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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 03 SEPTEMBER 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b07q2dvc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b07qc3g5)
Shrinking Violets, Episode 5

Joe Moran has spent his life trying to get to grips with his shyness. In this Field Guide to Shyness, he explores the hidden world of reticence, navigating the myriad ways scientists and thinkers have tried to explain and cure shyness, and uncovering the fascinating stories of the men and women who were 'of the violet persuasion'.

"It feels like coming late to a party when everyone else is about three beers in and entering that state that allows them to have fluent exchanges that settle on some pre-agreed theme as if by magic."

In 1993, a drug initially intended as an antidepressant, Paxil, was marketed in the US as alleviating social anxiety disorder. Since then, many other drugs, like Prozac and Zoloft, have been rebranded as treating social anxiety. But when does shyness become pathological?

Read by Nigel Planer
Written by Joe Moran
Abridged and produced by Hannah Marshall
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07q2dvf)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07q2dvh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07q2dvk)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b07q2dvm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07qcb8v)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Greenbelt Festival with Canon Mark Oakley.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b07qcb93)
The programme that starts with its listeners.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b07q2dvp)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b07q2dvr)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Open Country (b07qbl5p)
Hoylake: Green Belt and Greens

A new golf resort has been proposed for Hoylake in Wirral. Helen Mark explores how this will affect the local green belt and the birdlife and wildlife that live there.

Helen speaks to Andrew Needham from the Council for the Protection of Rural England about what constitutes green belt land and why a golf course may be permissible. John Hutchinson from the Hoylake Golf Resort Committee talks about his opposition to the resort and how it will destroy a much-loved piece of land. Dr Hilary Ash takes Helen bird-watching for some of the thousands of Black Tailed Godwits that use the existing land as part of their migration. Craig Gilholm shows Helen around the Royal Liverpool Golf Club and recalls how the Natterjack Toad almost halted the Open in 2006, and local resident and golfer David Stacey explains why the lure of a new Championship Golf Course would be an asset to the area. Cllr Gerry Ellis says this proposed resort is the biggest issue he's faced as a Councillor and explains why he's less optimistic now that the resort will ever go ahead.

Producer: Toby Field.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b07q2dvt)
Farming Today This Week: Green Belt

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b07q2dvw)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b07rgybm)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b07q2dvy)
John Bishop

Stand-up comedian and actor John Bishop joins Aasmah Mir and the Rev. Richard Coles. John Bishop found fame after discovering his talent for stand-up comedy in his thirties. He talks about his willingness to try new things, which includes a new TV interview series, his Liverpudlian identity and creating comedy.

Listener Rachel Gadsden is an artist who is involved in creating artworks and an animation for the lighting of the Paralympic Heritage Torch Lighting Ceremony.

Pianist Antimo Magnotta talks to JP Devlin about his experience on board the Costa Concordia cruise ship on the night the vessel collided into a rock.

Comedian and writer Deborah Frances-White was adopted at ten days old in Australia. She has tracked down her birth mother and family, and continues to search for her birth father.

American singer PP Arnold shares her Inheritance Tracks: River Deep Mountain High by Ike and Tina Turner and Aretha Franklin's Natural Woman, written by Carole King

Simon Cowell MBE, not the X-Factor music mogul but a former city trader. He now runs his own animal rescue centre, the Wildlife Aid Foundation.

John Bishop: In Conversation With... continues on Thursday's at 9pm on W.
Deborah Frances-White's 4-part series 'Rolls the Dice' begins on Radio 4 on Friday at 11.30am.
PP Arnold is touring around the UK from October as part of Maximum Rhythm N' Blues.
Simon has published the book My Wild Life: The story of a Most Unlikely Animal Rescuer, which is out now.

Producer: Claire Bartleet
Editor: Karen Dalziel.

SAT 10:30 A Journey Through English (b07rgybq)
How do accents and dialects change on the longest continuous train journey in Britain? In A Journey We jump on board in Aberdeen in the early morning and arrive late in the evening in Penzance over 600 miles away.

En route, we tune in to the distinctive regional voices of the passengers and staff as they talk about their voices and the impact they have on their lives - both positive and negative. Jonnie Robinson, the British Library's Lead Curator of Spoken English, is on board to uncover the political, geographic and societal aspects of regional English.

The route cuts through several of the UK's major dialect regions via Scotland, the North East, Yorkshire, the Midlands and the West Country. A Journey Through English covers, in just under half an hour, a train journey that in reality takes more than thirteen hours travelling from north-east Scotland to the tip of Cornwall.

Producer: Jane French
A Soundscape production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 11:00 The Forum (b07tm29p)
Reawakening Language

There are several thousand languages around the world but not all are in good health. It is thought that at least half of the languages alive today could cease to be spoken by the end of this century. What can we do about it? How do you re-awaken hibernating or dying languages and the cultures that go with them? Or, is some extinction inevitable? Bridget Kendall explores the positive things that are happening with some minority languages, focusing on Australia, Nepal and Hawaii with linguists Professor Ghil'ad Zuckermann and Dr. Candace Kaleimamoowahinekapu Galla and anthropologist Dr. Mark Turin.

Photo: 'Idea' written (clockwise from top) in Hebrew, Arabic, Yiddish and Indonesian. Illustration by Shan Pillay.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b07q2dw0)
Kate Adie introduces dispatches from writers and correspondents around the world. This week: Wyre Davies considers the vote of the Brazilian Senate to impeach Dilma Rousseff and whether the change at the top of the country's politics amounts to a coup. As the latest summit of the Group of 20 leading nations takes place in China this weekend, Carrie Gracie profiles the historic city of Hangzhou which will host the meetings of the heads of government and central bank governors. Katerina Vittozzi reports from the Central African Republic on her meeting with the victim of a brutal sexual assault. With Pyongyang holding its first international beer festival, Stephen Evans considers how the drink is a surprisingly unifying facet of life in North and South Korea. And David Willis in Los Angeles ponders whether errant American Olympian, Ryan Lochte, may yet be rehabilitated by dancing with the stars.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b07q2dw2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b07rgybs)
Dire time for savers with more rate cuts

Millions of savers are being hit by further cuts in interest rates, making it especially difficult for people who rely on the income from their savings. For the first time, the average easy access rate has fallen below 0.5%, while cash Isa rates fell below 1%. This follows the Bank of England's decision to cut base rates by 0.25% on 4 August, with the expectation of further cuts if necessary. As a result, savings rates were reduced on 354 products last month. What can savers do? Charlotte Nelson from the comparison website, Money Facts, joins the programme.

A law firm is planning action against some providers of self managed pension investments or SIPP's. SIPPS give people more flexibility over the management of their own pension pot- including what to invest in. The action centres on the claim that providers didn't carry out adequate checks before processing millions of pounds of investor's money into unregulated investment schemes, which are not FCA authorised. Some of those high risk schemes either failed or turned out to be scams.
Michael Cotter from Waterside Legal, the firm behind the action, and John Moret, a SIPP industry expert discuss the issue of who is to blame when a SIPP investment goes wrong.

Thousands of people in social work and other professions face large and unexpected tax bills after HMRC won a court case about what are called managed service companies - MSCs. They are set up by people who work through a separate company which then rents their services to a firm instead of them being taken on as a regular employee. Many firms prefer that arrangement to avoid the liabilities and costs of being an employer. The worker can gain big savings by paying less tax and national insurance. Now HMRC wants that money back. And the bills are huge. Many face bankruptcy. Money Box talks to health professional Laura who found she owed HMRC almost £12,000, including penalties and fees. The programme also speaks to tax expert David Kirk.

Bank error in your favour. People who had a student current account with RBS or Natwest between 2002 and March this year will be receiving a refund of overdraft charges that should never have been taken. The bank gives students interest-free overdrafts. But they are given the option to increase their overdraft limit by up to £500. And the banks did charge interest on the top-up amount. However, the bank discovered earlier this year that the terms and conditions continued to day that there were no charges on student account overdrafts. So student customers should have been paying no charges at all. David Crawford, Head of Current Accounts, at Natwest/RBS, explains how they will contact people owed a refund.

SAT 12:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b07qc93g)
Series 9, Brown, Birkwood, Monbiot

Craig Brown, critic and satirist, best known for his parodies in Private Eye. In The Independent on Sunday he is Wallace Arnold, he's Bel Littlejohn in The Guardian, and he has a diary in Private Eye under a number of topical guises. As well as writing comedy shows such as Norman Ormal for TV, Craig has a regular column in The Daily Telegraph, and his books include The Little Book of Chaos, The Marsh Marlowe Letters and The Hounding of John Thomas.

Katie Birkwood, the rare books and special collections librarian at the Royal College of Physicians, London, where she's worked for three years and recently curated a hugely popular exhibition on the life and book collection of John Dee. Katie regularly contributes to the journal Library & Information History, and has published on topics as diverse as the 16th century manuscripts collector Robert Cotton; the 17th archbishop James Ussher; depictions of venereal disease in early printed books, and the 20th century astronomer Fred Hoyle.

George Monbiot, a journalist best known for his environmental activism. His celebrated Guardian columns are syndicated all over the world, and he is the author of the bestselling books Captive State, The Age of Consent, as well as the investigative travel books Poisoned Arrows, Amazon Watershed and No Man's Land. His investigations in Africa, Asia, and the Americas have led to him to be declared persona non grata in seven countries, sentenced in absentia to life imprisonment in Indonesia, shot at, beaten up by military police, shipwrecked and stung into a coma.

This week, the Museum's Guest Committee appreciate a mythical hotel from another age; a book that was stolen from the greatest library of the Tudor age; and the greatest bear that ever lived.

The show was researched by Mike Turner and Anne Miller of QI.
The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.
It was a BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b07q2dw4)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b07q2dw6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b07qc93l)
Diane Abbott MP, James Delingpole, Larry Sanders, Theresa Villiers MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Lydney Town Hall in Gloucestershire with Shadow Health Secretary Diane Abbott MP, author and broadcaster James Delingpole, the Green Party's health spokesman Larry Sanders, and the former Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers MP.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b07q2dw8)
Listeners have their say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

SAT 14:30 Saturday Drama (b01sc9cp)
Pepys: Fire of London

London in 1666 was a health and safety nightmare. It was illegal to build with wood and thatch but people did it anyway. Foundries were forbidden in the city but that didn't stop them operating. Charles II had banned dangerous overhanging windows but this was ignored by local government who carried on building them regardless. Many homes still contained muskets and gunpowder left over from Cromwell's time. Six hundred tons of highly potent gunpowder were stored in the Tower of London itself. Riverfront warehouses were full of oil and tallow. There was no fire service.

In Pudding Lane, on 2 September, after a day of slaving over a hot oven, Thomas Farrinor, baker to King Charles II, went to bed unaware that his oven was still alight. The smouldering embers ignited some nearby firewood and by 1 o'clock in the morning his house was ablaze. A strong wind on that September morning ensured that sparks flew everywhere . . .

Samuel Pepys' diary of the following days, dramatised by Hattie Naylor, reveals the unfolding drama of 350 years ago.


Theme music: Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May, words by Robert Herrick and music by William Lawes, sung by Bethany Hughes. Lute, baroque guitar and theorbo played by David Miller. Violin and viol by Annika Gray, and recorders by Alice Baxter.
Historical consultant: Liza Picard
Sound by Nigel Lewis

A BBC/Cymru Wales production, directed by Kate McAll.

SAT 15:30 Great Fire 350 (b07rh0xs)
A giant model of 1666 London being set on fire in the Thames, a 6km domino run made up of 26,000 breezeblocks falling through the City of London, fire installations and projections onto landmark buildings...

These are some of the highlights of London's Burning, an ambitious arts spectacle taking place on the weekend of 2nd - 4th September, marking 350 years since the Great Fire of London.

It's organised by Artichoke, the arts company responsible for London Lumiere, the Sultan's Elephant and Derry-Londonderry's Temple bonfire. The aim is to disrupt city life for exhilarating spectacles and, over the past four months, the director Helen Marriage and her team have granted Radio 4 access to its nail-biting negotiations as they prepare to stage their most challenging project so far.

Road closures, large-scale crowd control, access to historic spaces, the introduction of fire onto the streets of the City - it's the stuff of nightmares for Health and Safety, Transport for London and the Fire Service, who need to be brought on side before the final vital funding can be released.

We also follow the community project that aims to transform the lives of a large group of young Londoners, as unemployed people with no previous construction experience will build the festival's centrepiece sculpture. Their model of London in 1666 will be transported down the River Thames before being burned in a huge conflagration.

As well as witnessing the drama of mounting the show, Great Fire 350 raises questions about public space - who owns it and what is the citizen's rights to stage public events? It will look at how our cities are controlled and their resilience, even in the face of a great fire.

Producer: Paul Smith
A Just Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b07q2dwb)
The Canonisation of Mother Theresa of Calcutta

On Sunday St Peter's Square in Rome will be packed with tens of thousands of people for the Canonisation of Mother Theresa of Calcutta as a Saint. But who was she and what kind of role model might she be? Madeline Bunting the author and journalist and Dr Gemma Simmonds, a sister of the Congregation of Jesus, discuss.

We hear from Janie Schaffer, the Founder of Knickerbox, about the underwear industry, how she started as a trainee at M&S and why she believes your bra must always match your knickers!

Why do black women face more abuse on social media? We hear from the black feminist blogger Claire Heuchan and Natalie Jeffers, the Co-creator of Black Lives Matter UK.

After winning Gold for Great Britain's Women's Hockey team, discuss their careers in sports and what it means to them to be the first same sex married couple at the Olympics.

New research in the US suggests young people born after 1980 are having less sex than previous generations. Is it the same in the UK? Journalist Daisy Buchanan and the sex blogger 'Girl on the Net' discuss.

Atiha Sen Gupta is the writer-in-residence at the Theatre Royal Stratford East. She tells us about her new play 'Counting Stars' set in a fictional nightclub in Woolwich and tells the love story of two Nigerian immigrants Sophie and Abiodun who work in its toilets.

Country music has produced some of the greatest singer-songwriters in history like Dolly Parton, Reba McEntire and Trisha Yearwood. But if you listen to Country Radio in the US only a handful of female artists are given any air time. So where are all the female country stars? Beverley Keel, a former music executive in Nashville and co-founder of Change the Conversation, joins Catherine and Lizzy Ward Thomas a UK country duo 'Ward Thomas' discuss.

Presented by Jenni Murray
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow.

SAT 17:00 PM (b07q2dwd)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 iPM (b07qcb93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07q2dwg)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b07q2dwj)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07q2dwl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b07q2dwn)
Nikki Bedi, Scroobius Pip, Niamh Cusack, Arnold Oceng, Mary Roach, The Divine Comedy, Natty and The Rebel Ship

Nikki Bedi and Sara Cox are joined by Niamh Cusack, Arnold Oceng, Scroobius Pip and Mary Roach for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from The Divine Comedy and Natty & The Rebel Ship.

Producer: Debbie Kilbride.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b07rh0xv)
Amber Rudd

Series of profiles of people who are currently making headlines. Becky Milligan profiles the new home secretary, Amber Rudd.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b07q2dwq)
Ian McEwan, Sausage Party, Reading gaol, The Entertainer, The Collection

Ian McEwan's latest novel Nutshell tells the story from the point of view of a foetus.
Sausage Party is the sweariest, most vulgar cartoon film you will ever have seen. From the imagination of Seth Rogen, it imagines the world of sentient food
Artangel's project 'Inside- artists and writers in Reading Prison' is staged at the gaol where Oscar Wilde was incarcerated. It features work by contemporary artists reflecting on the themes of imprisonment and separation.
Kenneth Branagh reprises another role associated with Laurence Olivier; playing Archie Rice in John Osbourne's The Entertainer. He can't escape the comparisons but can he live up to expectations?
The Collection is a new TV drama series dealing with the not-so-glamorous world of haute couture.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b07rh18q)
Star Trek - The Undiscovered Future

The first episode of Star Trek aired half a century ago, on 8th September 1966. Space medic and broadcaster Kevin Fong asks what happened to the progressive and optimistic vision of future that the iconic television series promised him?

In 1964, Star Trek producer Gene Roddenberry repeatedly failed to convince US television studios and networks to buy his idea for a new kind of science fiction series. Eventually he sold NBC the concept of a sci-fi story in which the human race explored space, united in racial harmony and with benign global purpose.

This was the era of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the western world: mutual nuclear annihilation had almost happened in 1963. The US and USSR were engaged in the Space race.

Yet in Star Trek, American captain James Kirk had a Russian, Pavel Chekov, in charge of the Enterprise's weapon systems.

The battle for civil rights in the United States was also coming to ahead. Gene Roddenberry cast a black woman as fourth in command of the Enterprise - Lieutenant Uhura, the ship's communications officer.

The Vietnam war was ramping up and relations between Mao's China and the United States were at a low. Yet another senior figure on the Enterprise's bridge was Mr Sulu, who Roddenberry wanted as a representative of Asia.

How far have we voyaged towards Star Trek's vision of the future and what of it is likely to be fulfilled or remain undiscovered in the next 50 years?

Kevin Fong presents archive material of the likes of Leonard Nimoy (Spock) and Nichelle Nichols (Lieutenant Uhura) talking about the inception and filming of the original Star Trek series, and their thoughts about Roddenberry's vision of the future and its impact in the United States at the time.

For example, Nichols relates how she had a chance encounter with Martin Luther King the day after she had told Roddenberry that she intended to leave Star Trek after the first series. King told her he was her number fan and almost demanded that she didn't give up the role of Uhura, because she was an uniquely empowering role model on American television at the time.

For a perspective from today, Kevin also talks to George Takei who played Mr Sulu. Takei laments the ethnically divisive politics of the United States in 2016.

He meets Charles Bolden - the first African American to both command a shuttle mission and lead NASA as its chief administrator. In the age of the International Space Station, he compares himself to the 'Admiral of Star Fleet'. But the former astronaut also talks about the anger he first felt in 1994 when he was asked to fly the first Russian cosmonaut ever to board an American space shuttle.

Kevin also talk to cultural broadcaster and Star Trek fan Samira Ahmed about the sexual and racial politics of the Original series.

Rod Roddenberry, the television producer son of Gene Roddenberry, tells Kevin about his father, his father's politics and creative vision, and why Star Trek still endures, even though its future remains unattained.

Producers: Andrew Luck-Baker and Jennifer Whyntie.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b07q2r4v)
New Grub Street, Episode 1

New Grub Street by George Gissing. Dramatised by Christopher Douglas.
Episode 1
Edwin Reardon is a serious novelist striving for recognition in a literary world that's dumbing rapidly down. His younger, confident friend Jasper Milvain believes the only purpose of writing is to make big bucks. Neither approach has brought them much success. Radio 4's Ed Reardon and Jaz Milvain are loosely based on characters from this Victorian novel. And in this satiric dramatisation George Gissing is played by Christopher Douglas.

Director/Producer Gary Brown

Free schooling, which followed the Education Act of 1807 helped to create a newly literate working class. This created a demand for popular fiction and sensational journalism. Thus a gulf opened up between 'Literature' and the mass market as embodied by writers Edwin Reardon and Jasper Milvain.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b07q2dws)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Unreliable Evidence (b07qbcbq)
In the first of a new series, Clive Anderson hosts a lively discussion about how the law addresses the conflicting interests of humans and animals.

In the wake of attempts by lawyers in the US to create "legal personhood" for chimpanzees, guaranteeing them a right to freedom, Unreliable Evidence asks if animals have enough protection in law - as pets, in the food industry, in medical trials and in the entertainment and sports worlds. Ten years after the Animal Welfare Act was introduced, is the law in this area working, and is it now time to introduce animal rights, along broadly the same lines as human rights?

Clive's guests include animal welfare lawyers, including the US attorney Steve Wise who is spearheading attempts to break down what he describes as the wall between those who have rights and those who don't, and lawyers who act for the Countryside Alliance, farmers, the meat industry and even for a lion-tamer.

The programme considers how well the law reflects growing scientific understanding of animal intelligence and their ability to suffer, whether the law strikes the right balance between the interests of animals and the commercial interests which humans have in animals, and if future generations might look back at how we treat animals today in much the same way as we now view slavery.

And what would be the consequences for society if there were major changes in law? Would the legal floodgates open if courts accepted that certain higher apes should be granted similar rights to humans?

Other programmes in the series look at the Law and Violence, The Legal Implications of Brexit and the Law and Prisoners.

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b07q31y7)
Series 30, Semi-Final 2, 2016

(11/13)
The second semi-final of Counterpoint 2016 features another three competitors who've won through from the heats stage. Paul Gambaccini asks the questions, requiring a knowledge ranging from symphonic poems to no.1 pop albums of 2016. As always, the competitors also have to pick a special topic on which to answer an individual round of questions, with no prior warning of the categories. The winner will return in two weeks' time in the grand Final at the BBC Proms.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

SAT 23:30 Poetry Please (b07q2krb)
Jack Clemo at 100

Roger McGough listens to a series of poems by the remarkable Cornish poet Jack Clemo who was born 100 years ago. A devout and singular poet, Clemo grew up in the raw and brutal landscape of the china-clay pits of Cornwall. He was deeply affected by where he was from. Deaf from an early age, and later blind as well, he wrote an extraordinary physical yet religious verse that is like nothing and no one else. The former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, and Clemo's biographer, Luke Thompson, pick and read their favourite poems and Jim Causley sings some. Producer: Tim Dee.


SUNDAY 04 SEPTEMBER 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b07rkgk1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Skylines (b045c65w)
Stonehenge

The first of three specially commissioned stories which invited writers to lift their gaze to the horizon - the point where our everyday worlds intersect with the sky.

In Stonehenge the exiled Emperor Haile Selassie makes an unofficial excursion to the ancient holy place whose outline dominates the skyline of Salisbury Plain.

Reader: Kobna Holdbrook-Smith

Written by by Maaza Mengiste

Commissioned for radio by Ellah Allfrey

Directed by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07rkgkh)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07rkgkp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07rkgkv)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b07rkgky)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b07sx9y8)
All Saints, Writtle

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from the tower of All Saints, Writtle in Essex. All Saints is one of the many hundreds of churches taking part next weekend in the National Trust's Heritage Open Days. Visitors will be able to see the bells and ringers in action in a good number of towers and in some cases, have a go themselves.
As part of the celebrations on Saturday, ringers from Essex will be competing in a striking competition for the Essex Trophy.
All Saints, Writtle has a peal of 10 bells cast by John Taylor and Company in 2004. The Tenor weighs Thirty One and a Half Hundredweight and is tuned to the Key of D. We hear them now ringing Plain Bob Royal.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b07rh0xv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b07rkgl5)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b07sx9z5)
The Future of Our Planet

Former President of Ireland Mary Robinson examines the impact of climate change and what she describes as "an existential threat to the future of our planet".

Mary Robinson became interested in climate change during her time spent working in African nations on issues of development and human rights. She explains "I kept hearing this pervasive sentence - 'Oh, but things are so much worse now, things are so much worse.' When I explored what was behind that, it was about changes in the climate - climate shocks, unpredictable weather - and then I realised that this was an issue of human rights."

Mary explores the plight of the Marshall Islands, which sit only two metres above sea level. She draws upon the work of Marshall islander Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner whose poetry lays bare the effects of climate change on her place of birth.

Looking to the future, Mary argues "we have to move away from business as usual. The industrial and technological revolutions, I believe, have to give way to an ecological revolution. This has to become everyone's agenda, to take part in this revolution."

Presenter: Mary Robinson
Producer: Michael Wakelin
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 The Living World (b07sxqt5)
The Dance of the Dragonfiles

Chris Packham relives programmes from The Living World archives.

In many ways 1985 changed Raury MacKenzie-Dodds life. Idly walking along a London canal towpath a dragonfly landed on his shirt. So mesmerised was Raury by the beauty and form of this dazzling 'devils darning needle' as dragonflies are sometimes known, that a few years later he created the Ashton Water Dragonfly Sanctuary in Nottinghamshire.

In this programme from 1994 Lionel Kelleway travels to the Dragonfly Sanctuary to discover for himself why these aerial predators delight Raury so much. With them is dragonfly ecologist Erica Towner who's studies are providing a vital link between dragonflies and a changing environment.
Producer Andrew Dawes.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b07rkglc)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b07rkglj)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b07rkgln)
Mother Teresa's canonisation, British bell ringer shortage, Ben-Hur review

On Sunday, 19 years after her death, Mother Teresa will be canonised at a Mass in St Peter's Square. David Willey is in Rome ahead of the ceremony while Mike Wooldridge returns to Kolkata to report on her legacy. He hears why some people in the Indian city are still critical about her work there.

For the past two years the Church of England has held meetings to allow clergy and laity to talk about their differences on issues around human sexuality. Later this month, at a meeting of the House of Bishops, the church will discuss what to do next. Trevor Barnes hears why some churches are threatening to split and form a 'shadow synod' if the church moves in a 'liberal direction'.

In 1959, Ben Hur won 11 Oscars and became a cinema classic so how does the latest remake released this week compare? Film critic Richard Fitzwilliams reviews the latest biblical blockbuster for Sunday.

Two thirds of Muslims worldwide are under 30 and have grown up in the shadow of the terror attacks of 9/11. In her new book, Generation M, Shelina Janmohamed tells William how this modern, self empowered generation are shaping the world around them.

Last weekend a mosque for women in Copenhagen held Friday prayers for the first time. Women's mosques have been operating in China for over 300 years. Dr Maria Jaschok tells William about their history and the role of the female imam.

A poll for BBC local radio reveals there is a shortage of people training to become bell ringers while the demand for bells at weddings and other ceremonies is increasing. We send William off for his first lesson in bell ringing and Kate Flavell from the Central Council of Bell Ringers explains why there is a recruitment problem.

Producers:
David Cook
Peter Everett

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b07sxhwr)
Breast Cancer Care

Amanda Mealing makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Breast Cancer Care.
Registered Charity No 1017658
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That's the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope 'Breast Cancer Care'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Breast Cancer Care'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b07rkgls)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b07rkglw)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b07sxhwz)
Phoenix from the Ashes

The Bishop of London Richard Chartres preaches live from the fine Wren Church of St Stephen, Walbrook in the City of London, to mark the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire.

Early on Sunday, 2nd September 1666, a fire in a bakery near London Bridge became out of control and a strong wind fanned the flames westward. Not only the wooden houses, but warehouses, public buildings and churches were consumed in the fierce heat - molten lead running in the gutters, while stone was burnt to lime. The Great Fire destroyed over three quarters of the City.

A large number of the City Churches were rebuilt, many designed by Sir Christopher Wren, including one of his most famous, St Stephen Walbrook.

The ever increasing range and diversity of Christian worship in the City Churches today is celebrated in this act of worship, which includes contributions from some of the newer priests in the City, including Rev David Ingall from St Sepulchre's, and Revd Sally Muggeridge from St Stephen's. The service is led by the Priest-in-Charge of St Stephen Walbrook, Revd Jonathan Evens and music is sung by St Stephen's Voices, directed by Jeremy Cole, with organist Robert Mingay. The producer is Andrew Earis.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b07qc93n)
Parliament Roadshow

Tom Shakespeare argues that the upcoming refurbishment work on the Palace of Westminster provides a perfect opportunity for taking it out of London.

"My vision is of the Houses of Parliament as a travelling caravan, a charabanc of power, spending a year here and a year there throughout our United Kingdom".

He says it would enable our leaders to see at first hand what they are legislating about and who they are legislating for.

He quotes Cromwell at the sacking of the Rump Parliament in 1653: "You have sat too long here for any good you have been doing. Depart, I say, and let us have done with you. In the name of God, go"!

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qk0c)
Green Sandpiper

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the Green Sandpiper; a bird with a wonderful yodelling call and the heart-stopping suddenness with which it leaps up from its feeding place and dashes off. The birds that visit the UK are often from Scandinavia, where they nest high up in a fir-tree. When the chicks hatch they tumble unharmed from the nest and are escorted to safe feeding places by their parents.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b07rkgm5)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b07sxhx4)
Writer ..... Simon Frith
Director ..... Marina Caldarone
Editor ..... Sean O'Connor
Jill Archer ..... Patricia Greene
Ruth Archer ..... Felicity Finch
Tony Archer ..... David Troughton
Pat Archer ..... Patricia Gallimore
Tom Archer ..... William Troughton
Brian Aldridge ..... Charles Collingwood
Jennifer Aldridge ..... Angela Piper
Ian Craig ..... Stephen Kennedy
Joe Grundy ..... Edward Kelsey
Eddie Grundy ..... Trevor Harrison
Shula Hebden Lloyd ..... Judy Bennett
Dr Richard Locke ..... William Gaminara
Adam Macy ..... Andrew Wincott
Elizabeth Pargetter ..... Alison Dowling
Freddie Pargetter ..... Toby Laurence
Johnny Phillips ..... Tom Gibbons
Caroline Sterling ..... Sara Coward
Rob Titchener ..... Timothy Watson
Helen Titchener ..... Louiza Patikas
Carol Tregorran ..... Eleanor Bron
Anna Tregorran ..... Isobel Middleton
Kaz ..... Amaka Okafor.

SUN 11:15 The Reunion (b07sxhx9)
The Launch of Private Eye

Sue MacGregor brings together the group of cartoonists and writers responsible for the launch of Private Eye magazine.

On 25th October 1961 a scrappy magazine containing six pages of jokes and cartoons, printed on yellow paper, appeared in coffee shops in London's South Kensington. More than fifty years on Private Eye, is Britain's bestselling current-affairs magazine and copies of the rare first edition, which cost sixpence, are now worth over a thousand pounds.

"In the beginning, if we had an aim, it was to provide an alternative to Punch, which was then like the Bank of England," says the Eye's former editor Richard Ingrams.

Private Eye's early covers had great shock value. Gerald Scarfe made his name there, depicting Harold Macmillan posing naked in the chair associated with Profumo Affair model Christine Keeler. He later drew Harold Wilson kneeling behind Lyndon B Johnson in support of the Vietnam War, pulling down the president's trousers and licking his bottom.

The magazine quickly built a reputation for breaking stories that other papers would not print, taking on the rich and powerful and risking expensive libel actions that threatened to close the magazine down.

Reunited to look back on the launch and development of Private Eye are its two first editors Christopher Booker and Richard Ingrams, long time cartoonists Barry Fantoni and Gerald Scarfe, and publisher Peter Usborne.

Producer: Emily Williams
Series Producer: David Prest
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b07rkgml)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b07q3328)
Series 76, Episode 4

Nicholas Parsons and guests return for the 76th series of the panel show where participants must try to speak for 60 seconds without hesitation, deviation or repetition. No repetition? That's no small order after nearly 50 years.

This is a very special episode coming from the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and features the following guests: Paul Merton, Fred MacAulay, Pippa Evans and Marcus Brigstocke.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Matt Stronge.

It is a BBC Studios production.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Matt Stronge.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b07sxqt8)
Coffee and the God Shot. The Drinks Menu

Dan Saladino journeys into coffee's past, present and future. He discovers a world of new flavours, far from his formative espresso experiences in Sicily - and finds that things are more precarious than they may seem. Are we living in a golden age of coffee?

Behind every cup of coffee is a story - or rather many stories. A whole chain, from people to processes, all of which make a difference to the taste and experience.

Featured in the programme are Stephen Leighton - roaster and founder of Hasbean, James Hoffman - author of 'The World Atlas of Coffee: From Beans to Brewing', Barista Claire Wallace - Winner of the 2015 Scottish Aeropress Championships, Professor Robert W Thurston - coffee shop owner and Senior Editor of 'Coffee - A Comprehensive Guide', Alejandro Martinez - Coffee Grower in El Salvador and Sarada Krishnan - Director of Horticulture at the Denver Botanic Gardens and coffee scientist..... and Joe of Brew in Bristol who makes Dan's espressos when he takes a break from The Food Programme office.

The podcast of this programme features extra material, including coffee businessman Kenfe Bellay on the Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony and a new coffee story from the Ark of Taste.

Producer: Rich Ward.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b07rkgmx)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b07rkgn1)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 No Triumph, No Tragedy (b07sxttj)
Clarence Adoo

Clarence was a promising trumpet player who was paralysed after a car accident as he drove to his brother's stag do. He has kept his musical career alive thanks to advances in technology. A special head-set allows him to select notes via an on-screen cursor and a twist of the neck, while blowing into a tube plays the note and tilting his head varies the volume. Adoo was able to make music again - and in 2012 became one of the founder members of the British Paraorchestra.

In this special edition of No Triumph, No Tragedy, Peter White talks to him about his early years in foster care and the coronet he was given as a six year old in church. He loved music from the off and made a successful career as a trumpet player before his accident. London 2012 marked just how far he had come since his accident and as all eyes turn to the Rio Paralympics he reflects on his own development and his hopes for the future as the Games get under-way.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07qc92r)
Moving House Special

Eric Robson hosts a Moving House edition of the horticultural panel programme from Matthew Wilson's house in Rutland. Anne Swithinbank and Pippa Greenwood join Eric and Matthew to answer the questions.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b06z1zf2)
Sunday Omnibus - Families

Fi Glover with conversations about various ways of living family life - married or not, in one home or two, and how not to introduce a step parent, in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b07sxttl)
New Grub Street, Episode 2

New Grub Street by George Gissing. Dramatised by Christopher Douglas.
Episode 2
Edwin Reardon's struggles as a serious novelist have created a rift between himself and his wife Amy. Meanwhile Jasper Milvain seems drawn to the bookish Marian Yule. Radio 4's Ed Reardon and Jaz Milvain are loosely based on characters from this Victorian novel. And in this satiric dramatisation George Gissing is played by Christopher Douglas.

Director/Producer Gary Brown

Free schooling, which followed the Education Act of 1807 helped to create a newly literate working class. This created a demand for popular fiction and sensational journalism. Thus a gulf opened up between 'Literature' and the mass market as embodied by writers Edwin Reardon and Jasper Milvain.

SUN 16:00 Bookclub (b07sxttn)
Don DeLillo - Underworld

The American novelist Don DeLillo gives an account of writing his modern masterpiece Underworld. DeLillo's 1997 novel is a deep examination of postwar America, taking in nuclear paranoia, the decline of industry, Vietnam and the Cuban missile crisis, with cameo appearances from historical figures including J Edgar Hoover and Lenny Bruce.

Speaking to James Naughtie and a group of readers, DeLillo talks about how he tapped into his Bronx upbringing to write the book, his love of baseball, and about how he is sometimes thought as prophetic, especially in terms of the world of high finance. He also touches on the US now, and how the American national identity is not as clearly describable as it once was.

October's Bookclub choice : H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald (2014)

Presenter : James Naughtie
Interviewed guest : Don DeLillo
Producer : Dymphna Flynn.

SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (b07sxttq)
Thomas Gray

Roger McGough marks 300 years since the birth of the influential poet Thomas Gray, author of Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, with a visit to the graveyard itself, in Stoke Poges. With readers Mark Meadows and Katie Sobey. Producer Sally Heaven.

SUN 17:00 Cities from the Ashes (b07q8st4)
Much of London was destroyed in the Great Fire and again in the Blitz. How did the city respond, and are there lessons for ever-growing cities today? London's response to the two crises of the Great Fire and the Blitz was very different. How should an ever-expanding London today deal with the challenges to cities?

Nicholas Kenyon, Director of the Barbican Centre, marks the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London with a look at how London recovered from two major disasters. He explores the issues with architects Lord Richard Rogers and Eric Parry; Professor of Urban Studies at the LSE, Ricky Burdett; Meriel Jeater, Curator of the Museum of London's Fire Fire! exhibition; Peter Larkham, Professor of Planning at Birmingham City University; Design Historian and Public Space Consultant Sarah Gaventa; architecture critic and author of Slow Burn City, Rowan Moore, and Creative Cities exponent, Charles Landry.

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b07rh0xv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07rkgng)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b07rkgnl)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07rkgnr)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b07sxvnd)
Farrah Jarral

Farrah Jarral chooses her BBC Radio highlights.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b07sxvng)
Rob explains things from his point of view, and Tom is alert to the tiniest details.

SUN 19:15 Sketchorama (b062nrxn)
Series 4, Episode 3

Award winning actress and comedian Isy Suttie presents the pick of the best live sketch groups currently performing on the UK comedy circuit.

The programme showcases three up and coming groups featuring character, improv, broken and musical sketch comedy.

There are so many incredibly talented and inventive sketch groups on the British Comedy scene, but with no dedicated broadcast format. Sketchorama aims to bring hidden gems and established live acts to the airwaves.

Producer: Gus Beattie
A Comedy Unit production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 19:45 Tourists (b07sxvnl)
By Morven Crumlish. Two women meet up prior to a university reunion in a funny story about women's friendships, nostalgia, and life not turning out how you planned.

Morven Crumlish's stories have been broadcast widely, and she also contributes to the Guardian. Her work has featured in five previous Sweet Talk productions for BBC Radio 4 - most recently her trilogy inspired by the life and work of Phoebe Traquair, Murals. Morven lives in Edinburgh.

Writer: Morven Crumlish
Reader: Polly Frame
Producer: Jeremy Osborne

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:00 More or Less (b07qc93b)
Irish Passports

Britons entitled to Irish passports
After the Brexit vote in June, so many Britons applied for Irish passports that Ireland's foreign minister had to ask them to stop - pointing out that the UK remains, for now, in the EU. If some of the figures that have been quoted are correct, the Irish passport service may find itself completely inundated in future. But does one in four Britons really have Irish heritage? We reveal the dubious history of that number and attempt to estimate the number of Britons who are actually entitled to dual nationality with Ireland.

Do women's periods sync?
It is a commonly held belief that if women spend time together, their bodies start to sync and they will have their periods at the same time. But where does this idea come from? And is it really true? We look at the evidence and wonder - could it be down to chance?

Numbers in music
Marcus du Sautoy takes us on a journey through some of his favourite musical pieces, pointing out the interesting mathematical patterns hidden in the compositions.

Dangerous algorithms
Cathy O'Neil, a data scientist and activist, has written a new book, "Weapons of Math Destruction." She is concerned about the proliferation of certain kinds of algorithms - that help make important decisions, but that could be based on unfair statistics with hidden biases. She explains how to look out for them, and what we can do to protect ourselves.

Desk of Good News - organ donations
We look at the trends for organ donations and transplants.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b07tlv1m)
Joao Havelange, Sonia Rykiel, Gene Wilder, Toots Thielemans

Matthew Bannister on

João Havelange, the President of the international football federation, FIFA, who stepped down amid allegations of corruption.

The French fashion designer Sonia Rykiel who broke the conventions of haute couture to produce wearable clothes for women on the go.

Gene Wilder, the comedy film actor best known for his roles as Willy Wonka in Charlie and The Chocolate Factory and in Mel Brooks films like Blazing Saddles and Young Frankenstein.

And Toots Thielemans, the jazz musician who played the harmonica and made his name by whistling along to his own guitar.

Producer: Neil George.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b07rgybs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b07sxhwr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 In Business (b07qbstj)
Has 3D printing lived up to the hype?

Peter Day takes a close look at the progress of 3D printing in manufacturing 5 years on from the first programme he made about this new way of making things. Back then there was much hype and excitement about its potential to revolutionise traditional manufacturing. From aircraft parts to cartilage in knees, Peter discovers 3D printing's current range and uses and asks whether it's really lived up to its early promise.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b07rkgp2)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b07qbst8)
The Choir That Sang Elvish

With Antonia Quirke.

Antonia meets London Voices, the choir that supply the voices to the soundtracks of blockbusters such as The Lord Of The Rings, Spectre and Iron Man 2.

Poet Don Paterson concludes his series on great movie speeches with James Stewart drunkenly telling Katherine Hepburn that she has "fires banked down inside" in The Philadelphia Story.

Andy Mitchell nominates his father Andrew as an unsung hero of British cinema - he was in charge of Elstree Studios in the 1980s when six of the top ten grossing moves of all time were made in Borehamwood.

SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b07sx9z5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]


MONDAY 05 SEPTEMBER 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b07rkh1k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Yusra: Swim for Your Life (b07qbcbj)
Episode 1

The extraordinary journey of eighteen-year-old refugee Yusra Mardini, who fled war-torn Syria last year. During the crossing from Turkey to Lesbos, Yusra and her sister helped to save their fellow passengers when the engine of their crammed dinghy stopped working. Swimming together they dragged the boat to safety. The sisters then made their way across Europe, evading capture by the authorities, travelling through Greece, Serbia and Hungary to get to Germany. It was there that Yusra was selected as one of the ten athletes to form the refugee Olympic team to compete as a swimmer in Rio.

This is a Czech Radio/BBC Co-Production. Czech Radio reporter, Magdalena Sodomková, first met Yusra in Serbia last year, and has since followed her journey through Europe and accompanied her on her latest adventure in Brazil.

Producer: Clare Walker.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b07sx9y8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07rkh1q)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07rkh1s)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07rkh1v)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b07rkh1z)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07v79nw)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Greenbelt Festival with Satish Kumar.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b07rkh21)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Fiona Clampin.

MON 05:56 Weather (b07rkh27)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378xcd)
Icterine Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachan presents the icterine warbler. Icterine Warblers are fluent mimics and include phrases of other species in their song. Their name, icterine, is derived from ikteros, the ancient Greek word for jaundice and describes the bird's spring plumage...yellowish beneath and olive brown on top.

MON 06:00 Today (b07rkh2f)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 The Matter of the North (b07sy32x)
Northern Inventions and the Birth of the Industrial Revolution

Episode Six features George Stephenson, one of the many northern inventors who helped launch the Industrial Revolution. Melvyn Bragg believes the Industrial Revolution is the greatest Revolution the world has ever seen - and its heart lies in the North of England. In this programme he pays tribute to the men who nurtured that great revolution. The inventors and engineers - often from very humble beginnings - whose discoveries would shape the world to this day. One of the greatest was the north east's George Stephenson, whose Rocket locomotive heralded the age of the railways. The programme starts with the writer Frank Cottrell Boyce - who ( in collaboration with Danny Boyle ) put the Industrial Revolution centre stage at the 2012 Olympic opening ceremony. Melvyn met him at Rainhill near Liverpool where Rocket took part in a famous trial. Of course, Stephenson wasn't the only great inventor of the period - the great machines of the cotton industry can also be claimed by the north - the genius of Samuel Crompton and his Spinning Mule is celebrated. The façade of Sheffield Town Hall is emblazoned with scenes of industry, but why wonders Melvyn are the achievements of these great men not celebrated more? Why aren't they as much a part of our national mythology as Tudor Monarchs?

Contributors
Frank Cottrell Boyce
Professor Hannah Barker, University of Manchester
Professor Robert Colls, De Montfort University
Matthew Watson, Bolton Museum
Professor Richard Horrocks, University of Bolton

Producer: Faith Lawrence.

MON 09:30 Natural History Heroes (b06d9pb3)
Alice Eastwood

Alice Eastwood was a self-taught botanist using her holidays to collect and identify plants in Colorado who went on to become the curator of the California Academy of Science botany collection. Over her career Eastwood discovered many of the plants on California's coastline and during the fire that followed the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco Eastwood rescued 1,497 important specimens from the museum - only made possible because she had taken the fortunate step of segregating it in the first place. The rest of the collection was destroyed and Eastwood devoted the rest of her life to rebuilding it. When she retired the collection contained over 300,000 specimens, over three times as many as were destroyed in 1906. Sandy Knapp explains why Alice Eastwood is her Natural History Hero.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b07sy32z)
Beryl Bainbridge - Love by All Sorts of Means, Episode 1

A biography of the novelist who denied that she ever wrote fiction, maintaining that her books were based on her experiences. "What is more peculiar, more riveting, devious and horrific than real life?" she said.

But while her own life was the primary source for her books, she was never afraid of adding a little colour.

Episode 1: The early years at Formby.

The author Brendan King is a freelance translator, editor and reviewer, with a special interest in late nineteenth century French literature. He completed his PhD on Joris-Karl Huysmans' life and work at Birkbeck College, London, in 2004.

Between 1987 and 2010, King worked for Beryl Bainbridge, and helped prepare a number of the novels she wrote during this period for publication, including the book she was working on at the time of her death, The Girl in the Polka-dot Dress, which was published posthumously.

Readers:
Narrator....................James Fleet
Beryl Bainbridge........Samantha Bond

Author: Brendan King
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07rkh2h)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07sy331)
Pepys: After the Fire, Episode 1

When the Great Fire of 1666 was finally extinguished, all that remained of the city of London were smouldering ruins. Samuel Pepys, the famous diarist, witnessed first hand the impact it had on the city and its people, and he would be haunted by what he had seen for the rest of his life. 13,000 homes, 88 churches, and many key buildings had been destroyed or damaged including markets, jails, the Guildhall and St Paul's Cathedral. Now aged 70, in poor health, and living with his servant Will Hewer in Clapham, Sam remembers the devastation, and how thousands of those made homeless by the fire were camped out on the fields of Islington and Moorfields.
By Hattie Naylor.

Theme music: Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May, words by Robert Herrick and music by William Lawes, sung by Bethany Hughes. Lute, baroque guitar and theorbo played by David Miller. Violin and viol by Annika Gray, and recorders by Alice Baxter.

Sound by Iain Hunter

A BBC/Cymru Wales Production, directed by Kate McAll.

MON 11:00 Funny Money (b07sy4fl)
Since carrying his box of belongings out of the bank in 2008, when Lehman Brothers filed the biggest bankruptcy in US history, precipitating the worst recession since the 1930s, Henry Dodds has had to re-assess the meaning of money.

Starting in Canary Wharf, outside the offices where he once worked, Henry sets out on a journey to discover whether trust in the financial sector can ever be restored, and what steps need to be taken to adjust our relationship with money to one which is a force for good. Along the way he seeks advice from Sir Hector Sants, former CEO of the Financial Services Authority, social anthropologist Sitna Quiroz, clinical psychologist Elise Stephen, journalist and author of Who Cooked Adam Smith's Dinner, Katrine Marcal, and a butcher in Newcastle's Grainger Market, where the Dodds family firm traded for over a century.

Producer: Marya Burgess.

MON 11:30 The Rest Is History (b04vk0c1)
Series 1, Episode 3

A new, six-part comedy discussion show hosted by Frank Skinner.

Frank loves history, but just doesn't know much of it. So he's devised a new comedy discussion show in order to find out more about it. Along with his historian in residence, Dr Kate Williams, each episode will see Frank joined by a selection of celebrity guests, who will help him navigate his way through the annals of time, picking out and chewing over the funniest, oddest, and most interesting moments in history.

Frank's guests in this edition of the programme are John Lloyd and Katy Brand.

Produced by Dan Schreiber and Justin Pollard
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b07rkh2m)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 Home Front (b07kswdp)
5 September 1916 - Isabel Graham

On this day in 1916, ambulance driver Dorothie Feilding was the first woman to be awarded a Military Medal, and Isabel's courage fails her.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b07rkh2t)
Egypt tourism, Online gambling, Photobooths

Exclusive research commissioned by You and Yours shows how visitor numbers to Egypt are dropping since political unrest and terror attacks - we report on how the tourism industry is suffering and how the UK's Foreign and Commonwealth Office travel advice is decided.

Punters not being allowed to place bets and having their winnings withheld when they gamble online is becoming a growing problem. The horseracing industry is worried it could damage the sport. We speak to Australian campaigners who pushed through new laws down under which make bookies accept punter's bets.

More parents are seeking advice from sleep consultants to try and find ways to get their children to sleep through the night. A sleep consultant tells us about the qualifications and increased regulation she thinks are needed in the sector.

Photobooths are becoming the must have accessory at a party or wedding, we look at the people making big business from franchises in photobooths and why they've become so popular.

The Swedish boss of the outdoor clothing company, Fjallraven, speaks to Winifred about his surprise that his Kanken backpacks have become a fashion accessory for trendy young people.

And, people with memory loss and dementia are racking up big bills by calling the speaking clock at night. The Alzheimer's Society says people do it because they get comfort from it and feel lonely.

MON 12:57 Weather (b07rkh2w)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b07rkh2z)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 In Search of Eden (b07sy5y4)
A Garden Eastward in Eden

What really happened when we ate from the Tree of Knowledge? Paul Howard-Jones, Professor of Neuroscience and Education at Bristol University, has had a lifelong fascination with the story of the Garden of Eden. He first heard it in the Herefordshire church where his father was the vicar. Now, he investigates how knowledge has changed us, and whether the Eden story contains within it a nostalgic longing for our simpler, hunter-gathering past.
In episode one, Paul talks to Professor Michael Anderson, who runs the memory control laboratory at Cambridge University, and discovers that we can, if we want to, make ourselves forget what we don't want to know. And we meet Brook Wilensky-Lanford, who has chronicled the stories of Eden seekers in her book Paradise Lust.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b07sxvng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b04jmcr1)
The Electrical Venus

May 1749. Grainger's travelling fair develops an astonishing new act, care of Sebastian Fox and his 'electrickery' in a play by Julie Mayhew.

In the courtyard of a country tavern, Mr Francis P Grainger displays the wonders of his menagerie - animal and human.

Mim is the illegitimate daughter of an aristocratic lady and her black slave, and she's been raised by Grainger since she was a baby. But now her mistress, Hildy 'the Hog-Faced Lady', has run away to London, Mim needs to find her own act.

Sound design by Caleb Knightley

Directed by Emma Harding.

MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b07sy5y6)
Series 30, Semi-Final 3, 2016

(12/13)
Elgar, Monteverdi, the Eagles and the music of 1970s science fiction shows are among the topics the competitors are required to know something about in the last of this year's semi-finals.

Paul Gambaccini asks the questions, in the contest which will decide which of the 2016 heat winners will take the one remaining place in the grand Final next week. Every point counts - and, as always, part of the challenge will be to select a musical 'specialist subject' from a list of five, of which the competitors have had no prior warning.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b07sxqt8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 My Muse (b07sy5y8)
Lisa Dwan on Samuel Beckett

Lisa Dwan, a renowned performer of works by Samuel Beckett, reflects on Beckett, who left Ireland, and one of his key inspirations, Dante, who was exiled from Florence, never to return.

Producer Sara Parker.

MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b07sy5yb)
Religious Education

What should be the purpose and scope of Religious Education in an increasingly pluralist and multi-faith society? An independent commission has been set up by the Religious Education Council of England and Wales to make "wide-ranging recommendations for change" within religious education in schools. It follows a report last year from Goldsmiths, University of London, which argued that RE in England's schools needs a total overhaul to keep pace with the changing religious landscape of the country. While many within Religious Education are calling for sweeping changes to the subject, they don't always agree on what those changes should be.

Ernie Rea discusses the role of religious education with Dr Adam Dinham, Professor of Faith & Public Policy at Goldsmiths, University of London; Adrian Hilton, theologian, educationalist and advisor to the former Education Secretary, Michael Gove; and Dr Abdullah Sahin, reader in Islamic Education at the University of Warwick

Producer: Dan Tierney
Series producer: Amanda Hancox.

MON 17:00 PM (b07rkh3q)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07rkh3s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b07sy5yd)
Series 76, Episode 5

Nicholas Parsons and guests return for the 76th series of the panel show where participants must try to speak for 60 seconds without hesitation, deviation or repetition. No repetition? That's no small order after nearly 50 years.

Paul Merton, now the second most prolific player of the game after Kenneth Williams, will be joined by guests including series regulars Josie Lawrence, Sheila Hancock, Marcus Brigstocke and Gyles Brandreth.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Matt Stronge.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b07sy5yg)
Kirsty speaks her mind, and Helen is emotional.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b07rkh3v)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07sy331)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 Eastern Europeans in Brexitland (b07sy81f)
The issue of immigration and immigrants dominated the EU referendum campaign with much of the focus on the increased numbers of Eastern Europeans in the UK following EU expansion in 2004. They are often talked about - but rarely spoken to.

Writer and journalist Gary Younge meets Eastern Europeans who live in the UK. He explores the impact of the Brexit vote on these communities and considers how the vote and their experiences fit into the history of race and migration in Britain.

In this first of two programmes, Gary talks to Poles and Romanians in Bristol, an area that voted Remain and which has longstanding Eastern European communities.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b07qbfxv)
Addicted in Suburbia

The United States is in the throes of a heroin and opiate epidemic. For Crossing Continents, India Rakusen travels to Lorain County, in the state of Ohio, where addiction has become part of everyday life. West of the city of Cleveland, Avon Lake is a wealthy suburb - its large, expensive properties back onto the shores of Lake Eerie, and wild deer frolic on neat lawns. But behind this façade, there is a crisis. Many families have felt the damaging impact of addiction. And across Lorain County, opiates - pharmaceutical and street heroin - have killed twice as many people in the first six months of 2016 alone, as died in the whole of 2015.

Producer Linda Pressly.

MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b07q7jl2)
Spider

Brett Westwood blows away the cobwebs to reveal tales of spiders as objects of fear, merciless femmes fatales and tricksters too. Featuring interviews with the Natural History Museum's spider curator Jan Beccaloni, naturalist Rosemary Winnall, president of Buglife and writer Germaine Greer and tarantula keeper Gemma Wright. Readings Brian Protheroe. Producer: Tom Bonnett.

MON 21:30 The Matter of the North (b07sy32x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b07rkh3y)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b07rkh40)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07sy81h)
Paradise Lodge, Episode 6

Leicestershire, 1977.

Craving independence, frustrated with her dysfunctional family and fed up with not being able to afford branded shampoo, 15-year-old Lizzie Vogel takes a job at Paradise Lodge, a nursing home for the elderly.

She soon learns the ways of the 'comfort round' and gets used to the scheming of her eccentric co-workers, but finds herself distracted by thoughts of 'erotic handholding' with her friend Miranda's boyfriend, Mike Yu.

When a new old people's home threatens to poach all their patients, Paradise Lodge must fight for survival. And as Lizzie gets increasingly drawn in to keeping the crumbling home afloat, her job threatens to impact her schoolwork and she must choose which path to take.

A wise, moving and funny new coming-of-age novel from Nina Stibbe, the bestselling author of 'Love, Nina'.

Read by Alice Lowe
Produced by Mair Bosworth.

MON 23:00 Setting the Past Free (b0745d3c)
Part II, Mark Lawson on how the story of Rudolf Kastner, the Jew who negotiated with Eichmann, continues to be retold

For some Rudolf Kastner is a hero, for others a traitor. Mark Lawson explores the cultural retellings of a story that began in Nazi occupied Hungary in 1944. At the time Kastner, a lawyer and a journalist, was deputy chairman of the Relief and Rescue Committee. His negotiations with Adolf Eichmann, the man responsible for the deportation and extermination of the Jewish communities in Europe, saved Jewish lives but did he pay for them with other Jewish lives?

This question has been the subject of court trials, books, poetry, documentaries, television dramas, and plays - each one retelling Kastner's story from a new perspective. Two of those cultural retellings, one in the UK - the 1987 play Perdition, and the other in Israel - the 1994 television drama The Kastner Trial, managed to make headlines of their own.

And still the retellings continue with one of Israel's most celebrated playwrights, Motti Lerner, in the process of writing a new version of Kastner's story. The new play will be staged at Israel's National Theatre in 2017, thirty years after Jim Allen's play, Perdition, led to one of the most incendiary episodes in British theatre history.

In part 2, Mark Lawson talks to those, within Israel - including the playwright Motti Lerner, the Chief Historian of Yad Vashem Professor Dina Porat, and the literary critic Professor Dan Laor - who have wrestled with Kastner's story and the issues it raises.

Presenter - Mark Lawson

Interviewed Guest - Motti Lerner

Interviewed Guest - Ilan Ronen

Interviewed Guest - Professor Dan Laor

Interviewed Guest - Professor Dina Porat

Interviewed Guest - Gaylen Ross

Actor - James Puddephatt

Actor - Gemma Paige North

Actor - Cokey Falkow

Poem reader - Dr Omer Edhan

Producer - Ekene Akalawu.

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07sy81k)
Susan Hulme reports as MPs and peers return to Westminster.


TUESDAY 06 SEPTEMBER 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b07rkh69)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b07sy32z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07rkh6c)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07rkh6f)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07rkh6h)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b07rkh6m)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07v88r8)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Greenbelt Festival with the Reverend Nadia Bolz-Weber.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b07rkh6p)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Vernon Harwood.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qkcg)
Great Reed Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the great reed warbler. As you'd expect from their name, Great Reed Warblers are a much larger version of the Common Reed Warbler and breed in Continental Europe where their very loud song echoes around reed-beds, it can be heard up to half a kilometre away. We can hear one or more singing Great Reed Warblers in the UK each spring.

TUE 06:00 Today (b07synwg)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Matter of the North (b07synwj)
Manchester: First City of the Industrial Revolution

Melvyn Bragg celebrates the achievements of Manchester, the original northern powerhouse. Its emblem is the bee, a symbol of work, cooperation and industry. It was from here that huge scientific, social and commercial changes would sweep the globe. Melvyn visits Quarry Bank Mill in Styal outside Manchester which is one of the best preserved textile mills in the country.
Melvyn visits the house of the novelist Elizabeth Gaskell, who chronicled the rapidly changing lives of the people who lived in or near Manchester, or Cottonopolis as it was known. Melvyn hears how a culture of dissent or non-conformity fed into the city's spirit of invention. He discusses the great scientists that came out of the city - James Joule the father of thermodynamics and John Dalton the father of atomic theory. Melvyn also hears about one of the country's biggest and now largely forgotten art exhibitions which was held in Manchester - The Art Treasures exhibition of 1857.

Contributors
Canon Apiarist Adrian Rhodes, Manchester Cathedral
Professor Hannah Barker, University of Manchester
Dr James Sumner, University of Manchester
Jenny Uglow
Dr Katy Layton-Jones, University of Leicester
Maria Balshaw, The Whitworth Art Gallery

Producer: Faith Lawrence.

TUE 09:30 Natural History Heroes (b06fkg22)
Franz Nopsca

Franz Baron Nopcsa von Felso-Szilvás was among the first people to think about what fossils can tell us about how extinct animals lived - rather than just giving them a name Nopcsa is therefore considered the father of palaeo-biology. Nopcsa described the first fossil evidence that the Sauropods had gone through a process of island dwarfism - shrinking body size over generations to adapt to living on islands. Nopcsa was a flamboyant character and was unafraid to make his more wacky and outlandish theories public and was also one of very few openly gay men in the early part of the 20th century. Paul Barrett, dinosaur research at the Natural History Museum, explains why Nopsca is his Natural History Hero.

Produced by Ellie Sans.

TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b07synwl)
Beryl Bainbridge - Love by All Sorts of Means, Episode 2

A biography of the novelist who denied that she ever wrote fiction, maintaining that her books were based on her experiences. "What is more peculiar, more riveting, devious and horrific than real life?" she said.

But while her own life was the primary source for her books, she was never afraid of adding a little colour.

Episode 2: Swept up by the stage.

The author Brendan King is a freelance translator, editor and reviewer, with a special interest in late nineteenth century French literature. He completed his PhD on Joris-Karl Huysmans' life and work at Birkbeck College, London, in 2004.

Between 1987 and 2010, King worked for Beryl Bainbridge, and helped prepare for publication a number of the novels she wrote during this period, including the book she was working on at the time of her death, The Girl in the Polka-dot Dress, which was published posthumously.

Readers:
Narrator....................James Fleet
Beryl Bainbridge........Samantha Bond

Author: Brendan King
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07rkh6r)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07synwn)
Pepys: After the Fire, Episode 2

After the Great Fire, the clear up begins. But when Sam Pepys and his servant Will go out in the carriage to look at the City, there's so much rubble they can't even tell where they are. Old London had been described as looking like a hastily constructed bonfire waiting for someone to put a match to it. No one wants that back. So King Charles II calls for plans for a magnificent new London. Three of Sam's closest friends - John Evelyn, Robert Hooke and Christopher Wren - are eager to present their ambitious designs.

Theme music: Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May, words by Robert Herrick and music by William Lawes, sung by Bethany Hughes. Lute, baroque guitar and theorbo played by David Miller. Violin and viol by Annika Gray, and recorders by Alice Baxter.

Sound by Iain Hunter

A BBC/Cymru Wales Production, directed by Kate McAll.

TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b07synwq)
Tiger

Brett Westwood sees how the tiger has burnt bright in our imagination across the globe. And measures the real creature against this beast of our imaginings. With contributions from tiger expert and writer Valmik Thapar, Dr Susan Stronge, Senior Curator, South Asia at the Victoria & Albert Museum, Chris Coggins, Professor of Geography and Asian studies at Simon's Rock College, Massachusetts, Susie Green author of Tiger (Reaktion Books) and lecturer and community arts leader Rosamund Hiles who grew up with a tiger. Producer: Tom Bonnett.

TUE 11:30 Voices of... (b07syrrs)
Annie Briggs

An intimate portrait of the iconic but elusive English folksinger Annie Briggs.

Annie Briggs was a leading figure in the English folk revival of the early 1960's, inspiring Bert Jansch (famously, in Blackwater Side), Sandy Denny, The Watersons and many more. But she was a restless spirit, travelling through the British Isles and Ireland, finding songs and living close to the earth.

As Sandy Denny depicted her in The Pond and the Stream:
Annie wanders on the land.
She loves the freedom of the air.
She finds a friend in ev'ry place she goes.
There's always a face she knows.
I wish that I was there.

And so she remains, now a grandmother living by the water in the west of Scotland. She's always resolutely resisted celebrity and commercial success, withdrawing from the folk scene in the early 1970s, but her legacy - her voice and her attitude - continue to inspire and to carry a link to life as it was once lived in 'the imagined village'.

In this programme, she talks to Alan Hall about childhood holidays singing along with the waves, writing songs while living on a beach in west Ireland, her garden and the wildlife that she shares it with, and the ballad tradition she discovered as a teenager and that she "belongs to".

Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b07rkh6v)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 Home Front (b07kswdx)
6 September 1916 - Alice Macknade

On this day in 1916, 80 men were detained as absentee conscripts after a raid on a boxing tournament at Woolwich Hippodrome, and Bill Macknade is back on fighting form.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b07rkh70)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b07rkh72)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b07rkh74)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 In Search of Eden (b07syt89)
Every Beast of the Field

What really happened when we ate from the Tree of Knowledge? Paul Howard-Jones, Professor of Neuroscience and Education at Bristol University, has had a lifelong fascination with the story of the Garden of Eden. He first heard it in the Herefordshire church where his father was the vicar. Now, he investigates how knowledge has changed us, and whether the Eden story contains within it a nostalgic longing for our simpler, hunter-gathering past.
In episode two, Paul visits Chauvet cave in the Ardeche region of southern France, to get a sense of the relationship that hunter-gatherers had with nature. Fiona Coward from Bournemouth University discusses the shift to farming and the development of a material culture that helped larger societies bind together. And to experience material culture first hand, Paul dresses as a rabbit and hands out leaflets in Hereford city centre.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b07sy5yg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Tracks (b07syt8c)
Hippocampus

The fifth in a major new nine-part conspiracy thriller, starring Romola Garai. Written by Matthew Broughton

Confined to her hospital bed, Helen is desperate to continue her investigation into the plane crash and find her missing father, Florian. But with the mystery child locked in a coma upstairs in the same building, is Helen safe?

Where is Florian Chauvin? What did he do to the little boy? And is Helen on the right drugs?

Tracks: A story in nine parts about life, death and the human brain.

Original music by Stu Barker

Directed in Wales by James Robinson.

TUE 15:00 Making History (b07syt8f)
Tom Holland and guests discuss the stories that are Making History.

Helen Castor is joined by Stephen Chalke and former Sussex cricket captain John Barclay to discuss the origins and rather odd structure of English (and Welsh) county cricket.

Iszi Lawrence heads to North Yorkshire to hear a story of divorce and betrayal from the 1st century and the forgotten queen who was central to both.

And the former head of Friends of the Earth, Tony Juniper, takes us to South America to remind us of the achievements of the nineteenth century scientist and explorer Johann Baptist von Spix.

Producer: Nick Patrick
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 15:30 Costing the Earth (b07syt8k)
Big Oil Big Trouble

The big oil companies are the pantomime villains of the global warming debate. They've been accused of everything from climate change denial to commercial incompetence in a rapidly changing world. Campaigners attack their boardroom practices and push pension funds and universities to withdraw their investments.

Tom Heap examines the reactions of the likes of Exxon, Shell, BP and Total to the mounting evidence of man-made climate change. How much did they know? How much did they lobby against meaningful action? He meets Lord Browne, the former head of BP who famously rebranded his company as 'Beyond Petroleum' to find out why the rest of the industry failed to join his campaign to cut emissions and invest in renewable energy.

Tom and Lord Browne also discuss the changing rhetoric since the signing of the 2015 Paris climate change agreement. With fresh commitments to alternative fuels could the oil companies finally turn themselves from the villain to the principal boy, using their engineering expertise to halt the planet's changing climate?

Producer: Alasdair Cross.

TUE 16:00 Word of Mouth (b07syt8m)
Break Ups and Brexit

How do you find the right words to make- or break- a personal relationship? Or to leave a political union, for that matter? To consider the clichés and coinages used to negotiate matters of the heart by everyone from novelist Edith Wharton to actress Gwyneth Paltrow, Michael Rosen & linguist Dr. Laura Wright are joined by Zoe Strimpel of the University of Sussex. Also, in the aftermath of the UK's EU Referendum, author & journalist Sam Leith riffs on the term 'Brexit' and the infectious wordplay it spawned. Producer Kirsty McQuire.

TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b07syv25)
Series 40, Maureen Lipman on Cicely Saunders

Dame Cicely Saunders was known as 'the woman who changed the face of death'. At almost 6 foot tall, she could be intimidating, tiresome and relentless as she devoted her life to ensuring that terminally ill people could die with dignity and without pain. Championing the life of Cicely Saunders as her great life is the actress and writer Maureen Lipman. The expert witness is Professor David Clark, from the University of Glasgow. Matthew Parris is the presenter and the producer is Perminder Khatkar.

TUE 17:00 PM (b07rkh76)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07rkh78)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 Mark Watson Talks a Bit About Life (b07syv27)
Series 2, Family

New series from multi-award winning Mark Watson. Assisted and impeded in equal measure by henchmen Sam Simmons and Will Adamsdale, he revives his quest to make some sort of sense of life, against the backdrop of a world that has, in recent times, come to seem even more peculiar than usual.

The tenacious trio take on some of human life's central topics - family, spirituality, Scandinavia. Watson peddles his unique, high-octane stand-up while Simmons and Adamsdale chip in with interjections which include (but are not limited to) music, shopping lists, life advice, stunts, avant-garde offerings and divvy interactions.

Expect big laughs, controlled chaos and an attempt to answer the one question none of us can quite escape from - what exactly is going on?

This week, Watson and his team look at family. It's often considered the staple of a happy existence, but does family life enrich us or merely guarantee hang-ups and frustrations? We can't live without our families, but should we feel bad for wanting to?

Mark Watson is a multi-award winning comedian, including the inaugural If.Comedy Panel Prize 2006. He is assisted by Sam Simmons, winner of Fosters Edinburgh Comedy Award 2015, and Will Adamsdale who won the Perrier Comedy Award in 2004.

Produced by Lianne Coop
An Impatient production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07syv29)
Anna is asking questions, and Peggy takes it all in.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b07rkh7b)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07synwn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b07syv2c)
'High Way' to Hell

Earlier this year, the government introduced legislation banning the production, distribution, sale and supply of legal highs. Designed to stop what has been described as a tsunami of chemicals flooding into the UK, it has resulted in the closure of the high street shops which had been selling exotically named substances like Spice, Mamba and China White.

So why are they still finding their way onto the streets? File on 4 traces the supply back to labs in China and discovers a myriad of psychoactive substances are still only a few internet clicks away. Prior to the ban, the authorities were aware of the risk that internet sales could take over from the high street and that China is fast becoming the 'chemical and pharmaceutical wholesaler to the world'.

So is the new legislation really the answer, and if not, what options remain to disrupt the now illegal supply of these lethal substances?

Reporter: Danny Vincent
Producer: Nicola Dowling.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b07rkh7d)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Down the Generations (b07krkgt)
As the Second World War drew to a close, the German army effectively blockaded parts of the Netherlands. Food supplies dried up and calorie intake fell to 600 per day in some areas. People starved - the only example of a widespread famine in 20th century Europe. Babies born to mothers who were pregnant during the famine tended to have a low birth weight. And those children, as they grew up, had more health problems than those in the womb before and after the famine. That in itself isn't surprising. But what is surprising is that many of the ill-effects took decades to emerge. Babies who were born apparently healthy, and were still fine at 18, were more likely to suffer from diabetes and schizophrenia and cardiovascular problems in later decades. And by the time they reached their 50s, the famine babies were more likely to be unemployed.

How bad the effects are often depends on how developed the foetus was when the famine struck. Babies malnourished in the first trimester tended to have normal birthweights, while those malnourished in the third trimester were born small. But here's the kicker: when the apparently normal babies grew up, they as mothers were more likely to have heavier than average babies. Something is being passed down the generations.

The Dutch "Hunger Winter" study is just one of many studies where economists, as well as health researchers, have made discoveries from looking at the big data sets which arise from "natural experiments" such as famines.

Kat Arney asks, from an economic point of view, would we be better off investing in people's health in the nine months before they are born, rather than playing catch-up later?

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.

TUE 21:30 The Matter of the North (b07synwj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 21:58 Weather (b07rkh7g)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b07rkh7j)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07syvdf)
Paradise Lodge, Episode 7

Leicestershire, 1977.

Craving independence, frustrated with her dysfunctional family and fed up with not being able to afford branded shampoo, 15-year-old Lizzie Vogel takes a job at Paradise Lodge, a nursing home for the elderly.

She soon learns the ways of the 'comfort round' and gets used to the scheming of her eccentric co-workers, but finds herself distracted by thoughts of 'erotic handholding' with her friend Miranda's boyfriend, Mike Yu.

When a new old people's home threatens to poach all their patients, Paradise Lodge must fight for survival. And as Lizzie gets increasingly drawn in to keeping the crumbling home afloat, her job threatens to impact her schoolwork and she must choose which path to take.

A wise, moving and funny new coming-of-age novel from Nina Stibbe, the bestselling author of 'Love, Nina'.

Read by Alice Lowe
Produced by Mair Bosworth.

TUE 23:00 Couples (b07syvdh)
Episode 3

Semi-improvised character comedy written and performed by Julia Davis and Marc Wootton. The duo portray a series of couples in therapy with the renowned therapist Dr Tanya Ray-Harding, as played by Vicki Pepperdine.

In the third episode, Dr Tanya meets again with spiritual lovers Helen and John.

Written and Performed by Julia Davis and Marc Wootton
With Vicki Pepperdine

Produced by Ashley Blaker
A Black Hat production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07syvdk)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


WEDNESDAY 07 SEPTEMBER 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b07rkh9j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b07synwl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07rkh9l)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07rkh9n)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07rkh9q)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b07rkh9s)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07vfj69)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Greenbelt Festival with Abdul-Rehman Malik.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b07rkh9v)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qkck)
Tawny Pipit

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the tawny pipit. Tawny pipits have never bred in the UK in real life but they have in fiction. Released in 1944 the film, 'The Tawny Pipit', featured a pair found in an English village. Their rarity causes the village to rally round to protect the birds when the field in which they are nesting is marked out for ploughing. The film leaves the audience with the message that nothing can change traditional village life.

WED 06:00 Today (b07syyrf)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 The Matter of the North (b07syyrh)
The Radical North

Melvyn explores the radical movements that sprang from the North - Chartism, the campaign for women's votes, anti-slavery protests, the birth of the Labour Party. The programme begins outside Manchester's Midland Hotel where Mr Rolls met Mr Royce. It's also near the site of the Peterloo Massacre - one of the defining moments in British social history. People had gathered here in their thousands from the city and surrounding towns and villages - protesting for parliamentary reform. fifteen were slain and hundreds wounded by charging cavalry troops. Melvyn visits what one contributor Dr Robert Poole describes as Democracy Wall - it runs alongside of the nearby Quaker Meeting House - many people were crushed against it at the time of the Massacre. The wall is the only structure left from the period. The massacre inspired the poet Shelley to write the Masque of Anarchy, part of which is read for us by the actor Maxine Peake. Melvyn goes on to describe the rich history of dissent nurtured in the north - the women's suffrage movement, the campaign to abolish slavery, chartism, and the founding of the Independent Labour Party. Why the north? Was it Methodism, the size of the population, the isolated landscapes, the topography of the cities or even the weather?

Contributors
Dr Robert Poole, University of Central Lancashire
Dr Katrina Navickas, University of Hertfordshire
Professor Robert Colls, De Montfort University
Dr Jill Liddington, University of Leeds
Judith Cummins MP
Rommi Smith
Jonathan Schofield

Producer: Faith Lawrence.

WED 09:30 Prime Ministers' Props (b07syyrk)
Harold Wilson's Pipe and Mac

Professor Sir David Cannadine explores political fame and image by looking at how an object or prop, whether chosen deliberately or otherwise, can come to define a political leader - from Winston Churchill's cigar and siren suit to Margaret Thatcher's handbag.

Sir David looks at the significance of these props of power - what they mean and what they become, and what happens when, almost inevitably, Prime Ministers lose control of their image and their props take on a hostile meaning, very different from their original intentions.

Harold Wilson sought to enhance his political image, in part by wearing a Gannex mac which made him seem ordinary, and also by puffing at his pipe, as memorably expressed in Ruskin Spear's 1974 portrait of him.

Following Stanley Baldwin, who had also made much of his pipe, Harold Wilson hoped to convey an image that was homely, benevolent and avuncular, and to some extent he succeeded. But the unintended consequence was that the pipe also enhanced Wilson's reputation for evasiveness and deviousness. Whenever asked a difficult question by an interviewer, he would delay and distract attention by lighting up - and it was widely believed that, although he puffed his pipe in public, he preferred cigars in private. A rumour that his son, Robin Wilson, scotches.

The Gannex mac was also to become a hostage to fortune for Wilson. While he was the peak of his popularity, the Gannex made him look like a man of the people and the millionaire businessman who invented Gannex, Joseph Kagan, became a close friend of Wilson. But once Kagan fell from grace due to his crooked business dealings, Wilson's Kagan connection was further evidence to his enemies that he was not to be trusted.

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b07syyrm)
Beryl Bainbridge - Love by All Sorts of Means, Life with Austin

A biography of the novelist who denied that she ever wrote fiction, maintaining that her books were based on her experiences. "What is more peculiar, more riveting, devious and horrific than real life?" she said.

But while her own life was the primary source for her books, she was never afraid of adding a little colour.

Episode 3: Life with Austin.

The author Brendan King is a freelance translator, editor and reviewer, with a special interest in late nineteenth century French literature. He completed his PhD on Joris-Karl Huysmans' life and work at Birkbeck College, London, in 2004.

Between 1987 and 2010, King worked for Beryl Bainbridge, and helped prepare a number of the novels she wrote during this period for publication, including the book she was working on at the time of her death, The Girl in the Polka-dot Dress, which was published posthumously.

Readers:
Narrator....................James Fleet
Beryl Bainbridge........Samantha Bond

Author: Brendan King
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07rkh9x)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b07syz1b)
Pepys: After the Fire, Episode 3

Following the Great Fire, three different magnificent new designs have been presented to the King by Pepys' friends - John Evelyn, Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke. But plans for an ambitious new London are soon watered down. The city is losing money fast because of the disruption to trade. They must get the city back to work as soon as possible. Utopian visions are out, and compromise is the order of the day. Meanwhile, demolition work at St Paul's Cathedral causes problems with the neighbours, and another fire, this time at Sam's home in Seething Lane, threatens not only the occupants but his precious library.

By Hattie Naylor

Theme music: Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May, words by Robert Herrick and music by William Lawes, sung by Bethany Hughes. Lute, baroque guitar and theorbo played by David Miller. Violin and viol by Annika Gray, and recorders by Alice Baxter.

Sound by Iain Hunter

A BBC/Cymru Wales Production, directed by Kate McAll.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b06spffv)
Jean and Georgina - It's Strictly Not Come Dancing

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a mother and daughter for whom clog-dancing forms a supportive - and unconventional - bond. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 Eastern Europeans in Brexitland (b07sy81f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Josh Howie's Losing It (b07sz52p)
The Travel System

New sitcom in which stand-up comic Josh comes to terms with the impending birth of his first child.

In this third episode, Josh attempts to buy a pram on the cheap while also trying to convince his mechanic to give him a good deal.

Written by Josh Howie
Produced by Ashley Blaker

A Black Hat production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b07rkh9z)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 Home Front (b07kswf2)
7 September 1916 - Elizabeth Chance

On this day in 1916, a repatriated prisoner of war reported German propaganda claiming the destruction of the Houses of Parliament by zeppelins, and the Winwood household is finally ready for some truths.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b07rkhb3)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b07rkhb5)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b07rkhb7)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 In Search of Eden (b07sz52t)
The Flaming Sword

What really happened when we ate from the Tree of Knowledge? Paul Howard-Jones, Professor of Neuroscience and Education at Bristol University, has had a lifelong fascination with the story of the Garden of Eden. He first heard it in the Herefordshire church where his father was the vicar. Now, he investigates how knowledge has changed us, and whether the Eden story contains within it a nostalgic longing for our simpler, hunter-gathering past.
In episode three, he visits the archaeological dig at Catalhoyuk in Turkey, where he sees a thousand years of technological development exposed in the soil. And he finds out what we lose when we learn to read and to count.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b07syv29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Drama (b07szbjt)
Hidden Harm

by Natalie Mitchell

Directed by Sally Avens

When Sam and Lucy return to live with their Dad they couldn't be happier; they've been apart for a year since their mother's death and their father took refuge in alcohol. Dad's dry again now, the question is can he stay that way when the pressures on?

Tom Brooke (Gary) is currently appearing in the TV series Preacher and can also be seen in Sherlock and Dark Heart.
Fern Deacon (Lucy) played the lead in Fungus The Bogeyman and also appeared in The Enfield Haunting.
Finn Monteath (Sam) has appeared in Casualty and numerous Radio Dramas.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b07szbk0)
Money Box Live: Working Through University

We're keen to hear your views and experiences. Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday 7 September, standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply. Or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

Louise Cooper asks how today's students combine work and study. What are the financial and long term career benefits and is there impact on academic results?

The typical English Student faces debts of over £44,000 at graduation say the Sutton Trust so it's hardly surprising that around 70% of undergraduates also have a job.

While some universities discourage students from accepting paid work during term time, many have invested in specialist employment services to help students find paid work.

The right experience can also give students a long term advantage. Market research company High Fliers say more than 90% of the UK's leading graduate employers are offering paid work experience programmes for students and recent graduates, with over 14,000 paid work placements.

So what is the right balance between work and study?
Does it matter what sort of work you do?
What are the pressures and benefits?
How do you avoid paying too much or too little tax?

We're keen to hear your views and experiences. Call 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday 7 September, standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply. Or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

WED 15:30 Science Stories (b07cx3q8)
Series 3, Paul Ehrlich's 'Magic Bullet' and the Cure for Syphilis

Naomi Alderman tells the story of Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullet' cure for syphilis. If you take a drug today to cure an illness, you have this man to thank for inventing the concept of targeted treatments that aim to hit the disease and not the patient. This revolutionary idea opened the door to modern pharmaceutical therapies and initiated debates about the role of medical research that echo through the 20th Century.

WED 16:00 Yusra: Swim for Your Life (b07szbkb)
Episode 2

In the second programme charting how Syrian teenager Yusra Mardini fled her homeland and was selected for the refugee team in the Rio Olympics, we hear how this young competitive swimmer was able to start training again in Berlin, and follow her as she travels to Brazil.

This is a Czech Radio/BBC Co-Production. Czech Radio reporter Magdalena Sodomková first met Yusra in Serbia last year, and has since followed her journey through Europe and accompanied her on her latest adventure in Brazil.

Producer Tom Alban.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b07rkhb9)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b07rkhbc)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07rkhbf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 Mark Steel's in Town (b07tbfmw)
Series 7, Stockport

Mark Steel's In Town - Stockport

"Welcome to Stockport - Home of Stockport College"

Mark Steel returns to Radio 4 for a seventh series of the award winning show that travels around the country, researching the history, heritage and culture of six towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness, and performs a bespoke evening of comedy for the local residents.

In the first programme, Mark visits the Greater Manchester town of Stockport, once the centre of the hatting industry.

He takes a trip on the infamous 192 bus, visits the world famous hat museum and tries to get to the bottom of how one of its suburbs ended up with an infestation of marauding peacocks.

In this series Mark visits Stockport in Greater Manchester, Colchester in Essex, Hebden Bridge in Yorkshire, The Royal Borough of Kingston Upon Thames, Lynton in North Devon and the British overseas territory of Gibraltar.

Written and performed by ... Mark Steel
Additional material by ... Pete Sinclair
Production co-ordinator ... Hayley Sterling
Producer ... Carl Cooper

This is a BBC Studios Production.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b07tbfn0)
Contemporary drama in a rural setting.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b07rkhbh)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07syz1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Unreliable Evidence (b07tbj8b)
Do we have the laws we need to tackle violence in our society? Recent crime statistics reveal a disturbing 27 per-cent increase in violent crime. Clive Anderson asks a panel of leading lawyers how changes to the law might help tackle the problem.

The programme looks at Law Commission proposals to sweep away archaic laws and introduce new categories of violent crime which would be simpler to understand and create more effective charging and sentencing options. It's also suggested that magistrates be allowed powers to jail violent offenders for longer periods.

Clive and his guests discuss particular concerns about domestic violence, exploring arguments that recent changes in the law relating to psychological abuse and coercive behaviour are inadequate and ineffective.

Outlining the Law Commission's proposals, Professor David Ormerod explains that they are designed to sweep away outdated, incoherent and ineffective laws and achieve quicker, better and cheaper justice.

Barrister and academic Susan Edwards says it may be difficult to produce the necessary evidence to achieve convictions in domestic violence cases involving coercive behaviour. And she complains that the Law Commission has not attempted to improve the law relating to strangulation, a common element of domestic violence.

Magistrates Association chairman Malcolm Richards agrees that allegations of coercive behaviour may be difficult to prove in court and says he and his colleagues are waiting for guidance on how to deal with such cases.

Francis FitzGibbon QC, the new chair of the Criminal Bar Association, doubts the Law Commission proposals will make much difference and argues strongly that magistrates sentencing powers should not be increased.

Producer: Brian King
An Above The Title production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 20:45 Four Thought (b07tbj8d)
The Social Media Poet

Brian Bilston, who accidentally became a poet through Twitter, explains the power of social media for poetry.

"Poetry on social media is more than a never-ending stream of haiku concerning the changing light of the moon on water, or the beauty of cherry blossom. It's far more interesting and relevant than that. It's an opportunity for poetry to present itself in situations when people most need it."

Producer: Sheila Cook.

WED 21:00 Costing the Earth (b07syt8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]

WED 21:30 The Matter of the North (b07syyrh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b07rkhbk)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b07rkhbm)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07tbj8g)
Paradise Lodge, Episode 8

Leicestershire, 1977.

Craving independence, frustrated with her dysfunctional family and fed up with not being able to afford branded shampoo, 15-year-old Lizzie Vogel takes a job at Paradise Lodge, a nursing home for the elderly.

She soon learns the ways of the 'comfort round' and gets used to the scheming of her eccentric co-workers, but finds herself distracted by thoughts of 'erotic handholding' with her friend Miranda's boyfriend, Mike Yu.

When a new old people's home threatens to poach all their patients, Paradise Lodge must fight for survival. And as Lizzie gets increasingly drawn in to keeping the crumbling home afloat, her job threatens to impact her schoolwork and she must choose which path to take.

A wise, moving and funny new coming-of-age novel from Nina Stibbe, the bestselling author of 'Love, Nina'.

Read by Alice Lowe
Produced by Mair Bosworth.

WED 23:00 The Pin (b07b3snr)
Series 2, Award

Following a hugely successful first series, which drew praise from the likes of David Walliams and Ben Stiller, Alex and Ben are back with their weird twist on the double-act sketch show. Strap in for a 15 minute delve in to a world of oddness performed in front of a live studio audience.

This week, The Pin are trying for a perfectly achievable goal for a Radio 4 late night comedy - an Oscar.

About The Pin
The Pin are an award-winning comedy duo, and legends of Edinburgh festival. They deconstruct the sketch form, in a show that exists somewhere between razor-sharp smartness and utterly joyous silliness.

After a sold-out run in Edinburgh, and a string of hilarious performances across BBC Radio 4 Extra, BBC 3, Channel 4, and Comedy Central, this is The Pin's debut solo show for Radio 4. Join them as they celebrate, make, collapse and rebuild their jokes, each other, and probably the radio too.

For fans of Adam and Joe, Vic and Bob, and Fist of Fun - a show of absurd offerings from two loveable idiots.

- 'The Pin prove it's still possible to play with the conventions of the medium of sketch comedy.' - The Guardian
- 'Knowing and inventive: a 15 minute blast.' - The Times
- 'The sketches are funny, and made special by Ben Ashenden and Alexander Owen also examining, subverting and reversing familiar tropes. The material is excellent.' - Radio Times
- 'Eviscerating their chosen form completely.' - The Sunday Times
- 'A very classy, very funny show indeed.' - The Telegraph

Producer: Sam Bryant
A BBC Studios Production.

WED 23:15 Tez Talks (b07tbj8l)
Tez Commandments

Breakthrough comedian Tez Ilyas presents a show for everyone interested in - or interested in becoming - a British Muslim. Everything you need to know is here - the do's, don'ts, and avoid-or-you'll-be-arresteds. Simultaneously a hilarious, joyous celebration of British-Muslim life - and a subversive, thoughtful satire on society's attitudes to Islam.

In the final episode, Tez rounds up all his remaining advice on being a British Muslim in a handy cut-out-and-keep guide. From instruction on confidence building, to advice on limb replacement, simply follow the Tez Commandments...

About Tez
Blackburn-born Tez Ilyas started performing comedy in 2010 and has appeared in eight competition finals including the BBC New Comedy Award and Leicester Mercury New Comedian of the Year. He has recently appeared on the Now Show on Radio 4, as well as having performances on BBC1, BBC 3, E4, and BBC iPlayer, following his hugely critically-acclaimed debut Edinburgh show.

Producer: Sam Bryant
A BBC Studios Production.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07tbj8q)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


THURSDAY 08 SEPTEMBER 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b07rkhdn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b07syyrm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07rkhdq)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07rkhds)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07rkhdv)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b07rkhdx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07v85sk)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Greenbelt Festival with Julie Siddiqi.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b07rkhdz)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced by Alun Beach.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkt07)
Yellow-Browed Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Yellow-Browed Warbler. The delicate yellow-browed warbler breeds in Siberia and winters in south-east Asia. Several hundred birds, sometimes many more, turn up each autumn anywhere between the Isles of Scilly and Shetland.

THU 06:00 Today (b07v868w)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 The Matter of the North (b07tbkwz)
The 20th-Century North: Radical Culture

Melvyn Bragg explores the great cultural movements that came from the North of England which rippled out to affect the world - music with the Beatles, social commentary with Coronation Street and the rise of some of Britain's greatest comedians. Melvyn Bragg examines the contribution of the north to British culture throughout the 20th century - and celebrates the way in which it refreshed and transformed the arts of this country. Also included are some of the earliest voices of northerners ever recorded - part of the Berliner Lautarchiv collection recorded by Wilhelm Doegen - held at Humboldt Universitat. The British Library also offers access to these recordings via its website.

Contributors

Maxine Peake
Dame Joan Bakewell
Lee Hall
Sir Michael Parkinson
Professor Dave Russell
Jimmy McGovern
Dame Judi Dench
David Hockney

Producer: Faith Lawrence.

THU 09:30 Natural History Heroes (b06flmd3)
Evelyn Cheesman

Evelyn Cheesman was an entomologist and the first female curator hired by London Zoo. An intrepid traveller and collector who defied expectations at a time when science, exploration and natural history were still heavily dominated by men. A formidable character her 8 solo research trips to the Islands of the Pacific South Seas left Cheesman laid low by fever, septic sores, malaria and lack of food, found herself trapped in spiders webs and came close to falling to her death - but she always learned from her experiences and had an indomitable spirit. Beulah Garner takes us into the beetle collections at the Natural history museum to explain why Evelyn Cheesman is her Natural History Hero.

Produced by Ellie Sans.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b07tbprw)
Beryl Bainbridge - Love by All Sorts of Means, When Beryl Met Alan

A biography of the novelist who denied that she ever wrote fiction, maintaining that her books were based on her experiences. "What is more peculiar, more riveting, devious and horrific than real life?" she said.

But while her own life was the primary source for her books, she was never afraid of adding a little colour.

Episode 4: When Beryl met Alan.

The author Brendan King is a freelance translator, editor and reviewer, with a special interest in late nineteenth century French literature. He completed his PhD on Joris-Karl Huysmans' life and work at Birkbeck College, London, in 2004.

Between 1987 and 2010, King worked for Beryl Bainbridge, and helped prepare a number of the novels she wrote during this period for publication, including the book she was working on at the time of her death, The Girl in the Polka-dot Dress, which was published posthumously.

Readers:
Narrator....................James Fleet
Beryl Bainbridge........Samantha Bond

Author: Brendan King
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07rkhf1)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07tc1r7)
Pepys: After the Fire, Episode 4

Pepys, now 70 and in poor health, has a visit from Sir Christopher Wren, who tells him of the death of an old friend, Robert Hooke. Hooke played a key role in the rebuilding of London after the Great Fire, at the time when Wren had been commissioned to redesign St Pauls. For his third design of the cathedral Wren made an enormous model, large enough to walk through, and presented it to the clergy for their approval.
By Hattie Naylor

Theme music: Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May, words by Robert Herrick and music by William Lawes, sung by Bethany Hughes. Lute, baroque guitar and theorbo played by David Miller. Violin and viol by Annika Gray, and recorders by Alice Baxter.

Sound by Iain Hunter

A BBC/Cymru Wales Production, directed by Kate McAll.

THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b07tc1r9)
Torah and Tech in Israel

Can you learn to code if you've spent your life studying religious texts? Can you be part of the fast-paced, secular world of technology and startups if you're from a conservative religious community? Israel has been called the "Startup Nation", with a flourishing technology sector playing a big role in the country's economy. But one group who haven't traditionally been involved are ultra-Orthodox Jews, known as Haredim. They often live apart from mainstream Israeli society and adhere to strict religious laws covering everything from diet to dress and technology. Many men don't work or serve in the army, spending their lives studying the Torah, subsidised by the government. It's a way of life that leaves many Haredim in poverty, and other Israelis resenting picking up the tab. But in recent years, the ultra-orthodox have been increasingly joining the high-tech world, working in big international tech companies and founding their own startups. David Baker travels to Israel to meet the new breed of high tech Haredim, and find out how they reconcile taking part in the "Startup Nation" with traditional Torah life.

Produced by James Fletcher.

THU 11:30 Antony Gormley: Missing Continents at the British Museum (b07tc1rc)
When it was founded in the 18th century from the collections of Sir Hans Sloane, the British Museum aspired to being not just a national museum, but a world collection, accessible to a global audience.

The recent, outgoing director Neil MacGregor gave fresh life to this idea - the British Museum as a museum of the world for the world. But does this definition hold true?

Artist Antony Gormley, a former British Museum trustee, is on a quest to right what he sees as a centuries-old wrong. While the history of the classical Old World cultures are given centre stage in the museum's hallowed halls, those of the numerous rich and complex cultures of Africa, Oceania and the Americas are barely visible. Although cared for by the museum's curators, much of the time they are packed away in boxes.

And yet, the collections of historical objects from these continents are among the best in the world - from the monumental to the domestic, from lavish feather costumes to fragile woven skirts. They tell the stories of the unlikely settlement of the far-flung islands of Micronesia, Captain Cook's ill-fated Pacific voyages and the oppression of the colonised by the colonisers.

Antony Gormley challenges the museum's new director Hartwig Fischer to restore these neglected cultures to their rightful place in human history. He talks to Lissant Bolton the Keeper who spends much of her time in the Oceanic store rooms. Can these objects and the stories they tell, help today's diverse cultures overcome their deep divisions and find a common humanity?

Produced by Zoe Blackler.
A Cast Iron Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b07rkhf6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 Home Front (b07kswf8)
8 September 1916 - Dennis Monk

On this day in 1916, the Daily Mirror featured amputee soldiers fitted with new limbs, and Dennis Monk tries to re-enter Folkestone life.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b07rkhfb)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b07rkhfh)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b07rkhfk)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 In Search of Eden (b07tc1rf)
Cursed Is the Ground

What really happened when we ate from the Tree of Knowledge? Paul Howard-Jones, Professor of Neuroscience and Education at Bristol University, has had a lifelong fascination with the story of the Garden of Eden. He first heard it in the Herefordshire church where his father was the vicar. Now, he investigates how knowledge has changed us, and whether the Eden story contains within it a nostalgic longing for our simpler, hunter-gathering past.
In episode four, Paul looks at the links between knowledge and conflict, and visits the Talheim death pit in Germany, perhaps the earliest evidence of organized violence to have been found in Europe.

Producer: Chris Ledgard.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b07tbfn0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b0499dlc)
Hatch, Match and Dispatch, A Certain Date

Geoff Levine, aka the Slim Reaper, is a pest control technician. All day long he kills rats and other vermin. Until Mystic June tells him something that will alter the rest of his life - what's left of it anyway. A surreal and darkly comic exploration of the meaning of death. With talking pigeons.

Written by Alan Harris
Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru Wales Production

The cast is led by Julian Lewis Jones who is best known for his roles in 'Stella,' 'Where the Heart Is' and Clint Eastwood's film, 'Invictus.'

Hatch, Match and Dispatch is an umbrella series of six contemporary fables about the registering of life's important moments.

THU 15:00 Open Country (b07tc1rh)
Bellaghy - Seamus Heaney's Homeplace

Seamus Heaney grew up in Bellaghy in Northern Ireland and his poetry features many of the people who lived there and the views he saw there. Helen Mark visits Bellaghy to discover the real places which inspired so many well loved words and meets the people who live there to find out what Heaney's work means to them.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b07sxhwr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Bookclub (b07sxttn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b07tc1rk)
Looking at the latest cinema releases, DVDs and films on TV.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b07rkhfq)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b07rkhfs)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07rkhfv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups (b07tc1rm)
Series 4, Construction Time Again

Episode 3 - Construction Time Again. Tom's Dad offers some unwanted assistance.

Series 4 of Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups presents another hilarious helping of down-the-line adventures from Edinburgh Comedy Award nominated Tom. Listen in on Tom's weekly phone calls home to his Mum, Dad and Gran in Sheffield and get a glimpse into the triumphs and tribulations of the Wrigglesworth clan in all its dysfunctional glory.

Starring Tom Wrigglesworth, Paul Copley, Kate Anthony, Elizabeth Bennett.

Written by Tom Wrigglesworth and James Kettle with additional material by Miles Jupp.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b07tc1rp)
Ian makes a quick exit, and Shula grows increasingly uncomfortable.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b07rkhfx)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07tc1r7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b07tc1rr)
David Aaronovitch looks at important issues in the news.

THU 20:30 In Business (b07tc1rt)
Making Babies: The Business of Fertility

The business of making babies is booming, both in the UK and globally, as recent research suggests the world's fertility industry is set to be worth an estimated 15 billion pounds by the year 2020. One in six couples in the world are thought to experience fertility problems. There's a huge range of treatments available - from egg donation and specialist 'add ons' to improve the odds, to egg freezing and surrogacy, not to mention an increasing market for gay and lesbian couples.

In Britain, the NHS restricts and rations access to IVF, and sperm donation is heavily regulated. However in Denmark, a multi-million dollar sperm bank is supplying some 80 countries under a very different framework. Pharmacies at the supermarket chain ASDA has been selling IVF drugs at cost price, and tech giants Google and Facebook will pay the costs of freezing the eggs of its female employees to be used at a later date.

Will ethical and moral issues surrounding the baby making business, hinder the growth of the fertility industry? Or will it continue unhindered, making money for private healthcare providers, individuals and tech start-ups? What does the future hold not just for those making money, but also for those IVF conceived babies and their parents?

Presenter: Matthew Gwyther
Producer: Nina Robinson.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b07rkhfq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 The Matter of the North (b07tbkwz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b07rkhg2)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b07rkhg7)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07tc1rw)
Paradise Lodge, Episode 9

Leicestershire, 1977.

Craving independence, frustrated with her dysfunctional family and fed up with not being able to afford branded shampoo, 15-year-old Lizzie Vogel takes a job at Paradise Lodge, a nursing home for the elderly.

She soon learns the ways of the 'comfort round' and gets used to the scheming of her eccentric co-workers, but finds herself distracted by thoughts of 'erotic handholding' with her friend Miranda's boyfriend, Mike Yu.

When a new old people's home threatens to poach all their patients, Paradise Lodge must fight for survival. And as Lizzie gets increasingly drawn in to keeping the crumbling home afloat, her job threatens to impact her schoolwork and she must choose which path to take.

A wise, moving and funny new coming-of-age novel from Nina Stibbe, the bestselling author of 'Love, Nina'.

Read by Alice Lowe
Produced by Mair Bosworth.

THU 23:00 Heresy (b02qr6wd)
Series 9, Episode 5

Victoria Coren Mitchell presents another edition of the show which dares to commit heresy .

Her guests this week are comedians Miles Jupp, Sue Perkins and television presenter Richard Osman.


Producers: Victoria Coren Mitchell and Daisy Knight
An Avalon production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07tqzs8)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


FRIDAY 09 SEPTEMBER 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b07rkhq8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b07tbprw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07rkhqf)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07rkhqq)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07rkhqw)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b07rkhr6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07tmm4g)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day from the Greenbelt Festival with The Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Reverend. Justin Welby.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b07rkhrc)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

Presented by Charlotte Smith
Produced by Fiona Clampin.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378y3z)
Barred Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachan presents the barred warbler. With its glaring yellow eyes, banded chest and long white-tipped tail, the Barred Warbler is always an exciting find. Look out for them in late summer and autumn, when young Barred Warblers turn up here regularly as they migrate south.

FRI 06:00 Today (b07tmqpd)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 The Matter of the North (b07tc373)
Northern Power: Speaking from the North

In this final programme Melvyn Bragg celebrates the power of northern voices in our sporting life, and asks what being and sounding Northern means more generally - in a year which has seen what might be a traumatic and decisive shift in our politics, and in our sense of national identity. In the wake of the EU Referendum, new questions are being raised about the need for devolution in the north of England - the need for the north to have a stronger presence in our public life and politics.

Contributors

David Hockney
Maxine Peake
Professor Robert Colls, De Montfort University
Geoffrey Boycott
Dame Judi Dench
Ian McMillan
Jimmy McGovern
Lee Hall
Ed Cox, Director IPPR North
Lee Rigg and the Wardle Academy Youth Brass Band

Producer: Faith Lawrence.

FRI 09:30 Natural History Heroes (b06fn26f)
George Verrall

George Verrall was an entomologist who loved lists. In a time when his peers were busy chasing butterflies and beetles Verrall made himself extremely busy attempting to list all the species of 'true' fly of the British Isles. His initial list of around 2000 flies from the late 1800's has been updated over the years and at the last revision included over 7000 species. Verrall's love of wildlife and his concern for the British countryside inspired him along with the better known naturalist Walter Rothschild to start buying up the fenland around Cambridge. On his death this land was gifted to the National Trust increasing the size of their very first nature reserve - Wicken Fen. Fellow fly expert Erica McAllister explains why Verrall is her Natural History Hero.

Produced by Ellie Sans.

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b07tc375)
Beryl Bainbridge - Love by All Sorts of Means, Episode 5

A biography of the novelist who denied that she ever wrote fiction, maintaining that her books were based on her experiences. "What is more peculiar, more riveting, devious and horrific than real life?" she said.

But while her own life was the primary source for her books, she was never afraid of adding a little colour.

Episode 5: An accidental meeting sets Beryl on the path to success.

The author Brendan King is a freelance translator, editor and reviewer, with a special interest in late nineteenth century French literature. He completed his PhD on Joris-Karl Huysmans' life and work at Birkbeck College, London, in 2004.

Between 1987 and 2010, King worked for Beryl Bainbridge, and helped prepare a number of the novels she wrote during this period for publication, including the book she was working on at the time of her death, The Girl in the Polka-dot Dress, which was published posthumously.

Readers:
Narrator....................James Fleet
Beryl Bainbridge........Samantha Bond

Author: Brendan King
Abridger: Pete Nichols
Producer: Karen Rose

A Sweet Talk production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07rkhsc)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07tc377)
Pepys: After the Fire, Episode 5

Sam is feverish from infection and close to death. It is time to put his affairs in order. A visit from one of his oldest friends, John Evelyn, prompts him to look back on events in his life, in the city he has loved. St Paul's Cathedral, once devastated in the Great Fire almost forty years ago, is nearing completion. London has arisen anew from the ashes.

By Hattie Naylor

Theme music: Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May, words by Robert Herrick and music by William Lawes, sung by Bethany Hughes. Lute, baroque guitar and theorbo played by David Miller. Violin and viol by Annika Gray, and recorders by Alice Baxter.

Sound by Iain Hunter

A BBC/Cymru Wales Production, directed by Kate McAll.

FRI 11:00 Standing Up to the Sharing Economy (b07tc379)
From its simple roots, the sharing economy has become big business.

Hoteliers, car manufacturers, retailers and the music industry are all being hit by its astonishing success.

Mary Ann Sieghart heads out to discover how businesses are responding to the formidable competition.

Uber says it will be the largest indirect car purchaser in the world by the end of 2016, and 17 year olds in cities across Europe are just not interested in sitting a driving test, never mind owning a car. As the sharing economy changes our values and behaviour, Mary Ann hears how BMW and Land Rover are varying their business models, creating their own sharing economy companies, partnering with and enabling bright start-ups.

In the face of young and flexible new businesses, she hears how venerable and traditional companies are having to take risks and think creatively.

She visits clothing brand Patagonia who are embracing the values of the sharing economy, finds Barclays getting hip, collaborating with Fintech in East London and at the opening of a chic new hotel, she hears how the CitizenM chain are taking on competition from Airbnb.

Wondering where the next new sharing economy business might hit, Mary Ann asks if industries will be ready to react to defend themselves.

Producer: Sarah Bowen.

FRI 11:30 Deborah Frances-White Rolls the Dice (b05qfjn1)
Episode 1

Comedian Deborah Frances-White tells the true life story of her search for her birth mother.

Deborah is Australian but now living in London. With the vocal assistance of Thom Tuck, Alex Lowe, and Celia Pacquola, she ploughs through Google and Facebook to seek out her long lost family before finally hiring a private detective.

Deborah soon uncovers clues that lead her to the discovery of a genuine relative - her aunt - but not before some odd detours, including possibly being related to a one-armed champion pole dancer.

Eventually, contact is made with Deborah's real mother, Devon, and she must ask the awkward question - why was she given away?

Producer: Alan Nixon
A So Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b07rkhsq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 Home Front (b07kswfp)
9 September 1916 - Jessie Moore

On this day in 1916, two people died by hand grenade in Glasgow, after a woman challenged a wounded ex-soldier to a fight, and Jessie and Adam enter a singing contest on the pier.

Written by Shaun McKenna & Katie Hims
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b07rkhtd)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b07rkhtl)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b07rkhtr)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 In Search of Eden (b07tc520)
Digital Eden

What really happened when we ate from the Tree of Knowledge? Paul Howard-Jones, Professor of Neuroscience and Education at Bristol University, has had a lifelong fascination with the story of the Garden of Eden. He first heard it in the Herefordshire church where his father was the vicar. Now, he investigates how knowledge has changed us, and whether the Eden story contains within it a nostalgic longing for our simpler, hunter-gathering past.
In the final episode, Paul arrives in the digital age and asks if it is taking us further from Eden than ever. He visits Stuttgart University to talk to Niels Henze who is researching how we can cope with the onslaught of notifications from our various screens and devices...with more devices. And in his last street experiment, Paul puts on a Google t-shirt to see what effect it has on people taking his general knowledge challenge.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b07tc1rp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b01nl96h)
The Other Simenon, Teddy Bear

When he wasn't writing Maigret, Georges Simenon produced a huge body of novels and short stories, often tough, gripping and psychologically-penetrating dissections of lives confounded by fate. In The Other Simenon we explore more of his dark tales of human misfortune!
In The Neighbours, Emile Jovis, the director of a Paris travel agency, finds that moving home doesn't always make for a better life. Acting from the best possible motives he decides to uproot his family from their dilapidated flat in the Marais district of Paris to a new development outside the city. All too soon, however, he becomes aware that his wife and son do not share his enthusiasm. And his peace of mind is shattered when he overhears a series of blunt and brusque conversations coming from his neighbours' flat. His irritation on hearing their voices leads to an obsessive interest in their world.
Dramtised by Ronald Frame and starring Jamie Glover and Robin Weaver.

Other parts played by members of the cast.
Producer/Director: David Ian Neville.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07tc522)
Stonyhurst College

Eric Robson and the panel visit Stonyhurst College, Lancashire. Chris Beardshaw, Anne Swithinbank and Christine Walkden answer this week's horticultural queries.

Produced by Hannah Newton
Assistant Producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 In Austria, Riding Black (b07v3bj1)
Short story reading.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b07tmqpg)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 Feedback (b07tc524)
Radio 4's forum for comments, queries, criticisms and congratulations.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b06spjr1)
Saph and Milly - Agents of Burlesque

Fi Glover with a conversation between friends for whom burlesque has provided a confidence-building outlet for creativity, and an opportunity to prove that a walrus act can be sexy. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b07rkhwq)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07rkhwz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The News Quiz (b07tc527)
Series 91, Episode 1

Jeremy Hardy, Lucy Porter, Andy Hamilton and Kerry Godliman join Chairman Miles Jupp, for the first in a new series of the long-running satirical quiz of the week's news.

Producer: Paul Sheehan.
A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b07tc529)
Helen has questions for Anna, and Johnny stands by his family.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b07rkhxg)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07tc377)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b07tc52c)
Dan Jarvis MP, Kerry-Anne Mendoza, Steven Woolfe MEP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Shuttleworth College in Padiham,Lancashire, with former Shadow Foreign Affairs Minister Dan Jarvis MP, Editor in Chief of the online news site The Canary Kerry-Anne Mendoza, and UKIP's Migration and Financial Affairs Spokesman Steven Woolfe MEP.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b07tmqpj)
My Idea of Heaven

A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b07kswfr)
5-9 September 1916

In the week, in 1916, when ambulance driver Dorothie Feilding was the first woman to be awarded a Military Medal, there are some lesser but notable firsts in Folkestone.

Written by Shaun McKenna
Directed by Jessica Dromgoole

Story-led by Katie Hims
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b07rkhyw)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b07rkhzd)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07tc52f)
Paradise Lodge, Episode 10

Leicestershire, 1977.

Craving independence, frustrated with her dysfunctional family and fed up with not being able to afford branded shampoo, 15-year-old Lizzie Vogel takes a job at Paradise Lodge, a nursing home for the elderly.

She soon learns the ways of the 'comfort round' and gets used to the scheming of her eccentric co-workers, but finds herself distracted by thoughts of 'erotic handholding' with her friend Miranda's boyfriend, Mike Yu.

When a new old people's home threatens to poach all their patients, Paradise Lodge must fight for survival. And as Lizzie gets increasingly drawn in to keeping the crumbling home afloat, her job threatens to impact her schoolwork and she must choose which path to take.

A wise, moving and funny new coming-of-age novel from Nina Stibbe, the bestselling author of 'Love, Nina'.

Read by Alice Lowe
Produced by Mair Bosworth.

FRI 23:00 The Matter of the North (b07tc373)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07tc52h)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b06shzhh)
Fi Glover introduces a conversation between a couple for whom the chemistry was instant, fuelled by foreign attraction -
another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.



LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 MON (b07sy331)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 MON (b07sy331)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 TUE (b07synwn)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 TUE (b07synwn)

15 Minute Drama 10:41 WED (b07syz1b)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 WED (b07syz1b)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 THU (b07tc1r7)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 THU (b07tc1r7)

15 Minute Drama 10:45 FRI (b07tc377)

15 Minute Drama 19:45 FRI (b07tc377)

A Journey Through English 10:30 SAT (b07rgybq)

A Point of View 08:48 SUN (b07qc93n)

A Point of View 20:50 FRI (b07tmqpj)

Afternoon Drama 14:15 MON (b04jmcr1)

Afternoon Drama 14:15 THU (b0499dlc)

Afternoon Drama 14:15 FRI (b01nl96h)

Antony Gormley: Missing Continents at the British Museum 11:30 THU (b07tc1rc)

Any Answers? 14:00 SAT (b07q2dw8)

Any Questions? 13:10 SAT (b07qc93l)

Any Questions? 20:00 FRI (b07tc52c)

Archive on 4 20:00 SAT (b07rh18q)

BBC Inside Science 16:30 THU (b07rkhfq)

BBC Inside Science 21:00 THU (b07rkhfq)

Bells on Sunday 05:43 SUN (b07sx9y8)

Bells on Sunday 00:45 MON (b07sx9y8)

Beyond Belief 16:30 MON (b07sy5yb)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 MON (b07sy81h)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 TUE (b07syvdf)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 WED (b07tbj8g)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 THU (b07tc1rw)

Book at Bedtime 22:45 FRI (b07tc52f)

Book of the Week 00:30 SAT (b07qc3g5)

Book of the Week 09:45 MON (b07sy32z)

Book of the Week 00:30 TUE (b07sy32z)

Book of the Week 09:45 TUE (b07synwl)

Book of the Week 00:30 WED (b07synwl)

Book of the Week 09:45 WED (b07syyrm)

Book of the Week 00:30 THU (b07syyrm)

Book of the Week 09:45 THU (b07tbprw)

Book of the Week 00:30 FRI (b07tbprw)

Book of the Week 09:45 FRI (b07tc375)

Bookclub 16:00 SUN (b07sxttn)

Bookclub 15:30 THU (b07sxttn)

Broadcasting House 09:00 SUN (b07rkgm5)

Cities from the Ashes 17:00 SUN (b07q8st4)

Costing the Earth 15:30 TUE (b07syt8k)

Costing the Earth 21:00 WED (b07syt8k)

Counterpoint 23:00 SAT (b07q31y7)

Counterpoint 15:00 MON (b07sy5y6)

Couples 23:00 TUE (b07syvdh)

Crossing Continents 20:30 MON (b07qbfxv)

Crossing Continents 11:00 THU (b07tc1r9)

Deborah Frances-White Rolls the Dice 11:30 FRI (b05qfjn1)

Down the Generations 21:00 TUE (b07krkgt)

Drama 21:00 SAT (b07q2r4v)

Drama 15:00 SUN (b07sxttl)

Drama 14:15 WED (b07szbjt)

Eastern Europeans in Brexitland 20:00 MON (b07sy81f)

Eastern Europeans in Brexitland 11:00 WED (b07sy81f)

Farming Today 06:30 SAT (b07q2dvt)

Farming Today 05:45 MON (b07rkh21)

Farming Today 05:45 TUE (b07rkh6p)

Farming Today 05:45 WED (b07rkh9v)

Farming Today 05:45 THU (b07rkhdz)

Farming Today 05:45 FRI (b07rkhrc)

Feedback 16:30 FRI (b07tc524)

File on 4 20:00 TUE (b07syv2c)

Food Programme 12:32 SUN (b07sxqt8)

Food Programme 15:30 MON (b07sxqt8)

Four Thought 20:45 WED (b07tbj8d)

From Our Own Correspondent 11:30 SAT (b07q2dw0)

Front Row 19:15 MON (b07rkh3v)

Front Row 19:15 TUE (b07rkh7b)

Front Row 19:15 WED (b07rkhbh)

Front Row 19:15 THU (b07rkhfx)

Front Row 19:15 FRI (b07rkhxg)

Funny Money 11:00 MON (b07sy4fl)

Gardeners' Question Time 14:00 SUN (b07qc92r)

Gardeners' Question Time 15:00 FRI (b07tc522)

Great Fire 350 15:30 SAT (b07rh0xs)

Great Lives 16:30 TUE (b07syv25)

Heresy 23:00 THU (b02qr6wd)

Home Front - Omnibus 21:00 FRI (b07kswfr)

Home Front 12:04 MON (b07kswdp)

Home Front 12:04 TUE (b07kswdx)

Home Front 12:04 WED (b07kswf2)

Home Front 12:04 THU (b07kswf8)

Home Front 12:04 FRI (b07kswfp)

In Austria, Riding Black 15:45 FRI (b07v3bj1)

In Business 21:30 SUN (b07qbstj)

In Business 20:30 THU (b07tc1rt)

In Search of Eden 13:45 MON (b07sy5y4)

In Search of Eden 13:45 TUE (b07syt89)

In Search of Eden 13:45 WED (b07sz52t)

In Search of Eden 13:45 THU (b07tc1rf)

In Search of Eden 13:45 FRI (b07tc520)

In Touch 20:40 TUE (b07rkh7d)

Josh Howie's Losing It 11:30 WED (b07sz52p)

Just a Minute 12:04 SUN (b07q3328)

Just a Minute 18:30 MON (b07sy5yd)

Last Word 20:30 SUN (b07tlv1m)

Last Word 16:00 FRI (b07tmqpg)

Loose Ends 18:15 SAT (b07q2dwn)

Making History 15:00 TUE (b07syt8f)

Mark Steel's in Town 18:30 WED (b07tbfmw)

Mark Watson Talks a Bit About Life 18:30 TUE (b07syv27)

Midnight News 00:00 SAT (b07q2dvc)

Midnight News 00:00 SUN (b07rkgk1)

Midnight News 00:00 MON (b07rkh1k)

Midnight News 00:00 TUE (b07rkh69)

Midnight News 00:00 WED (b07rkh9j)

Midnight News 00:00 THU (b07rkhdn)

Midnight News 00:00 FRI (b07rkhq8)

Money Box 12:04 SAT (b07rgybs)

Money Box 21:00 SUN (b07rgybs)

Money Box 15:00 WED (b07szbk0)

More or Less 20:00 SUN (b07qc93b)

My Muse 16:00 MON (b07sy5y8)

Natural Histories 21:00 MON (b07q7jl2)

Natural Histories 11:00 TUE (b07synwq)

Natural History Heroes 09:30 MON (b06d9pb3)

Natural History Heroes 09:30 TUE (b06fkg22)

Natural History Heroes 09:30 THU (b06flmd3)

Natural History Heroes 09:30 FRI (b06fn26f)

News Briefing 05:30 SAT (b07q2dvm)

News Briefing 05:30 SUN (b07rkgky)

News Briefing 05:30 MON (b07rkh1z)

News Briefing 05:30 TUE (b07rkh6m)

News Briefing 05:30 WED (b07rkh9s)

News Briefing 05:30 THU (b07rkhdx)

News Briefing 05:30 FRI (b07rkhr6)

News Headlines 06:00 SUN (b07rkgl5)

News Summary 12:00 SAT (b07q2dw2)

News Summary 12:00 SUN (b07rkgml)

News Summary 12:00 MON (b07rkh2m)

News Summary 12:00 TUE (b07rkh6v)

News Summary 12:00 WED (b07rkh9z)

News Summary 12:00 THU (b07rkhf6)

News Summary 12:00 FRI (b07rkhsq)

News and Papers 06:00 SAT (b07q2dvp)

News and Papers 07:00 SUN (b07rkglj)

News and Papers 08:00 SUN (b07rkglw)

News and Weather 22:00 SAT (b07q2dws)

News 13:00 SAT (b07q2dw6)

No Triumph, No Tragedy 13:30 SUN (b07sxttj)

Open Country 06:07 SAT (b07qbl5p)

Open Country 15:00 THU (b07tc1rh)

PM 17:00 SAT (b07q2dwd)

PM 17:00 MON (b07rkh3q)

PM 17:00 TUE (b07rkh76)

PM 17:00 WED (b07rkhbc)

PM 17:00 THU (b07rkhfs)

PM 17:00 FRI (b07rkhwq)

Pick of the Week 18:15 SUN (b07sxvnd)

Poetry Please 23:30 SAT (b07q2krb)

Poetry Please 16:30 SUN (b07sxttq)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 SAT (b07qcb8v)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 MON (b07v79nw)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 TUE (b07v88r8)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 WED (b07vfj69)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 THU (b07v85sk)

Prayer for the Day 05:43 FRI (b07tmm4g)

Prime Ministers' Props 09:30 WED (b07syyrk)

Profile 19:00 SAT (b07rh0xv)

Profile 05:45 SUN (b07rh0xv)

Profile 17:40 SUN (b07rh0xv)

Radio 4 Appeal 07:54 SUN (b07sxhwr)

Radio 4 Appeal 21:26 SUN (b07sxhwr)

Radio 4 Appeal 15:27 THU (b07sxhwr)

Saturday Drama 14:30 SAT (b01sc9cp)

Saturday Live 09:00 SAT (b07q2dvy)

Saturday Review 19:15 SAT (b07q2dwq)

Science Stories 15:30 WED (b07cx3q8)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SAT (b07q2dvh)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 SUN (b07rkgkp)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 MON (b07rkh1s)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 TUE (b07rkh6f)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 WED (b07rkh9n)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 THU (b07rkhds)

Selection of BBC World Service Programmes 01:00 FRI (b07rkhqq)

Setting the Past Free 23:00 MON (b0745d3c)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SAT (b07q2dvf)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SAT (b07q2dvk)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SAT (b07q2dwg)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 SUN (b07rkgkh)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 SUN (b07rkgkv)

Shipping Forecast 17:54 SUN (b07rkgng)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 MON (b07rkh1q)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 MON (b07rkh1v)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 TUE (b07rkh6c)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 TUE (b07rkh6h)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 WED (b07rkh9l)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 WED (b07rkh9q)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 THU (b07rkhdq)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 THU (b07rkhdv)

Shipping Forecast 00:48 FRI (b07rkhqf)

Shipping Forecast 05:20 FRI (b07rkhqw)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SAT (b07q2dwl)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 SUN (b07rkgnr)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 MON (b07rkh3s)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 TUE (b07rkh78)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 WED (b07rkhbf)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 THU (b07rkhfv)

Six O'Clock News 18:00 FRI (b07rkhwz)

Sketchorama 19:15 SUN (b062nrxn)

Skylines 00:30 SUN (b045c65w)

Something Understood 06:05 SUN (b07sx9z5)

Something Understood 23:30 SUN (b07sx9z5)

Standing Up to the Sharing Economy 11:00 FRI (b07tc379)

Sunday Worship 08:10 SUN (b07sxhwz)

Sunday 07:10 SUN (b07rkgln)

Tez Talks 23:15 WED (b07tbj8l)

The Archers Omnibus 10:00 SUN (b07sxhx4)

The Archers 19:00 SUN (b07sxvng)

The Archers 14:00 MON (b07sxvng)

The Archers 19:00 MON (b07sy5yg)

The Archers 14:00 TUE (b07sy5yg)

The Archers 19:00 TUE (b07syv29)

The Archers 14:00 WED (b07syv29)

The Archers 19:00 WED (b07tbfn0)

The Archers 14:00 THU (b07tbfn0)

The Archers 19:00 THU (b07tc1rp)

The Archers 14:00 FRI (b07tc1rp)

The Archers 19:00 FRI (b07tc529)

The Briefing Room 20:00 THU (b07tc1rr)

The Film Programme 23:00 SUN (b07qbst8)

The Film Programme 16:00 THU (b07tc1rk)

The Forum 11:00 SAT (b07tm29p)

The Listening Project 14:45 SUN (b06z1zf2)

The Listening Project 10:55 WED (b06spffv)

The Listening Project 16:55 FRI (b06spjr1)

The Listening Project 23:55 FRI (b06shzhh)

The Living World 06:35 SUN (b07sxqt5)

The Matter of the North 09:00 MON (b07sy32x)

The Matter of the North 21:30 MON (b07sy32x)

The Matter of the North 09:00 TUE (b07synwj)

The Matter of the North 21:30 TUE (b07synwj)

The Matter of the North 09:00 WED (b07syyrh)

The Matter of the North 21:30 WED (b07syyrh)

The Matter of the North 09:00 THU (b07tbkwz)

The Matter of the North 21:30 THU (b07tbkwz)

The Matter of the North 09:00 FRI (b07tc373)

The Matter of the North 23:00 FRI (b07tc373)

The Media Show 16:30 WED (b07rkhb9)

The Museum of Curiosity 12:30 SAT (b07qc93g)

The News Quiz 18:30 FRI (b07tc527)

The Pin 23:00 WED (b07b3snr)

The Rest Is History 11:30 MON (b04vk0c1)

The Reunion 11:15 SUN (b07sxhx9)

The World This Weekend 13:00 SUN (b07rkgn1)

The World Tonight 22:00 MON (b07rkh40)

The World Tonight 22:00 TUE (b07rkh7j)

The World Tonight 22:00 WED (b07rkhbm)

The World Tonight 22:00 THU (b07rkhg7)

The World Tonight 22:00 FRI (b07rkhzd)

Today in Parliament 23:30 MON (b07sy81k)

Today in Parliament 23:30 TUE (b07syvdk)

Today in Parliament 23:30 WED (b07tbj8q)

Today in Parliament 23:30 THU (b07tqzs8)

Today in Parliament 23:30 FRI (b07tc52h)

Today 07:00 SAT (b07rgybm)

Today 06:00 MON (b07rkh2f)

Today 06:00 TUE (b07synwg)

Today 06:00 WED (b07syyrf)

Today 06:00 THU (b07v868w)

Today 06:00 FRI (b07tmqpd)

Tom Wrigglesworth's Hang-Ups 18:30 THU (b07tc1rm)

Tourists 19:45 SUN (b07sxvnl)

Tracks 14:15 TUE (b07syt8c)

Tweet of the Day 08:58 SUN (b038qk0c)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 MON (b0378xcd)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 TUE (b038qkcg)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 WED (b038qkck)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 THU (b03bkt07)

Tweet of the Day 05:58 FRI (b0378y3z)

Unreliable Evidence 22:15 SAT (b07qbcbq)

Unreliable Evidence 20:00 WED (b07tbj8b)

Voices of... 11:30 TUE (b07syrrs)

Weather 06:04 SAT (b07q2dvr)

Weather 06:57 SAT (b07q2dvw)

Weather 12:57 SAT (b07q2dw4)

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Weather 06:57 SUN (b07rkglc)

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Westminster Hour 22:00 SUN (b07rkgp2)

Woman's Hour 16:00 SAT (b07q2dwb)

Woman's Hour 10:00 MON (b07rkh2h)

Woman's Hour 10:00 TUE (b07rkh6r)

Woman's Hour 10:00 WED (b07rkh9x)

Woman's Hour 10:00 THU (b07rkhf1)

Woman's Hour 10:00 FRI (b07rkhsc)

Word of Mouth 16:00 TUE (b07syt8m)

World at One 13:00 MON (b07rkh2z)

World at One 13:00 TUE (b07rkh74)

World at One 13:00 WED (b07rkhb7)

World at One 13:00 THU (b07rkhfk)

World at One 13:00 FRI (b07rkhtr)

You and Yours 12:15 MON (b07rkh2t)

You and Yours 12:15 TUE (b07rkh70)

You and Yours 12:15 WED (b07rkhb3)

You and Yours 12:15 THU (b07rkhfb)

You and Yours 12:15 FRI (b07rkhtd)

Yusra: Swim for Your Life 00:15 MON (b07qbcbj)

Yusra: Swim for Your Life 16:00 WED (b07szbkb)

iPM 05:45 SAT (b07qcb93)

iPM 17:30 SAT (b07qcb93)