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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 01 OCTOBER 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b07w5ycx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b07wrr5p)
Another Day in the Death of America, Episode 5

On Saturday 23rd November 2013, ten children were shot dead in the US. The youngest was nine, the oldest was nineteen. They fell in suburbs, hamlets and ghettos. None made the national news. It was just another day in the death of America, where on average seven children and teens are killed by guns daily.

Gary Younge picked 23rd November at random, and set out to tell the stories of the lives lost during that single day.

Samuel Brightmon's shooting was reported in the Dallas Morning News: "Police are investigating after a teenager was fatally shot on Saturday night when walking down the street in Southeast Dallas," the article read. "Police say Samuel Brightmon, 16, and another 16-year-old were walking in the 7300 block of Schepps Parkway around 11 pm when they heard gunshots. As the teens tried to run away, Brightmon was shot and collapsed in the street. Brightmon was taken to Baylor University Medical Center of Dallas where he was pronounced dead. No suspect has been identified."

"That was it," writes Younge. "They didn't have an awful lot to go on. The police report is similarly minimal, adding only that it believed the shooting was not gang-related. There was no profile, no testimony from his school friends or teachers. No sense of who he was, let alone why he was killed. His death was counted. It just didn't count for much."

Abridged by Jo Coombs
Produced by Hannah Marshall
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07w5ycz)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07w5yd3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07w5yd5)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b07w5yd7)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07wm871)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Steve Chalke.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b07wm873)
Living in Antarctica

After hearing weatherman Peter Gibb's adventures in Antarctica on PM, listener Doug Stacey decided to quit and job to take a job at the end of the earth. iPM joins him at a training day. Radio 3's Sarah Walker reads Your News.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b07w5ydb)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b07w5ydd)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Ramblings (b07wgmf4)
Series 34, Hebden Bridge

Clare Balding continues her series of talking to, or about, those who have a real passion for walking. As a teacher, heavily involved with the Duke of Edinburgh Awards scheme, Lynn had always known how beneficial it was for young people to get out into the countryside but when she and her partner Jacqueline, adopted three siblings, who had all experienced emotional difficulties, walking took on a new significance. While the three children, all under ten, find it difficult to be in a confined space together, when out walking they become more co-operative, calmer and can begin to enjoy all it means to be a family. They take Clare on one of their favourite walks from their home in Hebden Bridge.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b07w5ydg)
Farming Today This Week

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b07w5ydj)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b07wmzx4)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b07w5ydl)
Ian Wright

Ian Wright joins Aasmah Mir and the Rev. Richard Coles to discuss his football career, proudest achievements and life after retiring from the game aged 36.

Reporter JP Devlin talks to Saturday Live listener Maria Prowse who talks about the special relationship with her dog- which nearly ended when Maria gave her dog away after her husband died.

Writer India Knight shares her love of dogs and reveals why she decided to choose her own name as a teenager.

Nicola White talks about collecting messages in a bottle: the types of things she's found and meeting up with some of the people whose messages she's discovered.

Enya shares her Inheritance Tracks. She has chosen Claude Debussy, Nocturnes: Nuages and Orinoco Flow.

Award winning comedian David O'Doherty will perform a song and explain why he's written a children's book about avoiding danger.

Ian Wright A Life In Football is out now.
The Goodness of Dogs by India Knight is out now
Nicola White is exhibiting her work at the Royal Naval College in London on the 21st December.
Enya's new album Dark Sky Island is out now.
Danger Really is Everywhere by David O'Doherty and Chris Judge is out now.

Producer: Claire Bartleet
Editor: Karen Dalziel.

SAT 10:30 The Kitchen Cabinet (b07wmcmv)
Series 14, Windsor

Jay Rayner and his panel of food experts are in Windsor.

Joining Jay this week are the food historian Dr Annie Gray, the Catalan-inspired Scottish chef Rachel McCormack, the man bringing the best Middle Eastern flavours to the heart of London Itamar Srulovich, and the king of DIY cooking Tim Hayward.

This week the panel offer advice on using up unwanted pickled onions, how to make the most of mutton, and the advantages of cooking with fire - as well as tips on making party food for forty and the difference between salt beef and pastrami.

They also discuss the kitchens and eating habits of Queen Victoria during her time at nearby Windsor Castle.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant producer: Laurence Bassett

Food consultant: Anna Colquhoun

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 11:00 What Does Theresa Really Think? (b07wmzx6)
Nick Robinson explores the political beliefs and underlying philosophy of the new Prime Minister, Theresa May.

Speaking to those who have worked closely with her over many years - whether in Conservative politics, across the despatch box in the House of Commons, in government or in international negotiations, as well as to friends and family, Nick gets a picture of how Theresa May operates, and what she really thinks.

Producer: Peter Snowdon.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b07w5ydn)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b07w5ydq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b07wmzx8)
The energy deals which cut customers off

Existing energy customers with E.ON, SSE, EDF and British Gas have found themselves locked out of attractively priced tariffs because those deals are only available to new joiners. In 2014, following a series of energy mis-selling scandals, Ofgem created a rule which effectively banned suppliers from excluding existing customers. However in April this year the regulator announced that it no longer planned to enforce that rule, meaning a new generation of tariffs which ignore existing customers have surfaced.

A group comprising some of the UK's main regulators has released its report into price comparison websites. The UK Regulators Network which includes Ofcom, The Financial Conduct Authority and Ofgem found many consumers don't understand exactly how the sites make money from them. It comes as the Competition and Markets Authority launches its own review into whether price comparison sites actually benefit consumers. Adam Shaw hears from Dermot Nolan CEO of Ofgem who is also Chair of the UK Regulators Network.

Deutsche Bank, which is one of the biggest lenders in Germany, is in crisis. The US Department of Justice wants £10.8 billion from it for mis-selling mortgage secured bonds before the 2008 financial crash happened. Peter Hahn, Henry Grunfeld Professor of Banking at the London Institute of Banking and Finance, discusses.

Presenter: Adam Shaw
Reporter: Michael Robinson
Producer: Charmaine Cozier
Editor: Andrew Smith.

SAT 12:30 The News Quiz (b07wm6jj)
Series 91, Episode 4

Susan Calman, Frankie Boyle, Baron Finkelstein and Angela Barnes join Chairman Miles Jupp for the latest edition of the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

Producer: Paul Sheehan.
A BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b07w5yds)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b07w5ydv)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b07wm6jy)
Kate Andrews, John Harris, Angela Rayner MP, Nadhim Zahawi MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Newcastle Under Lyme College in Staffordshire with a panel including the news editor of the Institute for Economic Affairs, Kate Andrews, Guardian journalist and author John Harris, Shadow Education Secretary Angela Rayner and the Conservative MP Nahim Zahawi.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b07w5ydx)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?
Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230. Presented by Anita Anand
Call 03700 100 444. Email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Tweet,#BBCAQ.

SAT 14:30 The Forsyte Saga (b07wmzxb)
The Forsytes Returns, Episode 7

by John Galsworthy, dramatised by Shaun McKenna

As Fleur rushes headlong towards her old love, Jon Forsyte, she has no idea how things will rebound on her.

Original music by Neil Brand

Produced & directed by Marion Nancarrow

"The Forsytes Returns" continues John Galsworthy's epic tale of sex, money and power in the lives of an upper middle-class family in London, spanning 50 years from 1886 to 1936. It's narrated by Fleur Forsyte, the baby born at the end of series one. More than 20 years has passed since Soames divorced the love of his life, Irene, who left him after he forced himself upon her and went on to marry his cousin Jo. Fleur then fell head over heels in love with Irene's son, Jon, neither knowing their parents' troubled history and this eventually divided them, with Jon leaving for America with his mother. To mend a broken heart, Fleur married the adoring Michael Mont on the rebound and threw herself into smart society, determined to embrace all that is considered modern. This is the generation that survived the war, now hell-bent on not taking life too seriously.

"The Forsytes Returns" continues BBC Radio 4's dramatisation of all John Galsworthy's Forsyte novels and interludes and covers Books 5 and 6 - "The Silver Spoon" and "Swan Song". Across the week, this 90 minute stand-alone drama will be followed by five 15 minute dramas and concludes on Saturday afternoon with a heartbreaking finale, as Fleur finally has to learn to grow up.

SAT 15:30 Arthur Russell: Vanished into Music (b07wbtsz)
The writer Olivia Laing presents an imaginative portrait of Arthur Russell.

Arthur Russell was a cellist, a composer, a songwriter and a disco auteur. He was active in the New York downtown scene of the 1970s and was a frequent collaborator with the likes of Allen Ginsberg and Philip Glass. Although extremely prolific, his inability to finish projects is often cited as part of the reason that very little of his music was released during his lifetime.

When Arthur Russell died in 1992 his Village Voice obituary read, "Arthur's songs were so personal that it seems as though he simply vanished into his music."

Featuring: Mustafa Ahmed, Joyce Bowden, Steven Hall and Tom Lee

Producer: Martin Williams.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b07w5ydz)
Weekend Woman's Hour: The Girl on the Train, Jo Brand, Amanda Knox

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week.Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.

SAT 17:00 PM (b07w5yf1)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b07wgmfg)
Theresanomics

Theresa May has promised a bigger role for the state in business. The previously unfashionable concept of a comprehensive industrial strategy is back on the agenda. There is a new wariness about foreign investment in strategic industries such as electricity generation. Mrs May also wants to see employee representatives on company boards.

Presenter Evan Davis discusses "Theresanomics" with a panel of entrepreneurs and corporate leaders.

Guests include:

Elizabeth Corley, vice-chair of Allianz Global Investors
David Pitt-Watson, former Chair of Hermes Focus Funds and co-author of The New Capitalists

Producer: Julie Ball.

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07w5yf3)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b07w5yf5)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07w5yf7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b07w5yf9)
Clive Anderson, Francesca Martinez, Paul Feig, Mark Ravenhill, David Essex, Mark Watson, Yann Tiersen, Skye Ross

Clive Anderson and Francesca Martinez are joined by Paul Feig, Mark Ravenhill, David Essex and Mark Watson for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Yann Tiersen and Skye Ross.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b07wmzxd)
Series of profiles of people who are currently making headlines.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b07w5yfc)
Free State of Jones, Abstract Expressionism, Transit, Crisis in Six Scenes, Villette

Free State of Jones is an American war film inspired by the life of Newton Knight and his armed rebellion against the Confederacy in Jones County, Mississippi, during the American Civil War. Written and directed by Gary Ross, the film stars Matthew McConaughey, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Mahershala Ali and Keri Russell.
Crisis in Six Scenes is Woody Allen's first television series. Made for Amazon Studios it also stars Miley Cyrus and Elaine May and is set during the turbulent years of the late 1960s in the USA.
The Royal Academy of Arts in London presents the first major exhibition of Abstract Expressionism to be held in the UK for six decades and features work by Willem de Kooning, Arshile Gorky, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Clyfford Still amongst many others.
Award winning writer Rachel Cusk's new novel Transit documents a writer and her two young sons moving to London following a family collapse. There are many transitions to negotiate - personal, moral, artistic, practical as the writer endeavours to construct a new reality for herself and her children.
Marking the bicentenary of Charlotte Bronte's birth, her novel Villette is brought to life in a striking new adaptation for the Courtyard Theatre in Leeds. Yorkshire writer Linda Marshall-Griffiths reimagines Charlotte Brontë's ground-breaking novel whilst remaining true to its unique insights into loneliness, yearning and the redemptive power of love.

Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Katie Puckrik, Alex Clark and Francis Spufford. The producer was Hilary Dunn.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b07wmzxg)
Radio Dada

Alexei Sayle explores the cultural impact of the Dada movement, 100 years since it was founded.

On 5th of February 1916 a small group of poets, artists and musicians gathered in Zurich at the Cabaret Voltaire nightclub. The gathering would become recognised as the birth of Dada, a nihilistic movement that emerged in response to the trauma of The Great War.

Dada was anti-art, anti-bourgeois, anti-establishment. anti-Dada. From the performance of nonsense poems with a backdrop of gigantic cucumbers, to vitriolic manifestos decrying bourgeois culture, the Dadaists forged a set of anarchic strategies, attitudes and philosophies that would sweep across Europe and America - 'the chaos from which a thousand orders rise', forever changing not only perceptions, but the very definitions of art.

Comedian, writer and one-time art student Alexei Sayle explores the absurdist sounds of a movement that may have been fleeting, but has had a profound impact on the art, music and comedy of the 20th and 21st centuries - from the Goons to Lady Gaga via hay-eating pianos and conceptually rich tunafish sandwiches.

With thanks to:
filmmaker Helmut Herbst for excerpts from his Dada documentary,
Trio EXVOCO for their recording of Karawane by Hugo Ball,
KRAB FM for their interview recording with George Maciunas.

Presenter: Alexei Sayle
Producer: Chris Elcombe
A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b07w6b7t)
Tsar, Peter the Great: The Gamblers

By Mike Walker

Moscow, 1682 and clan rivalry forces the accession of two joint tsars: one, Ivan, is feeble-minded and the other is Peter, a child of ten years old. Sophia, their half-sister, proclaims herself regent and in so doing becomes the first woman to rule Russia, with the Streltsy, the tsar's regiment of ruthless musketeers, on her side. But under-estimating Peter as he grows up could prove a dangerous mistake.

Director Alison Hindell

In the run-up to the centenary of the Russian Revolution in October 2017, Radio 4's ambitious chronicle of Russian rulers continues. 11 plays, in three seasons, from Ivan the Terrible, contemporary of Elizabeth I, to Russia's current Premier, Vladimir Putin, TSAR continues the full-blooded, 'more is more' tradition established in Plantagenet and The Stuarts for Radio 4.

Series One takes in the reigns of Ivan IV (aka The Terrible), Boris Godunov and Peter The Great.

Series Two (Spring 2017) will chronicle the reigns of Catherine the Great; Alexander I and the Napoleonic Wars; and Alexander II and the emancipation of the serfs.

Series Three (Autumn 2017) takes in Nicholas II and the Revolution, the Soviets, and Putin.

The dramas are produced by Alison Hindell and Sasha Yevtushenko.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b07w5yff)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Reporting Terror: A Dangerous Game (b07wc4np)
A string of terrorist attacks in France and Germany dominated the news agenda in summer 2016. Now, some journalists are asking if their approach needs to change. More than 30 years after Margaret Thatcher famously coined the phrase "the oxygen of publicity" when referring to media coverage of the IRA, the French newspaper Le Monde has pledged to stop publishing photographs of terrorists in an attempt to deny them "posthumous glorification". So should media outlets in the UK and Europe change the way in which they cover terrorism?

The BBC's Security Correspondent, Gordon Corera, and an expert panel of journalists and editors from the UK, France and Germany debate the topic at Chatham House, the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London.

They discuss the different considerations journalists have both when reporting live on mass casualty attacks, and on reporting the aftermath. Should the media treat terrorist killings differently to other types of murder? And what's the balance to be struck between reporting terrorism whilst suppressing terrorist propaganda?

Panellists:

Simon Jenkins, Columnist, The Guardian; Editor, The Times (1990-92)

Jonathan Munro, Head of Newsgathering, BBC

Fatima Manji, News Correspondent, Channel 4 News

Amil Khan, Media consultant; Advisor to Syrian Opposition Coalition (2013-14); Middle East Correspondent, Reuters (2003-06)

Sophie Desjardin, Head, French Service, Euronews

Dr Peter Busch, Senior Lecturer, Department of War Studies, King's College London; Senior Broadcast Journalist, Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen

Chair: Gordon Corera, Security Correspondent, BBC
Producer: Alex Burton.

SAT 23:00 Quote... Unquote (b07w9jg3)
Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, returns for its 40th anniversary series.

For forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian KcKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 2

Comedian and writer Arnold Brown
Director, producer and author Lissa Evans
Educationalist and writer Christopher Frayling
Author and critic Erica Wagner

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Reader ... Charlotte Green
Producer ... Carl Cooper
Production co-ordinator ... George Pierpoint

This is a BBC Studios Production.

SAT 23:30 Voices of... (b07syrrs)
The Voices of Annie Briggs

An intimate portrait of the iconic but elusive English folksinger Annie Briggs.

Annie Briggs was a leading figure in the English folk revival of the early 1960's, inspiring Bert Jansch (famously, in Blackwater Side), Sandy Denny, The Watersons and many more. But she was a restless spirit, travelling through the British Isles and Ireland, finding songs and living close to the earth.

As Sandy Denny depicted her in The Pond and the Stream:
Annie wanders on the land.
She loves the freedom of the air.
She finds a friend in ev'ry place she goes.
There's always a face she knows.
I wish that I was there.

And so she remains, now a grandmother living by the water in the west of Scotland. She's always resolutely resisted celebrity and commercial success, withdrawing from the folk scene in the early 1970s, but her legacy - her voice and her attitude - continue to inspire and to carry a link to life as it was once lived in 'the imagined village'.

In this programme, she talks to Alan Hall about childhood holidays singing along with the waves, writing songs while living on a beach in west Ireland, her garden and the wildlife that she shares it with, and the ballad tradition she discovered as a teenager and that she "belongs to".

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


SUNDAY 02 OCTOBER 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b07wn3lp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Food Chains (b04807j2)
Reunited

by Edson Burton.

Bandele refuses to be enslaved by the ghost men who've appeared in his village. He chooses to die rather than be taken with his lover, Amara, on a slave ship.

But the gods do not abandon him. An extraordinary journey across the sea, through generations of creatures, is about to begin. Will he and Amara ever be reunited?

A magical story of reincarnation from poet and playwright Edson Burton, specially commissioned for Bristol Food Connections festival.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07wn3lr)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07wn3lt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07wn3lw)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b07wn3ly)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b07wn9kd)
St. Helen's Sefton

This week's Bells on Sunday, comes from the ancient parish church of St. Helen's, Sefton in Liverpool. There are 8 bells, two each from 1588, 1601, 1815 and 1945. We hear them ringing now, 'Grandsire Triples'.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b07wmzxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b07wn3m5)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b07wn3m9)
The Good Old Days

John McCarthy looks back over the history of nostalgia, tracing the term back to the 17th century when a medical student coined it as a way of describing the bouts of homesickness the Swiss mercenaries were experiencing while fighting far from their native mountains.

In years past, treatment for nostalgia ranged from the application of leeches to being buried alive.

For John, far from being a disease, nostalgia is something that can be harnessed with beneficial results. Reflecting on his own time as a hostage in Lebanon, John explains that nostalgia can strengthen us, as long as it doesn't develop into a morbid obsession.

While homesickness and nostalgia might have plagued soldiers, they have always provided artists and composers with a powerful source of inspiration. Featured music includes Antonín Dvorák's Symphony Number 9 - From The New World, George Butterworth's setting of The Lads in their Hundreds and Robert Schumann's Kinderszenen. Poetry includes the work of John Masefield and Carol Ann Duffy.

John discovers that there is much to be gained from examining nostalgia through the lens of religion. The sermons of C S Lewis, the words of the Buddha and the research of Friar Dr Paul Witts who has studied the role of nostalgia in the life of the local church, all provide fertile material for contemplation. John also draws upon the works of Sigmund Freud and the 18th century British regimental surgeon Robert Hamilton.

John concludes that, while nostalgia certainly has a lot to offer, we shouldn't let it trump an enjoyment of the here now. After all, as the American band Eels so poignantly declare, these could be the good old days.

Presenter: John McCarthy
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b07wn9km)
Australian Drought

Australia has recently suffered some of the worst years of drought since the arrival of Captain Cook. Philippa Hall has been travelling through southern and eastern Australia meeting the farmers struggling to cope. Most have struggled to find feed for their cattle and sheep, many have had to sell their stock and some have abandoned the parched land altogether.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b07wn3mc)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b07wn3mf)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b07wn3mh)
The Battle of Cable Street, Animal Welfare Sunday, Exorcism

Religious and ethical news.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b07wn9kp)
Nicholls Spinal Injury Foundation

Jordan Bone makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Nicholls Spinal Injury Foundation.
Registered Charity Number 1107671
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Nicholls Spinal Injury Foundation'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Nicholls Spinal Injury Foundation'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b07wn3mk)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b07wn3mm)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b07wn3mp)
Taste and See

A Harvest Thanksgiving Service reflecting on the goodness of God.
Live from West Presbyterian Church, Ballymena, Co. Antrim
The preacher is the minister, the Rev Daniel Kane and the service is led by Phyllis Linton, the congregation's Deaconess.

Luke 11.5-13

A Jubilant Thanksgiving
Bringing in the Sheaves
Creation sings the Father's Song
He's always been faithful
For the beauty of the earth
We plough the fields and scatter

Director of Music: Sam Murray.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b07wm6k0)
Against Safe Spaces

John Gray reflects on the controversial "safe spaces" policy being pursued by some universities.

It may have been devised to ensure that people of all identities are entitled to a tolerant environment ...but John Gray argues that the policy not only threatens a fundamental liberal value but represents a demand to be sheltered from human reality.

He says the point of education used to be to learn how to live well in full awareness of the disorder of life. "A lack of realism ...was considered not just an intellectual failing but also a moral flaw".

He says we ignore this lesson of history at our peril.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dwvx5)
Barnacle Goose

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Barnacle Goose. Yapping like terriers, skeins of barnacle geese leave their roosts on mud-flats and fly inland at dawn to feed in grassy fields.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b07wn3mr)
News with Paddy O'Connell including Conservative Party Conference latest. Our political sages Peter Hennessy and John Sergeant reflect on how new party leaders seek to make their mark at conference and Michael Palin pays tribute to travel writer Jan Morris. Reviewing the Sunday papers: journalist Robin Lustig, novelist Frank Cottrell Boyce and pickle pioneer Abi Ramanan.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b07wn3mt)
Adam keeps his distance, and Toby is caught out.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b07wnbj2)
Christiane Amanpour

Kirsty Young's castaway is the journalist and broadcaster Christiane Amanpour. Her career as a reporter was forged in some of the world's most hostile environments from Bosnia to Rwanda and Iraq to Israel. From the early '90s onwards she was so ubiquitous on screen that her peers in the press pack coined the darkly comic phrase "where there's a war, there's Amanpour."

Born to an Iranian father and a British mother, she initially wanted to be a doctor, but the Revolution in Iran in 1979 galvanised her political consciousness and she turned to journalism. Her first major assignment was in Saudi Arabia where she covered the 1990 invasion of Kuwait. She describes her time in Bosnia as a life-changing experience which made her determined to tell the stories of ordinary people caught up in the chaos of conflict.

During her career she has interviewed some of the biggest names on the world stage from Bill Clinton and Tony Blair to Robert Mugabe and Colonel Gaddafi. The winner of 11 Emmy Awards, she now anchors her own nightly television show on CNN although she can be whisked away at a moment's notice to cover major disasters around the globe. She has borne witness to some of history's worst atrocities but what gets her through is her eternal optimism and the courage and dignity of humanity.

Producer: Paula McGinley.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b07wn3mw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b07w9jg9)
Series 76, Episode 8

Nicholas Parsons and guests return for the 76th series of the panel show where participants must try to speak for 60 seconds without hesitation, deviation or repetition. No repetition? That's no small order after nearly 50 years.

Nicholas is joined by Paul Merton, Gyles Brandreth, Josie Lawrence and Katherine Ryan.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Matt Stronge.

It was a BBC Studios production.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b07wnbj8)
Diet and Dementia

For the 850 thousand families in the UK living with dementia, the simple daily practise of eating a meal can escalate into a dreaded challenge. Spurred on by a listener's own experience, Sheila Dillon meets people living with dementia to ask how their relationship with food has changed. She finds out about new food research which could prevent the onset of dementia and speaks to American food writer Paula Wolfert who has transformed her own diet to deal with her Alzheimer's.

Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced by Clare Salisbury

Photo credit: Alison van Diggelen.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b07wn3my)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b07wn3n0)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Hardeep's Sunday Lunch (b07wnbjc)
Series 5, 02/10/2016

In the first programme of this series Hardeep cooks lunch for Anne and Terry Panks. Now in their 80s you might assume they are living a quiet life, enjoying retirement. But nothing could be further from the truth. 40 years ago Anne and Terry converted a dilapidated police station in Wythenshawe, south Manchester, into a hostel called "Copperdale" and over the years have provided a home for almost a thousand vulnerable and sometimes very troubled young men. Whilst two miles away one of their sons has converted a ruined Church into a gym and cultural centre for inner city young people. As Hardeep prepares lunch for them and their extended family he discovers what motives them to try to help these men lead better and more fulfilled lives.

Producers: Phil Pegum and Amanda Hancox.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07wm0l5)
Bath

Eric Robson and his panel of experts are at the University of Bath. Matt Biggs, Anne Swithinbank and Chris Beardshaw answer the horticultural questions from the audience.

This week, the panel discuss rose maintenance and under-planting sunflowers, and recommend the best trees to start an orchard. They also analyse the best direction to plant vegetables and how to keep a large bamboo under control.

Matt Biggs investigates the history behind the ivy-covered Admiralty Citadel.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Hester Cant

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b07wndxv)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover hears about coming to terms with devastating loss, the stigma that used to be associated with divorce, and the health benefits - mental and physical - of running, in the Omnibus of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b07wndxx)
Tsar, Peter the Great: Queen of Spades

By Mike Walker

Peter the Great returns from a grand tour of Europe full of ideas of modernisation. Distracted with the building of his new capital of St Petersburg, and the passion of Catherine, the only woman to meet his match, he ignores his opponents who don't want to be dragged into the eighteenth century. But when his own son Alexei declares his colours, Peter is forced to take action.

Director Alison Hindell.

SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b07wnj7t)
Helen Macdonald - H is for Hawk

Helen Macdonald talks to James Naughtie and readers about her memoir H is for Hawk which won the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction in 2014.

When her father dies and Macdonald is knocked sideways by grief, she becomes obsessed with the idea of training her own goshawk. She buys Mabel for £800 on a Scottish quayside and takes her home to Cambridge.

Since its publication just two years ago, H is for Hawk has already become a classic of nature writing. The book is a record of a spiritual journey - an unflinchingly honest account of Macdonald's struggle with grief during the difficult process of the hawk's taming and her own untaming. At the same time, it's a biography of the brilliant and troubled novelist TH White, best known for The Once and Future King, who also wrote an account of training a goshawk.

Presenter : James Naughtie
Interviewed guest : Helen Macdonald
Producer : Dymphna Flynn

November's Bookclub choice : Kidnapped by RL Stevenson.

SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b07wnj7w)
Seamus Heaney - Death of a Naturalist

Roger McGough marks 50 years since Seamus Heaney published his first collection, Death of a Naturalist. Featuring interviews from Heaney's childhood home of Bellaghy, and archive recordings of the poet reading his work. Poems include Digging, Mid Term Break and Blackberry Picking. Producer Sally Heaven.

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b07wby0z)
Little Brother's Big Secrets

Valued at £80 billion, the UK's junior stock market is hyped as the most successful growth market in the world.

Government incentives - including stamp duty and inheritance tax breaks - mean that more ordinary UK investors are opting for the Alternative Investment Market (AIM).

Set up in 1995 to allow smaller companies to raise funds, AIM is a less-regulated alternative to its big brother, the main London Stock Exchange.

But it is no stranger to controversy.

Once labelled a "casino" by a senior US regulator due to its lax regulation, the market has been hit by a series of recent high profile scandals.

File on Four asks if this light-touch regulation poses a hidden risk for shareholders and if unscrupulous businesses are exploiting AIM to rip off ordinary British investors?

Producer: Alys Harte
Reporter: Simon Cox.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b07wmzxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07wn3n2)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b07wn3n4)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07wn3n6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b07wn3n8)
John Waite

John Waite chooses his BBC Radio highlights.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b07wnj7y)
Kaz has a visitor, and Rob wants to talk strategy.

SUN 19:15 Sketchorama (b061yh01)
Series 4, Episode 2

Award winning actress and comedian Isy Suttie presents the pick of the best live sketch groups currently performing on the UK comedy circuit.

Each week the programme showcases three up and coming groups featuring character, improv, broken and musical sketch comedy.

There are so many incredibly talented and inventive sketch groups on the British Comedy scene, but with no dedicated broadcast format. Sketchorama aims to bring hidden gems and established live acts to the airwaves.

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 19:45 Balm of Hurt Minds (b07yc9x2)
Spinkej by Clare Wigfall

Balm of Hurt Minds - three short stories on the theme of sleep and rest specially commissioned for Radio 4. The first is Spinkej by young British writer Clare Wigfall and is set in Czechoslovakia 1945. An exhausted mother contemplates her sleeping newborn baby.

Ludmila, a young girl falls unwittingly pregnant after a brief relationship with a Soviet soldier. She is sent to a mother and baby unit where she is kept until the baby is born. In her naivety, she is totally unprepared for motherhood, but as she watches the sleeping child a bond begins to form. It is a bond that the staff at the clinic and her mother do not wish to support. When Ludmila, now exhausted, herself falls sleeps what will happen? The reader is Sian Thomas.

SUN 20:00 Feedback (b07wm11l)
Roger Bolton discusses audience views on BBC radio programmes.

The news coming out of Aleppo in Syria becomes more horrific each day but, while the human suffering of civilians caught up in the conflict is undeniable, hard facts about what's happening on the ground are very difficult to come by. As in everything else, the BBC's duty is to remain duly impartial in its reporting. But some listeners believe the BBC has been less than even-handed in its coverage of recent events.

Can the BBC ever be truly neutral in reporting wars? Roger discusses the issue with Dr Peter Busch, Senior Lecturer in War Studies at King's College London, and the BBC's Director of Editorial Policy and Standards, David Jordan.

And is the BBC guilty of pushing stories about its own programmes at the expense of more newsworthy items? Some listeners say they think coverage of The Archers trial and The Great British Bake Off in recent weeks has blurred the line between real news and self-promotion.

Finally - making Tracks. The last episode of Radio 4's nine-part drama goes out on Tuesday 4th October, and one of its producers, James Robinson, gives Roger the inside track on how the programme was conceived and made.

Producer: Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b07wm11j)
Shimon Peres, Nathalie Evans, Arnold Palmer, Bill Mollison, Jean Shepard

Matthew Bannister on

Shimon Peres, the Israeli elder statesman who was twice Prime Minister of his country and won the Nobel Peace Prize for his part in negotiating the Oslo Accord with the Palestinians.

Nathalie Evans who co founded the Twycross Zoo and provided the chimps for the PG Tips TV adverts.

Arnold Palmer, the legendary golfer who won 91 professional titles and was followed by fans known as "Arnie's Army".

Bill Mollison, the Australian author and lecturer who was known as the "father of permaculture".

Produced by Neil George.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b07wmzx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b07wn9kp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 Analysis (b07w9km7)
Tearing Up the Politics Textbook

British politics has been going through a period of rapid and remarkable change. That's a headache for the politicians and for the voters. But spare a thought also for politics professors like Rosie Campbell of Birkbeck, University of London. Following the results of the 2015 election and the EU referendum, she ask whether it's time for her and her colleagues to bin their old lecture notes and start afresh. How should we understand this new landscape where old assumptions about the dominance of two mainstream class-based parties and the crucial role of a few swing seats have become outdated? And what should go in the new politics textbooks?

Producer: Rob Walker.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b07wn3nd)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b07wgmf6)
Tim Burton

Francine Stock enters Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children with Tim Burton. The director reveals why he loves Blackpool so much and why its pleasure beach reflects his state of mind.

Director Babak Anvari reveals how much his horror movie, Under The Shadow, set in the Iran-Iraq war, is autobiographical.

The director of When Marnie Was There discusses the popularity of British children's literature in Japan.

Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey takes us through the history of peculiar children in cinema.

SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b07wn3m9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]


MONDAY 03 OCTOBER 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b07wn3r1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b07wc303)
Higher Education - Crisis or Change?

Higher education - crisis or change? A special programme exploring the role, meaning and future of a university education in a globalised world. It was once assumed that university graduates, particularly those from working class backgrounds, had a route to social mobility via a degree. Sara Goldrick-Rab, Professor of Higher Education Policy and Sociology at Temple University, tells Laurie Taylor why her new study suggests the end of the American dream of self improvement. Half the students, in her sample of 3,000 disadvantaged young adults, dropped out of college due to a lack of financial resources. Lorenza Antonucci, Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Teeside University, compared the lives of students in England, Italy and Sweden and found that, contrary to what is assumed by HE policies, participating in university education now exacerbates inequality. Thomas Docherty, Professor of English and of Comparative Literature at the University of Warwick, joins the discussion, placing these developments in the context of an increasing marketisation of education which, he argues, has turned the university into the servant of the economy.

Producer: Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b07wn9kd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07wn3r4)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07wn3r6)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07wn3r8)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b07wn3rb)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07yr8y7)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Steve Chalke.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b07wn3rd)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced by Sally Challoner.

MON 05:56 Weather (b07wn3rg)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03jz1hj)
Whooper Swan

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the whooper swan. The elegance and beauty of wild swans has inspired writers and musicians across the centuries - the most familiar perhaps being Tchaikovsky's ballet Swan Lake, which may well have been inspired by the Whooper swan.

MON 06:00 Today (b07wn3rq)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (b07wp83q)
Soldiering on: the British Army, Lenin and Putin

On Start the Week Tom Sutcliffe talks to the former Chief of the General Staff Sir Richard Dannatt about the history of the British Army, its role in present conflicts and relations with NATO. The writer Ben Macintyre reveals the wartime antics of one of the most secret regiments, the SAS and the historian Catherine Merridale recreates Lenin's journey across Europe in the midst of the Great War. John Lough was NATO's first representative based in Moscow and explores the tensions on Russia's borders.
Producer: Katy Hickman.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b07jxsy3)
The Return, Episode 1

In this powerful memoir, Libyan novelist Hisham Matar describes the state of hope and grief he has endured in the two decades since his father, Jaballa, was kidnapped by Qaddafi's regime in 1990. Imprisoned and kept isolated from other prisoners, Jaballa managed to send only a handful of letters to his family before he disappeared without trace. To this day, no-one is sure what happened to him, although it is likely that he died in a massacre at Abu Salim prison in Tripoli in 1996.

Living in exile since the 1970s, Hisham returned to Libya for the first time in 2012, following the revolution that brought down Qaddafi and his regime. In beautiful language, he describes the difficult state of exile, its mix of guilt and pain, as well as the powerful meetings with his uncles and cousins, many of whom had also been imprisoned, and for whose release he campaigned tirelessly.

"You make a man disappear to silence him but also to narrow the minds of those left behind, to pervert their soul and limit their imagination. When Qaddafi took my father, he placed me in a space not much bigger than the cell Father was in. I paced back and forth, anger in one direction, hatred in the other, until I could feel my insides grow small and hard. And, because I was young, and hatred and anger are a young man's emotions, I tricked myself into thinking the transformation was good, that it was akin to progress, a sign of vigour and strength."

The reader, Khalid Abdalla, is an actor and political activist who was born in Britain after his parents were forced to leave Egypt in the late 1970s - his father was a leading student activist there and was imprisoned several times.

Reader: Khalid Abdalla

Writer: Hisham Matar

Abridger: Anna Magnusson

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07wn3rs)
Jo Malone, Bella Younger

Jo Malone, one of the UK's most successful entrepreneurs, launched her beautician business in 1989 and began making small samples of moisturiser and bath oil for clients. In 1999 she sold her eponymous fragrance business to Estee Lauder for "undisclosed millions". Jo left the company in 2006 and five years later launched her new fragrance brand Jo Loves. She joins Jane to discuss her memoir, Jo Malone: My Story.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07xh51w)
Writing the Century: Stannington, Episode 1

Writing the Century, the series that explores the twentieth century through the words and experiences of real people.

In 1950 at the age of 17, Marjorie Wilson was a student nurse caring for children with tuberculosis at Stannington Children's Sanatorium in Morpeth, Northumberland. The drama is based on her interviews and freely adapted by Margaret Wilkinson.

Suffering from TB, twelve year old Alan is admitted to Stannington Sanatorium to join his bother Ken.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.

MON 11:00 A Casual Clearance (b07wpf5n)
After her mother dies, Clare Jenkins explores the practical and emotional difficulties of clearing out her parents' home.

Mabel Jenkins died in May 2015, after two months in a care home and 25 years in a sheltered housing flat. Clare and her siblings had to decide which of their parents' possessions they should keep, and what to let go.

Guardian writer Deborah Orr and her brother had faced the same dilemma a couple of years earlier, when their mother died at the family home in Motherwell, near Glasgow. And Times columnist Robert Crampton has been going through the process this year, clearing out his parents' house in Hull.

What is important to keep at such a time? Is it the letters, diaries and photos, or the expensive, but disliked, heirlooms? Which objects seem pathetic, when removed of meaning? What emotions surface during the clearing-out process?

Treasured possessions often have stories to tell, secrets to give up. Clare and her sisters discovered this when rifling through their mother's black tin box. So did Deborah, when her brother opened the pillbox their mother always clutched tight to her. Children can often be surprised by evidence of their parents' younger selves, including their younger voices.

In this programme - which includes archive recordings of Jenkins family get-togethers - Clare and her sisters, together with Deborah and Robert, reflect on these questions and issues. They consider the symbolism of inconsequential treasures such as old tea sets, job references and children's hair clippings - mundane objects that attain the status of holy relics because of the meaning a parent attached to them.

A Pennine production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 11:30 Lemn Sissay's Origin Stories (b07wpf5q)
The Bed Under the Stairs

Batman was an orphan; Lisbeth Salander, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, was an orphan; Superman was an orphan and a foundling. Cinderella was a foster child. Darth Vader - well, they can't all be winners. Lemn Sissay returns to BBC Radio 4 with a comic and poetic look at the treatment of children raised in care, orphans and foster children in popular culture, comparing them with reality. Because it surely says something about how we view them that we create so many for fiction.
Lemn will explore the gap between fiction and reality, based on his own experiences of growing up in care as well as those of some special guests.

1. THE BED UNDER THE STAIRS

In this first episode, Lemn discusses his experiences as a foster child, comparing them to the life of Harry Potter. Like Harry, Lemn was never told the truth about what happened to his parents. Like Harry, he found his foster parents harsh and unforgiving. But, like Harry, he came through those problems, avoided the dementors, and grew up.

As well as storytelling, comedy and poetry, Lemn imagines an interview with Vernon and Petunia Dursley - Harry's foster parents. Finally, they get to tell their side of the story.

Written and performed by ... Lemn Sissay
Producer ... Ed Morrish

Lemn Sissay is the author of six collections of poetry. He has also written plays for stage and BBC radio. His radio documentary Child of the State was nominated for the 2010 Sony Awards, and last year's two-part series for Radio 4, Lemn Sissay's Homecoming was described by The Spectator as "a poignant, mind-stretching half-hour ... This was truly innovative radio", and caused The Observer to remark, "What a thing to hear in Radio 4's 6.30pm slot - the sound of genuine happiness; also regret, anger, wonder, bursting from the radio with the unexpected exuberance of a child dancing at a chamber concert ... terrific radio".

Lemn was the first poet to write for the Olympics 2012 and received an MBE for Services to Literature. He is associate artist at the Southbank Centre, an (hon) Doctor of Letters, and currently the Chancellor of the University of Manchester. If you should Google "Lemn Sissay" all the returning hits will be about him. There is only one person named Lemn Sissay in the world.

LEMN SISSAY'S ORIGIN STORIES IS A BBC STUDIOS PRODUCTION.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b07wn3rv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (b07wpf5s)
Series 3, The Sinister Hand Part 1

Neal Shepperson asks, "What determines left or right handedness and why are us lefties in the minority?"

When we started investigating this question it became clear that there were just too many scientific mysteries to squeeze into one episode. So there are two whole episodes devoted to this very Curious Case.

One in ten people are left-handed, but where does this ratio come from and when did it appear in our evolutionary past?

Hannah talks to primatologist Prof Linda Marchant from Miami University about Neanderthal teeth and termite fishing.

Adam consults handedness expert Prof Chris McManus from University College London. He's been trying to track down the genes responsible for whether we're right or left handed.

If you have any Curious Cases for the team to investigate please email curiouscases@bbc.co.uk

Presenter: Adam Rutherford & Hannah Fry
Producer: Michelle Martin.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b07wn3rx)
Classic car investment, Acupuncture and fertility

Leading fertility experts have told You & Yours that some acupuncture clinics could be misleading couples who are desperate to have a child. Some acupuncturists believe they can improve natural fertility and increase the chances of success in IVF treatment. But the British Fertility Society is concerned that the scientific evidence doesn't support these claims. You & Yours has seen claims from some acupuncturists that their treatment improves fertility by reducing stress, promoting ovulation and improving blood-flow to the pelvic area. But senior doctors have told us that couples could be wasting money and time that would be better spent on a medical diagnosis and treatment.

You & Yours has discovered that energy companies are holding on to millions of pounds of customers' money, without telling them. One of our listeners found that his energy supplier had collected £2000 of over-payments on his account. They agreed to return it, but only after he discovered the size of the credit himself and asked for it back. The regulator, Ofgem, says customers can request refunds at any point if they believe they've paid too much, but suppliers aren't required to give refunds automatically. We ask if it is fair for companies to hang on to large amounts of customers' money.

If you are lucky enough to have money to invest for the future, then the stock market, gold, or even vintage wine are familiar options. But how about buying a 1980s Delorean sports car? Some classic cars have increased in value dramatically in recent years, bringing impressive returns for their owners. We investigate whether they are a realistic and sensible investment, or just something to enjoy owning.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.

MON 12:57 Weather (b07wn3rz)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b07wn3s1)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 Britain's Black Past (b07wpf5v)
The Invisible Presence

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

Over two weeks, Professor Gerzina travels across Britain and talks to historians, unearthing new evidence about Britain's black past. From a country estate in Chepstow, via the docks of Liverpool, to grand houses in London and Bristol, she evokes the daily texture of black people's lives.

In the first programme in the series, Professor Gerzina travels to Sunderland Point to discover a remote grave in the corner of a windswept field - a memorial to a young black cabin boy, abandoned on the coast by his slave-owning master. This poignant story sparks questions about how we remember black figures from the past.

With Professor Alan Rice, novelist Steve Martin, historians Professor James Walvin and Dr Caroline Bressey of the Equiano Centre at University College London.

The music in this series is by the 18th century composer Ignatius Sancho, and performed by the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra.

Readers: Paterson Joseph, Jonathan Keeble
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b07wnj7y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Drama (b05r3w3j)
Euston to Whitechapel

When London taxi driver Marshall detours suddenly off the rank at Euston Station to pick up a passenger he mistakes for his estranged daughter, he does not expect what happens next. Over a 45-minute trip to the Royal London Hospital, Marshall revisits the story of his life.

Meanwhile, paramedic Corinne is called to attend a road accident outside Euston and also travels to the Royal London, transporting an unconscious patient. As her patient's condition deteriorates it requires all her skill and compassion to keep her passenger alive.

For both cabbie Marshall and medic Corinne, a routine afternoon's work turns into a life and death journey. In this real-time drama, Marshall's and Corinne's stories shadow one another and interweave like vehicles caught in London traffic.

Written by Nicola Baldwin

Director: Celia de Wolff
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 15:00 Quote... Unquote (b07wpgjk)
Quote ... Unquote, the popular quotations quiz, returns for its 40th anniversary series.

For forty years, Nigel Rees has been joined by writers, actors, musicians, scientists and various comedy types. Kenneth Williams, Judi Dench, PD James, Larry Adler, Ian KcKellen, Peter Cook, Kingsley Amis, Peter Ustinov... have all graced the Quote Unquote stage.

Join Nigel as he quizzes a host of guests on the origins of sayings and well-known quotes, and gets the panel to share their favourite anecdotes.

Episode 3

Comedian, actor and writer Dan Antopolski
Presenter, actress and author Janet Ellis
Journalist and Broadcaster Kirsty Lang
Journalist and ballroom dancer John Sergeant

Presenter ... Nigel Rees
Reader ... Charlotte Green
Producer ... Carl Cooper
Production co-ordinator ... George Pierpoint

This is a BBC Studios Production.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b07wnbj8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 Moving Pictures (b07wpgjm)
A Flower Painting by Rachel Ruysch

A three-part series for BBC Radio 4 offering the chance to take a long, slow look at great artworks, photographed in incredible detail.

What's hiding in the undergrowth of Rachel Ruysch's bold and beautiful flower painting? Follow the link to explore the picture and you'll be able to zoom in and see the tiniest details as you listen. This is a world where buds hiss like snakes, poppies twirl and tiny insects devour - a vibrant, fecund jungle, full of uncanny life.

Cathy FitzGerald hears how this great Dutch artist was influenced by her unusual childhood as the daughter of Frederik Ruysch, maker of one of the world's great curiosity cabinets. Frederik Ruysch's weird tableaux - created from human skeletons and embalmed bodies, insects and plants - were hugely popular in 17th century Amsterdam and his young daughter Rachel was almost certainly involved in their creation. Is this what brings a touch of strangeness to her brilliantly observed vases and bouquets?

Cathy talks to art-experts, garden historians and artists and asks why this brilliant painter - one of the most sought-after of her age - is so little known today.

Image: Roses, Convolvulus, Poppies, and Other Flowers in an urn on a Stone Ledge by Rachel Ruysch, c.1680s, from the collection of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. Photograph by Google Arts and Culture.

Presenter and Producer: Cathy FitzGerald
A White Stiletto production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b07wpgjp)
Children's Literature

C.S. Lewis is thought of as one of the most influential children's authors of the 20th century. The Chronicles of Narnia series has inspired generation after generation of children. The story is gripping; and the magical land of Narnia excites the imagination. But just how much do children today know about the overt parallels to the Christian story contained within the books? And does it matter as long as it's a great story? Is C.S. Lewis one of a kind when it comes to the incorporation of religion into mainstream children's fiction? Do religious language, ideas and imagery have anything to offer children's literature in today's increasingly secular society?

Ernie Rea discusses the role of religion in children's literature with the novelist Geraldine McCaughrean, whose work includes the retelling of classic stories for children, including The Canterbury Tales, The Pilgrim's Progress and Moby Dick; Frank Cotterell Boyce, screenwriter, novelist and author of 'Millions' which won the 2004 Carnegie Medal for children's literature; and Nicholas Tucker, an educational psychologist and academic who has written widely on children's literature.

Producer: Dan Tierney
Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.

MON 17:00 PM (b07wn3s3)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07wn3s5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 The Unbelievable Truth (b07wpgjr)
Series 17, Episode 1

David Mitchell hosts the panel game in which four comedians are encouraged to tell lies and compete against one another to see how many items of truth they're able to smuggle past their opponents.

Henning Wehn, Rich Hall, Lloyd Langford and Holly Walsh are the panellists obliged to talk with deliberate inaccuracy on subjects as varied as mosquitoes, flags, roads and North Korea.

The show is devised by Graeme Garden and Jon Naismith, the team behind Radio 4's I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.

Produced by Jon Naismith
A Random Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b07wpgjt)
Jill puts her foot down, and it is feeling cramped at Bridge Farm.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b07wn3s7)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07xh51w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 Too Many Helping Hands (b07wphhh)
The past 40 years has seen a shift from specialist education for blind children to the majority attending mainstream schools. Peter White asks whether the one-on-one teaching assistants now given to blind students in mainstream education helps or hinders them in the transition from school, to university and beyond.

Peter talks to blind students who speak openly about the impact of constant adult supervision on their daily school life, their relationships with other sighted students and their specialist skill development. Two past students look back and speak frankly about how they feel now about the constant support they received and how its affected them since leaving school.

Kevin Satizabal, 25, says constant help negatively affected his ability to take responsibility for his own learning at university, "There was no one there to tell me to do it and I had to learn that the hard way."

Saliha Rashid who is embarking on her third university degree says the privileges she got at school through blindness were detrimental to her development and how her sighted peers viewed her. "We had privileges that other pupils didn't have. We were allowed to leave classes 5 minutes early. Looking back, that was very wrong. Not just because it's not the real world, but because it sends the wrong message to other people. They [sighted students] are going to grow up thinking that we [blind pupils] need special treatment which defeats the whole purpose of inclusion."

Three professionals in the field give their views on what is helpful and unhelpful assistance for blind children in the classroom and how the situation could be improved

Producer: Lee Kumutat
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 20:30 Analysis (b07wphhk)
Breaking Promises

Paul Johnson, director of the Institute of Fiscal Studies, asks if the time has come for the government to break pledges made to pensioners. He charts how the average income of senior citizens has risen and is now higher than that of the rest of the population. "We are in a position we never intended," he says. "One generation has lucked out and generations coming after are not only doing much worse, but paying for the older generation." He asks whether the government can and should sustain the "triple lock" which makes the state pension rise much faster than other benefits. And he argues that the inequality between generations is now entrenching inequality within generations.
Producer: Helen Grady

Interviewees:
Torsten Bell, the Resolution Foundation
Angus Hanton, the Intergenerational Foundation
Baroness Ros Altmann, former pensions minister
John Kay, economist
Joanne Segars, Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association
Baroness Onora O'Neill, philosopher
Frances O'Grady, Trades Union Congress
Ben Page, Ipsos MORI.

MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b07wbtsx)
Elephant

In 1903 Topsy the elephant was given copper sandals to wear at the amusement park in Coney Island. Hundreds of spectators and photographers crowded close, Thomas Edison's film crew got the camera in position. With the flick of a switch, steam filled the air and electricity ran through her body.

The electrocution of Topsy the elephant in New York is just one low point in man's long and complex relationship with the animal. The elephant's huge size has allowed us to load it with attributes like supernatural strength, great wisdom, phenomenal memory. And we've always wanted to be close to it, to harness the power, to use it, to destroy it.

Brett Westwood tracks our cultural relationship with the elephant, from battlefield to big top, via Swahili proverbs, artworks on the streets of Sheffield, DH Lawrence, and the festivities for Lord Ganesha at the Hounslow Ganeshotsav Mandal in West London.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

MON 21:30 Start the Week (b07wp83q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b07wn3sd)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b07wn3sj)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07wphhm)
The Wonder, Episode 6

A new novel from the bestselling writer of 'Room', and its recent Academy Award nominated screen adaptation, Emma Donoghue.

A small village in 1850s rural Ireland is baffled by Anna O'Donnell's fast, which began as a self-inflicted and earnest expression of faith. After weeks of subsisting only on what she calls "manna from heaven," the story of the "miracle" has reached a fever pitch. Tourists flock in droves to the O'Donnell family's modest cabin hoping to witness, and a Dublin journalist is sent to cover the sensational story. Enter Lib, an English nurse trained by Florence Nightingale who is hired to keep watch for two weeks and determine whether or not Anna is a fraud. As Anna deteriorates, Lib finds herself responsible not just for the care of a child, but for getting to the root of why the child may actually be the victim of murder in slow motion.

A magnetic novel written with all the propulsive tension that made Emma Donoghue's 'Room' a bestseller, 'The Wonder' is tale of two strangers who will transform each other's lives, a powerful psychological thriller, and a story of love pitted against evil in its many masks.

As read by the Academy Award nominated and BAFTA winning actress Carey Mulligan (An Education; Drive; The Great Gatsby; Suffragette).

Read by Carey Mulligan
Written by Emma Donoghue
Abridged by Neville Teller
Produced by Gemma McMullan.

MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b07wby0n)
Small Talk

Pointless chit chat or vital social lubricant? Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright talk small talk with psychotherapist and writer Philippa Perry, author of 'How to Stay Sane'. Why do we bother with small talk? What are the rules of banter? And what are we really talking about when we talk about the weather?

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

MON 23:30 Wireless Nights (b01g6592)
Series 1, Behind Closed Doors

Jarvis Cocker takes to the streets to peer through stained windows, cold steel bars and Japanese paper screens, to find out just what goes on Behind Closed Doors at night time.

He joins a lock-in where the time bell is never rung, and peers into the deepest recesses of a lock-in brain that belongs to Jack, reliving the night when the doors shut in his brain.

On his nocturnal sojourn Jarvis recalls old times, on the streets of post-industrial Sheffield, and shares the loneliness of the long sentenced prisoner who dreams of empty streets under a full moon.

Take a night walk with Jarvis Cocker; bring a torch. You might find yourself in a dark corner, but you've got a good guide.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.


TUESDAY 04 OCTOBER 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b07wn3vp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b07jxsy3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07wn3vw)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07wn3vy)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07wn3w0)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b07wn3w2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07z38v1)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Steve Chalke.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b07wn3w4)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

Presented by Anna Hill
Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03k5b9c)
Long-Tailed Duck

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the long-tailed duck. The musical call of the long-tailed duck gives it the Scottish name of 'calloo', or 'coal- and-candlelight'. In the UK you're more likely to see them in Scotland and northern England where they seek out shellfish, diving up to 60 metres to retrieve them.

TUE 06:00 Today (b07ws0dr)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b07wt6bj)
Frans de Waal

Charles Darwin first alerted us to our ape ancestry. Genome analysis tells us we share 99% of our DNA with our closest relatives in the animal kingdom, the chimpanzee and the bonobo. And yet we seem surprised to learn that apes are kind and clever, traits we tend to like to think of as being uniquely human. Behavioural biologist and best-selling author, Frans de Waal has spent many years in offices overlooking chimp colonies, observing their behaviour on a daily basis. He pioneered studies of kindness and peace-making in primates, when other scientists were focussing on violence, greed and aggression. Empathy, he argues, has a long evolutionary history; and he is determined to undermine our arrogant assumptions of human superiority. Frans talks to Jim Al-Khalili about growing up on the Dutch polders, chimpanzee politics, and the extraordinary sex lives of the bonobos.

TUE 09:30 One to One (b07ws0dt)
Trevor McDonald on Redemption

For his One to One series, Sir Trevor McDonald explores the idea of redemption, talking to two very different people with very different ideas on what it means.

This week a former maximum security prisoner talks about finding redemption through sport. Former armed robber John McAvoy once shared a wing with convicted terrorist Abu Hamza in Belmarsh Prison. His life was going nowhere but then he discovered rowing in the prison gym and went on to break the world record for indoor rowing. Now he's a semi professional tri-athlete seeking to inspire other young people who risk becoming offenders.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b07jys1m)
The Return, Episode 2

In this powerful memoir, Libyan novelist Hisham Matar describes the mix of hope and grief he has lived with in the two decades since his father, Jaballa, was kidnapped by Qaddafi's regime in 1990. Imprisoned and kept isolated from other prisoners, Jaballa managed to send only a handful of letters to his family before he disappeared without trace. To this day, no-one is sure what happened to him, although it is likely that he died in a massacre at Abu Salim prison in Tripoli in 1996.

Living in exile from his homeland since the 1970s, Hisham returned to Libya for the first time in 2012, following the revolution that brought down Qaddafi and his regime. Amongst the joy of being reunited with his extended family, many of whom had also endured long imprisonment, was the growing acceptance of his father's death and unknown fate.

Reader: Khalid Abdalla

Writer: Hisham Matar

Abridger: Anna Magnusson

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07wn3w6)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07xfhqg)
Writing the Century: Stannington, Episode 2

Writing the Century, the series that explores the twentieth century through the words and experiences of real people.

In 1950 at the age of 17, Marjorie Wilson was a student nurse caring for children with tuberculosis at Stannington Children's Sanatorium in Morpeth, Northumberland. The drama is based on her interviews and freely adapted by Margaret Wilkinson.

With Marjorie's help, Alan comes to terms with life in the sanatorium.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.

TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b07ws0dw)
Rat

Brett Westwood burrows into the complicated relationship we have with our constant but mostly unwelcome companion: the rat. Featuring interviews with historian Dr. Edmund Ramsden, researcher for the charity Apopo Haylee Ellis, Professor of German and Folklore Wolfgang Mieder, rat enthusiast Jo Pegg, and ecologist and expert in rodents as pests Professor Steven Belmain. Produced by Ellie Sans.

TUE 11:30 The Danube Ain't Blue, It's Green (b07ws0dy)
Rainer Hersch champions the most popular waltz Johann Strauss ever wrote - the Blue Danube.

Ringtones and muzak have made it universal and, in Vienna, he hits the tourist trail and finds that everyone knows it, from South Koreans to Californians, while hard-working musicians there can play it over 400 times a year. It's always performed as the inevitable encore at the New Years' Day Concert in Vienna, and Franz Bartholomey, former principal cellist with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, thinks it's "simply the most beautiful waltz in the world".

Rainer touches on the finer points with conductor Alfred Eschwé as they sing their way through it, discovering that it's not just "da-da-da-da-daa, tchk-tchk, tchk-tchk" - but Strauss combined five separate waltz melodies in the piece.

He also finds out that, as Spike Jones described it in his musical parody, the waters of the Danube aren't blue, they're green, and a rather murky green at that.

Also murky was one period of the waltz's history, when Goebbels decided that the music of Strauss was an ideal palliative for the Nazi war machine, though he had to remove all traces of Strauss's Jewish ancestry in order to make the music acceptable.

Musician Ernst Theis and Strauss biographer John Suchet trace the Blue Danube's history, while Piers Lane shows how it has become one of the pianist's favourite encores in its devilish transcription by Schulz-Evler.

A Far Shoreline production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b07wn3w8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (b07ws0f0)
Series 3, The Sinister Hand Part 2

In the previous episode the team started investigating the following enquiry, sent in to curiouscases@bbc.co.uk:
"What determines left or right handedness and why are us lefties in the minority?"

They considered cockatoos, chimpanzees and Hannah's dog, Molly, to discover that humans are unique, with just one in ten of us being left-handed.

Today, they look inside the left-handed brain. Some researchers point to a link between left-handedness and impairments like autism or dyslexia. Others claim that lefties are more creative and artistic.

So what's the truth? The team consults Professors Sophie Scott, Chris McManus and Dorothy Bishop to find out.

Presenter: Adam Rutherford & Hannah Fry
Producer: Michelle Martin.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b07wn3wb)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b07wn3wf)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b07wn3wj)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 Britain's Black Past (b07ws0f2)
Ignatius Sancho

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

Over two weeks, Professor Gerzina travels across Britain and talks to historians, unearthing new evidence about Britain's black past. From a country estate in Chepstow, via the docks of Liverpool, to grand houses in London and Bristol, she evokes the daily texture of black people's lives, using first-hand accounts from letters and autobiographies.

In the second programme in the series, Professor Gerzina explores the life of the butler Ignatius Sancho, who rose to the top of fashionable society.

With historians Professor Brycchan Carey and novelist Steve Martin.

The music in this series is by the 18th century composer Ignatius Sancho, and performed by the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra.

Readers: Paterson Joseph, Jonathan Keeble
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b07wpgjt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Tracks (b07wsmrh)
9. Habenula

The final episode in the conspiracy thriller by Matthew Broughton. Starring Romola Garai. Written by Matthew Broughton.

Helen and Freddy fly to Shanghai to discover the secret of 'life without end'. But Helen fears that she'll actually find the worst thing in the world.

Who is the mysterious Doctor Fisker Lee? What procedure did he carry out on the boy from the plane crash? And what secrets lie within the vaults of his private research hospital?

Tracks: A story in nine parts about life, death and the human brain.

Directed in Wales by James Robinson.

TUE 15:00 The Kitchen Cabinet (b07wmcmv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]

TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b07wsmrk)
Spiritual Greens

Tom Heap drops in on the 50th anniversary celebrations of the green magazine Resurgence. With its origins in the peace movement, the magazine has championed the spiritual side of the ecological movement. Tom talks to some of its most famous contributors - and their critics - to take stock of what the last half century of green activism has - and hasn't - achieved.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b07wsmrp)
Snotrils and Jumpolines: Kids' Invented Words

Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright explore the words that children invent and reimagine, from snotrils and jumpolines, to Farmer Christmas and the hippyhoppymus. What do these linguistic leaps of imagination tell us about how children learn language? With writer Nicola Skinner and linguist Dr Kriszta Szendroi.

Producer: Mair Bosworth.

TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b07wt5tl)
Ann Widdecombe and Vince Cable

Former politicians- and dancers- Ann Widdecombe and Vince Cable talk to Harriett Gilbert about their favourite books. Ann has chosen Destiny in the Desert, Jonathan Dimbleby's account of the second world war battle his father reported on at El Alamein. Vince Cable has gone for a Robert Harris thriller about the Dreyfus affair, An Officer and a Spy. Harriet's choice is A Moveable Feast, Hemingway's memoir about his days as a struggling writer in Paris, which was published after his death. Which book, though, is hated by two despite being loved by one? Producer Sally Heaven.

TUE 17:00 PM (b07wn3wp)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07wn3wr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 Ed Reardon's Week (b07wt5tq)
Series 11, Episode 1

Episode 1: 'The Reboot'

Ed Reardon is back, and this time in slightly unfamiliar territory as he has entered the groves of academe and returned to full-time education at 'Uni'. He's doing a three-year course in, well he's not entirely sure, but at the end he'll get a BA with the chance of a two-year MA add-on. The fact that he'll have warm, comfortable accommodation for the foreseeable future, a student loan to pay the rent and that he'll reach 65 by the time he's finished the course and therefore passed the age of paying back the fees has nothing to do with his decision to study. No, this is all to do with making up for lost time when his studies were cut short in his youth following expulsion from school.

Of course, as with all students nowadays Ed will need to boost his loan by earning extra cash so he'll still be pestering his agent, Ping for writing opportunities and so it is as we renew our acquaintance with Ed, and trusty companion Elgar, that we find him reimagining a series of children's books and giving them a savvy post-modern twist for a "cool hundred each" whilst trying to keep up with the other students and their love of coffee shop loyalty cards, seminar satisfaction surveys and certain daytime TV programmes.

The regular cast are joined this series by guests including Sylvestra Le Touzel, Nicholas Farrell and Maya Sondhi.

Cast list ep 1

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas
Produced by Dawn Ellis.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07wt5ts)
Helen faces a problem head on, and Johnny surprises Tom, twice.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b07wn3wt)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07xfhqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b07wt5tx)
Transforming Rehabilitation: At What Cost?

The split and part privatisation of the UK probation system in June 2014 saw huge changes to the service, with high risk offenders managed by the new National Probation Service and low to medium risk offenders managed by Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs).

Two years on, probation officers report a system that has been 'ripped apart', with two sides often failing to communicate. There are concerns over rising caseloads, falling staffing levels and the number of murders committed by offenders released from prison on licence.

File on 4 speaks to families who have lost loved ones, and hears how they have had to fight to find out the full extent of the failings of the probation system in their cases.

Charities report particular concerns over vulnerable women in the probation system, with many being recalled to prison for breaching probation orders, following short sentences for minor offences.

As Transforming Rehabilitation is scrutinised by the Public Accounts Committee and Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Probation, File on 4 asks if the changes are putting the public at risk?

Reporter - Melanie Abbott
Producer - Ruth Evans.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b07wn3ww)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b07wt5v1)
Dr Mark Porter presents a series that aims to demystify perplexing health issues.

TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b07wt6bj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 21:58 Weather (b07wn3wy)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b07wn3x0)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07wt5v5)
The Wonder, Episode 7

A new novel from the bestselling writer of 'Room', and its recent Academy Award nominated screen adaptation, Emma Donoghue.

A small village in 1850s rural Ireland is baffled by Anna O'Donnell's fast, which began as a self-inflicted and earnest expression of faith. After weeks of subsisting only on what she calls "manna from heaven," the story of the "miracle" has reached a fever pitch. Tourists flock in droves to the O'Donnell family's modest cabin hoping to witness, and a Dublin journalist is sent to cover the sensational story. Enter Lib, an English nurse trained by Florence Nightingale who is hired to keep watch for two weeks and determine whether or not Anna is a fraud. As Anna deteriorates, Lib finds herself responsible not just for the care of a child, but for getting to the root of why the child may actually be the victim of murder in slow motion.

A magnetic novel written with all the propulsive tension that made Emma Donoghue's 'Room' a bestseller, 'The Wonder' is tale of two strangers who will transform each other's lives, a powerful psychological thriller, and a story of love pitted against evil in its many masks.

As read by the Academy Award nominated and BAFTA winning actress Carey Mulligan (An Education; Drive; The Great Gatsby; Suffragette).

Read by Carey Mulligan
Written by Emma Donoghue
Abridged by Neville Teller
Produced by Gemma McMullan.

TUE 23:00 Life: An Idiot's Guide (b044mc1g)
Series 3, Belief and Opinion

Stephen K Amos is joined by comedians Wil Hodgson, Gavin Webster and Shazia Mirza to present a guide to belief and opinion.

TUE 23:30 Wireless Nights (b06qj74f)
Series 4, Keep on Truckin'

Jarvis Cocker continues his nocturnal exploration of the human condition.

Tonight: an unlucky trucker, a hopeful hitch-hiker and a host of Scottish ghostbusters.

As Jarvis climbs up into the Wireless Nights monster truck, he hears from a long distance lorry driver who received a nasty surprise, a hitcher trying to make it to Liverpool and he travels along the most haunted stretch of road in Scotland.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


WEDNESDAY 05 OCTOBER 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b07wn3z8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b07jys1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07wn3zb)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07wn3zd)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07wn3zg)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b07wn3zj)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07yqmp0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Steve Chalke.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b07wn3zl)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

Presented by Anna Hill
Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dx944)
Twite

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Twite. Twites are birds of heather moorland and crofting land - a Scottish name is "Heather lintie", as they nest in the shelter of wiry heather clumps and feed on seeds. To see twites, you'll need to visit some of our most scenic spots; the Scottish Isles, the moorlands of northern England or the western Irish coast.

WED 06:00 Today (b07z39tn)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Midweek (b07wt83d)
Lively and diverse conversation with Libby Purves and guests.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b07jyvzx)
The Return, Episode 3

In the era of rolling news and social media connectedness, it's easy to become blasé about world events and overlook their human cost. In this beautifully written memoir, Hisham Matar offers us a vivid and very moving account of what it's like to be swept up in a situation completely outwith your control and the ways in which it comes to define your life.

In 1990, Hisham Matar was nineteen when his father, a prominent critic of the Libyan regime, was kidnapped and taken to prison in Tripoli. He would never see him again. Two decades later, in 2012, after the fall of Qaddafi, Hisham was finally able to return to his homeland. He recounts his return to a country and a family he thought he would never see again and describes the pain of not knowing what happened to his father - it's likely that he died in a massacre at one of Qaddafi's cruellest prisons, Abu Salim in 1996, but he can find no-one able to say absolutely that he did. However, after the fall of the regime, prisons were liberated and the spark of hope that his father had somehow survived slowly petered out. He and his family must come to terms with the fact that they will never know what happened to him.

Reader: Khalid Abdalla

Writer: Hisham Matar

Abridger: Anna Magnusson

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07wn3zn)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b07wp83v)
Writing the Century: Stannington, Episode 3

Writing the Century, the series that explores the twentieth century through the words and experiences of real people.

In 1950 at the age of 17, Marjorie Wilson was a student nurse caring for children with tuberculosis at Stannington Children's Sanatorium in Morpeth, Northumberland. The drama is based on her interviews and freely adapted by Margaret Wilkinson.

Aided by Marjorie, Alan secretly visits brother Ken and Marjorie is asked to sing at the Annual Physician's Dinner.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.

WED 10:56 The Listening Project (b07wt9c2)
Thembi and Kyle - You're My Role Model

Fi Glover with a conversation between a grandmother who was active in student politics in Apartheid South Africa and her law student grandson. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 Too Many Helping Hands (b07wphhh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Man at the Helm (b07wt9c4)
Episode 1

Amanda Whittington's adaptation of Nina Stibbe's comic novel set in 1970s Leicestershire about the madcap schemes of three kids to find their recently divorced mum a new man

Directed by Gemma Jenkins

Set in a small Leicestershire village in the 1970s, this four-part comedy drama is about the madcap schemes of three children to cheer up their recently divorced mum, Elizabeth. Struggling to cope, she has taken to drinking and compulsive playwriting - neither of which impresses villagers already deeply suspicious of an attractive divorcee. Top of their list is to find her a new man in the hope that it will appease the hostile locals.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b07wn3zq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (b07wtd6w)
Series 3, The Space Pirate

Listener Paul Don asks: "I'm wondering what's the feasibility of terraforming another planet i.e. Mars and if it's possible to do the same thing with something like the moon? Or, why isn't there already a moon-base? Surely that's easier."

Adam & Hannah consider moving to another planet, and discover what challenges they would need to overcome to live in space.

They consult engineer Prof Danielle George from the University of Manchester and Dr Louisa Preston, UK Space Agency Aurora Research Fellow in Astrobiology.

Adam also hears about attempts to recreate a Martian base on a volcano in Hawaii. He calls HI-SEAS crew member Tristan Bassingthwaighte, who has just emerged from a year of isolation.

If you have any Curious Cases for the team to solve please email curiouscases@bbc.co.uk

Features archive from 'Outlook' on BBC World Service, broadcast in August 2016.

Presenters: Adam Rutherford & Hannah Fry
Producer: Michelle Martin.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b07wn3zs)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b07wn3zv)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b07wn3zx)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 Britain's Black Past (b07wtd6y)
Pero Jones and Fanny Coker

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

Over two weeks, Professor Gerzina travels across Britain and talks to historians, unearthing new evidence about Britain's black past. From a country estate in Chepstow, via the docks of Liverpool, to grand houses in London and Bristol, she evokes the daily texture of black people's lives, using first-hand accounts from letters and autobiographies.

In the third programme in the series, Gretchen Gerzina explores the story of two enslaved people who were brought from the West Indies to Bristol and lived there for the rest of their lives. Recorded on location in the Georgian House Museum in Bristol.

With historians Professor Madge Dresser and Dr Christine Eickelman.

The music in this series is by the 18th century composer Ignatius Sancho, and performed by the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra.

Readers: Cathy Tyson, Jonathan Keeble
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b07wt5ts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Drama (b07wtd70)
Comment Is Free

Everybody hates Alistair Cooper and they're not afraid of saying it.

Starring Rachael Stirling (Detectorists, Capital) and Tobias Menzies (Games of Thrones, Outlander) alongside a cast of hundreds, Hilary Cooper watches her husband's story get chewed up and spat out by an unscrupulous media and a divided public. The whole nation competes to be the quickest to comment in this thrilling portrayal of the sound and fury of modern British politics.

Written by James Fritz. Produced and directed by Becky Ripley.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b07wtd72)
Money Box Live: Who needs a bank branch?

Financial phone-in.

WED 15:30 Inside Health (b07wt5v1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b07wtd74)
Political polarisation, Who does the housework?

Political polarisation in America. Laurie Taylor talks to Marc Hetherington, Professor of Political Science at Vanderbilt University, about why distrust of the opposite party is now so common in the US. Is the same pattern emerging in Britain? They're joined by Robert Ford, Professor of Political Science at the University of Manchester.
Also, Oriel Sullivan, Professor of Sociology of Gender at the University of Oxford, talks about an international study of who is doing the housework.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b07wn3zz)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b07wn403)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07wn405)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b07wtd76)
Series 7, Lynton and Lynmouth

Mark Steel's In Town - Lynton and Lynmouth

Lynton and Lynmouth - Don't mention the goats!

Mark Steel returns to Radio 4 for a seventh series of the award winning show that travels around the country, researching the history, heritage and culture of six towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness, and performs a bespoke evening of comedy for the local residents.

Mark visits the lovely seaside towns of Lynton and Lynmouth in North Devon, lovely that is until he mentions the goats, then the rest of the show doesn't go entirely to plan.

In this series Mark visits Stockport in Greater Manchester, Colchester in Essex, Hebden Bridge in Yorkshire, The Royal Borough of Kingston Upon Thames, Lynton in North Devon and the British overseas territory of Gibraltar.

Written and performed by ... Mark Steel
Additional material by ... Pete Sinclair
Production co-ordinator ... Hayley Stirling
Producer ... Carl Cooper

This is a BBC Radio Comedy Production.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b07wt9c6)
Alice hopes to impress, and Tom's reminded of old memories.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b07wn407)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07wp83v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b07wtd78)
Combative, provocative and engaging debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Giles Fraser, Claire Fox, Anne McElvoy and Melanie Phillips.

WED 20:45 Four Thought (b07wtd7b)
The Art of Diary Writing

Talks with a personal dimension.

WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b07wsmrk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]

WED 21:30 Midweek (b07wt83d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b07wn409)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b07wn40c)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07wtd7d)
The Wonder, Episode 8

A new novel from the bestselling writer of 'Room', and its recent Academy Award nominated screen adaptation, Emma Donoghue.

A small village in 1850s rural Ireland is baffled by Anna O'Donnell's fast, which began as a self-inflicted and earnest expression of faith. After weeks of subsisting only on what she calls "manna from heaven," the story of the "miracle" has reached a fever pitch. Tourists flock in droves to the O'Donnell family's modest cabin hoping to witness, and a Dublin journalist is sent to cover the sensational story. Enter Lib, an English nurse trained by Florence Nightingale who is hired to keep watch for two weeks and determine whether or not Anna is a fraud. As Anna deteriorates, Lib finds herself responsible not just for the care of a child, but for getting to the root of why the child may actually be the victim of murder in slow motion.

A magnetic novel written with all the propulsive tension that made Emma Donoghue's 'Room' a bestseller, 'The Wonder' is tale of two strangers who will transform each other's lives, a powerful psychological thriller, and a story of love pitted against evil in its many masks.

As read by the Academy Award nominated and BAFTA winning actress Carey Mulligan (An Education; Drive; The Great Gatsby; Suffragette).

Read by Carey Mulligan
Written by Emma Donoghue
Abridged by Neville Teller
Produced by Gemma McMullan.

WED 23:00 Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair (b07wtd7g)
Series 3, Leo's Passport

by Jenny Eclair

Penny ..... Imelda Staunton
Caroline ..... Karen Bartke

Produced by Sally Avens

Four of the countries leading actresses star in this comic series about women facing a crisis in their lives.
Penny loves working as Howard's secretary, she's very protective of him, which is why when Jodie begins work at the office Penny decides that action must be taken.

WED 23:15 Bird Island (b044ghpd)
Series 2, Episode 4

EPISODE FOUR:

Ben, a young scientist working in Sub-Antarctica, tries to adapt to the loneliness by keeping a cheery audio diary on his Dictaphone. This week, Ben gets a new telescope, and Graham has some big news.

Written by ..... Katy Wix
Produced by ..... Tilusha Ghelani

ABOUT BIRD ISLAND:

An atmospheric comedy about a cheery scientist based in Sub-Antarctica. Starring Reece Shearsmith, Julian Rhind-Tutt, Alison Steadman and Katy Wix.

On the one hand, Ben is on the trip of a lifetime. On the other, he's trapped in a vast icy landscape with a dodgy internet connection and a dictaphone. Loneliness is something of a problem. So, Ben shares his thoughts with us in the form of an audio 'log'.

His fellow scientist Graham should alleviate this sense of isolation, but the tragi-comic fact is, they are nerdy blokes, so they stumble through yet another mumbled exchange. Not to mention the new arrival Jane, who Ben is even more awkward around, for reasons that aren't entirely clear to him.

Apart from his research studying the Albatross on the Island, Ben attempts to continue normal life with an earnestness and enthusiasm which is ultimately very endearing. We eavesdrop as he chats awkwardly with Graham or Jane, phones his mother or talks to himself, as he often does. We also hear the Squawks and screeches of the birds and the vast expanse outside. Oh, and ice. Lots of ice.

Bird Island is written by Katy Wix, half of sketch comedy Duo 'Anna and Katy'. Katy is also an actress who stars in 'Miranda', 'Outnumbered' and as Daisy in 'Not Going Out'.

WED 23:30 Wireless Nights (b06r4gq1)
Series 4, Snowbound

Jarvis Cocker is snowed in for tonight's nocturnal exploration of the human condition. With the snow piling high outside his farmhouse and long hours to kill, Jarvis's mind drifts to other snowbound dramas and dilemmas as he tries to distract himself from a creeping solitude. But as night draws on, can he be sure he's really alone?

Producer Neil McCarthy.


THURSDAY 06 OCTOBER 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b07wn42j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b07jyvzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07wn42l)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07wn42n)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07wn42q)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b07wn42s)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07z839f)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Steve Chalke.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b07wn42v)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced by Sally Challoner.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dwyv9)
Common Crane

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the Common Crane. Common Cranes were extinct in the UK in the 17th century. Now, they are being re-introduced to the Somerset Levels and Moors. The aim is to release a hundred birds into the wild over five years and establish a strong population.

THU 06:00 Today (b07z839l)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 In Our Time (b07wtggv)
Lakshmi

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the origins of the Hindu goddess Lakshmi, and of the traditions that have built around her for over 3,000 years. According to the creation story of the Puranas, she came to existence in the churning of the ocean of milk. Her prominent status grew alongside other goddesses in the mainly male world of the Vedas, as female deities came to be seen as the Shakti, the energy of the gods, without which they would be powerless. Lakshmi came to represent the qualities of blessing, prosperity, fertility, beauty and good fortune and, more recently, political order, and she has a significant role in Diwali, one of the most important of the Hindu festivals.

With

Jessica Frazier

Jacqueline Suthren-Hirst

and

Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b07k01bk)
The Return, Episode 4

Beautifully written memoir by the Libyan author Hisham Matar. It's a vivid and very moving account of what it's like to be swept up in a situation completely outwith your control.

In 1990, Hisham Matar was nineteen when his father, a prominent critic of the Libyan regime, was kidnapped and taken to prison in Tripoli. He would never see him again. Two decades later, in 2012, after the fall of Qaddafi, Hisham returned to his homeland. He recounts his return to a country and a family he thought he would never see again and describes the pain of not knowing what happened to his father - it's likely that he died in a massacre at one of Qaddafi's cruellest prisons, Abu Salim in 1996, but he can find no-one able to say absolutely that he did. However, after the fall of the regime, prisons were liberated and the spark of hope that his father had somehow survived slowly petered out. He and his family must come to terms with the fact that they will never know what happened to him.

Reader: Khalid Abdalla

Writer: Hisham Matar

Abridger: Anna Magnusson

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07wn42x)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07xh59k)
Writing the Century: Stannington, Episode 4

Writing the Century, the series that explores the twentieth century through the words and experiences of real people.

In 1950 at the age of 17, Marjorie Wilson was a student nurse caring for children with tuberculosis at Stannington Children's Sanatorium in Morpeth, Northumberland. The drama is based on her interviews and freely adapted by Margaret Wilkinson.

Alan wants to see his brother Ken but finds his room empty and no-one will tell him where Ken's gone.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.

THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b07wtggx)
Reports from writers and journalists around the world. Presented by Kate Adie.

THU 11:30 Body Count Rising (b07wtggz)
Killer brandishes knife....squeezes hands tightly around woman's throat....drags body through woods. This could describe any number of prime-time dramas on British TV.

There are numerous dramas with similar recurring narratives - a little girl abducted and murdered, a teenage girl raped, a wife beaten. Cue sinister music, graphic images, and sometimes overly-sexy portrayals of female victims. But has television culture made the depiction of rape and the ritualistic murder of women into an undesirable industry?

Audiences lap it up, but what does our fascination with glossy, high budget TV series, saturated with the corpses of unfortunate women, say about the society we live in, and the way we view women?

Actor Doon Mackichan examines the trend, speaking to criminal sociologist Ruth Penfold-Mounce; US TV critic Sonia Soraiya; Allan Cubbit, writer and director of critically-acclaimed series The Fall; playwright Nick Payn; Elaine Collins, Executive Producer of Shetland; and an actor who has twice played a rape victim.

Presenter: Doon Mackichan
Producer: Gemma Newby
A Juniper production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b07wn42z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (b07wtgh1)
Series 3, The Portly Problem

"Why do we have middle aged spread?" asks Bart Janssen from New Zealand.

From obese mice to big bottoms, the duo discovers what science can tell us about fat.

Why do we put on weight in middle age? And are some types of fat better than others?

Hannah meets Prof Steve Bloom at Imperial College, London to discuss apples and pears.

Adam talks to Dr Aaron Cypess from the National Institutes of Health in Maryland, who has created a 'fatlas' - an atlas that maps fat inside the body.

Please email your Curious Cases for the team to investigate to: curiouscases@bbc.co.uk

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Michelle Martin.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b07wn431)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b07wn433)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b07wn435)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 Britain's Black Past (b07wtgh3)
Sailors

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

Over two weeks, Professor Gerzina travels across Britain and talks to historians, unearthing new evidence about Britain's black past. From a country estate in Chepstow, via the docks of Liverpool, to grand houses in London and Bristol, she evokes the daily texture of black people's lives, using first-hand accounts from letters and autobiographies.

In the fourth programme in the series, Professor Gerzina travels to Liverpool to explore the lives of black sailors. Life in the British Navy brought decent pay and promotion prospects - it could be a 'taxi service to freedom' for runaway slaves. But black sailors were always in danger of being kidnapped and sold into slavery.

Presenter Gretchen Gerzina is the author of 'Black in England: Life before Emancipation'. She is Dean of the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts.

With historians Dr Ray Costello and Professor Charles Foy.

The music in this series is by the 18th century composer Ignatius Sancho, and performed by the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra.

Readers: Paterson Joseph, Jonathan Keeble
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b07wt9c6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Drama (b07wtgh5)
Journey to Pakistan

Based on a true story, Samina Baig's new play tells the story of one man's search for his roots. Adopted as a baby and raised in Suffolk, Peter who is now a successful fashion designer, sets out for Pakistan in search of the birth mother he's never known.

Writer.....Samina Baig
Director.....Elizabeth Allard.

THU 15:00 Ramblings (b07wtgh7)
Ripon to Ripley

Clare Balding marks the eightieth anniversary of the Jarrow crusade, when two hundred men walked from Tyneside to London to petition the British government to bring back industry to their town. The the closure of the main employer, Palmer's shipyard. in 1934 had led to most of the population of Jarrow being plunged into poverty.Clare has three companions on this walk ; Robert Colls, professor of Cultural History at de Montfort university who explains the role marching has played in modern politics , Helen Antrobus from the People Museum in Manchester , who tells the story of the one woman allowed on the march, the indomitable local MP, Ellen Wilkinson and local walker Margaret Laurenson, who devised the route they take. in the programme we also hear archive recording of one of the marchers talking about the overwhelming reception they received in the mainly Tory town of Harrogate.
Producer: Lucy Lunt.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b07wn9kp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Bookclub (b07wnj7t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b07wtgh9)
Black Star

The Film Programme has teamed up with the BFI on a poll to decide the best performance by a black actor of all time.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b07wn43d)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b07wn43g)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07wn43j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 It's Not What You Know (b07wthbz)
Series 4, Episode 2

Joe Lycett discovers how well a panel of celebrity guests know their nearest and dearest.

This week Joe probes into the lives of of Zoe Lyons, Adrian Chiles and Mae Martin.

Production coordinator: Emily Hallett

Producer: Matt Stronge

A BBC Studios production.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b07wthc1)
In The Bull, the interview panel is waiting, and Kate and Roy have a heart to heart.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b07wn43l)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07xh59k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b07wthc3)
David Aaronovitch looks at important issues in the news.

THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b07wthc5)
Brexit: What Next?

How do you do business when you can't see into the future? This may be what businesses always have to do, but Brexit has undeniably made the future even harder to discern than usual. When will it happen, what relationship with Europe will follow, and how will the rest of the world react?

For now we don't know, but the answers to those questions will affect every business in Britain.

So how are companies planning for an uncertain future while at the same time trying to ensure that whichever model of Brexit emerges is one that suits their needs.

Joining Evan Davis are:

Karen Briggs: Head of Brexit - KPMG
Gerald Mason: SVP - Tate & Lyle Sugars
Gavin Williams: Partner - Herbert Smith Freehills

Producer: Joe Kent.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b07wn43d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 In Our Time (b07wtggv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b07wn43n)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b07wn43q)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07wthc7)
The Wonder, Episode 9

A new novel from the bestselling writer of 'Room', and its recent Academy Award nominated screen adaptation, Emma Donoghue.

A small village in 1850s rural Ireland is baffled by Anna O'Donnell's fast, which began as a self-inflicted and earnest expression of faith. After weeks of subsisting only on what she calls "manna from heaven," the story of the "miracle" has reached a fever pitch. Tourists flock in droves to the O'Donnell family's modest cabin hoping to witness, and a Dublin journalist is sent to cover the sensational story. Enter Lib, an English nurse trained by Florence Nightingale who is hired to keep watch for two weeks and determine whether or not Anna is a fraud. As Anna deteriorates, Lib finds herself responsible not just for the care of a child, but for getting to the root of why the child may actually be the victim of murder in slow motion.

A magnetic novel written with all the propulsive tension that made Emma Donoghue's 'Room' a bestseller, 'The Wonder' is tale of two strangers who will transform each other's lives, a powerful psychological thriller, and a story of love pitted against evil in its many masks.

As read by the Academy Award nominated and BAFTA winning actress Carey Mulligan (An Education; Drive; The Great Gatsby; Suffragette).

Read by Carey Mulligan
Written by Emma Donoghue
Abridged by Neville Teller
Produced by Gemma McMullan.

THU 23:00 Small Scenes (b03gbxnj)
Series 1, Episode 3

Symphonious sketch series with Daniel Rigby, Mike Wozniak, Sara Pascoe and Henry Paker. This week, we learn about the cosmetic benefits of old men's legs and we also drop in at the Witness Protection Conference 2013.

Small Scenes is written by the cast and Benjamin Partridge with additional material from Eddie Robson.

The producer is Simon Mayhew-Archer.

THU 23:30 Wireless Nights (b01snqbv)
Series 2, The Darkest Hour

Jarvis Cocker stars in his own horror movie as he continues his nocturnal examination of the human condition, exploring the battle between the forces of darkness and light.

He hears from horror movie goers at the Electric Cinema in Birmingham, keen to turn the lights off and let the scares begin; the National Grid control room which is charged from keeping the lights on; and Lundy Island in the Bristol Channel - where the electricity switches off at midnight.

What is lurking in the basement as Jarvis approaches the darkest hour?

Producer: Laurence Grissell.


FRIDAY 07 OCTOBER 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b07wn45q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b07k01bk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07wn45s)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07wn45v)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07wn45x)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b07wn45z)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07zf2mn)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with the Reverend Steve Chalke.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b07wn461)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced by Mark Smalley.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03dwsxw)
Curlew

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Martin Hughes-Games presents the story of the curlew. The UK is a vital wintering ground for flocks of curlews. Some birds fly in from as far away as Belgium and Russia, probing our coastal mudflats and thrilling us with their mournful cries.

FRI 06:00 Today (b07z393v)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b07wnbj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b07k0k4h)
The Return, Episode 5

The Libyan novelist Hisham Matar's powerful memoir is a vivid and very moving account of what it's like to be swept up in a situation completely outwith your control - and the ways in which it comes to define your life.

In 1990, Hisham Matar was nineteen when his father, an outspoken critic of the Libyan regime, was kidnapped and taken to prison in Tripoli. He would never see him again. Two decades later, in 2012, after the fall of Qaddafi, Hisham was finally able to return to his homeland after an exile of thirty years. He recounts his return to a country and a family he thought he would never see again and describes the pain of not knowing what happened to his father - it's likely that he died in a massacre at one of Qaddafi's cruellest prisons, Abu Salim in 1996, but he can find no-one able to say absolutely that he did. However, after the fall of the regime, prisons were liberated and the spark of hope that his father had somehow survived slowly petered out. He and his family must come to terms with the fact that they will never know what happened to him.

Reader: Khalid Abdalla

Writer: Hisham Matar

Abridger: Anna Magnusson

Producer: Kirsteen Cameron.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07wn463)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07xh5fz)
Writing the Century: Stannington, Episode 5

Writing the Century, the series that explores the twentieth century through the words and experiences of real people.

In 1950 at the age of 17, Marjorie Wilson was a student nurse caring for children with tuberculosis at Stannington Children's Sanatorium in Morpeth, Northumberland. The drama is based on her interviews and freely adapted by Margaret Wilkinson.

Marjorie fears for young Alan when he goes missing from the ward at night.

Directed by Nadia Molinari.

FRI 11:00 The Intimate Art of Tattoo (b07wtkfz)
In the first of a two-part series, Laurence Llewelyn Bowen considers the exponential rise in tattooing across the UK. With as many as 25% of the population now tattooed, he asks why we're acquiring permanent inkings.

While once the markers of transgression, of the exotic, of forbidden sexuality, Laurence looks at the many and various factors that are driving us to get tattooed now.

From commemorative images of deceased family members, to political scenes marking the centenary of the Easter Rising, our desire to permanently mark our bodies is striking. Laurence meets Lal Hardy who, over five decades as one of the UK's best tattoo artists, has watched the medium move from the backstreet parlour to the high street studio. "Human beings have always wanted to change the way they look, from the earliest beings to now," he says.

At the Great British Tattoo Show, people of all generations descend upon London's Alexandra Palace to meet some of the industry's top talent and plan their next tattoo, from watercolour portraits of their pets to dotwork renderings of Hollywood actors.

Dr Matt Lodder, a heavily tattooed lecturer in contemporary art at the University of Essex, describes the emergence of the British tattoo industry in the late 19th Century. Sutherland Macdonald, the first professional tattooist in London had an upper class clientele with an interest in the Orient.

But despite the tattoo's posh history, they still have the power to appal the middle classes. Social historian Kathryn Hughes makes no excuse for her fear of permanent inkings and the writer and broadcaster Bidisha discusses her regret at getting a full sleeve on her left arm.

A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 11:30 Deborah Frances-White Rolls the Dice (b07wtkg1)
Series 2, Papa Was a Rolling Stone

Award-winning writer and comedian Deborah Frances-White searches for her birth father. Following her highly successful first series, Deborah continues her international adventures. Her unique style mixes reality and comedy as she retells her true-life story.

In the company of a distinguished cast of comedy actors - Alex Lowe (Barry from Watford), Margaret Cabourn-Smith (John Finnemore's Sketchbook) and Laurence Dobiesz (What The Papers Say) - Deborah's quest spans the globe revealing a cast of eccentric characters from the Trenchcoat Detective Agency to the Australian Salvation Army, locally known as the Salvos.

An invited audience enjoys the breadth and depth of her writing which the Guardian called "gripping and compelling' and which won Deborah Frances-White the 2016 Writers Guild Award for Best Scripted Comedy for Half a Can of Worms - the first show in last-year's Radio 4 series.

A So Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b07wn467)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry (b07wtkg3)
Series 3, The Strongest Substance

"What is the strongest substance in the universe? Some people say it is spiderweb, because it is stronger than steel. Is it iron? Is it flint? Is it diamond because diamond can be only be cut by diamond?" asks Françoise Michel.

Adam and Hannah put a variety of materials, from biscuits to spider web, under the hammer to test their strength.

In their quest to find the strongest substance they quiz materials scientist Mark Miodownik, engineer Danielle George and spidergoat creator, Dr Randy Lewis from Utah.

Features archive from 'Horizon: Playing God', first broadcast in January 2012.

Please send your Curious Cases for the team to investigate to curiouscases@bbc.co.uk

Presenters: Adam Rutherford, Hannah Fry
Producer: Michelle Martin.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b07wn469)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b07wn46c)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b07wn46f)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 Britain's Black Past (b07wtkg5)
Olaudah Equiano

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

Over two weeks, Professor Gerzina travels across Britain and talks to historians, unearthing new evidence about Britain's black past. From a country estate in Chepstow, via the docks of Liverpool, to grand houses in London and Bristol, she evokes the daily texture of black people's lives, using first-hand accounts from letters and autobiographies.

In the fifth programme of the series, Professor Gerzina explores the life of the best-known black person in 18th century Britain, Olaudah Equiano. A former sailor and slave, he was a world traveller who bought his own freedom. He ultimately arrived at the heart of British power, even visiting the Queen.

Presenter Gretchen Gerzina is the author of Black in England: Life before Emancipation. She is Dean of the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts.

With historians Professor Vincent Carretta and Professor James Walvin.

The music in this series is by the 18th century composer Ignatius Sancho, and performed by the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra.

Readers: Paterson Joseph, Jonathan Keeble
Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b07wthc1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b04hywtb)
Julie

By Rob Gittins

Based on the true story of Operation Julie - the biggest drug bust in British history.

In the 1970s a large proportion of the world's LSD supply was coming from the wilds of West Wales. Based on true events, this is the story of how one idealistic chemist - Richard Kemp - sought to change the world. And how one determined detective - Dick Lee - set out to stop him.

In 1977 the Operation Julie police team retrieved 18 million microdots of LSD from one small cottage in Tregaron, West Wales. The street value of the haul was over £65 million. But this was no ordinary drugs ring. It grew out of the exploits of a handful of idealistic hippies, motivated by a genuine desire to open people's minds.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07ww88g)
Birmingham

Eric Robson and the horticultural panel visit the Birmingham Botanical Gardens. Bunny Guinness, Bob Flowerdew and Christine Walkden answer the audience questions.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 Autumn Princess (b07xhyx8)
by Sara Maitland

In this sly and playful fairy tale, a princess who has lived by the rule book secretly regrets her lonely life of service and good works. But when a dragon comes to her kingdom, will she continue to do the right thing?

Read by Pauline Knowles
Produced by Eilidh McCreadie

Sara Maitland is an acclaimed novelist, short story writer and author of "A Book of Silence" in which she explores the challenges and joys of self-sought silence. From her home in a remote part of Galloway, she is working on a book for Granta about migrations of no return.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b07ww88j)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 Feedback (b07ww88n)
Radio 4's forum for audience comment.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b07ww88q)
Tallulah and Elijah - Transitioning Together

Fi Glover with a conversation between a couple who are who are dealing with the impact on their relationship as one of them transitions from female to male. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b07wn46h)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07wn46k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b07ww88s)
Series 91, Episode 5

Jeremy Hardy, Paul Sinha, Vicki Pepperdine and Dane Baptiste are on the panel joining Miles Jupp for the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

Producer: Paul Sheehan.
A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b07ww88w)
Helen makes a shocking discovery, and Neil searches for a solution.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b07wn46m)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07xh5fz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b07ww892)
Hilary Benn MP, Laurie Penny

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from the University of the Creative Arts in Epsom,Surrey, with a panel including Hilary Benn MP and Laurie Penny.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b07x1dnd)
A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 Britain's Black Past (b07x15n5)
Omnibus 1

Professor Gretchen Gerzina explores a largely unknown past - the lives of black people who settled in Britain in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

She reveals a startling paradox - although Britain was at the heart of a thriving slave trade, it was still possible for many black people to live here in freedom and prosperity. A few even made it to the very top of fashionable society.

But there were others who were brought over by slave-owners from the West Indies and who were never free, despite living for the rest of their lives in Glasgow or Bristol or London. Some took the law into their own hands, and managed to free themselves, others went further and advocated violent revolution. Free or unfree, they all saw Britain as a place of opportunity that could become a home.

Over two weeks, Professor Gerzina travels across Britain and talks to historians, unearthing new evidence about Britain's black past. From a country estate in Chepstow, via the docks of Liverpool, to grand houses in London and Bristol, she evokes the daily texture of black people's lives, using first-hand accounts from letters and autobiographies.

The first week of the series focuses on the 18th century, with the lives of servants, sailors, and two extraordinary figures who made it to the top of English society - the butler Ignatius Sancho and the former sailor Olaudah Equiano.

Readers: Paterson Joseph, Jonathan Keeble, Kathy Tyson.

With music by the 18th century composer Ignatius Sancho, performed by the Afro-American Chamber Music Society Orchestra.

Producer: Elizabeth Burke
A Loftus Media production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b07wn46p)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b07wn46r)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07x15n7)
The Wonder, Episode 10

A new novel from the bestselling writer of 'Room', and its recent Academy Award nominated screen adaptation, Emma Donoghue.

A small village in 1850s rural Ireland is baffled by Anna O'Donnell's fast, which began as a self-inflicted and earnest expression of faith. After weeks of subsisting only on what she calls "manna from heaven," the story of the "miracle" has reached a fever pitch. Tourists flock in droves to the O'Donnell family's modest cabin hoping to witness, and a Dublin journalist is sent to cover the sensational story. Enter Lib, an English nurse trained by Florence Nightingale who is hired to keep watch for two weeks and determine whether or not Anna is a fraud. As Anna deteriorates, Lib finds herself responsible not just for the care of a child, but for getting to the root of why the child may actually be the victim of murder in slow motion.

A magnetic novel written with all the propulsive tension that made Emma Donoghue's 'Room' a bestseller, 'The Wonder' is tale of two strangers who will transform each other's lives, a powerful psychological thriller, and a story of love pitted against evil in its many masks.

As read by the Academy Award nominated and BAFTA winning actress Carey Mulligan (An Education; Drive; The Great Gatsby; Suffragette).

Read by Carey Mulligan
Written by Emma Donoghue
Abridged by Neville Teller
Produced by Gemma McMullan.

FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b07wt5tl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:27 Wireless Nights (b01s8t7n)
Series 2, Night of the Hunter

Jarvis Cocker returns to Radio 4 with his award-winning feature series exploring the human condition after dark. Tonight is the 'Night of the Hunter' and Jarvis turns his eye to the starlit sky with his mind on hunters and their quarry.

Taking his bearings from Orion, he follows a lamper across farmland hunting foxes by torchlight. A soldier takes him on a top secret mission behind enemy lines when the hunter became the hunted. He accompanies a young man nervously preparing for his first date, in pursuit of love. And a party of friends go out on the pull in Hull, with mixed results.

Join him on an aural journey of the imagination as he tunes into the wireless night.

Producer Neil McCarthy

Contributor recordings by Sara Parker, David Reeves and Laurence Grissell.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b07x15n9)
Suzy and Bridget - My Flaky Friend

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between old friends who harbour few illusions about each other. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b07xh51w)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b07xh51w)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b07xfhqg)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b07xfhqg)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b07wp83v)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b07wp83v)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b07xh59k)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b07xh59k)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b07xh5fz)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b07xh5fz)

A Casual Clearance 11:00 MON (b07wpf5n)

A Good Read 16:30 TUE (b07wt5tl)

A Good Read 23:00 FRI (b07wt5tl)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b07wm6k0)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b07x1dnd)

Afternoon Drama 14:15 FRI (b04hywtb)

Analysis 21:30 SUN (b07w9km7)

Analysis 20:30 MON (b07wphhk)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b07w5ydx)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b07wm6jy)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b07ww892)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b07wmzxg)

Arthur Russell: Vanished into Music 15:30 SAT (b07wbtsz)

Autumn Princess 15:45 FRI (b07xhyx8)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b07wn43d)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b07wn43d)

Balm of Hurt Minds 19:45 SUN (b07yc9x2)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b07wn9kd)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b07wn9kd)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b07wpgjp)

Bird Island 23:15 WED (b044ghpd)

Body Count Rising 11:30 THU (b07wtggz)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b07wphhm)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b07wt5v5)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b07wtd7d)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b07wthc7)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b07x15n7)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b07wrr5p)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b07jxsy3)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b07jxsy3)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b07jys1m)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b07jys1m)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b07jyvzx)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b07jyvzx)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b07k01bk)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b07k01bk)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b07k0k4h)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b07wnj7t)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b07wnj7t)

Britain's Black Past 13:45 MON (b07wpf5v)

Britain's Black Past 13:45 TUE (b07ws0f2)

Britain's Black Past 13:45 WED (b07wtd6y)

Britain's Black Past 13:45 THU (b07wtgh3)

Britain's Black Past 13:45 FRI (b07wtkg5)

Britain's Black Past 21:00 FRI (b07x15n5)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b07wn3mr)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b07wsmrk)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b07wsmrk)

Deborah Frances-White Rolls the Dice 11:30 FRI (b07wtkg1)

Desert Island Discs 11:15 SUN (b07wnbj2)

Desert Island Discs 09:00 FRI (b07wnbj2)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b07w6b7t)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b07wndxx)

Drama 14:15 MON (b05r3w3j)

Drama 14:15 WED (b07wtd70)

Drama 14:15 THU (b07wtgh5)

Ed Reardon's Week 18:30 TUE (b07wt5tq)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b07w5ydg)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b07wn3rd)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b07wn3w4)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b07wn3zl)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b07wn42v)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b07wn461)

Feedback 20:00 SUN (b07wm11l)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b07ww88n)

File on 4 17:00 SUN (b07wby0z)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b07wt5tx)

Food Chains 00:30 SUN (b04807j2)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b07wnbj8)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b07wnbj8)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b07wtd7b)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b07w5ydn)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:00 THU (b07wtggx)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b07wn3s7)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b07wn3wt)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b07wn407)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b07wn43l)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b07wn46m)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b07wm0l5)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b07ww88g)

Hardeep's Sunday Lunch 13:30 SUN (b07wnbjc)

In Our Time 09:00 THU (b07wtggv)

In Our Time 21:30 THU (b07wtggv)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b07wn3ww)

Inside Health 21:00 TUE (b07wt5v1)

Inside Health 15:30 WED (b07wt5v1)

It's Not What You Know 18:30 THU (b07wthbz)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b07w9jg9)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b07wm11j)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b07ww88j)

Lemn Sissay's Origin Stories 11:30 MON (b07wpf5q)

Life: An Idiot's Guide 23:00 TUE (b044mc1g)

Little Lifetimes by Jenny Eclair 23:00 WED (b07wtd7g)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b07w5yf9)

Man at the Helm 11:30 WED (b07wt9c4)

Mark Steel's in Town 18:30 WED (b07wtd76)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b07w5ycx)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b07wn3lp)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b07wn3r1)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b07wn3vp)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b07wn3z8)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b07wn42j)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b07wn45q)

Midweek 09:00 WED (b07wt83d)

Midweek 21:30 WED (b07wt83d)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b07wmzx8)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b07wmzx8)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b07wtd72)

Moral Maze 20:00 WED (b07wtd78)

Moving Pictures 16:00 MON (b07wpgjm)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b07wbtsx)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b07ws0dw)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b07w5yd7)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b07wn3ly)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b07wn3rb)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b07wn3w2)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b07wn3zj)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b07wn42s)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b07wn45z)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b07wn3m5)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b07w5ydq)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b07wn3mw)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b07wn3rv)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b07wn3w8)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b07wn3zq)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b07wn42z)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b07wn467)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b07w5ydb)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b07wn3mf)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b07wn3mm)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b07w5yff)

News 13:00 SAT (b07w5ydv)

On Your Farm 06:35 SUN (b07wn9km)

One to One 09:30 TUE (b07ws0dt)

PM 17:00 SAT (b07w5yf1)

PM 17:00 MON (b07wn3s3)

PM 17:00 TUE (b07wn3wp)

PM 17:00 WED (b07wn403)

PM 17:00 THU (b07wn43g)

PM 17:00 FRI (b07wn46h)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b07wn3n8)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b07wnj7w)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b07wm871)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b07yr8y7)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b07z38v1)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b07yqmp0)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b07z839f)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b07zf2mn)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b07wmzxd)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b07wmzxd)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b07wmzxd)

Quote... Unquote 23:00 SAT (b07w9jg3)

Quote... Unquote 15:00 MON (b07wpgjk)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b07wn9kp)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b07wn9kp)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b07wn9kp)

Ramblings 06:07 SAT (b07wgmf4)

Ramblings 15:00 THU (b07wtgh7)

Reporting Terror: A Dangerous Game 22:15 SAT (b07wc4np)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b07w5ydl)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b07w5yfc)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b07w5yd3)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b07wn3lt)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b07wn3r6)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b07wn3vy)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b07wn3zd)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b07wn42n)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b07wn45v)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b07w5ycz)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b07w5yd5)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b07w5yf3)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b07wn3lr)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b07wn3lw)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b07wn3n2)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b07wn3r4)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b07wn3r8)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b07wn3vw)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b07wn3w0)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b07wn3zb)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b07wn3zg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b07wn42l)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b07wn42q)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b07wn45s)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b07wn45x)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b07w5yf7)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b07wn3n6)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b07wn3s5)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b07wn3wr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b07wn405)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b07wn43j)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b07wn46k)

Sketchorama 19:15 SUN (b061yh01)

Small Scenes 23:00 THU (b03gbxnj)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b07wn3m9)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b07wn3m9)

Start the Week 09:00 MON (b07wp83q)

Start the Week 21:30 MON (b07wp83q)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b07wn3mp)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b07wn3mh)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b07wn3mt)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b07wnj7y)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b07wnj7y)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b07wpgjt)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b07wpgjt)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b07wt5ts)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b07wt5ts)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b07wt9c6)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b07wt9c6)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b07wthc1)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b07wthc1)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b07ww88w)

The Bottom Line 17:30 SAT (b07wgmfg)

The Bottom Line 20:30 THU (b07wthc5)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b07wthc3)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 12:04 MON (b07wpf5s)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 12:04 TUE (b07ws0f0)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 12:04 WED (b07wtd6w)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 12:04 THU (b07wtgh1)

The Curious Cases of Rutherford & Fry 12:04 FRI (b07wtkg3)

The Danube Ain't Blue, It's Green 11:30 TUE (b07ws0dy)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b07wgmf6)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b07wtgh9)

The Forsyte Saga 14:30 SAT (b07wmzxb)

The Intimate Art of Tattoo 11:00 FRI (b07wtkfz)

The Kitchen Cabinet 10:30 SAT (b07wmcmv)

The Kitchen Cabinet 15:00 TUE (b07wmcmv)

The Life Scientific 09:00 TUE (b07wt6bj)

The Life Scientific 21:30 TUE (b07wt6bj)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b07wndxv)

The Listening Project 10:56 WED (b07wt9c2)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b07ww88q)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b07x15n9)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b07wn3zz)

The News Quiz 12:30 SAT (b07wm6jj)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b07ww88s)

The Unbelievable Truth 18:30 MON (b07wpgjr)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b07wn3n0)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b07wn3sj)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b07wn3x0)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b07wn40c)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b07wn43q)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b07wn46r)

Thinking Allowed 00:15 MON (b07wc303)

Thinking Allowed 16:00 WED (b07wtd74)

Today 07:00 SAT (b07wmzx4)

Today 06:00 MON (b07wn3rq)

Today 06:00 TUE (b07ws0dr)

Today 06:00 WED (b07z39tn)

Today 06:00 THU (b07z839l)

Today 06:00 FRI (b07z393v)

Too Many Helping Hands 20:00 MON (b07wphhh)

Too Many Helping Hands 11:00 WED (b07wphhh)

Tracks 14:15 TUE (b07wsmrh)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b03dwvx5)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b03jz1hj)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b03k5b9c)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b03dx944)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03dwyv9)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b03dwsxw)

Voices of... 23:30 SAT (b07syrrs)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b07w5ydd)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b07w5ydj)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b07w5yds)

Weather 17:57 SAT (b07w5yf5)

Weather 06:57 SUN (b07wn3mc)

Weather 07:57 SUN (b07wn3mk)

Weather 12:57 SUN (b07wn3my)

Weather 17:57 SUN (b07wn3n4)

Weather 05:56 MON (b07wn3rg)

Weather 12:57 MON (b07wn3rz)

Weather 21:58 MON (b07wn3sd)

Weather 12:57 TUE (b07wn3wf)

Weather 21:58 TUE (b07wn3wy)

Weather 12:57 WED (b07wn3zv)

Weather 21:58 WED (b07wn409)

Weather 12:57 THU (b07wn433)

Weather 21:58 THU (b07wn43n)

Weather 12:57 FRI (b07wn46c)

Weather 21:58 FRI (b07wn46p)

Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b07wn3nd)

What Does Theresa Really Think? 11:00 SAT (b07wmzx6)

Wireless Nights 23:30 MON (b01g6592)

Wireless Nights 23:30 TUE (b06qj74f)

Wireless Nights 23:30 WED (b06r4gq1)

Wireless Nights 23:30 THU (b01snqbv)

Wireless Nights 23:27 FRI (b01s8t7n)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b07w5ydz)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b07wn3rs)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b07wn3w6)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b07wn3zn)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b07wn42x)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b07wn463)

Word of Mouth 23:00 MON (b07wby0n)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b07wsmrp)

World at One 13:00 MON (b07wn3s1)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b07wn3wj)

World at One 13:00 WED (b07wn3zx)

World at One 13:00 THU (b07wn435)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b07wn46f)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b07wn3rx)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b07wn3wb)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b07wn3zs)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b07wn431)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b07wn469)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b07wm873)