "disco rice"?
Producer Beth O'Dea.

TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b07z44bj)
Sebastian Faulks and Sarfraz Manzoor

Birdsong author Sebastian Faulks and journalist Sarfraz Manzoor talk about favourite books with Harriett Gilbert. Sebastian champions Joseph Conrad's controversial and influential classic Heart of Darkness, Sarfraz chooses The Plot Against America, in which Philip Roth imagines a fascist in the White House, and Harriett loves Stet, Diana Athill's memoir of a life spent in publishing. Producer Sally Heaven.

TUE 17:00 PM (b07z3cbc)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07z3cbf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b07z44bl)
Series 11, Episode 3

Comedy. The curmudgeonly author takes listeners through his week.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07z45x0)
Jill catches a thief, and Alistair has an announcement.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b07z3cbh)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07z43f4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b07z45x2)
Changing Tides: Can the UK keep its renewable energy promises?

The world's first tidal lagoon power station in Wales, which was in the Conservative manifesto, has stalled, as the government seems to be baulking at the price. The Swansea Bay lagoon, and five more that would follow around the country, would generate as much electricity as Hinkley Point C nuclear power station. But does the government's commitment to the wave of new nuclear threaten the future of renewable energy in the UK?

Jane Deith hears about the options the government's considered to meet an EU target of providing 15% of energy from renewables by 2020. Does the answer lie in buying in renewable power from Norway, or 'credit transfers' from countries who've hit their targets? Or does the commitment need to renegotiated completely?

With growing pressure to keep a lid on bills, will renewables come second to economic interests?

Reporter: Jane Deith
Producer: Rob Cave.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b07z3cbk)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b07z45x4)
Dr Mark Porter presents a series that aims to demystify perplexing health issues.

TUE 21:30 The Anglo-Irish Century (b077jp13)
Out of the sea of blood

In this, the first of four programmes looking back at a century of Anglo-Irish relations, Diarmaid Ferriter begins with the Anglo-Irish agreement of 1921. The names on the treaty document, and indeed the names missing from it, tell a story in themselves. Ireland's Michael Collins signed fearing it was a suicidal gesture, accepting, as it did the New Free States allegiance to the Crown. Churchill felt it was one of his first great political successes, bringing an end to a damaging war. The Irish leader De Valera had operated at arms length from the Irish negotiating team and his opposition to the resulting treaty resulted in the violent turmoil that followed.
But the years leading up to the treaty were themselves some of the most bloody in Irish history. Diarmaid turns back to the failed Easter Rising and the brutal suppression of it, the growing tensions and the electoral disaster of the Irish Parliamentary Party in the 1918 elections. Thereafter there was a slide towards a war of independence that saw brutality on both sides. It reached a grim climax with the events of Bloody Sunday on 21st November 1920 which prompted a parliamentary debate in which the former Prime Minister H. H. Asquith attacked both sides from the back benches.
Diarmaid also explains the importance of the unlikely partnerships forged during the subsequent treaty negotiations, partnerships of mutual understanding if not friendship, between the likes of Michael Collins and Winston Churchill. That they were able to reach a compromise accepted by the majority of the new Irish parliament and the country is significant. But as this first programme in the series underlines, the new Free State had been born out of an armed struggle and the arms were not yet to be turned into ploughshares.

Producer: Tom Alban.

Photo: University College Dublin

TUE 21:58 Weather (b07z3cbm)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b07z3cbp)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07zx1n9)
Conrad and Eleanor, Episode 7

The story of a marriage.

When Conrad fails to return from a science conference, Eleanor wonders if it is because of the affair she is having. But he has known about it for years.

Perhaps it's because his research into transgenic monkey hearts is stalling; perhaps he is sick of having the less successful career of the two of them?

While he has been the main carer for the children, Eleanor's work with stem cells has forged ahead. And now the children are all grown up. They suspect Eleanor of murdering their father, but El secretly fears that what has driven Con away is his discovery of their daughter Cara's parentage.

While his family in Manchester scrabble for clues and reasons, Conrad - alone, confused, and on the run from a crazed animal rights activist - loses himself in the cold foggy streets of Bologna, and revisits the stages of his long marriage to El, from the happiness of the year of Cara's birth to the grief and anger he now feels.

Both partners are forced to re-examine their marriage, and become aware of the shifting balance of power between them. In the process, they move closer to an understanding of what it is that matters most to each of them.

Read by Penny Downie, Robert Glenister and Jasmine Hyde
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 23:00 Life: An Idiot's Guide (b045fzcm)
Series 3, Penny Pinching and Austerity

Stephen K Amos is joined by Suzi Ruffell, Tom Rhodes and Andy Zaltzman to present a guide to penny pinching and austerity.

Additional material by Stephen Grant and Hugh Sington. Produced by Colin Anderson.

TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07z47zt)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


WEDNESDAY 19 OCTOBER 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b07z3cg0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b079rr28)
The Running Hare, Episode 4

A close up and intimate natural history by John Lewis-Stempel. By taking an abandoned field close to his farm, he observes in minute detail the behaviour of plants, birds and animals that are being displaced by agribusiness. In telling the story of one field, he tells the story of our countryside, our language, our religion and our food. But in transforming one field, he creates a haven for one particular animal close to his heart - the brown hare.

Part four brings us to harvest time, but no traditional farmer would dream of using a combine harvester.

Writer: John Lewis-Stempel
Abridger Barry Johnston
Reader: Bernard Hill

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07z3cg3)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07z3cg5)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07z3cg7)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b07z3cgc)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b080v4kp)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Tim Hughes.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b07z3cgf)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thsg9)
Waxwing

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the waxwing. Waxwings are winter visitors from Russia and Scandinavia where they breed in conifer forests. They head south to feed on berries and other fruits, and if these are in short supply on the Continent, the birds flood into the UK. It happens every few years or so and the sight of these punk-crested plunderers swarming over rowan and other berry-producing trees is sure to attract your attention.

WED 06:00 Today (b07zx6k7)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Midweek (b07z4dht)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b07z4dhw)
The Good Immigrant, A Guide to Being Black, by Varaidzo

A collection of essays, edited by Nikesh Shukla, in which writers explore what it means to be Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic in Britain today.

How do you learn to care for your black hair when you are growing up under the wing of a white mother? Is it ever OK to join in the chorus of a Kanye West song featuring the n-word? Varaidzo examines the duality of being black and also being mixed race. She grew up in Bristol and is now a student and freelance writer and editor at gal-dem.

The music used in the programme is Englistan by the actor and rapper Riz Ahmed, whose essay Airports and Auditions also features in the collection, The Good Immigrant.

Written and read by Varaidzo
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07z3cgh)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b07z4dhy)
Incredible Women, Nessa Blackwater

Rebecca and Jeremy Front bring us 5 new 'incredible women'.

Today Jeremy Front meets the Queen of crafting, Nessa Blackwater. Thanks to her TV profile and famous for her eye for retro British charm, Nessa has just been appointed Public Champion for Independent Craftspeople. Jeremy travels to Nessa's beautiful home in rural Dorset to find out just what has made the Blackwater brand such a success story.

But not everyone is a Nessa fan. Designer Wayne Hemingway is repulsed by her middle England image and he doesn't hold back.

Starring Rebecca Front, Jeremy Front, Wayne Hemingway, Nicholas Murchie, Alison Belbin, David Sterne and some bees.
Series created by Rebecca Front and Jeremy Front.
Written by Jeremy Front with additional material by Rebecca Front.
Producer: Claire Jones.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b07z4dj0)
Joyce and Romy - Back from the Brink

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about a serious health crisis and its aftermath. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 Green Cities from Bricks and Mortar (b07z4155)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Man at the Helm (b07z4dj4)
Episode 3

Amanda Whittington's adaptation of Nina Stibbe's comic novel set in 1970s rural Leicestershire.

The kids begin to wonder if Charlie Bates is reliable man at the helm material and decide the local vet is a much better option

Directed by Gemma Jenkins.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b07z3cgn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 The Listening Project (b07z4dj6)
The Listening Project: Referendum Tales, Germany Calling

Fi Glover introduces Cumbrian hoteliers, friends who grew up in Bristol, and a mother and daughter living in Edinburgh, all with a German connection that Brexit has touched, to explore the aftermath of the EU Referendum for the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b07z3cgq)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b07z3cgs)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b07z3cgx)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 The Robber Barons (b07z7g5p)
Andrew Carnegie

In the 19th century, so-called 'Robber Barons' - men like Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jay Gould, Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller and J.P. Morgan - seized the great new opportunities thrown up by the United States' Industrial Revolution.

The Robber Barons built vast businesses, and helped forged a radically new country - the basis of the America we know today. But did they sow the seeds of amazing progress, or did they steal the American Dream? Historian Adam Smith tells their stories and confronts their legacy.

In this episode, Adam explores the paradoxical career of steel tycoon Andrew Carnegie.

Carnegie was born poor in Scotland and seized the opportunities America offered.

He clambered up through the burgeoning telegraph and railroad industries through determination, hard work and intelligence. But along the way he was making money by corrupt means.

With the help of this money, he launched himself into the steel industry. His deployment of innovations in production helped him dominate it.

And then he sold up and spent decades giving away his money to pay for libraries and concert halls.

And yet he was also one of America's leading strike-breakers, not averse to using violence to crush trade union activity.

With: TJ Stiles, Joanna Cohen, Steve Fraser

PRODUCER: PHIL TINLINE.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b07z45x0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b01bwfyg)
The Interrogation - Series 1, Rod

by Roy Williams.

1/3 The story of Rod, a Premier League footballer accused of rape, who discovers his skill, wealth and fame make no odds in a police station.

Cast
DS Max Matthews ..... Kenneth Cranham
DC Sean Armitage ..... Alex Lanipekun
Rod Tyler ..... Joe Sims
Helen Cottol ..... Katie Angelou
Mother ..... Tracy Wiles

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

Notes

The Interrogation, running Wednesday to Friday this week, comprises three hard-hitting contemporary crime stories that probe some of today's most complex moral issues.

Roy Williams is an award-winning English playwright, and is considered one of the most astute and talented chroniclers of his time. Williams has many awards including the George Devine Award for Lift Off, the 2001 Evening Standard Award for Most Promising Playwright for his play Clubland, the 2002 BAFTA for Best Schools Drama for Offside and 2004 South Bank Show Arts Council Decibel Award. His most recent play Sucker Punch was nominated for the Evening Standard Award for Best New Play and the Olivier Award for Best New Play 2011, and is currently playing in Washington DC. He was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2008 Birthday Honours.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b07z4dj9)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.

WED 15:30 Inside Health (b07z45x4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b07z4djc)
Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b07z3cgz)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b07z3ch1)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07z3ch3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 Rich Hall's (US Election) Breakdown (b07z4djf)
Multi award-winning comedian and US Citizen Rich Hall follows the closing stages of the US Presidential race, offering an acerbic look at the electoral system and the two candidates vying for the most important job in the world.

A combination of stand-up, sketch and interview, Rich Hall's (US Election) Breakdown broadcasts live from the fictional IBBC network in Washington to the whole of the United States.

Rich and his producer Nick Doody take calls from every corner of the United States to hear the concerns of voters, offering their take on the issues troubling the American electorate.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b07z4djh)
Lilian lends a hand, and Roy is in need of guidance.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b07z3ch5)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07z4dhy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b07z4djk)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Giles Fraser, Michael Portillo, Anne McElvoy and Claire Fox.

WED 20:45 Four Thought (b07z4djm)
Other People's Stories

Anna Derrig asks who has the right to tell someone else's story.

Anna has worked in the media, in international development and in social and community work telling stories, and now she is writing the story of her life with a family member. It has made her think carefully about the ethics of writing other people's lives, an issue she now teaches the issue at Goldsmith's, University of London. It's a good time to be thinking about this subject, she argues, since so many of us are telling stories - our own and other people's.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b07z4421)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]

WED 21:30 Midweek (b07z4dht)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b07z3ch7)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b07z3ch9)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07zx1q8)
Conrad and Eleanor, Episode 8

The story of a marriage.

When Conrad fails to return from a science conference, Eleanor wonders if it is because of the affair she is having. But he has known about it for years.

Perhaps it's because his research into transgenic monkey hearts is stalling; perhaps he is sick of having the less successful career of the two of them?

While he has been the main carer for the children, Eleanor's work with stem cells has forged ahead. And now the children are all grown up. They suspect Eleanor of murdering their father, but El secretly fears that what has driven Con away is his discovery of their daughter Cara's parentage.

While his family in Manchester scrabble for clues and reasons, Conrad - alone, confused, and on the run from a crazed animal rights activist - loses himself in the cold foggy streets of Bologna, and revisits the stages of his long marriage to El, from the happiness of the year of Cara's birth to the grief and anger he now feels.

Both partners are forced to re-examine their marriage, and become aware of the shifting balance of power between them. In the process, they move closer to an understanding of what it is that matters most to each of them.

Read by Penny Downie, Robert Glenister and Jasmine Hyde
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:00 Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair (b07z4f1p)
Series 3, Mothers and Daughters

by Jenny Eclair

Four of the country's leading actresses star in this comic series about women facing a crisis in their lives.
Coral is an ageing actress auditioning for a play about a mother and daughter; but her relationship with her own mother doesn't bear the scrutiny it's about to get.

WED 23:15 Mae Martin's Guide to 21st Century Sexuality (b07z4f1z)
What Should We Call Ourselves?

Canadian stand-up Mae Martin presents her debut series for BBC Radio 4. Combining wickedly astute social observations with personal references to her own unique upbringing, Mae's taking a funny, personal look at how millennials are transforming the way that society thinks about sexuality and gender.

In this episode; Mae is single and ready to mingle regardless of your gender, as she looks at how labels might help or hinder people when it comes to defining their sexual identity, or if that's something that we should be trying to define it at all.

Written and performed by Mae Martin.
Script editor: Sarah Campbell
Producer: Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios Production.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07z4f28)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


THURSDAY 20 OCTOBER 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b07z3clt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b07z4dhw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07z3clw)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07z3cly)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07z3cm0)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b07z3cm2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b080y9tx)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Tim Hughes.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b07z3cm6)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thsc6)
Long-Eared Owl

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the long-eared owl. The low moaning hoot of a long-eared owl filters through the blackness of a pine wood. Long-eared owls are nocturnal and one of our most elusive breeding birds. They nest in conifer woods, copses and shelter-belts of trees near wide open grasslands and heaths where they hunt for rodents.

THU 06:00 Today (b0801b67)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 In Our Time (b07z6vzq)
The 12th Century Renaissance

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the changes in the intellectual world of Western Europe in the 12th Century, and their origins. This was a time of Crusades, the formation of states, the start of Gothic architecture, a reconnection with Roman and Greek learning and their Arabic development and the start of the European universities, and has become known as The 12th Century Renaissance.

With

Laura Ashe

Elisabeth van Houts

and

Giles Gasper

Producer: Simon Tillotson.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b07z6vzv)
The Good Immigrant, Flags, by Coco Khan

A collection of essays, edited by Nikesh Shukla, in which writers explore what it means to be Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic in Britain today.

Coco Khan recalls her first forays into sexual relationships and the alarming assumptions that can be made - on both sides - about the way we look and who we are.

The music used in the programme is Englistan by the actor and rapper Riz Ahmed, whose essay Airports and Auditions also features in the collection, The Good Immigrant.

Written by Coco Khan
Read by tbc
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters and Lizzie Davies
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07z3cm9)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07z6vzx)
Incredible Women, Irina Stonkus

Rebecca and Jeremy Front bring us 5 new 'incredible women'.

Today Jeremy Front meets Irina Stonkus, soon to be the first woman on Mars. Having gained exclusive access to the Mars base training facility, Jeremy road tests some of the equipment used to train astronauts to reach the peak of their mental and physical ability. He wants to find out what makes Irina so perfect for the Mars mission, as well as whether he, Jeremy, could cut it as an astronaut.

Jeremy speaks to space expert Dr Kevin Fong to find out what is the best thing about being in space and what sort of qualities you might need to make the journey to Mars. Dr Fong also has to break it, as gently as possible, that as Jeremy has to wear travel bands on a local bus, he may not be made of the 'right stuff' for space exploration.

Starring Rebecca Front, Jeremy Front, Dr Kevin Fong and an inversion chair.
Series created by Rebecca Front and Jeremy Front.
Written by Jeremy Front with additional material by Rebecca Front.
Producer: Claire Jones.

THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b07z6vzz)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

THU 11:30 Thelma & Michael: Love in the Cutting Room (b07z6w01)
Nicholas Wapshott tells the story of how film director Martin Scorsese unwittingly acted as cupid in one of cinema's greatest love stories.

While working on Raging Bull in 1980, Scorsese introduced his American film editor Thelma Schoonmaker to his boyhood hero, the celebrated British director Michael Powell. Despite their 35 year age difference - Powell was 75 - the two fell in love and were married until Powell's death in 1994.

In this programme, Martin Scorsese assesses Powell's work on classic movies life The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp and The Red Shoes, and recalls introducing him to his long time cutting room colleague Schoonmaker.

Using clips from some of his best known films and tributes from academics and critics, Nicholas Wapshott puts Michael Powell's heritage in perspective and, in exclusive interviews with Scorsese and Schoonmaker, explores the brilliance of the two lovers and how their unlikely relationship developed in the cutting room.

A Trevor Dann's Company production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b07z3cn9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 The Listening Project (b07z6w03)
The Listening Project: Referendum Tales, Divided Families

Fi Glover introduces conversations from Leicester, Swansea and London about the impact on families and communities where members voted different ways, in order to continue to explore the aftermath of the EU Referendum for the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b07z3cnf)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b07z3cnh)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b07z3cnk)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 The Robber Barons (b07z6w09)
John D Rockefeller

In the 19th century, so-called 'Robber Barons' - men like Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jay Gould, Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller and J.P. Morgan - seized the great new opportunities thrown up by the United States' Industrial Revolution.

The Robber Barons built vast businesses, and helped forged a radically new country - the basis of the America we know today. But did they sow the seeds of amazing progress, or did they steal the American Dream? Historian Adam Smith tells their stories and confronts their legacy.

In this episode, Adam explores how Rockefeller spotted a huge business opportunity amidst the dynamic chaos and ruthless competition of the growing oil trade in America in the 1860s and 1870s.

Early Robber Barons like Cornelius Vanderbilt had begun their careers exulting in the anti-Establishment rebellion signalled by business competition. But Rockefeller saw another way: consolidation.

He cut secret deals with railroad companies, pressured his rivals into selling out to him, and so built Standard Oil - a gargantuan corporation that dominated US oil and 'vertically integrated' the production process, handing Rockefeller huge power.

Some condemned him as a monster - but he saw his company's actions as those of an angel of mercy, saving his fellow businessmen from the storms of the free market.

And all the while he was a devout Baptist, who spent his later decades giving away huge sums as one of America's pioneering philanthropists.

With: Joanna Cohen, Steve Fraser.

PRODUCER: PHIL TINLINE.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b07z4djh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b01byc0x)
The Interrogation - Series 1, Jermaine

by Roy Williams.

2/3 The story of Jermaine, a ruthless and amoral young gang member, who Max and Sean find disturbingly keen to confess.

Cast

DS Max Matthews ..... Kenneth Cranham
DC Sean Armitage ..... Alex Lanipekun
Jermaine ..... Anthony Welsh

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

THU 15:00 Ramblings (b07z728k)
Series 34, Suffolk with Geoff Nicholson

Clare Balding walks in Suffolk with the writer Geoff Nicholson. They talk of the history of walking, of flaneurs, pedestrianism and psychogeography. Geoff has delighted in walking all his life; from the daily walk to school,to trips with his father to the Peak District to the rambles he now takes around his new home of Los Angeles. He explains to Clare that his favourite walk is always his next one.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b07z3fjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (b07z3hpr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b07z728m)
David Oyelowo

With Francine Stock.

Actor and producer David Oyelowo outlines his plans to revolutionize the British film industry and to make films that are genuinely diverse and reflective of the United Kingdom. Oyelowo argues that industry orthodoxies about what audiences want "are all lies." And he explains why his son assumed that he would be playing the best friend, and not the male lead, in his new film The Queen Of Katwe.

The result of the BFI poll to find the best loved performance by a black star is announced exclusively on the programme.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b07z3cnm)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b07z3cnp)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07z3cnr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 It's Not What You Know (b07z728r)
Series 4, Episode 4

Joe Lycett discovers how well a panel of celebrity guests know their nearest and dearest.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b07z728t)
Bridge Farm is counting its costs, while Tom is making progress.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b07z3cnt)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07z6vzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b07z728w)
David Aaronovitch looks at important issues in the news.

THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b07z728y)
Activist Investors

Are activist investors good or bad for the firms they target? They hunt down companies they think are underperforming. They buy a stake in the business, then lobby for change. Critics say activists want to make a fast buck and then head for the exit. But you could regard these investors as doing a valuable service - challenging poorly performing company boards and making more profit for shareholders. Top UK names like Rolls Royce and John Menzies have been affected. Explore the world of activist investors with Evan Davis. Joining him will be: activist investor, Harlan Zimmerman, senior partner at Cevian Capital; Chris Walton, a company chairman and non-executive director; and Sacha Sadan, director of corporate governance at Legal and General Investment Management.

Producer: Lesley McAlpine.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b07z3cnm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 In Our Time (b07z6vzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b07z3cnw)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b07z3cny)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07zx2x4)
Conrad and Eleanor, Episode 9

The story of a marriage.

When Conrad fails to return from a science conference, Eleanor wonders if it is because of the affair she is having. But he has known about it for years.

Perhaps it's because his research into transgenic monkey hearts is stalling; perhaps he is sick of having the less successful career of the two of them?

While he has been the main carer for the children, Eleanor's work with stem cells has forged ahead. And now the children are all grown up. They suspect Eleanor of murdering their father, but El secretly fears that what has driven Con away is his discovery of their daughter Cara's parentage.

While his family in Manchester scrabble for clues and reasons, Conrad - alone, confused, and on the run from a crazed animal rights activist - loses himself in the cold foggy streets of Bologna, and revisits the stages of his long marriage to El, from the happiness of the year of Cara's birth to the grief and anger he now feels.

Both partners are forced to re-examine their marriage, and become aware of the shifting balance of power between them. In the process, they move closer to an understanding of what it is that matters most to each of them.

Read by Penny Downie, Robert Glenister and Jasmine Hyde
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 23:00 Rich Hall's (US Election) Breakdown (b07z4djf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:30 on Wednesday]

THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07z7292)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


FRIDAY 21 OCTOBER 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b07z3cr6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b07z6vzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07z3cr8)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07z3crb)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07z3crd)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b07z3crm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b080y9xr)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Tim Hughes.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b07z3crz)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mzv9d)
Great Northern Diver

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the story of the great northern diver. The wailing cries of a great northern diver echo around the lakes where they live. If the bird sounds striking, then its appearance is just as dramatic....a dagger bill, sleek submarine-shaped body, it's plumage covered in graphic patterns of black and white stripes, dots and dashes.

FRI 06:00 Today (b080yb3s)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b07z3fvy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b07z78t8)
The Good Immigrant, The Ungrateful Country, by Musa Okwonga

A collection of essays, edited by Nikesh Shukla, in which writers explore what it means to be Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic in Britain today.

After Musa Okwonga's mother was widowed, a scholarship to prep school and then to Eton made him determined to be 'an unofficial ambassador for black people'. But at what cost? As the role of the immigrant in British society came under pressure once again, it prompted some major decisions for the author who had been born and brought up in a country he was told was great.

The music used in the programme is Englistan by the actor and rapper Riz Ahmed, whose essay Airports and Auditions also features in the collection, The Good Immigrant.

Written and read by Musa Okwonga
Abridged and produced by Jill Waters and Lizzie Davies
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07z3csw)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07z78tb)
Incredible Women, Sam Mann

Jeremy Front travels to Hastings to catch up with Sam Mann, one half of the 80s hit duo, Crystalle. Sam is about to take her former bandmate Tanya Tyler, to court for lost earnings for their smash hit 'Always Make You Smile'.

Martin Kemp shares his take on Sam and Tanya. He is clearly a Sam fan and describes her as a real powerhouse of 'electro synth disco bubble gum pop arrangements'. But will the court case go Sam's way?

Starring Rebecca Front, Jeremy Front, Martin Kemp, Frances Barber, Hugh Kermode, Luke MacGregor, Finlay Robertson and a well-known 80s synth-drum riff.
Series created by Rebecca Front and Jeremy Front.
Written by Jeremy Front with additional material by Rebecca Front.
Producer: Claire Jones.

FRI 11:00 Journey of a Lifetime (b07z7bw9)
A Cello in the Desert

Winner of this year's prestigious BBC/RGS dream journey award is Nina Plapp who sets off from the Isle of Wight with her cello 'Cuthbert' en route to India via Transylvania in a search for the roots of gypsy music.

Nina is a cellist from a large musical family and the energy and rhythms of gypsy music have always mesmerized her. Cuthbert, now 167 years old, has played in many an orchestra and was most recently under the guardianship of Nina's great aunt Bebe.

After a family send-off, Nina and Cuthbert head east on an adventure into the rich musical landscape of the gypsies. They first visit a family in Romania where she immerses herself in the wild rhythms and melodies of the Roma in rural Transylvania. Then they continue to India to seek out the original gypsies. On their way they join a chorus on the train through the desert, get locked inside a cupboard with singing girls in a Rajasthani village and play with the gypsy musicians at a wedding.

If you'd like to apply for next years Journey of a Lifetime Award and make a feature fore Radio 4 about your adventure you have until 2nd November. Look for Journey of a Lifetime on the Royal Geographical Society website. www.rgs.org/journeyofalifetime

Producer Neil McCarthy.

FRI 11:30 My Teenage Diary (b04tlk9h)
Series 6, Oona King

Rufus Hound is joined by the Labour politician Baroness Oona King. Through her diaries we discover her growing up from a roller-skating 11 year-old who wants a new hamster to a 19 year-old politics student who wants to be Prime Minister.

Produced by Harriet Jaine
A Talkback production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b07z3ct8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 The Listening Project (b07z7bwc)
The Listening Project: Referendum Tales, Nothing's Certain

Fi Glover introduces a father and daughter who share political views but not a vote, a mother and son who find wry humour in current events and friends with a determinedly positive spin, to explore the aftermath of the EU Referendum for the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b07z3cth)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b07z3ctv)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b07z3cv6)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 The Robber Barons (b07z7bwf)
JP Morgan

In the 19th century, so-called 'Robber Barons' - men like Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jay Gould, Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller and J.P. Morgan - seized the great new opportunities thrown up by the United States' Industrial Revolution.

The Robber Barons built vast businesses, and helped forged a radically new country - the basis of the America we know today. But did they sow the seeds of amazing progress, or did they steal the American Dream? Historian Adam Smith tells their stories and confronts their legacy.

In this episode, Adam explores how New York banker J.P. Morgan used ruthless pressure not to win in the free market but to end 'ruinous' competition.

Morgan strong-armed rival railroad companies into agreeing not to compete.

He bought out Andrew Carnegie's steel empire, in the great such deal in history, to forge the huge corporation US Steel.

And he did the same in the fields of electricity, farming and telecommunications, creating General Electric, International Harvester and AT&T to close down competition through consolidated companies.

And then in 1907 he played a crucial role in stopping the American economy collapsing.

And in this final episode, Adam takes a walk down Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, to explore how the Robber Barons have shaped our world. They helped to create crucial aspects of our world, which we now take for granted - such as vast corporations and paid employment, cheap travel and technology and huge gaps between rich and poor.

But is their legacy really more about the ruthless dynamic innovation of the free market, or big companies cosily closing down competition?

With: TJ Stiles, Joanna Cohen, Steve Fraser

PRODUCER: PHIL TINLINE.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b07z728t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b01byc2s)
The Interrogation - Series 1, Sarah

by Roy Williams, with Kenneth Cranham & Alex Lanipekun. 3/3 The story of Sarah, married into a racist family, who has been holding out against their influence for years.

Long Desc
by Roy Williams.

3/3 The story of Sarah, married into a racist family, who has been holding out against their influence for years.

Cast

DS Max Matthews ..... Kenneth Cranham
DC Sean Armitage ..... Alex Lanipekun
Sarah ..... Claire Louise Cordwell
Danny ..... Carl Prekopp

Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07z7bwh)
Belfast 2

Eric Robson and the panel are in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Joining Eric this week are Matthew Wilson, Bunny Guinness and Bob Flowerdew.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 Reunion (b07z7bwk)
"The whole story came back into my mind, in every detail, with clarity and force. Lucy Venables' family had moved into the house next to mine.. "

In this new story, a cruel game that involves sisters Lucy and Chloe will haunt two people as they meet up again years later..

Reader Tom Hollander

Producer Duncan Minshull.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b07z7bwn)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 Feedback (b07zy5c8)
Radio 4's forum for audience comment.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b07z7bws)
Emma and Tamar - This Too Shall Pass

Fi Glover with a conversation about how the knowledge gained by one through her experience of postnatal depression enabled her to help her friend through it. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b07z3cvy)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07z3cw0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b07z7d5c)
Jeremy Hardy, Chris Addison, Rebecca Front and Zoe Lyons join Chairman Miles Jupp for the latest edition of the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

Producer: Paul Sheehan.
A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b07z7d5f)
Helen is ready to move forward, and Elizabeth is reminded of a road not taken.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b07z3cw2)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07z78tb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b07z7d5j)
Neil Hamilton AM, Stephen Kinnock MP, Liz Saville-Roberts MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from St Collen's Parish Church in Llangollen, Wales, with Neil Hamilton AM, Stephen Kinnock MP and Liz Saville-Roberts MP.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b07z7d5m)
A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 A British History in Weather (b07zn351)
Omnibus 1

Alexandra Harris tells the story of how the weather has written and painted itself into the cultural life of England in a history of a country and its culture told by its weather from the earliest days to the present, come rain come shine.

In ten programmes During Wind and Rain will bear witness to England's cultural climates across the centuries. Before the Norman Conquest, Anglo-Saxons living in a wintry world wrote about the coldness of exile or the shelters they had to defend against enemies outside. The Middle Ages brought the warmth of spring; the new lyrics were sung in praise of blossoms and cuckoos. Descriptions of a rainy night are rare before 1700, but by the end of the eighteenth century the Romantics had adopted the squall as a fit subject for their most probing thoughts.
The weather is vast and yet we experience it intimately, and Alexandra Harris builds her story from small details. There is the drawing of a twelfth-century man in February, warming bare toes by the fire. There is the tiny glass left behind from the Frost Fair of 1684, and the Sunspan house in Angmering that embodies the bright ambitions of the 1930s. There are distinct voices of compelling individuals. "Bloody cold," says Jonathan Swift in the "slobbery" January of 1713. Percy Shelley wants to become a cloud and John Ruskin wants to bottle one. During Wind and Rain is a celebration of English air and a life story of those who have lived in it.

With music by Jon Nicholls. Producer: Tim Dee.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b07z3cw6)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b07z3cw8)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07zym8v)
Conrad and Eleanor, Episode 10

The story of a marriage.

When Conrad fails to return from a science conference, Eleanor wonders if it is because of the affair she is having. But he has known about it for years.

Perhaps it's because his research into transgenic monkey hearts is stalling; perhaps he is sick of having the less successful career of the two of them?

While he has been the main carer for the children, Eleanor's work with stem cells has forged ahead. And now the children are all grown up. They suspect Eleanor of murdering their father, but El secretly fears that what has driven Con away is his discovery of their daughter Cara's parentage.

While his family in Manchester scrabble for clues and reasons, Conrad - alone, confused, and on the run from a crazed animal rights activist - loses himself in the cold foggy streets of Bologna, and revisits the stages of his long marriage to El, from the happiness of the year of Cara's birth to the grief and anger he now feels.

Both partners are forced to re-examine their marriage, and become aware of the shifting balance of power between them. In the process, they move closer to an understanding of what it is that matters most to each of them.

Read by Penny Downie, Robert Glenister and Jasmine Hyde
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b07z44bj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07z7dml)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b07z7dmn)
Katherine and Lizzie - Mum's the Word

Fi Glover with a conversation about postnatal depression and the stigma surrounding mental illness. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b07z3zfq)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b07z3zfq)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b07z43f4)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b07z43f4)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b07z4dhy)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b07z4dhy)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b07z6vzx)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b07z6vzx)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b07z78tb)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b07z78tb)

A British History in Weather 21:00 FRI (b07zn351)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b07z44bj)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b07z44bj)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b07yszww)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b07z7d5m)

Afternoon Drama 14:15 TUE (b04l10j7)

Afternoon Drama 14:15 WED (b01bwfyg)

Afternoon Drama 14:15 THU (b01byc0x)

Afternoon Drama 14:15 FRI (b01byc2s)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b07x2xlj)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b07z4157)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b07x19t8)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b07yqp3s)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b07z7d5j)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b07z2j3r)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b07z3cnm)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b07z3cnm)

Balm of Hurt Minds 19:45 SUN (b07z3jl6)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b07z3fjm)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b07z3fjm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b07zx1m4)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b07zx1n9)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b07zx1q8)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b07zx2x4)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b07zym8v)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b07y9rtv)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b07z3zfn)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b07z3zfn)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b079rr28)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b07z4dhw)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b07z4dhw)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b07z6vzv)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b07z6vzv)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b07z78t8)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b07z3c0r)

Conversations on a Bench 23:30 SAT (b07x1rxf)

Conversations on a Bench 16:30 SUN (b07z3hpt)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b07z4421)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b07z4421)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b07z3fvy)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b07z3fvy)

Digital Human 16:30 MON (b07z414z)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b05spk05)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b07x1rct)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b07z3hpp)

Drama 14:15 MON (b07z3zg2)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 TUE (b07z44bl)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b07x19st)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b07z3c6n)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b07z3c9z)

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Feedback 20:00 SUN (b07ysy1r)

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File on 4 17:00 SUN (b07x2zp8)

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Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b07z3fw0)

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Four Thought 20:45 WED (b07z4djm)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b07x19t0)

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Front Row 19:15 MON (b07z3c79)

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Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b07x6rr8)

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Green Cities from Bricks and Mortar 20:00 MON (b07z4155)

Green Cities from Bricks and Mortar 11:00 WED (b07z4155)

Hardeep's Sunday Lunch 13:30 SUN (b07z3fw2)

If I Only Had... 00:30 SUN (b04cfw3k)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b07z6vzq)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b07z6vzq)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b07z3cbk)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b07z45x4)

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It's Not What You Know 18:30 THU (b07z728r)

Journey of a Lifetime 11:00 FRI (b07z7bw9)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b07x6rrd)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b07z7bwn)

Lemn Sissay's Origin Stories 11:30 MON (b07z3zfw)

Life: An Idiot's Guide 23:00 TUE (b045fzcm)

Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair 23:00 WED (b07z4f1p)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b07x19tn)

Mae Martin's Guide to 21st Century Sexuality 23:15 WED (b07z4f1z)

Man at the Helm 11:30 WED (b07z4dj4)

Mark Thomas: The Manifesto 19:15 SUN (b01rlrjj)

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Money Box 12:04 SAT (b07z2f3s)

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Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b07x5vsc)

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My Teenage Diary 11:30 FRI (b04tlk9h)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b07x2zd0)

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On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b07z3fjp)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b07z3hpr)

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Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b07z3c2v)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b07z29pn)

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Profile 19:00 SAT (b07z2j37)

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Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b07x2s1y)

Quote... Unquote 15:00 MON (b07z414v)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b07z3fjr)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b07z3fjr)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b07z3fjr)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b07x6j4v)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b07z728k)

Reunion 15:45 FRI (b07z7bwk)

Rich Hall's (US Election) Breakdown 18:30 WED (b07z4djf)

Rich Hall's (US Election) Breakdown 23:00 THU (b07z4djf)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b07x19sy)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b07x19tq)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b07x19sh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b07z3bz9)

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Short Cuts 16:00 MON (b07z414x)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b07x19tl)

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Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b07z3bzn)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b07z3bzn)

Soul Music 15:30 SAT (b07x2zd2)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b07z43fm)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b07z3zfk)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b07z3zfk)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b07z3c0n)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b07z3c02)

The Anglo-Irish Century 21:30 TUE (b077jp13)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b07z3fjt)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b07z3hpw)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b07z3hpw)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b07z4153)

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The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b07x6jz2)

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The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b07z728w)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b07x6j4x)

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The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b07z2f3n)

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The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b07z3hpm)

The Listening Project 12:04 MON (b07z3zfy)

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The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b07z7bws)

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The Media Show 16:30 WED (b07z3cgz)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b07yszwt)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b07z7d5c)

The Reith Lectures 09:00 TUE (b07z43ds)

The Robber Barons 13:45 MON (b07z3zg0)

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The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (b07x2s22)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b07z4151)

The Untold 11:00 MON (b07z3zft)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b07z3c1v)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b07z3c7h)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b07z3cbp)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b07z3ch9)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b07z3cny)

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Thelma & Michael: Love in the Cutting Room 11:30 THU (b07z6w01)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b07x5vs1)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b07z4djc)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b07z4159)

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Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b07x19tb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b07z3c6v)

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Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b07x2zdb)

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World at One 13:00 MON (b07z3c73)

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You and Yours 12:15 MON (b07z3c6z)

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iPM 05:45 SAT (b07z29py)