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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 08 OCTOBER 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b07wn49p)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b07k0k4h)
The Return, Episode 5

The Libyan novelist Hisham Matar's powerful memoir is a vivid and very moving account of what it's like to be swept up in a situation completely outwith your control - and the ways in which it comes to define your life.

In 1990, Hisham Matar was nineteen when his father, an outspoken critic of the Libyan regime, was kidnapped and taken to prison in Tripoli. He would never see him again. Two decades later, in 2012, after the fall of Qaddafi, Hisham was finally able to return to his homeland after an exile of thirty years. He recounts his return to a country and a family he thought he would never see again and describes the pain of not knowing what happened to his father - it's likely that he died in a massacre at one of Qaddafi's cruellest prisons, Abu Salim in 1996, but he can find no-one able to say absolutely that he did. However, after the fall of the regime, prisons were liberated and the spark of hope that his father had somehow survived slowly petered out. He and his family must come to terms with the fact that they will never know what happened to him.

Reader: Khalid Abdalla

Writer: Hisham Matar

Abridger: Anna Magnusson

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07wn49r)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07wn49t)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07wn49w)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b07wn49y)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07x12lq)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Kate Bottley.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b07x12ls)
Why drinking fountains have dried up

iPM investigates why there aren't more usable drinking fountains in the UK. Dame Jenni Murray reads Your News. iPM@bbc.co.uk.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b07wn4b5)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b07wn4b7)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b07wtgh7)
Ripon to Ripley

Clare Balding marks the eightieth anniversary of the Jarrow crusade, when two hundred men walked from Tyneside to London to petition the British government to bring back industry to their town. The the closure of the main employer, Palmer's shipyard. in 1934 had led to most of the population of Jarrow being plunged into poverty.Clare has three companions on this walk ; Robert Colls, professor of Cultural History at de Montfort university who explains the role marching has played in modern politics , Helen Antrobus from the People Museum in Manchester , who tells the story of the one woman allowed on the march, the indomitable local MP, Ellen Wilkinson and local walker Margaret Laurenson, who devised the route they take. in the programme we also hear archive recording of one of the marchers talking about the overwhelming reception they received in the mainly Tory town of Harrogate.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b07wn4b9)
Farming Today This Week: Farm workers in a pre and post Brexit Britain

Farming Today This Week visits a farm in the Cotswolds which is preserved as a trust for the good of the workers. Sybil hears from a Royal Agricultural University academic what options will be available to fruit and vegetable farmers in a post Brexit Britain.

Presented by Sybil Ruscoe

Produced by Alun Beach.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b07wn4bc)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b07x12lv)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b07wn4bf)
McFly singer and author Tom Fletcher

Tom Fletcher of McFly, Silent Film pianist Neil Brand, Bookshop frequenter Erica Jones and extreme engineer Jimmy de Ville join Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir.

Tom Fletcher is best known as singer and songwriter of McFly, he's also written for Busted and One Direction, clocking up ten UK number one singles. He's also a children's author, having written The Dinosaur that Pooped series with his band mate Dougie Poynter, he's now written The Christmasaurus, his first solo kids' novel.

Saturday Live listener Erica Jones is a bookshop champion - she likes them so much that she has devoted her weekends for the last 3 years travelling all over the country visiting bookshops, reviewing them for her blog.

Neil Brand is a silent film pianist, which means he is both player and composer, improviser and emotional interpreter. He sees his role as raising the dead, bringing silent films back to life, the latest being Robin Hood from 1922.

Engineer and Adventurer Jimmy de Ville went from designing toys to creating special effects to serving in Afghanistan in the British Army. More recently he's been exploiting his love of engines: advising on and acting out dangerous stunts on camera for TV programmes.

JP meets Star Trek actor George Takei, we have your thank yous, and we'll have the inheritance tracks of DJ Trevor Nelson who chooses I Want You Back performed by the Jackson 5 and As by Stevie Wonder.

The Christmasaurus by Tom Fletcher is out now.
The Star Trek 50th Anniversary TV and movie collection box set is available now.
Neil Brand's new score for Douglas Fairbanks' 1922 Robin Hood premieres at the Barbican on 14th October.

Produced by Corinna Jones
Edited by Karen Dalziel.

SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b07x12lx)
Series 14, Pontefract

Jay Rayner and his panel of culinary kings and queens are in Pontefract, Yorkshire. On the panel this week are the food historian and author Dr Annie Gray, pop star-turned Caribbean-inspired cook Andi Oliver, the master of DIY cooking Tim Hayward, and the former Masterchef champion Tim Anderson.

The panellists debate the best way to keep the yolk runny in a Scotch egg, whether a Yorkshire pudding is savoury or sweet, and how to use ginger in savoury cooking outside of Asian cuisine.

They also discuss all things liquorice and are joined by local expert Tom Dickson who brings with him Charlie Chaplin's liquorice boot.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant producer: Laurence Bassett

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 11:00 The Case for Doing Nothing (b07x20bz)
From the biggest of issues to the most trivial, there are huge pressures on governments to act, to initiate and to modernise. But might it sometimes be better for politicians to simply 'do nothing'?

In an age of 24 hour news and social media, politicians need to be seen to be 'doing something'. Newly elected governments want to fulfill pledges, while older administrations have to prove they haven't run out of ideas. There is competition between ministers for parliamentary time and financial resources, which fuels political action. The result is permanent change, increasing complexity in law, projects which never conclude and government involvement in areas which shouldn't concern them.

Professor Stephen Barber asks whether the time has come to celebrate politicians who choose, deliberately, to do nothing.

Contributors include: Baroness Estelle Morris, Baroness Tessa Jowell, Dame Margaret Hodge MP, Sir Richard Mottram, Peter Lilley MP, Trevor Kavanagh and Lord Francis Maude.

Producer: Adam Bowen.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b07wn4bh)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b07wn4bm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b07x12lz)
Lower energy bills? Use a spreadsheet!

This week Prime Minister Theresa May strongly hinted of government intervention in the energy market as part of her closing address to the Conservative Party Conference. She said it was 'not right' that two thirds of energy customers are stuck on the most expensive tariffs. We speak to renowned regulatory economist Martin Cave on the state of the energy market. Cave sat on the Competition and Markets Authority recent review into the energy market, but refused to put his name to the final report.

We also meet serial switcher Peter Nadin, who eschews the use of price comparison websites in favour of negotiating with energy companies direct.

The former Pensions Minister Steve Webb has written a guide to help people who were 'contracted out' top up their State Pension at bargain rates. It's a complex area so can anyone understand it other than him? We get two listeners to road test his guide.

And Talk Talk have been fined for failing to protect Talk Talk customer data but customers are still receiving phone calls from criminals posing as Talk Talk customer service staff.

Presenter: Paul Lewis
Producer: Alex Lewis
Reporter: Ed Davey
Editor: Andrew Smith.

SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b07ww88s)
Series 91, Episode 5

Jeremy Hardy, Paul Sinha, Angela Barnes and Dane Baptiste are on the panel joining Miles Jupp for the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

Producer: Paul Sheehan.
A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b07wn4bp)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b07wn4br)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b07ww892)
Hilary Benn MP, Munira Mirza, Laurie Penny, Andrew Tyrie MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the University for the Creative Arts in Epsom Surrey with a panel including Labour MP Hilary Benn and Munira Mirza, an adviser on arts and philanthropy who was deputy mayor for Education and Culture at the Greater London Authority. Also: Laurie Penny a contributing editor to the New Statesman political magazine and the Chairman of the House of Commons Treasury Select Committee Andrew Tyrie MP.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b07wn4bt)
Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

SAT 14:30 Drama (b07x12m1)
Meet James McLevy

How it all began - a remake of the first episode of the Victorian detective drama featuring Inspector James McLevy - which first aired on Radio 4 in 1999.

Written by David Ashton.

Starring Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond

The death of a bank manager from a heart attack might have seemed straightforward enough - except he was found dead and naked in the Water of Leith. When it's revealed that the man was last seen trying to "save" girls in a brothel run by Jean Brash, McLevy's suspicions are aroused. Assisted by Constable Mulholland, newly arrived from Ireland, McLevy investigates.

Other parts played by the cast.
Producer/Director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland

A new series of McLevy begins on R4 on Monday.

SAT 15:30 The Danube Ain't Blue, It's Green (b07ws0dy)
Rainer Hersch champions the most popular waltz Johann Strauss ever wrote - the Blue Danube.

Ringtones and muzak have made it universal and, in Vienna, he hits the tourist trail and finds that everyone knows it, from South Koreans to Californians, while hard-working musicians there can play it over 400 times a year. It's always performed as the inevitable encore at the New Years' Day Concert in Vienna, and Franz Bartholomey, former principal cellist with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, thinks it's "simply the most beautiful waltz in the world".

Rainer touches on the finer points with conductor Alfred Eschwé as they sing their way through it, discovering that it's not just "da-da-da-da-daa, tchk-tchk, tchk-tchk" - but Strauss combined five separate waltz melodies in the piece.

He also finds out that, as Spike Jones described it in his musical parody, the waters of the Danube aren't blue, they're green, and a rather murky green at that.

Also murky was one period of the waltz's history, when Goebbels decided that the music of Strauss was an ideal palliative for the Nazi war machine, though he had to remove all traces of Strauss's Jewish ancestry in order to make the music acceptable.

Musician Ernst Theis and Strauss biographer John Suchet trace the Blue Danube's history, while Piers Lane shows how it has become one of the pianist's favourite encores in its devilish transcription by Schulz-Evler.

A Far Shoreline production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b07wn4bw)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Mbira Music, Anne Robinson on 21st-century parenting, Monica Galetti cooks the perfect artichoke salad

The Zimbabwean singer and dancer specialising in the traditionally male Mbira music of her ancestors performs for us.

Anne Robinson talks to us about her new BBC1 series where she enters the lives and homes of British families to investigate our attitude towards our pets, our image and in the first episode, 21st century parenting.

The professor of EU Law at the University of Cambridge discusses Theresa May's Great Repeal Bill which will convert EU law into British Law so what effect will this have on current laws that enshrine women's rights?

The chef Monica Galetti cooks the perfect artichoke salad with lemon and fennel.

The author Peggy Orenstein talks about her new book Girls and Sex. What sorts of pressures and expectations are girls experiencing today?

The comic actor Jackie Clune tells us about the temporary theatre in Kings Cross featuring a series of all-female Shakespeare Henry IV, Julius Caeser and The Tempest all set in a women's prison.

And we look at the etiquette of group texts whether it's a group of work colleagues, school friends or your family how can you avoid making a social faux pas? The journalist Edwina Langley and the comedian Helen Thorn discuss.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor:Jane Thurlow.

SAT 17:00 PM (b07wn4by)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b07wthc5)
Brexit: What Next?

How do you do business when you can't see into the future? This may be what businesses always have to do, but Brexit has undeniably made the future even harder to discern than usual. When will it happen, what relationship with Europe will follow, and how will the rest of the world react?

For now we don't know, but the answers to those questions will affect every business in Britain.

So how are companies planning for an uncertain future while at the same time trying to ensure that whichever model of Brexit emerges is one that suits their needs.

Joining Evan Davis are:

Karen Briggs: Head of Brexit - KPMG
Gerald Mason: SVP - Tate & Lyle Sugars
Gavin Williams: Partner - Herbert Smith Freehills

Producer: Joe Kent.

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07wn4c0)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b07wn4c2)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07wn4c4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b07wn4c6)
Clive Anderson, Emma Freud, Dame Edna Everage, Alan Carr, Leonie Orton, Jake Arnott, Kefaya, Antonio Forcione, Sarah Jane Morris

Clive Anderson and Emma Freud are joined by Dame Edna Everage, Alan Carr, Leonie Orton and Jake Arnott for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Kefaya and Antonio Forcione and Sarah Jane Morris.

Producer: Sukey Firth.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b07x12m3)
Professor David J Thouless

Series of profiles of people who are currently making headlines.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b07wn4c8)
The Girl on The Train, Travesties, Picasso Portraits, Nicotine, Divorce

The Girl on The Train starring British actress Emily Blunt is based on Paula Hawkins's best selling thriller which has sold more than 10 million copies world wide. The film is set in New York, rather than London, and explores the voyeuristic obsessions of its alcoholic central character as she observes her former neighbourhood from a train window on her daily commute.
Tom Stoppard wrote Travesties in 1974, inspired by the true story of James Joyce's involvement in a production of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Ernest in Zurich in 1917. A revival at the Menier Chocolate Factory is directed by Patrick Marber and stars Tom Hollander as Henry Carr the British consular official who played Algernon and fell out with Joyce during the production.
A major exhibition of portraits by Pablo Picasso opens at the National Portrait Gallery, with over 80 portraits by the artist in all media including the Cubist portrait from 1910 of the German art dealer and early champion of Picasso's work Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler.
In Nicotine by Nell Zing - whose work is admired by Jonathan Franzen - the author sets her third novel in a house in New Jersey inhabited by a group of anarchist smokers, united in defense of their right to smoke. When Penny Baker inherits the house from her father she becomes enmeshed in the political fervor and commitment of her fellow squatters.
And in Divorce, a new Sky Atlantic TV drama written by Sharon Horgan, Sarah Jessica Parker stars as Frances, a woman who suddenly begins to reassess her life and her marriage, and finds that making a clean break and a fresh start is harder than she thought.
Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Kamila Shamsie, Tim Lott and Charlotte Mullins. The producer was Hilary Dunn.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b07x12m5)
The Black Panthers

On the 50th anniversary of its foundation, Dorian Warren explores the rise and fall of the Black Panther Party and its legacy for more recent black insurgency in America.

Founded in Oakland California in 1966, the Black Panther Party represented a revolutionary disavowal of mainstream Civil Rights. Its Ten Point Programme advanced a series of radical demands ranging from the right to armed resistance against police violence to universal healthcare, housing and education for the poorest sections of the black community.

While Martin Luther King argued for tactical non-violence and full integration, the Panthers carried guns and were resolutely internationalist, drawing instead on the philosophy of Malcolm X, Karl Marx and the African liberation movement.

The media image of the Panthers, of the glowering, gun toting, leather jacket-clad revolutionary, still dominates - it was highly stylised, coded to alarm white America, and members did indeed receive munitions and weapons training. Armed confrontation with the police and SWAT teams ensued. But a good deal of their work was dedicated to grass-roots and community outreach work - food programs, schooling and crèche support, raising funds for legal aid, prison welfare reform.

The reasons for the Panthers' siege mentality and harrowing decline in the early 1970s are still contested: factional splits and trauma within the Party and internecine violence, but also huge pressure from without, police raids, FBI infiltration and the Nixon government pledging a platform of national law and order.

Hearing from former Panthers (including Party founder Bobby Seale) critics and scholars, broadcaster and writer Dorian Warren explores the different dimensions of the Black Panther Party. Fifty years after its foundation the Black Panther Party still casts a long shadow - in 2016 The Black Lives Matter coalition released a Six Point Platform for Black Power, Freedom and Justice, explicitly evoking the Panthers' original 1966 Ten Point Programme.

Presenter: Dorian Warren
Producer: Simon Hollis

A Brook Lapping production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b07wndxx)
Tsar, Peter the Great: Queen of Spades

By Mike Walker

Peter the Great returns from a grand tour of Europe full of ideas of modernisation. Distracted with the building of his new capital of St Petersburg, and the passion of Catherine, the only woman to meet his match, he ignores his opponents who don't want to be dragged into the eighteenth century. But when his own son Alexei declares his colours, Peter is forced to take action.

Director Alison Hindell.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b07wn4cb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b07wtd78)
A world without Down's syndrome?

Do we want to live in a world without Down's syndrome? This isn't just a theoretical question. It could soon become a reality. A new technique called non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT), detects Down's syndrome with 99% accuracy and it should soon be available on the NHS. It's already being used in Iceland where 100% of Down's syndrome pregnancies are terminated. The Danish health system declared the objective of being Down's-free and introduced the test in 2006. The termination rate there today is 98%. In Britain the termination rate for positive tests is 90 per cent and around 775 babies with Down's syndrome are born every year in England and Wales. A lot of effort has been made to increase people's knowledge of the condition which has a wide range of symptoms. Many children with it will grow in to adulthood and lead very integrated lives, but some will never walk or talk, or may have severe heart defects, glaucoma, deafness and a risk of early dementia. Would it be a sign of human progress if we reduced the number of people born with Down's syndrome to zero? Many people would agree that reducing suffering is an unequivocal moral good, yet when Richard Dawkins told a woman on Twitter that if she was carrying a child with Down's she should "abort it and try again" and "It would be immoral to bring it into the world if you have a choice" there was an outcry. NIPT could soon be available for other single gene disorders such as cystic fibrosis and we've done our best to eradicate many other disabling conditions, so why not make the most of what technology can offer? Or is this a kind of nightmare eugenicist council of perfection - a triumph of cold hearted utilitarianism over our moral duty to embrace difference and care for our fellow man? Chaired by Michael Buerk with Anne McElvoy, Claire Fox, Giles Fraser and Melanie Phillips. Witnesses are Sally Phillips, Jane Fisher, Prof Dominic Wilkinson and Simone Aspis.

SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b07wpgjk)
Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, returns for its 40th anniversary series.

For forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian KcKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 3

Comedian, actor and writer Dan Antopolski
Presenter, actress and author Janet Ellis
Journalist and Broadcaster Kirsty Lang
Journalist and ballroom dancer John Sergeant

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Reader ... Charlotte Green
Producer ... Carl Cooper
Production co-ordinator ... George Pierpoint

This is a BBC Studios Production.

SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b07wnj7w)
Seamus Heaney - Death of a Naturalist

Roger McGough marks 50 years since Seamus Heaney published his first collection, Death of a Naturalist. Featuring interviews from Heaney's childhood home of Bellaghy, and archive recordings of the poet reading his work. Poems include Digging, Mid Term Break and Blackberry Picking. Producer Sally Heaven.


SUNDAY 09 OCTOBER 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b07x18qr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Food Chains (b048nsmz)
An Open Letter to Bees

by Helen Cross.

The female Alpha-Eaters of the Kingdom have decided to appeal to bees to return, queen-to-queen.

After the fruit riots of the 2020s, the denim crisis and the scandal of the artificial pollinators, the Dusters, something has to be done.

A witty futuristic story for lovers of fruit and vegetables, from Bristol's Food Connections Festival.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07x18rs)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07x18s6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07x18s9)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b07x18sg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b07x1czn)
Holy Cross, Daventry

The bells of Holy Cross, Daventry.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b07x12m3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b07x18sn)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b07x18sz)
Learning and the Reasons of the Heart

Writer and theologian Jane Williams examines the relationship between learning and language and the tension between what we know in our hearts and what we can articulate.

Jane starts by looking at the beginning of life, when we exist in a pre-verbal stage. As wondrous as it is to see the arrival of speech in a child, there has long been a sense that children lose something as they try to contain their world in language.

Speech is one of the primary metaphors for God's communication. Jane explores the extraordinary mixed metaphor of a Divine Language that becomes a human being and, even more strangely, a human being who has to learn to speak. The Word of God made wordless, a baby able only to cry and babble.

As a theologian it is Jane's job - and her delight - to try to render our understanding of God in words. She explains that words are bound to be incomplete, but that's not an admission of failure, it's a celebration of the fact that language has its limits.

Presenter: Jane Williams
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b07x1czq)
Top Spud

Most of us would be hard pushed to name more than three or four different types of potato but Anthony and Lucy Carroll from Tiptoe Farm near Cornhill on Tweed in Northumbria would argue that we're missing out. They grow around twenty specialist heritage varieties, many of which fell out of fashion decades ago because, despite boasting distinctive flavours, colours and textures, they're much harder to grow and sell than large white round potatoes.

They have names that roll from the tongue like Mr Little's Yetholm Gypsy, Red Duke of York and Pink Fir Apple and are increasingly being sought out by top chefs, with the Cornhill potatoes getting pride of place in the restaurants of Jamie Oliver and Mark Hix.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b07x18tp)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b07x18vd)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b07x18vq)
Prison's Week, Sikh Army Regiment, James MacMillan and the Stabat Mater

Religious and ethical news.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b07x1czs)
Build Africa

Jane Garvey makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Build Africa.
Registered Charity Number 298316
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Build Africa'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Build Africa'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b07x18w1)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b07x18w3)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b07x18w5)
Theme for a Tapestry

Live from Battle Abbey School in East Sussex marking the 950th anniversary of the historic battle on 14 October 1066 between the Norman-French army of Duke William II of Normandy and an English army under the Anglo-Saxon King Harold Godwinson, beginning the Norman conquest of England which is celebrated in the Bayeux Tapestry. Leader: The Revd George Pitcher; Preacher: The Rt Revd Dr Martin Warner, Bishop of Chichester; Director of Music: John Langridge; Producer: Andrew Earis.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b07x1dnd)
Whoop!

Howard Jacobson deplores the fashion for "whooping" as a mark of approval, and sees it as a species of social blackmail.

"The whoop is on an errand to keep things simple. That which strikes audiences as true because it is what they think already, elicits a whoop."

Producer: Sheila Cook.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03jz1hj)
Whooper Swan

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the whooper swan. The elegance and beauty of wild swans has inspired writers and musicians across the centuries - the most familiar perhaps being Tchaikovsky's ballet Swan Lake, which may well have been inspired by the Whooper swan.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b07x18wc)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b07y5t5z)
Helen faces a problem head on, and Tom is reminded of old memories.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b07x1lhl)
Stephen Hough

Kirsty Young's castaway is the concert pianist and composer Stephen Hough.

He discovered he liked playing the piano when he went to visit his aunt's house and could pick out more than one hundred nursery rhymes on her piano. After much pestering, his parents bought him a cheap second hand piano from an antique shop. He went on to become one of the youngest students at the Royal Northern College of Music before winning a scholarship to The Juilliard School in New York.

His career began in 1983 after winning the Naumberg Piano Competition. He divides his time between New York and London and performs all over the world. He also has a prolific recording career and has won many awards for his discs.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b07x18wm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 The Unbelievable Truth (b07wpgjr)
Series 17, Episode 1

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Henning Wehn, Rich Hall, Lloyd Langford and Holly Walsh are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as mosquitoes, flags, roads and North Korea.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b07x1mt5)
The Apple: How British a Fruit?

As apple fairs and celebrations are held all around the country, Sheila Dillon travels to an orchard in Devon for a conversation with drinks writer Pete Brown, who has just written a book about his two-year journey into all things apple: 'The Apple Orchard'.

Sheila and Pete are joined at Otter Farm by its owner - food grower and writer Mark Diacono. From the Hoary Morning to the Bramley's Seedling to the Old Somerset Russet, from Kazakhstan to Paganism to the Garden of Eden - this is a celebration of a fruit with an incredible story to tell and with a unique place both in Britain, and the world.

Please note: the podcast of this programme is a special extended edition.

Presenter: Sheila Dillon
Producer: Rich Ward.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b07x18xz)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b07x18yl)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Hardeep's Sunday Lunch (b07x1mt7)
Series 5, Women Wrestlers

Dillicar Farm, in Dentdale east of Kendal, has been home to three generations of the Hodgson family. Dairy farming and Cumberland and Westmoreland wrestling are in their blood. The women of the family are pioneers in the field and are about to make history. The Hodgson girls are competing in the first women's Cumberland and Westmoreland wrestling world championship. This ancient sport is enjoying a resurgence but the way of life that's shaped this land and the people who've lived there for centuries, is slowly disappearing. Will Connie Hodgson win the world championship and can Dillicar Farm survive?

Producer: Phil Pegum.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07ww88g)
Birmingham

Eric Robson and the horticultural panel visit the Birmingham Botanical Gardens. Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew and Christine Walkden answer the audience questions.

This week, the panel offers advice on the best way to increase compost temperatures, which winter vegetable crops to plant and when to prune red currants.

Also, Bunny Guinness visits the Butterfly House within the Botanical Gardens.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b07x1mt9)
Sunday Omnibus - Someone to Lean On

Fi Glover introduces conversations about the inspiration of a role model, the honesty of old friends, and the impact on a gay relationship of one of the partners transitioning in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b07x1rct)
Graham Greene - The Confidential Agent, Episode 1

Dramatised by Nick Perry

Directed by Sally Avens

Graham Greene's masterful tale of suspense. When Edgar Dominguez is sent to England on a mission to arrange a supply of coal for the Republicans in the Spanish Civil War it seems a straightforward business negotiation; but no sooner does he set foot on English soil than he finds himself a hunted man, with seemingly no one he can trust and implicated in murder.

Greene wrote The Confidential Agent at the same time as his masterpiece The Power and The Glory. It was written in six weeks in 1938 as England stood on the brink of war, and the story is suffused with paranoia, distrust and urgency. He wrote it as an 'Entertainment' with the hope of getting a film made of the book and therefore providing much needed income for his family, in which he succeeded. A tense thriller where the hero must avoid trap after trap that is set for him haunted by the memory of his dead wife and his own time in prison awaiting execution.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (b07x1rcw)
Tommy Wieringa, Flemish and Dutch literature, Fashion in fiction, Stewart Lee on Ithell Colquhoun

Dutch novelist Tommy Wieringa talks to Mariella Frostrup about his new novel A Beautiful Young Wife, the story of a couple struggling to overcome an age gap. And, as Flanders and the Netherlands take the guest of honour title at this year's Frankfurt Book Fair, we look more widely at the literary culture of the region.

Comedian Stewart Lee discusses his passion for the travelogues of the surrealist painter and writer Ithell Colquhoun, and novelist Lucy Foley offers a guide to the importance of fashion in fiction - from Jay Gatsby's shirts to Madame Bovary's new satin slippers.

SUN 16:30 Conversations on a Bench (b07x1rxf)
Anna Scott-Brown returns to hear more stories from the people who stop to sit beside her on benches around the country. In this episode, she is joined on a bench overlooking Beadnell Harbour in Northumberland by holiday-makers, environmentalists and some members of the last remaining fishing families of Beadnell.

Throughout the programme, a specially commissioned work by poet and Beadnell resident, Katrina Porteous draws on the voices of locals and passers by.

The harbour was once a thriving departure point for the lime produced in the kilns behind the bench, and for the traditional coble fishing boats, now almost completely gone.

Today, the village has one of the highest percentages of holiday homes in Britain, and traditional ways of making a living are under threat, but Anna is joined by those whose communal memory goes back to the heyday of a once close-knit working community.

Now the only viable industry is tourism, and the beach below the bench throbs with the noise of watersports during the summer months. As migrations of salmon, arctic tern and human incomers ebb and flow, Katrina Porteous's poem evokes the cycles of seasons and millennia, the history locked within a disappearing dialect, and the constant reincarnation of communities, landscapes and ways of being.

Hidden lives are revealed and common threads recur as Anna Scott-Brown's gentle - but insistent and sometimes extremely direct - questions elicit poignant and profound responses from those sitting on the bench.

Presenter: Anna Scott-Brown
Producer: Adam Fowler
An Overtone production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b07wt5tx)
Transforming Rehabilitation: At What Cost?

The split and part privatisation of the UK probation system in June 2014 saw huge changes to the service, with high risk offenders managed by the new National Probation Service and low to medium risk offenders managed by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs).

Two years on, probation officers report a system that has been 'ripped apart', with two sides often failing to communicate. There are concerns over rising caseloads, falling staffing levels and the number of murders committed by offenders released from prison on licence.

File on 4 speaks to families who have lost loved ones, and hears how they have had to fight to find out the full extent of the failings of the probation system in their cases.

Charities report particular concerns over vulnerable women in the probation system, with many being recalled to prison for breaching probation orders, following short sentences for minor offences.

As Transforming Rehabilitation is scrutinised by the Public Accounts Committee and Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Probation, File on 4 asks if the changes are putting the public at risk?

Reporter - Melanie Abbott
Producer - Ruth Evans.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b07x12m3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07x18zg)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b07x18zl)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07x18zv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b07x18zz)
Sheila McClennon

Families in various forms this week - as novelist Hisham Matar searches for his father who's been missing in Libya for twenty five years. Deborah Frances White is searching for her father too but using very different methods and Lemn Sissay wonders if his life in foster care has any parallels with literature's most famous orphan- Harry Potter.
We're shifting through the accumulation of a life with the emotional toll of clearing out your parents' home and on National Poetry Day, the words that comforted a grieving mother when nothing else could reach her. And don't miss Brian Blessed recalling some unwanted audience participation during a performance of Hamlet.
Sheila's iPlayer pick is Obscure Elements from the BBC world Service.
Producer: Stephen Garner
with production support from Rachel Gill.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b07x1rxh)
Oliver has a question for Shula, and Tom comes clean to Helen.

SUN 19:15 Sketchorama (b01sjj11)
Series 2, Episode 4

Thom Tuck presents the pick of the new sketch groups currently performing live on the UK comedy circuit - with character, improv, broken and musical sketch comedy.

This final episode of the second series is in Glasgow and also features a special one-off reunion performance from classic sketch group Absolutely.

The sketch groups featured in episode four of Sketchorama are:

ENDEMIC
Endemic came together in 2009 as a loose collective of performers who just wanted to make new, funny stuff. This diverse bunch of experienced comedians, musicians, writers, actors and film-makers have since produced a variety of comedic offerings - music videos, online sketches and live shows, including a run at the Edinburgh Fringe festival. Their fan-base is growing, and now includes some of their own friends and family.

ABSOLUTELY
Members of the cast of Channel 4's hugely popular sketch show Absolutely reunited for a special, one-off radio appearance as part of this second series of Sketchorama. Pete Baikie, Morwenna Banks, Moray Hunter, Gordon Kennedy and John Sparkes recorded the show at The Oran Mor in Glasgow and performed new and classic material from some of the show's favourite characters - including Calum Gilhooley, Denzil and Gwynedd, The Little Girl and the Stoneybridge Town Council.

SUN 19:45 Balm of Hurt Minds (b07x1svs)
Waves, by Niven Govinden

Niven Govinden's tale of dwindling machismo and the uncertain benefits of rest. Part of 'Balm of Hurt Minds', a specially commissioned series of stories about sleep and rest for Radio 4. Waves is read by Nicky Henson.

Niven Govinden (born 1973) is an English novelist. He was born in East Sussex and then educated at Goldsmiths College where he studied film. He has written four novels: We Are The New Romantics (2004), Graffiti My Soul (2007), Black Bread White Beer (2013), and All the Days and Nights (2014). He has also written a number of short stories.

Author: Niven Govinden
Reader: Nicky Henson
Procucer: Simon Richardson.

SUN 20:00 Feedback (b07ww88n)
Roger Bolton hears listener views on BBC radio programmes and developments.

From next year, users will need to login and give their postcode to access BBC iPlayer, iPlayer Radio and some mobile apps. The BBC says the move will enable it to offer a more personalised service - tailoring content to individual preferences. Some Feedback listeners and concerned the information gleaned will be used to crack down on the non-payment of the licence fee. The BBC's Director of Homepage and myBBC, Phil Fearnley, explains the Corporation's thinking.

We find out more about binaural Beckett. Radio 3's Head of Speech Programming, Matthew Dodd, talks to Roger about why he commissioned new productions of five plays Samuel Beckett wrote especially for the Third Programme and how they were recorded binaurally - with voices and sounds in 360 degrees, coming not just from left and right but also from behind and in front of the listener.

The Daily Telegraph's radio critic, Gillian Reynolds, gives her thoughts on the appointment of James Purnell as the head of a new BBC division - Radio and Education.

And the Radio 4 Documentary A Casual Clearance explored the practical and emotional difficulties involved in clearing out a parent's house when they have died. It struck a chord with a number of listeners. Producer Clare Jenkins explains why and how she made the programme.

Producer: Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b07ww88j)
Sir Neville Marriner, Father Gabriele Amorth, Beryl Crockford, Professor Louis Herman, Rod Temperton

Matthew Bannister on

Sir Neville Marriner the conductor who founded the Academy of St Martin in the Fields and led them to become the world's most recorded orchestra.

Father Gabriele Amorth, the Catholic Church's leading exorcist who said he'd tackled over a hundred cases of demonic possession.

Beryl Crockford, one of the first two British women to become rowing world champions.

Professor Louis Herman the American psychologist who caused a sensation by communicating with dolphins.

Rod Temperton, a member of the band Heatwave who wrote a string of hits for Michael Jackson including the title track of his album Thriller.

Producer: Neil George.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b07x12lz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b07x1czs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 Analysis (b07wphhk)
Breaking Promises

Paul Johnson, director of the Institute of Fiscal Studies, asks if the time has come for the government to break pledges made to pensioners. He charts how the average income of senior citizens has risen and is now higher than that of the rest of the population. "We are in a position we never intended," he says. "One generation has lucked out and generations coming after are not only doing much worse, but paying for the older generation." He asks whether the government can and should sustain the "triple lock" which makes the state pension rise much faster than other benefits. And he argues that the inequality between generations is now entrenching inequality within generations.
Producer: Helen Grady

Interviewees:
Torsten Bell, the Resolution Foundation
Angus Hanton, the Intergenerational Foundation
Baroness Ros Altmann, former pensions minister
John Kay, economist
Joanne Segars, Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association
Baroness Onora O'Neill, philosopher
Frances O'Grady, Trades Union Congress
Ben Page, Ipsos MORI.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b07x1904)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 TED Radio Hour (b07x1tpr)
Guy Raz presents a journey through ideas, based on talks by the speakers on the TED stage.

SUN 23:50 A Point of View (b07x1dnd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]


MONDAY 10 OCTOBER 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b07x197s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b07wtd74)
Political polarisation, An anthropologist's guide to naming

Political polarisation in America. Laurie Taylor talks to Marc Hetherington, Professor of Political Science at Vanderbilt University, about why distrust of the opposite party is now so common in the US. Is the same pattern emerging in Britain? They're joined by Robert Ford, Professor of Political Science at the University of Manchester.
Also, an anthropologist's guide to names and naming with Barbara Bodenhorn, Emeritus Fellow, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b07x1czn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07x1980)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07x1982)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07x198c)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b07x198h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07zjmg4)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Kate Bottley.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b07x198n)
Harvest 2016 results, Tree planting, Russians buying Guernsey ice cream

The first results for harvest 2016 have been released, and yields are down across much of the UK. Provisional figures from Defra show wheat is down 12% and barley down 10% on last year. It reflects a poor harvest in other parts of Europe and comes just as Russia's grain exports are growing.

All this week we're looking at trees - they're a valuable source of home-grown timber, they can store carbon, are home to wildlife, absorb pollution and trees are vital for preventing flooding. Last year the government pledged to plant 11 million trees during this parliament. But the Woodland Trust says tree planting is at its lowest level for a generation.

And Vernon meets a dairy farmer who's in talks with the Russians who've got a taste for Guernsey milk and ice cream and want to import some of our dairy cows.

Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produced by Sally Challoner.

MON 05:56 Weather (b07x198t)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztpj)
Ring-Necked Parakeet

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the ring-necked Parakeet. These long-tailed emerald-green parakeets from Africa and Asia first appeared in the wild in the UK in 1969. Forty years on ring-necked parakeets are here to stay and their progress is being carefully monitored.

MON 06:00 Today (b07x1991)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (b07x20bq)
The Tempest Reimagined, with Margaret Atwood and Harriet Walter

On Start the Week Andrew Marr talks to the writer Margaret Atwood and the actor Harriet Walter about updating Shakespeare's The Tempest. Revenge is served cold in a men's prison for the former, while the latter reveals how she takes on the great Shakespearean roles in the setting of a women's prison. While Shakespeare was being performed in sixteenth century England, the artist Caravaggio was revolutionising painting on the Continent. The curator Letizia Treves explains how his intense naturalism and dramatic lighting influenced his contemporaries. Whilst little detail is known about Shakespeare's life, Caravaggio's colourful behaviour is writ large: the writer Richard Holmes reflects on the role of the biographer and asks whether a controversial reputation overshadows the art.
Producer: Katy Hickman.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b07x20bv)
The Invention of Angela Carter, Growing Up

Edmund Gordon's illuminating biography about one of English literature's most inventive writers. This is the first authorised biography of Angela Carter since her death almost twenty five years ago. Edmund Gordon has interviewed close friends, collaborators, lovers and family members, and had access to her journals, letters and manuscripts and so created a vivid portrait of her unconventional and extraordinary life.

Read by Emma Fielding
Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07x1999)
Woman's Hour at 70: Poll results

Woman's Hour celebrates its 70th birthday with a live audience. Presenters Jenni and Jane are joined by Bake-Off star Nadiya Hussain, historian Amanda Vickery, journalist Eve Pollard and Radio 1 presenter Gemma Cairney. The panel discuss the results of a poll specially commissioned to find out about UK women's lives in 2016. How has life changed for women at home and at work from 1946 to the present day?

Presenters: Jane Garvey and Jenni Murray
Producer: Rebecca Myatt.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07x20bx)
Intensive Care, This Can't Be Happening

Intensive Care by Mike Harris.
Ep 1 This Can't be Happening
Cath and Nick have a fractious forty year old marriage. Then one day their 'normal' comes to an end as Cath experiences a sub-arachnoid brain haemorrhage. Most people who get this are dead before they hit the ground. Can Cath be the one percent that survives with all her faculties in tact?

Director/Producer Gary Brown.

MON 11:00 The Truth about Children Who Lie (b07pgvjx)
Psychotherapist Philippa Perry delves into the world of childhood deception to discover when and why children lie. Are we all born liars? What role do parents and school play in developing our ability to lie? When and why can it become problem behaviour?

Philippa speaks to author Ian Leslie who believes that a child's first lie is a cause for celebration. On the other hand, neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris deplores all types of lies - even tiny white ones - and tells his children the unvarnished truth about almost everything. Even at Christmas.

We meet a group of excitable seven year olds who describe with great gusto their experiences of lying and being lied to. As Philippa observes, children receive very mixed messages from parents - on the one hand they're told not to lie but then they witness their parents lying all the time, often without even realising it. Similarly, she asks TV critic and mum Julia Raeside if television, particularly soaps, might be normalising lying.

Philippa tracks down Margaret Connell, former headmistress of her daughter's secondary school, to discuss the life-changing advice about lying that Margaret gave to parents on the first day of term. Margaret believes that parents put too much weight on truth-telling and teenagers often feel pushed into an impossible situation. Students from Haringey Sixth Form College also explain why they feel it necessary to lie to teachers, parents and fellow classmates.

We also hear about pioneering experiments by Dr Victoria Talwar of McGill University, Canada, which are increasing our understanding of how children develop their capacity to lie and the best ways for adults to foster their honesty.

Producers: Victoria Ferran and Susan Marling
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 11:30 Lemn Sissay's Origin Stories (b07x20c1)
Mutatis Mutandis

Batman was an orphan; Lisbeth Salander, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, was an orphan; Superman was an orphan and a foundling. Cinderella was a foster child. Darth Vader - well, they can't all be winners. Lemn Sissay returns to BBC Radio 4with a comic and poetic look at the treatment of children raised in care, orphans and foster children in popular culture, comparing them with reality. Because it surely says something about how we view them that we create so many for fiction.

Lemn will explore the gap between fiction and reality, based on his own experiences of growing up in care as well as those of some special guests.

2. MUTATIS MUTANDIS

In this second episode, Lemn looks at the children at Charles Xavier's School for Gifted Youngsters, otherwise known as The X-Men Academy; specifically, Rogue and Wolverine, whose dark and tragic origins lie long before either of them reached the School. But there, Xavier - Professor X - sought to teach the children how to control their powers and make the most of them. Lemn's experiences in children's homes in Wigan was not the same. What difference would it have made it it had been?

Lemn also talks to comedian and care leaver Sophie Willan, who spent most of her childhood in foster care and assisted accommodation. What superpowers did she discover she had, removed from the security of family?

Written and performed by ... Lemn Sissay
Guest ... Sophie Willan
Producer ... Ed Morrish

LEMN SISSAY'S ORIGIN STORIES IS A BBC STUDIOS PRODUCTION.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b07x199f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 Objects of Desire (b07x2s1r)
Such Stuff

This is the story of how the things we accumulate around us say more than we might imagine about who we are.

"The fate of the object," said the French thinker Jean Baudrillard, "has been claimed by no-one." Unless, of course, the object in question is the Mona Lisa or the Albert Jewel. In these programmes, Matthew Sweet will be looking at the other stuff. The cups. The spoons. The knick-knacks. The things we might keep, even if we don't quite have the room for them.

Through the prism of what people have in their homes, Objects of Desire explores the work of sociologists and anthropologists like Pierre Bourdieu and Mary Douglas, and philosopher Gaston Bachelard, in order to understand the curious mixture of display, memory, emotion and chance that informs the objects we surround ourselves with.

Episode One: Such Stuff. In which Matthew Sweet talks to Sioned (who has lots of stuff) and to Jordan (who has much less) and explores the philosophical and anthropological background to our relationship with things with academics Bill Brown and Daniel Miller.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b07x199h)
Consumer affairs programme.

MON 12:57 Weather (b07x199k)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b07x199m)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 Britain's Black Past (b07x2s1t)
Joseph Knight

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

The second week of programmes moves towards the 19th century and Abolition.

In this sixth episode, Professor Gerzina travels to Glasgow to meet a team of historians who are just beginning to uncover the lives of runaway slaves in Scotland. One enslaved man, Joseph Knight, took the law into his own hands, brought his owner to court, and outlawed slavery in Scotland for ever.

With Professor Simon Newman, Dr Stephen Mullen and Dr Nelson Mundell.

Presenter Gretchen Gerzina is the author of Black in England: Life before Emancipation. She is Dean of the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts and also presents book programmes on NPR.

The music in this series is by the 18th century composer Ignatius Sancho, and performed by the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra.

Readers: Jonathan Keeble, Paterson Joseph, Kathy Tyson
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b07x1rxh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Drama (b07x2s1w)
McLevy, A Matter of Balance

New series. Victorian detective drama, starring Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond.

Episode one: A Matter Of Balance

Written by David Ashton.

A circus visits Edinburgh and attempts to drum up business with a high-wire act stretching from the Scott Monument across Princes Street without a safety net. The circus crowds attract a gang of pickpockets. McLevy is on the case. Then the high-wire artiste, Maria Capaldi, receives a death threat.

Other parts are played by the cast.
Producer/Director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland

The next episode of McLevy can be heard at the same time tomorrow.

MON 15:00 Quote... Unquote (b07x2s1y)
Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, returns for its 40th anniversary series.

For forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian KcKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 4

Children's author Cressida Cowell
Journalist, biographer and crime novelist Ruth Dudley Edwards
Podcaster, broadcaster and writer Helen Zaltzman
Autor and arts critic Michael Billington

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Reader ... Sally Grace
Producer ... Carl Cooper
Production Co-ordinator ... George Pierpoint

This is a BBC Studios Production.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b07x1mt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 Moving Pictures (b07wxc7t)
Scenes in and around Kyoto

A three-part series for BBC Radio 4 offering listeners the chance to take a long, slow look at great artworks, photographed at high-resolution.

What would it be like to walk the streets of 17th century Kyoto? In this week's episode, Cathy FitzGerald explores a sumptuous pair of Japanese screens that depict the historic city in incredible detail. Follow the link to zoom in and examine the artwork as you listen.

Temples, shrines, castles, shops and homes - the image is crammed with tiny scenes. A man in a barber's shop examines his new hair cut in a mirror. People peer down into the street to watch a parade pass. Weary pilgrims sit on a verandah, sharing fruit. Men and women of every age and every social class appear, more than 1,800 in all.

Cathy FitzGerald hears how these glittering screens - a genre known as 'rakuchû rakugai-zu' or 'scenes in and around Kyoto' - were made and what they tell us about everyday life in the 17th century Japanese city.

Presenter and Producer: Cathy FitzGerald
A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4

Image: Sights in and around Kyoto, Artist Unknown, Mid Genna era (1615-24). From the collection of the Shimane Museum, courtesy of the Bureau of Public Enterprise, Shimane Prefectural Government. Photograph by Google Arts and Culture.

MON 16:30 Digital Human (b07x2s20)
Series 10, Sublime

The way the digital world is presented to us can be alienating and obfuscating, bad metaphors like the cloud or the slow tracking shots between the banks of servers can make us forget that these networks are built and maintained by human beings. They can appear as something vast, unfathomable and otherworldly - a kind of digital sublime. Yet they exist in the same world as we do and have a physicality that's often lost on us.

Aleks leads us on an exploration of this physicality from the digital temples of the data centre to the fragments that populate our city streets. In appreciating this physicality and its beauty we'll be reminded that this is not something we should feel excluded from or can't have an opinion about or indeed imagine differently.

Producer: Peter McManus.

MON 17:00 PM (b07x199q)
Coverage and analysis of the day's news.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07x199s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b07x2s22)
Series 17, Episode 2

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Henning Wehn, Rich Hall, Lloyd Langford and Holly Walsh are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as Tom Cruise, basketball, wood and McDonald's.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b07x2s24)
Susan doesn't feel like celebrating, and Johnny encourages Tony.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b07x199v)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07x20bx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 Gunning For Education (b07x2xlg)
On 1st August 2016, Texas became the first big American state to allow students aged over 21 to carry concealed handguns on campus. Ian Peddie explores the impact of the new law.

This change is seen by many as a litmus test and, despite a few smaller states already having similar laws, where Texas goes America often follows. As with all American gun debates the issue is divisive, with many seeing this moment as pivotal in framing the nation's political and cultural relationship with weapons.

Most educators in Texas oppose the legislation, Texas Senate Bill 11 (SB11). They fear an impact on teaching, where contentious topics such as religion and philosophy may now be avoided. But after notorious shootings at Virginia Tech, Columbine and the University of Texas, some students welcome the ability to defend themselves.

British born Assistant Professor Ian Peddie has lived and worked in the USA for over 25 years. SB11 will change the context under which he lives and works and it's in that knowledge that he explores the impact of the new campus carry laws.

We follow Ian into class at Sul Ross State University for the first day of the new law's introduction. On campus Ian meets students, faculty, and the police to gauge the mood of these new times. Later, Ian hears from protestors for and against the new law at the huge University of Texas in Austin. In a noisy atmosphere, the arguments are good natured but passionate.

Throughout the programme Ian examines the fears, claims and discussions being held across universities, the state, and the nation. It will be illegal for lecturers to ask students if they are carrying weapons but it remains to be seen how that 'knowing but not knowing' might affect the class.

A Like It Is Media production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 20:30 Analysis (b07x2xlj)
Gentrification

Can the process of gentrification be controlled? It is often hailed as a sign of social and economic progress. Places which were originally poor and downtrodden are transformed into prosperous and vibrant neighbourhoods. The phenomenon applies to large swathes of London and other cities across the country. David Baker asks whether gentrifying urban areas can retain their diversity and vibrancy. Is there a danger that in the latter stages of gentrification these places become the preserve of the very wealthy, losing much of their original character in the process? What tools are available to urban planners, local and national politicians to avoid this happening? Are there any lessons to be learned from cities in Europe and North America? Is there a new model of urban development emerging or will the British obsession with owning bricks and mortar define the way places become gentrified?
Producer: Peter Snowdon.

MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b07ws0dw)
Rat

Brett Westwood burrows into the complicated relationship we have with our constant but mostly unwelcome companion: the rat. Featuring interviews with historian Dr. Edmund Ramsden, researcher for the charity Apopo Haylee Ellis, Professor of German and Folklore Wolfgang Mieder, rat enthusiast Jo Pegg, and ecologist and expert in rodents as pests Professor Steven Belmain. Produced by Ellie Sans.

MON 21:30 Start the Week (b07vltzl)
The Tempest Reimagined, with Margaret Atwood and Harriet Walter

On Start the Week Andrew Marr talks to the writer Margaret Atwood and the actor Harriet Walter about updating Shakespeare's The Tempest. Revenge is served cold in a men's prison for the former, while the latter reveals how she takes on the great Shakespearean roles in the setting of a women's prison. While Shakespeare was being performed in sixteenth century England, the artist Caravaggio was revolutionising painting on the Continent. The curator Letizia Treves explains how his intense naturalism and dramatic lighting influenced his contemporaries. Whilst little detail is known about Shakespeare's life, Caravaggio's colourful behaviour is writ large: the writer Richard Holmes reflects on the role of the biographer and asks whether a controversial reputation overshadows the art.
Producer: Katy Hickman.

MON 21:58 Weather (b07x199x)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b07x199z)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07x2xrd)
Conrad and Eleanor, Episode 1

The story of a marriage.

When Conrad fails to return from a science conference, Eleanor wonders if it is because of the affair she is having. But he has known about it for years.

Perhaps it's because his research into transgenic monkey hearts is stalling; perhaps he is sick of having the less successful career of the two of them?

While he has been the main carer for the children, Eleanor's work with stem cells has forged ahead. And now the children are all grown up. They suspect Eleanor of murdering their father, but El secretly fears that what has driven Con away is his discovery of their daughter Cara's parentage.

While his family in Manchester scrabble for clues and reasons, Conrad - alone, confused, and on the run from a crazed animal rights activist - loses himself in the cold foggy streets of Bologna, and revisits the stages of his long marriage to El, from the happiness of the year of Cara's birth to the grief and anger he now feels.

Both partners are forced to re-examine their marriage, and become aware of the shifting balance of power between them. In the process, they move closer to an understanding of what it is that matters most to each of them.

Read by Penny Downie, Robert Glenister and Jasmine Hyde
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b07wsmrp)
Snotrils and Jumpolines: Kids' Invented Words

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright explore the words that children invent and reimagine, from snotrils and jumpolines, to Farmer Christmas and the hippyhoppymus. What do these linguistic leaps of imagination tell us about how children learn language? With writer Nicola Skinner and linguist Dr Kriszta Szendroi, who explains what's going on in the brain when children reach for the right word.

Producer: Mair Bosworth

The research study on 'logs-key' referred to in this program is the work of Jesse Snedeker (Harvard University) and Yi Ting Huang (University of North Carolina).

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07x2xrg)
Sean Curran reports as MPs and peers return to Westminster after the conference recess.


TUESDAY 11 OCTOBER 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b07x19cr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b07x20bv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07x19ct)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07x19cw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07x19cy)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b07x19d0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07x2xtl)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Kate Bottley.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b07x19d2)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Emily Hughes.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mzv53)
Mandarin Duck

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the story of the Mandarin Duck. A drake mandarin has orange whiskers, red bill, a broad creamy eye-stripe and an iridescent purple chest, set off by a pair of extraordinary curved orange wing feathers which stand up like a boat's sails. Today there are seven thousand birds living in the wild and the numbers are increasing.

TUE 06:00 Today (b07x2zcr)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b07x2zct)
Ian Wilmut on Dolly the sheep

Dolly the sheep was born near Edinburgh, twenty years ago this summer. She was the first mammal to be cloned from an adult animal, (named after Dolly Parton because she was created from a breast cell). And became a global media star, inspiring both amazement that an animal be created with three mothers but no father,and fear. Many worried about where such a development might lead. The papers reported: 'dreaded possibilities are raised'; 'cloned sheep in Nazi storm'. Professor Ian Wilmut,the man who created Dolly, was compared to Frankenstein. Jim talked to Ian in front of an audience at the Edinburgh Festival and asked him why he decided to try and clone a sheep; how he and the team did it; and whether cloning humans is now a real possibility.

Producer: Anna Buckley.

TUE 09:30 One to One (b07x2zcw)
Trevor McDonald on Redemption

In this series of One to One, Sir Trevor McDonald explores the idea of redemption, talking to two very different people with very different ideas on what it means.

This week he meets Madeleine Black who was violently attacked and raped when she was just 13, yet has found redemption through forgiving the men who did this to her.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b07y7j8w)
The Invention of Angela Carter, Bristol

Edmund Gordon's illuminating biography of one of English literature's most inventive writers. In today's episode, Angela Carter is in a rebellious mood and starts to find her voice.

Read by Emma Fielding
Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07x19d4)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07x2zcy)
Intensive Care, Dancing with Death

Intensive Care by Mike Harris
Ep 2 Dancing With Death
Cath has had a brain haemorrhage. If she gets through the next ten days her chances of survival will improve.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.

TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b07x2zd0)
Chameleon

Brett Westwood spots a chameleon and investigates how this master of disguise has led us to ask big questions about how we adapt to the environments we find ourselves in. John Keats coined the term 'the camelion poet' to describe a curiosity to explore situations and settings outside of usual experience that may be at odds with expected morals and personality. He argued that being chameleon was to take on poetic guises separate from the 'self'. Shakespeare was said to embody his characters to the extent that it was hard to know his own personality. Throughout his life, David Bowie was described as a 'musical chameleon' but was frustrated at the description, while the poet Jack Mapanje embraced the chameleon's ability to camouflage and used it as a way of voicing his political views under a cloak of ambiguity in his collection 'Of Chameleons and Gods'. Brett talks to reptile expert Rob Pilley, colouration scientist Devi Stuart-Fox, poet Jack Mapanje, English lecturer Stacey McDowell, sociologist Eoin Devereux and folklore expert Marty Crump. Producer: Tom Bonnett.

TUE 11:30 Soul Music (b07x2zd2)
Series 23, A Change Is Gonna Come, by Sam Cooke

Soul Music explores a song that has become synonymous with the American Civil Rights Movement, Sam Cooke's A Change Is Gonna Come released in December 1964 two weeks after he was shot dead in Los Angeles. Contributors include Sam Cooke's brother LC, singer Bettye Lavette who sang it for Barack Obama at his inaugural ceremony and civil rights activists from the Freedom Summer of 64, Jennifer Lawson and Mary King.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b07x19d6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 Objects of Desire (b07xh79m)
Dream Catcher

This is the story of how the things we accumulate around us say more than we might imagine about who we are.

"The fate of the object," said the French thinker Jean Baudrillard, "has been claimed by no-one." Unless, of course, the object in question is the Mona Lisa or the Albert Jewel. In these programmes, Matthew Sweet will be looking at the other stuff. The cups. The spoons. The knick-knacks. The things we might keep, even if we don't quite have the room for them.

Through the prism of what people have in their homes, Objects of Desire explores the work of sociologists and anthropologists like Pierre Bourdieu and Mary Douglas, and philosopher Gaston Bachelard, in order to understand the curious mixture of display, memory, emotion and chance that informs the objects we surround ourselves with.

Episode Two - Dream Catcher. In which Matthew explores the way our possessions and our homes connect us with dreams and memories.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b07x19d8)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b07x19db)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b07x19dd)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 Britain's Black Past (b07x2zd4)
Dido Belle and Francis Barber

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

The second week of programmes moves towards the 19th century and Abolition.

In the seventh programme of the series, Professor Gerzina explores the lives of two black people who lived in the higher echelons of English society, in households which were not their own - Dido Belle at Kenwood, and Dr Johnson's servant Francis Barber. They were not quite servants, but not quite family. What were their options in life?

With Professor Joan Anim-Addo and Dr Michael Bundock, biographer of Francis Barber.

Presenter Gretchen Gerzina is the author of Black in England: Life before Emancipation. She is Dean of the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts and also presents book programmes on NPR.

Recorded on location in Kenwood House and in Dr Johnson's House

Reader: Jonathan Keeble
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b07x2s24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Drama (b07x2zd6)
McLevy, A Man of Honour

Victorian detective drama starring Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond.

Written by David Ashton.

Episode two: A Man Of Honour.

McLevy's relations with Jean Brash turn frosty but he doesn't understand why. Mulholland chases a knife assailant over the rooftops of Leith Harbour - but in the tussle the man falls to his death. A family friend holds the police responsible for his godson's death and determines to kill Mulholland in a duel.

Other parts played by the cast.
Producer/Director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland

The next episode of McLevy is at the same time tomorrow.

TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b07x12lx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]

TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b07x2zd8)
Wildlife-Friendly Motorways

Motorways kill animals. That's unavoidable. But can road builders minimise the death toll with badger tunnels, bat flyovers, and green bridges covered in plants rather than tarmac? Tom Heap travels to the Gwent Levels and the Netherlands to find out.

Producer: Sarah Swadling.

TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b07x2zdb)
Reading: The Science and the Pleasure

As part of the BBC LovetoRead campaign, Michael Rosen talks about his first experience in reading, with Dr Laura Wright, and how and what he reads now. They're joined by cognitive psychologist Professor Kathy Rastle to explain the amazing process by which we read, and to find out how fast the average reader reads, and how many words they know..
Producer Beth O'Dea.

TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b07x2zdd)
Bidisha and Gillian Reynolds

Writer and broadcaster Bidisha and radio reviewer Gillian Reynolds choose favourite books to discuss with Harriett Gilbert. Bidisha chooses Jean Rhys' acclaimed Wide Sargasso Sea, which tells the back story of the 'mad wife in the attic' from Jane Eyre. Gillian Reynolds defends (against robust criticism) Hand Grenade Practice in Peking, Frances Woods' description of a year spent in China in 1975. Harriett's pick is John Le Carre's first novel, Call For the Dead, and Bidisha admits to a secret career aspiration. Producer Sally Heaven.

TUE 17:00 PM (b07x19dg)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07x19dj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b07x2zdt)
Series 11, Episode 2

Comedy. The curmudgeonly author takes listeners through his week.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07x2zp6)
Ian has got an offer to consider, and Kate is keen to share her perspective on relationships.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b07x19dl)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07x2zcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b07x2zp8)
How Safe Is Your Pension?

Following the BHS scandal, Allan Urry investigates other cases in which employees claim they've lost out because companies have ditched their full pension fund commitments.

It's the job of the Pensions Regulator to ensure employers follow the rules and to protect the benefits of those who've been paying in. So how good are they at keeping your pension safe?

The programme untangles the complex financial engineering that goes on as some foreign investors try to wash their hands of any on-going obligations to their UK workforce.

And one former director whose actions cost a pension fund millions of pounds is confronted at his home.

Producer: Paul Grant
Reporter: Allan Urry.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b07x19dn)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b07x2zpb)
Dr Mark Porter presents a series that aims to demystify perplexing health issues.

TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b07x2zct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 21:58 Weather (b07x19dq)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b07x19ds)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07zj21n)
Conrad and Eleanor, Episode 2

The story of a marriage.

When Conrad fails to return from a science conference, Eleanor wonders if it is because of the affair she is having. But he has known about it for years.

Perhaps it's because his research into transgenic monkey hearts is stalling; perhaps he is sick of having the less successful career of the two of them?

While he has been the main carer for the children, Eleanor's work with stem cells has forged ahead. And now the children are all grown up. They suspect Eleanor of murdering their father, but El secretly fears that what has driven Con away is his discovery of their daughter Cara's parentage.

While his family in Manchester scrabble for clues and reasons, Conrad - alone, confused, and on the run from a crazed animal rights activist - loses himself in the cold foggy streets of Bologna, and revisits the stages of his long marriage to El, from the happiness of the year of Cara's birth to the grief and anger he now feels.

Both partners are forced to re-examine their marriage, and become aware of the shifting balance of power between them. In the process, they move closer to an understanding of what it is that matters most to each of them.

Read by Penny Downie, Robert Glenister and Jasmine Hyde
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 23:00 Life: An Idiot's Guide (b044w2t8)
Series 3, Coming of Age

Stephen K Amos is joined by comedians Mae Martin, Travis Jay and Dan Antopolski to present a guide to coming of age.

Additional material by Christine Rose and Hugh Sington. Produced by Colin Anderson.

TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07x2zpd)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


WEDNESDAY 12 OCTOBER 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b07x19gr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b07y7j8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07x19gt)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07x19gw)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07x19gy)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b07x19h0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07x5qqf)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Kate Bottley.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b07x19h2)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

Presented by Anna Hill
Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztrh)
Great White Egret

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the Great White Egret. Great White Egrets are much bigger than little egrets, another recent colonist. These majestic birds first bred in Britain in 2012 at Shapwick Heath National Nature Reserve in Somerset where two nests produced a total of five chicks, four of which fledged successfully: they bred again in 2013.

WED 06:00 Today (b07x5qqh)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Midweek (b07x5qqk)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b07y9p10)
The Invention of Angela Carter, Japan

Edmund Gordon's vivid and illuminating portrait of Angela Carter is the first authorised biography of one of English literature's most imaginative writers. Today, Angela Carter is beguiled in Japan.

Read by Emma Fielding
Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07x19h4)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b07x5vrl)
Intensive Care, Dark, Dark Wood

Intensive Care by Mike Harris
Ep 3 Dark, Dark Wood
Cath is still in a coma. Her sister and mother travel from Australia to see her.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b07x5vrn)
Eddie and Jack - Busy Doing Nothing

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends in their 80s, who find it relaxing to swap their cars for the bus, and a hectic schedule for an amble about town. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 Gunning For Education (b07x2xlg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Man at the Helm (b07x5vrq)
Episode 2

Amanda Whittington's adaptation of Nina Stibbe's comic novel set in 1970s rural Leicestershire.

Local handyman Charlie Bates is not on the man list but the kids are prepared to give him a shot when their mum falls for him because he looks like Frank Sinatra.

Directed by Gemma Jenkins.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b07x19h6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 Objects of Desire (b07xh8cg)
Order and Territory

This is the story of how the things we accumulate around us say more than we might imagine about who we are.

"The fate of the object," said the French thinker Jean Baudrillard, "has been claimed by no-one." Unless, of course, the object in question is the Mona Lisa or the Albert Jewel. In these programmes, Matthew Sweet will be looking at the other stuff. The cups. The spoons. The knick-knacks. The things we might keep, even if we don't quite have the room for them.

Through the prism of what people have in their homes, Objects of Desire explores the work of sociologists and anthropologists like Pierre Bourdieu and Mary Douglas, and philosopher Gaston Bachelard, in order to understand the curious mixture of display, memory, emotion and chance that informs the objects we surround ourselves with.

Episode Three - Order and Territory. In which Matthew discovers the pleasure to be found in ordering our homes and our possessions, and discovers how our homes can be a battleground for space and taste.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b07x19h8)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b07x19hb)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b07x19hd)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 Britain's Black Past (b07x5vrs)
Mary Prince

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

The second week of programmes moves towards the 19th century and Abolition.

In this eighth episode, Professor Gerzina explores the moving story of Mary Prince. Her first-hand narrative of her life in slavery is the only account we have by a British woman. But it caused a scandal.

With Andrea Stuart and Professor Alison Donnell.

Presenter Gretchen Gerzina is the author of Black in England: Life before Emancipation. She is Dean of the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts and also presents book programmes on NPR.

The music in this series is by the 18th century composer Ignatius Sancho, and performed by the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra.

Readers: Kathy Tyson and Jonathan Keeble
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b07x2zp6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Drama (b07x5vrv)
McLevy, He Who Waits

Victorian detective drama starring Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond.

Written by David Ashton.

Episode three: He Who Waits.

McLevy is pining for decent coffee and Jean Brash's company - but he's out of favour with her and with Chief Constable Craddock. Meanwhile, the opening of the new docks in Leith promises an era of prosperity - but, as the bigwigs arrive for the grand opening, saboteurs plot to disrupt the celebrations.

Other parts played by the cast.
Producer/Director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland

The next episode of McLevy is at the same time tomorrow.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b07x5vrx)
Money Box Live

Financial phone-in.

WED 15:30 Inside Health (b07x2zpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b07x5vs1)
Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b07x19hj)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b07x19hl)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07x19hn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b07x5vs3)
Series 7, Gibraltar

Mark Steel's In Town - Gibraltar

Mark Steel returns to Radio 4 for a seventh series of the award winning show that travels around the country, researching the history, heritage and culture of six towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness, and performs a bespoke evening of comedy for the local residents.

"I've done loads of these, but I've never done one where I couldn't get into my dressing room because of monkeys"

In the last episode of the series, Mark visits the British overseas territory of Gibraltar where he performs in the spectacular setting of St Michael's Cave, inside The Rock. He explores Gibraltar's relationship with Spain, visits a British phone box, has some British fish and chips and encounters some not so British monkeys.

In this series Mark visits Stockport in Greater Manchester, Colchester in Essex, Hebden Bridge in Yorkshire, The Royal Borough of Kingston Upon Thames, Lynton in North Devon and the British overseas territory of Gibraltar.

This is a BBC Radio Comedy Production.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b07x5vs9)
Alistair wants to make it work, and Roy has got a new look.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b07x19hq)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07x5vrl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b07x5vsc)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Giles Fraser, Michael Portillo, Anne McElvoy and Matthew Taylor.

WED 20:45 Four Thought (b07x5vsh)
Liberating Men

Dave Pickering makes the case for a men's liberation movement.

Sharing experiences from his own life, he argues that it is not just women who need liberation from 'the patriarchy', but men themselves.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b07x2zd8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]

WED 21:30 Midweek (b07x5qqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b07x19hs)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b07x19hv)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07zj2mw)
Conrad and Eleanor, Episode 3

The story of a marriage.

When Conrad fails to return from a science conference, Eleanor wonders if it is because of the affair she is having. But he has known about it for years.

Perhaps it's because his research into transgenic monkey hearts is stalling; perhaps he is sick of having the less successful career of the two of them?

While he has been the main carer for the children, Eleanor's work with stem cells has forged ahead. And now the children are all grown up. They suspect Eleanor of murdering their father, but El secretly fears that what has driven Con away is his discovery of their daughter Cara's parentage.

While his family in Manchester scrabble for clues and reasons, Conrad - alone, confused, and on the run from a crazed animal rights activist - loses himself in the cold foggy streets of Bologna, and revisits the stages of his long marriage to El, from the happiness of the year of Cara's birth to the grief and anger he now feels.

Both partners are forced to re-examine their marriage, and become aware of the shifting balance of power between them. In the process, they move closer to an understanding of what it is that matters most to each of them.

Read by Penny Downie, Robert Glenister and Jasmine Hyde
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:00 Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair (b07x5vsm)
Series 3, Hannah's Gone

by Jenny Eclair

Hannah's Mum ..... Josie Lawrence

Produced by Sally Avens

Four of the country's leading actresses star in this comic series about women facing a crisis in their lives.
When Hannah leaves home her mother is heartbroken, but a visit to her daughter's room sheds some revealing light on Hannah's personality.

WED 23:15 Mae Martin's Guide to 21st Century Sexuality (b07x629l)
What Shall We Tell Our Kids?

Canadian stand-up Mae Martin presents her debut series for BBC Radio 4. Combining wickedly astute social observations with personal references to her own unique upbringing, Mae's taking a funny, personal look at how millennials are transforming the way that society thinks about sexuality and gender.

In this episode Mae considers how we should be teaching children about sex and relationships. Hint: possibly not the same way that her own mother Wendy did.

Written and performed by Mae Martin.
Script editor: Sarah Campbell
Producer: Alexandra Smith

A BBC Studios Production.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07x5vsp)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


THURSDAY 13 OCTOBER 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b07x19kz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b07y9p10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07x19l1)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07x19l3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07x19l5)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b07x19l7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07x6j4b)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Kate Bottley.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b07x19l9)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Trish Campbell.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mzv4q)
Glossy Ibis

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the Glossy Ibis. If, from a distance, you see what appears to be a stout-looking curlew with bronze-coloured highlights, it's probably a glossy ibis. Glossy ibis have always been rare visitors to the UK but in recent years, they've flown here much more regularly.

THU 06:00 Today (b07x6j4d)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 In Our Time (b07x6j4g)
Plasma

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss plasma, the fourth state of matter after solid, liquid and gas. As over ninety-nine percent of all observable matter in the Universe is plasma, planets like ours, with so little plasma and so much solid, liquid and gas, appear all the more remarkable. On the grand scale, plasma is what the Sun is made from and, when we look into the night sky, almost everything we can see with the naked eye is made of plasma. On the smallest scale, here on Earth, scientists make plasma to etch the microchips on which we rely for so much. Plasma is in the fluorescent light bulbs above our heads and, in laboratories around the world, it is the subject of tests to create, one day, an inexhaustible and clean source of energy from nuclear fusion.

With

Justin Wark

Kate Lancaster

and

Bill Graham

Producer: Simon Tillotson.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b07y9qkj)
The Invention of Angela Carter, Love

Edmund Gordon's illuminating portrait of Angela Carter is the first authorised biography of her since her death almost twenty five years ago and charts her unconventional life and how her literary voice developed. In today's episode she finds success with The Bloody Chamber, her collection of funny and erotic fairy tales.

Read by Emma Fielding
Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07x19lc)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07x6j4j)
Intensive Care, Sleeping Beauty

Intensive Care by Mike Harris
Ep 4 Sleeping Beauty
Nick's friends from Canada arrive. One of them has a cold and he worries she may infect Cath, who is still very poorly.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.

THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b07x6j4l)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

THU 11:30 21 Shades of Noir: Lee Child on John D MacDonald (b07x6j4n)
As the author of the internationally renowned Jack Reacher series, Lee Child knows how to draw his readers into a story.

And for decades he's been intrigued by the unusual life of John D MacDonald. Born in 1916, MacDonald was from a comfortable Pennsylvanian family. He went to Harvard and worked in naval intelligence during The Second World War. mustering out as a Lieutenant Colonel. It was what the British would call "a good war".
But Lee Child has always been confused by what happened next. With the pick of General Motors, IBM or maybe even The Pentagon before him - this Harvard MBA promptly spent five months, sitting at a table and hammering out pulp fiction, losing five stone in the process.

After 800,000 words and constant toil he managed to sell a story for $25 dollars. Writing under dozens of pen-names John D rode the paperback boom, crafting more than 60 novels in all and creating what Lee Child considers to be his greatest creation - the 21 novels featuring his world-weary "salvage consultant" and righter of wrongs, Travis McGee.

Lee Child considers the mystery at the heart of John D's work, and the mysterious life of one of popular fiction's most enigmatic authors.

Produced by Kev Core.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b07x19lf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 Objects of Desire (b07xh912)
The Unlovely

This is the story of how the things we accumulate around us say more than we might imagine about who we are.

"The fate of the object," said the French thinker Jean Baudrillard, "has been claimed by no-one." Unless, of course, the object in question is the Mona Lisa or the Albert Jewel. In these programmes, Matthew Sweet will be looking at the other stuff. The cups. The spoons. The knick-knacks. The things we might keep, even if we don't quite have the room for them.

Through the prism of what people have in their homes, Objects of Desire explores the work of sociologists and anthropologists like Pierre Bourdieu and Mary Douglas, and philosopher Gaston Bachelard, in order to understand the curious mixture of display, memory, emotion and chance that informs the objects we surround ourselves with.

Episode Four - The Unlovely. How do we make accommodations with objects in our homes and in our lives that we find ugly, or burdensome?

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b07x19lh)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b07x19lk)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b07x19lm)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 Britain's Black Past (b07x6j4q)
Robert Wedderburn

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

The second week of programmes moves towards the 19th century and Abolition.

In this ninth episode, Professor Gerzina discovers the story of Robert Wedderburn, the son of a plantation owner and an enslaved woman. His radical views became so challenging to the British establishment that he was imprisoned several times for sedition and blasphemy.

With Professor Alan Rice, Professor Joan Anim-Addo and novelist Steve Martin.

Presenter Gretchen Gerzina is the author of Black in England: Life before Emancipation. She is Dean of the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts and also presents book programmes on NPR.

The music in this series is by the 18th century composer Ignatius Sancho, and performed by the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra.

Reader: Paterson Joseph
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b07x5vs9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Drama (b07x6j4s)
McLevy, The Last Goodbye

Victorian detective drama starring Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond.

Written by David Ashton.

Episode four: The Last Goodbye.

A saboteur at the docks has been shot in the back and McLevy is under suspicion. In disgrace with his superiors and feeling disowned by a still-disapproving Jean, he presses on with his investigation - but, after the opening of the new docks, nothing will ever be the same again for McLevy, Jean, Mulholland and Roach.

Other parts played by the cast.
Producer/Director: Bruce Young
BBC Scotland.

THU 15:00 Ramblings (b07x6j4v)
Series 34, The South Downs Way

Clare Balding walks the The South Downs, from Bo Peep to Alfriston, in the company of writers June Goodfield and Lynne Truss. They've both been involved in a project for local people to write a new version of Eleanor Farjeon's poem, A Sussex Alphabet. Eleanor may be best known for the words to the much loved hymn Morning Has Broken. June and Lynne adore the South Downs although Lynne admits to being something of a timid walker, happier to be in a group and to carry a big stick. The day's walk inspired Clare to add her own contribution to the enterprise, after Amanda Elms of the South Downs National Park, explains the lifecycle of the Damselfly

D is for Damselfly

Summer's golden glow started to fade
With a walk ancient footsteps had made
Regular steps along the grassy path
To the rythmic beat of a wooden staff.
Gentle chat as we looked far beyond
When we spotted a stray from the nearby pond

A long insect lying on the ground
Not making a movement or a sound.
Pairs of bright blue spots along its back
Like eyes shining on a cloth of black.

Wings open, their delicate filigree
Paused and framed for all to see.
"What is it doing?" I began,
Ignorant of their brief lifespan.

"It's dying" came the instant reply
I swallowed hard and tried not to cry.
A beautiful creature swift and fast
Living the day that would be its last.

Without a whimper, minus a mess
A Damselfly in silent distress.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b07x1czs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (b07x1rcw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b07x6j4x)
Andrea Arnold

Oscar winning director Andrea Arnold discusses her road movie American Honey with Francine Stock.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b07x19lp)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b07x19lr)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07x19lt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 It's Not What You Know (b07x6jcr)
Series 4, Episode 3

Joe Lycett discovers how well a panel of celebrity guests know their nearest and dearest.

This week Joe probes into the lives of of Terry Christian, Jocelyn Jee Esien and Aisling Bea

Production coordinator: Emily Hallett

Producer: Matt Stronge

A BBC Studios production.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b07x6jct)
Rob is refusing to hide away, and Shula still has doubts.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b07x19lw)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07x6j4j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b07x6jz0)
Black Lives Matter

David Aaronovitch looks at important issues in the news.

THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b07x6jz2)
Careers without College

Business discussion show.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b07x19lp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 In Our Time (b07x6j4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b07x19ly)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b07x19m0)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07zj391)
Conrad and Eleanor, Episode 4

The story of a marriage.

When Conrad fails to return from a science conference, Eleanor wonders if it is because of the affair she is having. But he has known about it for years.

Perhaps it's because his research into transgenic monkey hearts is stalling; perhaps he is sick of having the less successful career of the two of them?

While he has been the main carer for the children, Eleanor's work with stem cells has forged ahead. And now the children are all grown up. They suspect Eleanor of murdering their father, but El secretly fears that what has driven Con away is his discovery of their daughter Cara's parentage.

While his family in Manchester scrabble for clues and reasons, Conrad - alone, confused, and on the run from a crazed animal rights activist - loses himself in the cold foggy streets of Bologna, and revisits the stages of his long marriage to El, from the happiness of the year of Cara's birth to the grief and anger he now feels.

Both partners are forced to re-examine their marriage, and become aware of the shifting balance of power between them. In the process, they move closer to an understanding of what it is that matters most to each of them.

Read by Penny Downie, Robert Glenister and Jasmine Hyde
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 23:00 Small Scenes (b03h3fxj)
Series 1, Episode 4

Last in this current series of comedy sketches starring Daniel Rigby, Sara Pascoe, Mike Wozniak and Henry Paker. This week, we meet the funniest (and unhappiest) man in the world and also listen in on a couple of lorry drivers as they discuss hopes, dreams and life on the road.

Written by the cast and Benjamin Partridge with additional material from Madeleine Brettingham.

Produced by Simon Mayhew-Archer.

THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07x6866)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


FRIDAY 14 OCTOBER 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b07x19ns)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b07y9qkj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07x19nv)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07x19nz)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07x19p1)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b07x19p3)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07x6mdv)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Kate Bottley.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b07x19p5)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03srqz5)
Great Bustard

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the great bustard. Great bustards, one of the heaviest flying birds in the world, were most common in Wiltshire and East Anglia but in the past they were hunted to extinction and the last known breeding birds in the UK were in 1832.

Today, great bustards are back on Salisbury Plain, thanks to the work of the Great Bustard Group. The Group aims to establish a self-sustaining population in the UK.

FRI 06:00 Today (b07x6mdx)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b07x1lhl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b07y9rtv)
The Invention of Angela Carter, Being Loved

Edmund Gordon's vivid and illuminating portrait of Angela Carter is the first biography of her since her death almost twenty five years ago. Today, motherhood, and publishing her last two joyous and comic novels.

Read by Emma Fielding
Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07x19p7)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07x6mdz)
Intensive Care, Bottom's Dream

Intensive Care by Mike Harris
Ep 5 Bottom's Dream
Cath has come out of her coma. Nick fusses around her, anxious she will relapse.

Director/Producer Gary Brown.

FRI 11:00 The Intimate Art of Tattoo (b07x6mf1)
Laurence Llewelyn Bowen considers some of the subject matter that people across the UK are having tattooed on their bodies. He uncovers arm sleeve tributes to family members, vivid Japanese back pieces and dotwork renderings of Hollywood actors.

Matt Lodder, lecturer in contemporary art at the University of Essex, views tattooing as an artistic medium responding to the visual culture around it. "People want to have on their bodies the same things that they hang on their walls. Tattoo collectors feel willing and able to pick and choose from a wide spectrum of things - Japanese to graphic culture to traditional western tattooing to riffs on anthropological traditions from around the world. This variety characterises contemporary tattooing."

Whether an assortment of unconnected images, or carefully considered full body masterpieces, Laurence asks what the tattoos on people's bodies say about their lives.

At Blythe House, the West London storage facility for the Wellcome Collection, he scrutinises the link between tattoos and criminality with Dr Gemma Angel, a research fellow at UCL's Institute of Advanced Studies. She shows him a collection of preserved tattooed human skins from 19th Century France.

Of course, many people's extensive tattooing is concealed from the outer world. Ivan Carter is a project manager from Cambridge, with a Japanese dragon adorning his back. You can watch a video of him on the Radio 4 website. We'll also join John, a senior city financier, finishing off his full body suit. "Some people I know were absolutely astonished when they discovered I was so fully tattooed as I am. Not everyone is fully approving. Not many people I work with will have visible tattoos. It's the tension between your outer world and inner world that's interesting."

And, at the end of this second programme in the two-part series, Laurence decides whether or not to join the ranks of the estimated quarter of the UK population with a permanent inking.

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 11:30 Deborah Frances-White Rolls the Dice (b07x6mf3)
Series 2, Saving Brother Ryan

Comedian Deborah Frances-White, having recalled her days as a teenage Jehovah's Witness in Australia, hears from a young Canadian man and decides to rescue him from the movement.

With the additional vocal talents of Alex Lowe (Barry from Watford), Margaret Cabourn-Smith (John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme) and Laurence Dobiesz (What the Papers Say).

In this second episode, Deborah Francis-White travels out to Canada to rescue a 23yr old man from the clutches of the Jehovah's Witness elders. She pretends to be his aunt and teaches him comedy improvisation and how to date a girl. Her hilarious adventures include sharing a legal high with Ryan and trying to talk her way out of being trapped in a closed room by FBI - like elders of the religious movement. She tries to escape without getting Ryan into further trouble.


A So Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b07x19p9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 Objects of Desire (b07xh96q)
The Nest

This is the story of how the things we accumulate around us say more than we might imagine about who we are.

"The fate of the object," said the French thinker Jean Baudrillard, "has been claimed by no-one." Unless, of course, the object in question is the Mona Lisa or the Albert Jewel. In these programmes, Matthew Sweet will be looking at the other stuff. The cups. The spoons. The knick-knacks. The things we might keep, even if we don't quite have the room for them.

Through the prism of what people have in their homes, Objects of Desire explores the work of sociologists and anthropologists like Pierre Bourdieu and Mary Douglas, and philosopher Gaston Bachelard, in order to understand the curious mixture of display, memory, emotion and chance that informs the objects we surround ourselves with.

Episode Five: The Nest. In which Matthew explores the relationships we have with our childhood homes, and the ways in which we use our homes and possessions as a refuge.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b07x19pc)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b07x19pf)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b07x19ph)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 Britain's Black Past (b07x6rr5)
Nathaniel Wells

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

The second week of programmes moves towards the 19th century and Abolition.

In the final programme of the series, Professor Gerzina discovers an unknown and challenging story. Nathaniel Wells was the son of a plantation owner and an enslaved woman, and he inherited a vast fortune from his father. He set himself up in a country estate in Chepstow and became the first black High Sheriff in Britain, but continued to run his father's plantations in the West Indies, where enslaved people were treated appallingly.

Recorded on location at the Piercefield Estate in Chepstow. With Anne Rainsbury, Curator of the Chepstow Museum.

Presenter Gretchen Gerzina is the author of Black in England: Life before Emancipation. She is Dean of the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts and also presents book programmes on NPR.

The music in this series is by the 18th century composer Ignatius Sancho, and performed by the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra.

Readers: Jonathan Keeble, Kathy Tyson, James Murray
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b07x6jct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b04gwk84)
The Basin

The Basin by Dan Allum

When Nina wakes the morning after her wedding to find her new husband sitting outside their trailer skinning a rabbit, it's a vivid reminder that her life has changed completely overnight. Nina gave up her home and career to become a Traveller's wife and although she's excited to take on the new challenge, she still has to come to terms with why she made such a big and hurried leap in the first place.

Produced by Charlotte Riches.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07x6rr8)
Horticultural panel programme.

FRI 15:45 A Happy Nation (b07x6rrb)
Immigrants currently comprise in the region of 10% of the population in the UK - around 1% of them born in Poland. Set in the not-too-distant future, Agnieszka Dale imagines a Britain where all the Polish immigrants have left the UK. All except for one, Krystyna Kowalska - who is visited by an immigration officer.

Agnieszka Dale is a Polish-born London-based author. Her story Fox Season appeared on Radio 4 in 2015 as part of the Angielski series.

Writer: Agnieszka Dale
Reader: Daniela Denby-Ashe
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b07x6rrd)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 Feedback (b07ysy1r)
Radio 4's forum for audience comment.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b07yszwr)
Elisha and Charlotte - The Best Thing That Ever Happened

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between sisters who were adopted and who share a positive outlook on their lives. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b07x19pm)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07x19pp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b07yszwt)
Susan Calman, Vicki Pepperdine, Francis Wheen and Simon Evans join Chairman Miles Jupp for the latest edition of the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

Producer: Paul Sheehan.
A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b07yqpkd)
Adam is desperate to speak to Ian, and Lynda appeals to Kate's creative flair.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b07x19pr)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07x6mdz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b07yqp3s)
Ruth Davidson MSP, Kate Hoey MP, David Frost

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from the University of Glasgow with a panel including the leader of the Conservatives in Scotland Ruth Davidson MSP, the Labour MP Kate Hoey and David Frost from the Scottish Whisky Association.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b07yszww)
A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 Britain's Black Past (b07yqp3v)
Omnibus 2

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

In this second week of the series, Professor Gerzina hears about new research into the lives of runaway slaves in Scotland, and discovers how one man, Joseph Knight, took the law into his own hands and ended slavery in Scotland for ever. She goes on to explore the moving story of Mary Prince, whose first-hand narrative of her life in slavery is the only account we have by a British woman.

Professor Gerzina discovers the story of a forgotten revolutionary, Robert Wedderburn, and compares the lives of two black people who lived in the higher echelons of English society, in households which were not their own - Dido Belle at Kenwood, and Dr Johnson's servant Francis Barber. They were not quite servance, and not quite family.

The programme ends with the troubling story of Nathaniel Wells, the son of an enslaved mother and plantation owner father. He inherited a massive fortune from his father and went on to become a plantation owner in the West Indies himself.

Presenter Gretchen Gerzina is the author of Black in England: Life before Emancipation. She is Dean of the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts and also presents book programmes on NPR.

Readers: Paterson Joseph, Jonathan Keeble, Kathy Tyson, James Murray.

With music by the 18th century composer Ignatius Sancho, performed by the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b07x19pt)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b07x19pw)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07zj5q6)
Conrad and Eleanor, Episode 5

The story of a marriage.

When Conrad fails to return from a science conference, Eleanor wonders if it is because of the affair she is having. But he has known about it for years.

Perhaps it's because his research into transgenic monkey hearts is stalling; perhaps he is sick of having the less successful career of the two of them?

While he has been the main carer for the children, Eleanor's work with stem cells has forged ahead. And now the children are all grown up. They suspect Eleanor of murdering their father, but El secretly fears that what has driven Con away is his discovery of their daughter Cara's parentage.

While his family in Manchester scrabble for clues and reasons, Conrad - alone, confused, and on the run from a crazed animal rights activist - loses himself in the cold foggy streets of Bologna, and revisits the stages of his long marriage to El, from the happiness of the year of Cara's birth to the grief and anger he now feels.

Both partners are forced to re-examine their marriage, and become aware of the shifting balance of power between them. In the process, they move closer to an understanding of what it is that matters most to each of them.

Read by Penny Downie, Robert Glenister and Jasmine Hyde
Abridged by Eileen Horne
Produced and Directed by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b07x2zdd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07x6mf5)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b07yqp3x)
Norbert and Trish - A Lovely Life Together

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a couple who met only 5 years ago but have made the most of their twilight romance. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b07x20bx)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b07x20bx)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b07x2zcy)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b07x2zcy)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b07x5vrl)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b07x5vrl)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b07x6j4j)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b07x6j4j)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b07x6mdz)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b07x6mdz)

21 Shades of Noir: Lee Child on John D MacDonald 11:30 THU (b07x6j4n)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b07x2zdd)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b07x2zdd)

A Happy Nation 15:45 FRI (b07x6rrb)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b07x1dnd)

A Point of View 23:50 SUN (b07x1dnd)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b07yszww)

Afternoon Drama 14:15 FRI (b04gwk84)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b07wphhk)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b07x2xlj)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b07wn4bt)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b07ww892)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b07yqp3s)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b07x12m5)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b07x19lp)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b07x19lp)

Balm of Hurt Minds 19:45 SUN (b07x1svs)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b07x1czn)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b07x1czn)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b07x2xrd)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b07zj21n)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b07zj2mw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b07zj391)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b07zj5q6)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b07k0k4h)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b07x20bv)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b07x20bv)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b07y7j8w)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b07y7j8w)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b07y9p10)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b07y9p10)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b07y9qkj)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b07y9qkj)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b07y9rtv)

Britain's Black Past 13:45 MON (b07x2s1t)

Britain's Black Past 13:45 TUE (b07x2zd4)

Britain's Black Past 13:45 WED (b07x5vrs)

Britain's Black Past 13:45 THU (b07x6j4q)

Britain's Black Past 13:45 FRI (b07x6rr5)

Britain's Black Past 21:00 FRI (b07yqp3v)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b07x18wc)

Conversations on a Bench 16:30 SUN (b07x1rxf)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b07x2zd8)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b07x2zd8)

Deborah Frances-White Rolls the Dice 11:30 FRI (b07x6mf3)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b07x1lhl)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b07x1lhl)

Digital Human 16:30 MON (b07x2s20)

Drama 14:30 SAT (b07x12m1)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b07wndxx)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b07x1rct)

Drama 14:15 MON (b07x2s1w)

Drama 14:15 TUE (b07x2zd6)

Drama 14:15 WED (b07x5vrv)

Drama 14:15 THU (b07x6j4s)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 TUE (b07x2zdt)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b07wn4b9)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b07x198n)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b07x19d2)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b07x19h2)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b07x19l9)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b07x19p5)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b07ww88n)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b07ysy1r)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b07wt5tx)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b07x2zp8)

Food Chains 00:30 SUN (b048nsmz)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b07x1mt5)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b07x1mt5)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b07x5vsh)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b07wn4bh)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b07x6j4l)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b07x199v)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b07x19dl)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b07x19hq)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b07x19lw)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b07x19pr)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b07ww88g)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b07x6rr8)

Gunning For Education 20:00 MON (b07x2xlg)

Gunning For Education 11:00 WED (b07x2xlg)

Hardeep's Sunday Lunch 13:30 SUN (b07x1mt7)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b07x6j4g)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b07x6j4g)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b07x19dn)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b07x2zpb)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b07x2zpb)

It's Not What You Know 18:30 THU (b07x6jcr)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b07ww88j)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b07x6rrd)

Lemn Sissay's Origin Stories 11:30 MON (b07x20c1)

Life: An Idiot's Guide 23:00 TUE (b044w2t8)

Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair 23:00 WED (b07x5vsm)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b07wn4c6)

Mae Martin's Guide to 21st Century Sexuality 23:15 WED (b07x629l)

Man at the Helm 11:30 WED (b07x5vrq)

Mark Steel's in Town 18:30 WED (b07x5vs3)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b07wn49p)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b07x18qr)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b07x197s)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b07x19cr)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b07x19gr)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b07x19kz)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b07x19ns)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b07x5qqk)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b07x5qqk)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b07x12lz)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b07x12lz)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b07x5vrx)

Moral Maze 22:15 SAT (b07wtd78)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b07x5vsc)

Moving Pictures 16:00 MON (b07wxc7t)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b07ws0dw)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b07x2zd0)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b07wn49y)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b07x18sg)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b07x198h)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b07x19d0)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b07x19h0)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b07x19l7)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b07x19p3)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b07x18sn)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b07wn4bm)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b07x18wm)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b07x199f)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b07x19d6)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b07x19h6)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b07x19lf)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b07x19p9)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b07wn4b5)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b07x18vd)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b07x18w3)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b07wn4cb)

News 13:00 SAT (b07wn4br)

Objects of Desire 12:04 MON (b07x2s1r)

Objects of Desire 12:04 TUE (b07xh79m)

Objects of Desire 12:04 WED (b07xh8cg)

Objects of Desire 12:04 THU (b07xh912)

Objects of Desire 12:04 FRI (b07xh96q)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b07x1czq)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b07x2zcw)

Open Book 16:00 SUN (b07x1rcw)

Open Book 15:30 THU (b07x1rcw)

PM 17:00 SAT (b07wn4by)

PM 17:00 MON (b07x199q)

PM 17:00 TUE (b07x19dg)

PM 17:00 WED (b07x19hl)

PM 17:00 THU (b07x19lr)

PM 17:00 FRI (b07x19pm)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b07x18zz)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b07wnj7w)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b07x12lq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b07zjmg4)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b07x2xtl)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b07x5qqf)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b07x6j4b)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b07x6mdv)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b07x12m3)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b07x12m3)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b07x12m3)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b07wpgjk)

Quote... Unquote 15:00 MON (b07x2s1y)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b07x1czs)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b07x1czs)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b07x1czs)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b07wtgh7)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b07x6j4v)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b07wn4bf)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b07wn4c8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b07wn49t)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b07x18s6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b07x1982)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b07x19cw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b07x19gw)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b07x19l3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b07x19nz)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b07wn49r)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b07wn49w)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b07wn4c0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b07x18rs)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b07x18s9)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b07x18zg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b07x1980)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b07x198c)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b07x19ct)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b07x19cy)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b07x19gt)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b07x19gy)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b07x19l1)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b07x19l5)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b07x19nv)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b07x19p1)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b07wn4c4)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b07x18zv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b07x199s)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b07x19dj)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b07x19hn)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b07x19lt)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b07x19pp)

Sketchorama 19:15 SUN (b01sjj11)

Small Scenes 23:00 THU (b03h3fxj)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b07x18sz)

Soul Music 11:30 TUE (b07x2zd2)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b07x20bq)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b07vltzl)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b07x18w5)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b07x18vq)

TED Radio Hour 23:00 SUN (b07x1tpr)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b07y5t5z)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b07x1rxh)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b07x1rxh)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b07x2s24)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b07x2s24)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b07x2zp6)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b07x2zp6)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b07x5vs9)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b07x5vs9)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b07x6jct)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b07x6jct)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b07yqpkd)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b07wthc5)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b07x6jz2)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b07x6jz0)

The Case for Doing Nothing 11:00 SAT (b07x20bz)

The Danube Ain't Blue, It's Green 15:30 SAT (b07ws0dy)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b07x6j4x)

The Intimate Art of Tattoo 11:00 FRI (b07x6mf1)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b07x12lx)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b07x12lx)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b07x2zct)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b07x2zct)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b07x1mt9)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b07x5vrn)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b07yszwr)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b07yqp3x)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b07x19hj)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b07ww88s)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b07yszwt)

The Truth about Children Who Lie 11:00 MON (b07pgvjx)

The Unbelievable Truth 12:04 SUN (b07wpgjr)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b07x2s22)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b07x18yl)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b07x199z)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b07x19ds)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b07x19hv)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b07x19m0)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b07x19pw)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b07wtd74)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b07x5vs1)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b07x2xrg)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b07x2zpd)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b07x5vsp)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b07x6866)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b07x6mf5)

Today 07:00 SAT (b07x12lv)

Today 06:00 MON (b07x1991)

Today 06:00 TUE (b07x2zcr)

Today 06:00 WED (b07x5qqh)

Today 06:00 THU (b07x6j4d)

Today 06:00 FRI (b07x6mdx)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03jz1hj)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03mztpj)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03mzv53)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03mztrh)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03mzv4q)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03srqz5)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b07wn4b7)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b07wn4bc)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b07wn4bp)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b07wn4c2)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b07x18tp)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b07x18w1)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b07x18xz)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b07x18zl)

Weather 05:56 MON (b07x198t)

Weather 12:57 MON (b07x199k)

Weather 21:58 MON (b07x199x)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b07x19db)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b07x19dq)

Weather 12:57 WED (b07x19hb)

Weather 21:58 WED (b07x19hs)

Weather 12:57 THU (b07x19lk)

Weather 21:58 THU (b07x19ly)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b07x19pf)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b07x19pt)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b07x1904)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b07wn4bw)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b07x1999)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b07x19d4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b07x19h4)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b07x19lc)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b07x19p7)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b07wsmrp)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b07x2zdb)

World at One 13:00 MON (b07x199m)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b07x19dd)

World at One 13:00 WED (b07x19hd)

World at One 13:00 THU (b07x19lm)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b07x19ph)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b07x199h)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b07x19d8)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b07x19h8)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b07x19lh)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b07x19pc)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b07x12ls)