Radio-Lists Home Now on R4

RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 13 AUGUST 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b07mvybt)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b07myyqx)
Flaneuse - Women Who Walk the Cities, Episode 5

Author Lauren Elkin strolls great cities, thinking about distinguished women who did the same.

There's an intriguing photograph of 'Jinx Allen', taken in Florence by Ruth Orkin, and it's mysteries are now revealed. Then some reveries after wandering the sidewalks of New York..

Reader Julianna Jennings

Producer Duncan Minshull.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07mvybw)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07mvyby)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07mvyc0)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b07mvyc2)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07mz0xh)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b07nmqtn)
'I loved the boogie woogie, but hated my wartime life': Listener John Barnes suffered bereavement, separation, scorn and worse growing up during World War Two. He takes Eddie Mair on a bittersweet musical trip back to "the worst years" of his long life. And Radio 2 star Ken Bruce reads the Your News bulletin - keeping you updated on what's happening in the lives of fellow listeners. iPM@bbc.co.uk.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b07mvyc4)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b07mvyc6)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Open Country (b07mytj4)
The 'Man Engine' in Cornwall's mining landscape

The largest mechanical puppet ever made in the UK "The Man Engine" has been striding out across Cornwall to celebrate 10 years since Cornwall's mining landscapes were awarded the status of UNESCO world heritage sites.

Standing 10 metres high this 'Man Engine' will visit each of the 10 heritage areas across Cornwall and Helen Mark meets him and his creator Will Coleman in Liskeard and Minions on Bodmin moor. Helen speaks to some of the people who live here about what tin mining means to them today and to their sense of history. Former miner Mark Kaczmarek tell us about life in the mines today at Camborne School of Mines and we hear songs from Nick Hart from 'The Story of Cornwall' that make up the soundtrack to this incredible landscape and the industry which began here.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b07mvyc8)
Farming Today This Week: Equine Industry

Felicity Evans is at a new livery yard in South Gloucestershire to learn about the UK's £7 billion equine industry. She meets 19 year old Chloe Dawes who hopes the livery business will help to fund her dressage and jumping career. We also hear from the British Horse Society about the safety and welfare rules around owning and riding horses, and from an agricultural university about the variety of careers available in the industry.
Emily Hughes learns about a pony trekking centre in Wales which offers education and skills to children with behavioural problems. And we meet the Yorkshire farrier who's volunteering at the equine clinic at the Olympics in Rio.
Presented by Felicity Evans and produced by Sally Challoner.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b07mvycb)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b07p161g)
News and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b07mvycd)
Craig Charles and David Emanuel

Craig Charles and David Emanuel join Richard Coles and Aasmah Mir.

For a while Craig Charles was best known for playing Dave Lister in sci fi comedy Red Dwarf, but he has probably usurped that with his love for Funk and Soul, dj-ing on BBC 6 music and gigging around the country. With acting, poetry, performance, dj-ing and writing under his belt, now he's championing BBC Get Playing.

Fashion Designer and Royal Couturier David Emanuel has dressed Elizabeth Taylor, Madonna, Joan Collins and Princess Diana, done the Jungle and now he's on Saturday Live!

Claire Garabedian contacted Saturday Live about her unusual job - working in the therapeutic arts as a professional cellist. She joins Richard and Aasmah.

Earlier this year Lizzie Carr became the first person to paddle board the length of England via its connected waterways, using entirely human powered means. She'll tell us about her adventure, and why she did it.

We'll have a thank you from one of our listeners.

And we'll have the Inheritance Tracks of geneticist Steve Jones who chooses Rachie by Caradog Roberts and Richard Wagner: Twilight Of The Gods: Siegfried's Funeral March.

Producer: Corinna Jones
Editor: Beverley Purcell.

SAT 10:30 Punt PI (b07nmqtq)
Series 9, There's A Kind of Hum

What is it?

The sounds generated by mating fish? The US government? Or even the evolution of humans to hear electromagnetic waves... Steve Punt, BBC Radio 4's Mulder and Scully combined, turns his analytical ears to The Hum - heard by people, all over the world, tonight.

For some of those who hear it, it's unpleasant, even distressing, for others simply mysterious.

The Hum has been reported as far back as the 1960's, when people in Bristol first brought it to the attention of the local council. They never found out what caused it.
Many have tried to work out the source of the Hum... so there is no real reason to expect Radio 4's gumshoe to solve it in half an hour... but Punt PI will investigate some intriguing possibilities.

From Surreyto the ionosphere, he examines afresh some of the most common theories - with leading experts: is it the sounds created by fish, as recorded by neurobiologist Dr Andrew Bass; or the noise of seismic waves as discussed with expert Dr Lucia Gaultieri of Columbia University, New York; might it be a whole range of potential ear problems as suggested by Mark Williams at the Tinnitus Clinic; tall buildings - given short shrift by South Leeds Life editor, Jeremy Morton; electromagnetism - considered by science expert Roland Pease; and last, but definitely most 'X-files' of all, HAARP, a US military research station, now run by Bob McCoy of the University of Alaska - a theory poo-pooed by national security journalist Sharon Weinberger.

He also touches base with the creator of the World Hum website, Dr Glen MacPherson, who is trying to keep an online record of this phenomenon - most commonly described as a diesel engine in the distance.

Producer: Sara Jane Hall

Music sourcing: Danny Webb.

SAT 11:00 The Forum (b07nmqts)
Taming Nature

Is the idea of a pristine landscape an illusion, given that over thousands of years human activity has almost everywhere left its mark? Bridget Kendall asks the gardener Gilly Drummond, the land artist Danae Stratou, the archaeobotanist Dorian Fuller, and the historian William Beinart.

(Photo: Blenheim Palace Park where English landscape architect Capability Brown created a 150-acre lake and planted more than a million trees to make perhaps his finest artificial landscape (c) Blenheim Palace).

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b07mvycg)
This week reports on two South Asian security crises: in Baluchistan and Kashmir; a reconciliation drama in Colombia; Armenia's recent unrest; and life a thousand feet down.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b07mvycj)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Your Money and Your Life (b07nmvmf)
Forty and Fifty-Somethings

In a four-part series, Louise Cooper considers the financial and emotional dimensions to the most important decisions we make in our lives.

For many, the forties and fifties is a time when you have the greatest number of financial responsibilities, as you're supporting your children and often these days, your ageing parents. The trend has given this generation a new nickname, 'the sandwich generation'.

And that's the simple model. It's in these two decades, that an increasing number of people are starting new relationships, giving rise to another new term, the 'blended family' which brings the complexities of managing money and relationships into sharp focus.

In this episode, Louise speaks to families and experts about the pressure of caring for children and parents, and the delicate balance of blended family finances.

Presenter:Louise Cooper
Producer: Ben Carter
Editor:Andrew Smith.

SAT 12:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b07mz0hn)
Series 9, Noble, Shanahan, Dent

This week, the Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Noel Fielding welcome the freewheeling superstar Geordie comedian Ross Noble; science journalist and rainforest ecologist Dr Mike Shanahan; and the famous, renowned, celebrated, prominent and popular lexicographer from Countdown, Susie Dent.

This week, the Museum's Guest Committee appreciate the significance of figs; the joys of long-distance football; and thoughts of an 18th Century spy.

The show was researched by Mike Turner and Anne Miller of QI.

The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b07mvycl)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b07mvycn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b07mz0hs)
Therese Coffey, Frank Field MP, Tim Montgomerie, Rhea Wolfson

Ritula Shah presents political debate and discussion from the Radio Theatre at Broadcasting House in London with a panel including Environment Minister Therese Coffey MP, the Chair of the House of Commons Work and Pensions Select Committee Frank Field MP, Times columnist Tim Montgomerie, and the new Labour Party NEC member Rhea Wolfson.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b07mvycq)
Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230Call 03700 100 444. Email any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Tweet,#BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.

SAT 14:30 Drama (b07nmvmh)
The Clintons, The Coup

Three entertaining new dramas imagine key moments in the Clintons' personal and political lives together, closely based on the published accounts and opinions of those who've witnessed their enduring partnership.

1995, and President Bill Clinton's business dealings in the failed Whitewater property scheme are under investigation by the Independent Counsel, Kenneth Starr. When Susan McDougal, one of the partners in the scheme, is asked to implicate the Clintons in return for her own immunity, she refuses to lie.

1998, and the Independent Counsel is running out of time. When he receives tapes of an interview with an intern called Monica Lewinsky, the investigation takes a new turn to indict the President for perjury.

'The Coup' explores the nexus of truth and lies which threatened to undermine a Presidency.

Produced and directed by Jonquil Panting.

SAT 15:15 A Guide to Coastal Wildlife (b074x4th)
Sandy Beaches

The sandy beach is one of the most hostile habitats on our coastline and to survive the driving wind, abrasive sand and predation by sea birds, animals either spend much of their lives below the surface or have evolved some very clever adaptations as Brett Westwood discovers when he joins naturalist Phil Gates on the Northumberland coast and with the help of recordings by wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson they offer a practical and entertaining guide to the wildlife which you're most likely to see and hear on sandy beaches. On the lower shore, they wander amongst the lugworm burrows in search of razor clams and pogoing cockles! Brett discovers not only how razor clams escape predation by burrowing into the sand with their muscular foot, but also how to age them "It's great I've come all the way to Northumberland to age a mollusc", laughs Brett. Higher up the beach, Brett and Phil gently rake through piles of decaying seaweed to discover a seething mass of jumping sand hoppers; small crustaceans about the size of a woodlouse with legs of two different lengths, which move up and down the beach with the tides. And finally at the top of the beach at the front of the sand dunes, they discuss the remarkable abilities of marram grass not only to avoid drying out, but also to hold back the sand and create stable areas where communities of other plants can take root and grow. Producer Sarah Blunt.

SAT 15:30 Marc Riley's Musical Time Machine (b07mxgxg)
Series 2, Lemmy and Joe Strummer

The BBC's archive is justifiably and inarguably world-famous, but most of this attention and praise is showered on the musical riches it contains - all those life-changing Peel performances, seminal sessions from Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, David Bowie and so on. But there's another archive that's just as diverse and rich and rewarding - the BBC's spoken work archive.

As long as there have been pop stars, the BBC has spoken to them. Here, Marc Riley and his trusty Time Machine will steer you back through the years to visit the great and the good, the famous and the infamous. In each episode, Marc travels to two different points in time and revisits two interviews that have something in common - a person or place, a shared influence or ideology, a discovery or a misunderstanding.

In this episode, we hear from two musicians who, on the surface, appeared to have little in common - Lemmy of Motorhead was a long haired, unreconstructed rock 'n' roller; Joe Strummer of The Clash, despite being the son of a diplomat, was a polemical firebrand and a musical magpie.

But in truth, they both had a similar ethos. Both were fiercely passionate about music and proud of their musical integrity. Both felt connected with, and appealed to, disaffected working class teenagers of the late 1970s. Both lived in squats in West London at the start of their musical careers. And both found early appeal within the burgeoning punk scene.

The Lemmy interview comes from 1991 and he tells Tommy Vance about his reading habits, his love of history and why rock 'n' roll shouldn't aspire to be art. The Joe Strummer interview dates from ten years earlier and covers his political ideologies, The Clash's refusal to appear on Top Of The Pops and their sometimes shambolic business acumen.

A Smooth Operations production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b07mvycs)
Weekend Woman's Hour: Angela Merkel, Giving birth in front of family, Charlotte Bray, Katharine Towers

Highlights from the Woman's Hour week.Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Sophie Powling
Editor: Erin Riley.

SAT 17:00 PM (b07mvycv)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 iPM (b07nmqtn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:45 today]

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07mvycx)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b07mvycz)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07mvyd1)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b07nn2t0)
Clive Anderson, Arthur Smith, Francesca Martinez, Angus Deayton, Cherry Jones, Camille O'Sullivan, Willis Earl Beal

Clive Anderson and Arthur Smith are joined by Francesca Martinez, Angus Deayton, Cherry Jones and Camille O'Sullivan for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy from the Edinburgh Festival. With music from Camille O'Sullivan, Willis Earl Beal and Royal Scottish Pipers' Society.

Producer: Sukey Firth.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b07nn2t2)
Poet, painter and virtuoso pianist, Stephen Hough has been described as a polymath. He learned to play on a piano that cost £5 from a local antique shop and went on to become a virtuoso to astonish the world. Becky Milligan speaks to lifelong friends and some of the world's leading names in classical music to profile a man who plays like a dream.

Producers Smita Patel & Ed Davey.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b07mvyd3)
Wiener-Dog, Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour, The Summer That Melted Everything, The Hunterian Collection, Ingrid Bergman

Todd Solondz's latest film Wiener Dog has been described as uniquely misanthropic; will our panellists agree?
The National Theatre of Scotland's production: Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour , written by Lee "Billy Elliot" Hall, arrives in London after a national tour and before it heads to Australia. There's plenty of profanity but is there any profundity?
Tiffany McDaniel's The Summer That Melted Everything is a first novel about the time The Devil came to visit a small southern US town.
The Hunterian Collection at London's Royal College of Surgeons is an unrivalled collections of human and non-human anatomical and pathological specimens, models, instruments, painting and sculptures that reveal the art and science of surgery from the 17th century to the present day.
Ingrid Bergman: In Her Own Words is a new look at the actress whose life scandalised old Hollywood. What does it tell us about fame today.
Sarah Crompton's guests are Natalie Haynes, Amanda Craig and Jake Arnott. The producer is Oliver Jones.

(Main image: Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour. L-R Caroline Deyga (Chell), Kirsty MacLaren (Manda), Melissa Allan (Orla), Frances Mayli McCann (Kylah), Dawn Sievewright (Fionnula), Karen Fishwick (Kay). Photo by Manuel Harlan).

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b07nn2t4)
Dimbleby on Dimbleby

Fifty years ago this year, Westminster Abbey played host to a remarkable occasion, a memorial service for a mere journalist and broadcaster. The Abbey was packed. Hundreds of members of the public stood outside in the cold and wet to pay their respects to someone they saw as a trusted friend, Richard Dimbleby.

In this programme, Jonathan Dimbleby dips into the extensive treasure-chest of his father's work, dating back to the 1930s, when Dimbleby Sr boldly wrote to the BBC to propose the idea of such a thing as a 'radio reporter' and promptly got the job he'd envisaged. Right from the start, he displayed a remarkable natural flair for bringing reports alive through his choice of language, facility for painting vivid pictures and ability to improvise under pressure.

Richard Dimbleby was the BBC's first-ever out-and-about radio reporter, cutting his teeth by reporting live from a telephone box on the burning down of Crystal Palace. He was the Corporation's first war correspondent and air correspondent during the Second World War, remembered for flying with bombers, reporting the horrors of the Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp and sitting in Hitler's chair. Dimbleby pioneered the art of broadcast commentary on major national events, describing the Coronation of Elizabeth II and the funerals of Winston Churchill and John F Kennedy. When the Telstar satellite enabled live trans-Atlantic television, there was Dimbleby to host a debut programme. And who was in Red Square to host the first live tv broadcast from Moscow?

Dimbleby was the first to perfect the art of anchoring General Election results broadcasts and was a major factor in turning a faltering Panorama programme into essential viewing for millions in the depths of the Cold War. As a radio personality, he graced Down Your Way as presenter and Twenty Questions as panellist.

'Assisting Jonathan Dimbleby in assessing his father's talents are three leading figures in post-war broadcasting - Sir Paul Fox, Sir Jeremy Isaacs and Michael Peacock.

Produced by Andrew Green
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b053zwq6)
Reading Europe - Spain: Tomorrow in the Battle Think on Me, Episode 2

When Marta dies in his arms during an illicit sexual encounter, Victor flees the scene leaving a 2 year old child alone in the apartment. Now Marta's husband, Eduardo, has returned from London. He is close to discovering Victor's identity and about to force a meeting at which he has some unexpected and surprising news to impart.

Writer Javier Marías, Europe's master of secrets and of what lies reveal and truth may conceal, is on sure ground in this profound, brilliantly imagined and hugely intricate novel.

From the novel by Javier Marías
Translated by Margaret Jull Costa
Dramatised for radio by Michael Butt

Produced by Eoin O'Callaghan
A Big Fish production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b07mvyd5)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Inside the Ethics Committee (b07mythf)
Series 12, Growth Restriction in Pregnancy

Today pregnancy brings a whole battery of tests and scans to check on the baby's development. But what happens when tests reveal that the fetus isn't growing?

There is very little that can be done to treat or prevent what's called fetal growth restriction. So doctors monitor the pregnancy closely in the hope that the fetus will be able to stay in the womb long enough to grow to size where it can survive outside.

Sometimes, it's not safe for the pregnancy to continue - either for the woman, if she becomes gravely ill, or for the fetus if it stops growing entirely.

But what happens when the baby is still so tiny that it's difficult to predict whether it will survive outside the womb or not? And if the baby does survive, he or she may go on to have development disabilities. Is it ethical to try to resuscitate it?

Survivors often spend months in intensive care, where they have to endure invasive painful procedures. When is it ethical to stop keeping them alive?

These dilemmas wouldn't arise for these growth-restricted babies if there was a way to treat or prevent the problem in the womb. But, as Professor Anna David explains, trialling untested medicines in pregnant women is seen as particularly ethically challenging.

It's a challenge that she has taken on. She's involved in two clinical trials in pregnant women to find out if the interventions improve fetal growth in the womb.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Photo Credit: Yarinca / Getty Images.

SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b07mwqfp)
Series 30, Heat 8, 2016

(8/13)
Which vocal ensemble was founded by the English bass singer Matthew Best when he was just sixteen? And which performers have sung the opening line in the four different versions of the Band Aid song 'Do They Know It's Christmas'? These are just two of the diverse questions Paul Gambaccini puts to the competitors in the eighth heat of 'Counterpoint'.

As always, the three contenders will have to choose a special musical topic on which they'll get their own individual questions - but with no warning of the categories, they'll be thrown in at the deep end.

The winner goes through to the semi-finals and stands a chance of competing in the 30th anniversary Counterpoint Final at the BBC Proms.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

SAT 23:30 How to Write a Poem (b07mw4f7)
Dickinson and Byron

The poet Glyn Maxwell finds himself in a strange village. He has been invited there to teach a poetry masterclass at a literature festival with some impressive names on the line-up. Could that really be John Keats reading in the back room of the pub? Is that John Clare wandering the lanes? Is Emily Dickinson really doing a Q&A in the village hall? And isn't that Lord Byron propping up the bar?

With Glyn are three new poets - Holly Corfield Carr, Victoria Adukwei Bulley and Dominic Fisher - who share their poems-in-progress. The students put their questions on writing directly to the greats and Glyn shares his own advice on writing better poetry - from facing the blank page and developing ideas, to the intricacies of rhyme, meter, form and line break.

All words spoken by Keats, Clare, Dickinson and Byron are taken verbatim from their poems, letters and diaries.

Written and presented by Glyn Maxwell
Produced by Mair Bosworth & Chris Ledgard

CAST
Barmaid - Sally Phillips
Emily Dickinson - Amy Rose
Lord Byron - Adam Harley
Student Poets - Holly Corfield Carr, Victoria Adukwei Bulley, Dominic Fisher.


SUNDAY 14 AUGUST 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b07nn82c)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Stories from the Southern Cross (b0499snx)
The Road from Austinmer Beach

Stories from the Southern Cross consists of three new pieces of writing produced in collaboration with the first Australia New Zealand Literature Festival. Each story represents a new voice from the Antipodes - a place at once very familiar, but in fact quite different.

The series depicts a world of aggressive ennui, of suburban sprawl battling with a voracious bush and extreme weather, of taboos and generations colliding as old, White Australia comes to terms with another generation of migration.

In "The Road from Austinmer Beach", widower Bert Hamilton travels for two hours a week to visit residents in a home - when, one day, a traffic jam forces a change of route, the discovery of a cake shop and an encounter with the latest wave of immigration that sheds new light on his life.

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07nn82f)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07nn82h)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07nn82k)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b07nn82m)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b07nnbjr)
Sheffield Cathedral

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from Sheffield Cathedral. Formerly the parish church of St. Peter, the tower had a ring of four bells as long ago as 1559. By 1745 it held eight, with the present ring of 12 being cast in 1970. Regarded as one of the finest products of the Whitechapel Bell Foundry, the sound has been improved by the use of a wooden-shafted clapper in the 34 hundredweight tenor. The method we hear here is Yorkshire Surprise Maximus, by the Sheffield Cathedral Company of Ringers.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b07nn2t2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b07nn82p)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b07nnbjt)
Sermons in Stone

John McCarthy celebrates the power of sacred architecture and wonders what lessons can be learned from these buildings.

Whether it's a grand cathedral or a humble non-conformist chapel, the architects who design sacred spaces are able to create a unique sense of peace. John explains, "exploring religious spaces, whether a local parish church, a simple village mosque or exuberant Hindu temple and watching the faithful in private prayer, or sharing in a service, I've been moved by this atmosphere of spirituality. I've always been intrigued as to how this sense of the sanctified can be physically built."

In order to find out more, John visits St Paul's Cathedral with The Bishop of London Richard Chartres as his guide. He then walks a few miles to a very different sacred space - Brick Lane Mosque. The building that currently houses the Mosque has been a site of worship for over 200 years, having passed hands from the Huguenots to the Methodists and then on to East London's Jewish community before becoming a Mosque in 1970s. Celebrated architect Niall McLaughlin is on hand to unpick the layers of symbolism in the bricks and mortar and to reveal the secrets to designing a space that fosters stillness.

Readings include the amusing grumblings of Bishop Earle in the 17th Century and the work of the Cornish poet Nicholas Michell. Musical selections feature the St Paul's Cathedral Choir and The Carter Family.

Presenter: John McCarthy
Producer: Max O'Brien
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b07nnbjx)
Rare and Ancient Cereals

Ancient wheat grains such as spelt, emmer and einkorn can trace their first use by man back nearly 10,000 years. With a need to feed an expanding human population, modern high yielding varieties of grains developed which today can produce 8 tonnes per hectare. It would be easy then to think that ancient grains have long been superseded in commercial farming. Not so it seems; far from being a footnote in historical texts the growing of these grains is attracting interest again.

In 1978, Michael and Clare Marriage grew a single field of organic wheat as a trial. In the four decades since then, Doves Farm has become one of the foremost organic growers of ancient grains in the UK. What is the appeal of these ancient grains, are they just a tasty novelty or do they really have something fresh to offer the modern consumer?

Sybil Ruscoe travels to Berkshire to see how Doves Farm mill their own flour on the farm and hears why they have begun producing organic and 'Free From' food products, many using these ancient grains.

Producer: Andrew Dawes.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b07nn82r)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b07nn82t)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b07nn82w)
Elvis, Canvey Island Jews, The Olympic effect

Religious and ethical news.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b07nnbjz)
Beanstalk

Jill Pay, a volunteer reading helper, and 7 year old Moris, present the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of the charity Beanstalk.
Registered Charity No 296454
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Beanstalk'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Beanstalk'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b07nn82y)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b07nn830)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b07nnbk1)
After the Somme - Remembering the Accrington Pals

100 years on, we've remembered those who fell in battle: but what of those they left behind to battle the grief and hardship of bereavement? Father Andrew Martlew leads worship from the Pals' Memorial Chapel, St John's Church, Accrington. Accompanied on the organ by Richard Tanner, St Christopher's CofE High School Choir is directed by Helen Davies, and is joined by choirs and congregations representing communities throughout East Lancashire and beyond where lives and history were changed forever after the Somme. Producer: Rowan Morton Gledhill.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b07mz0hv)
What's wrong with modern art?

Will Self explores what's wrong with modern art.

"I've been responsible for a fair amount of absolutely total nonsense in my time", he writes, but says most contemporary art is little more than "overvalued tosh and useless ephemera".

Instead of a world where Russian oligarchs "buy artworks by the metric tonne and plaster them on the walls of their vulgar houses", he calls for a genuine understanding of art where - once again - we become "capable of conveying and explaining the subtle ambiguities of genuine art".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkfhy)
Common Pheasant

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Common Pheasant. The crowing of pheasants is a sound inseparable from most of the UK countryside yet these flamboyant birds were introduced into the UK. The pheasant's coppery plumage and red face-wattles, coupled with a tail that's as long again as its body, make the cock pheasant a strikingly beautiful bird.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b07nn832)
News presented by Paddy O'Connell. Reviewing the papers - paralympian peer Tanni Grey-Thompson, conservative commentator Richard D North and art curator Morgan Quaintance.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b07nn834)
Shula shows off a birthday present, and Rob makes a last-minute decision.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b07nng5j)
Nadiya Hussain

Kirsty Young's castaway is the baker and winner of The Great British Bake Off in 2015, Nadiya Hussain.

One of six children born to Bangladeshi parents in Luton, it was her father - a restaurateur - who encouraged her to cook. Having grown up in a culture where dessert wasn't common, her love of baking was awakened by her Year Ten home economics teacher.

She had an arranged marriage to Abdal in her early twenties and stayed at home to bring up their three children until her husband encouraged her to apply for the Bake Off. She was selected and over 15 million viewers watched her beat her fellow finalists Tamal and Ian.

Since winning Bake Off, Nadiya has been writing a column for the Times Magazine and has published her first cook book. She also has further books and a TV programme in the pipeline.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b07nn836)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 Just a Minute (b07mwqfw)
Series 76, Episode 1

Nicholas Parsons and guests return for the 76th series of the panel show where participants must try to speak for 60 seconds without hesitation, deviation or repetition. No repetition? That's no small order after nearly 50 years.

Episode one features Paul Merton, Katherine Ryan, Gyles Brandreth and Josie Lawrence.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Matt Stronge.

It was a BBC Studios production.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b07nng5l)
Roger Protz: A Life Through Beer

From being tucked under the pub bar stool as a baby to getting into Fleet Street pubs underage, Roger Protz's passion for beer began early. He's spent 40 years on a mission to celebrate and protect brewing traditions - writing about brewing and beers including over 20 editions of the Good Beer Guide. Arguably what he was writing about then is what many hold important today - in both food and drink. His passion and excitement about innovation and new flavours hasn't waned. He took Sheila to one of his favourite local pubs to try some new local ales before sharing more about his life and career.

His writing saw him forge a path to parts of the world where few were travelling - including hunting out beers and brewers in Czechoslovakia before the fall of the Iron Curtain, his eyes were opened to Belgian beers and tastings through France, and across to the USA, all of which he shared with his readers.

Roger has also worked for the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) since the 70s helping bring real ale back from the brink of extinction as a threatened minority drink to a thriving British craft industry. His work has also seen him fighting to help save pubs - to put it simply, 'no pub, no ale'. But his opinions haven't been without controversy and while he celebrates the rise of the microbrewers, CAMRA is now asking its members on whether it should remodel itself and embrace all beers and beer drinkers.

Presented by Sheila Dillon.
Produced in Bristol by Anne-Marie Bullock.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b07nn838)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b07nn83b)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Fantasy Festival (b07nng5p)
Eliza Carthy

Folk musician Eliza Carthy joins presenter Verity Sharp to create and curate the festival of her wildest dreams. It's a chance for Eliza to set the festival's agenda, chose the guests, pick the acts, dictate the weather, the food and the ambience. A festival where anyone - dead or alive - can be summoned to perform, and nothing is unimaginable.

Eliza outlines her dream festival which takes place at Robin Hood's Bay. Finnish folk musicians Värttinä, Italian folk group Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino and Dreadzone are on the bill alongside Freddie Mercury, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Joe Venuti, Professor Brian Cox and Abba. Everyone's there and everything's possible in Eliza's feel good festival.

Producer Rosie Boulton
A Monty Funk production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07mz0hb)
West Dean Chilli Fiesta

Peter Gibbs and the panel visit the West Dean Chilli Fiesta near Chichester. Bob Flowerdew, Bunny Guinness and Matthew Wilson answer the horticultural questions this week.Produced by Dan CockerAssistant Producer: Hannah NewtonA Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b07nng5r)
Sunday Omnibus - Looking Back

Fi Glover introduces conversations reflecting on past attitudes to service, relationships and families in the Omnibus edition of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b07nng5t)
Reading Europe - Greece: The Final Reckoning, Episode 1

Set in Greece in 2008, just prior to the elections that will bring Tsipris to power, The Final Reckoning by Petros Markaris, one of the country's
most popular writers, is a cleverly disguised police procedural which takes us beneath the headlines and exposes a country in moral as well as financial crisis.

Our story begins with the quadruple suicide of four elderly women, friends who can longer see how to survive in a country where poverty is an arm of government policy. But somehow the death of these four hapless women precipitates an outpouring of public anger. And this anger finds expression when some of Athens' wealthiest citizens start turning up dead, causing a dilemma for the Police and in particular, Superintendent Kosta Jaritos.

Jaritos was once in the Military Police, the strong arm of the hated dictatorship of The Generals who ruled Greece as recently as the 1970's, and as a young officer he did things he was ordered to and of which he is now far from proud. The guilt he feels about a man called Merenditis who died while in his custody just will not go away and he knows in his heart that this new wave of murders is somehow linked to the crimes of the past - the crimes he himself committed.

Ep 1 The Final Reckoning by Petros Markaris.
Dramatised for Radio by Michael Butt.

A Big Fish production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (b07nng5w)
Colin Thubron

Celebrated travel writer and novelist Colin Thubron talks to Mariella Frostrup about his new novel 'Night of Fire'. Debut Author Garth Greenwell explores the progress forged by gay writers of the past and how they have paved the way for their successors. Children's author Roland Chambers tells Open Book why Arthur Ransome's complicated life influenced the safe and bucolic world of Swallows and Amazons. Writer Adam Baron questions why there isn't more contemporary literature which depicts parents sharing the childcare.

SUN 16:30 A Sea Shanty for Charles Causley (b07nng5y)
When we look at the sea, W.H. Auden wrote: 'all that we are not stares back at what we are.' Jane Darke goes in search of the sea's truths as told by the Cornish poet Charles Causley. He was born and lived in the centre of the county and went to sea only during the Second World War as a sailor and yet the marine world shaped and defined his work. The filmmaker and writer Jane Darke lives in and works from a house just above a beach on the north Cornish coast. Her rooms are filled with salvaged objects from the shore. She has made a film about Charles Causley whose 100th anniversary falls next year. For this poetry feature the filmmaker and the poet put out to sea and we find their sea lives and their land lives running together like a tide up a beach. With performances of poems by Jim Causley and Julie Murphy, by Natalie Merchant and by the poet himself. Producer: Tim Dee.

SUN 17:00 Pick of the Week (b07nn83l)
Katie Puckrik

Katie Puckrik chooses her BBC Radio highlights.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b07nn2t2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07nn83d)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b07nn83g)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07nn83j)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 18:15 BBC Radio New Comedy Award (b07nng60)
2016, Final - Part 1

Mark Watson hosts the grand final of the BBC Radio New Comedy Award 2016 - Radio 4's nationwide search to find the UK's comedy stars of the future - live from the Edinburgh Fringe.

The BBC Radio New Comedy Award 2016 is searching the country to find the next big comedy stars to join the likes of previous finalists Alan Carr, Peter Kay, Lee Mack, Sarah Millican, Marcus Brigstocke, Russell Howard and Rhod Gilbert.

Sixty acts competed in six regional heats held across the country to make it through to the semi-finals in Edinburgh, and now the live final from the Fringe.

Tonight, live on Radio 4, those final six acts go head to head to battle it out in the hope of being crowned winner of the BBC Radio New Comedy Award 2016 with a prize of £1,000 and a script commission with BBC Radio Comedy. Deciding upon the winner is an esteemed comedy panel of judges.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b07nng62)
Henry is waved off to the beach, and Ursula has a suggestion for Rob.

SUN 19:15 BBC Radio New Comedy Award (b07pdj28)
2016, Final - Part 2

Mark Watson hosts the grand final of the BBC Radio New Comedy Award 2016 - Radio 4's nationwide search to find the UK's comedy stars of the future - live from the Edinburgh Fringe.

The BBC Radio New Comedy Award 2016 is searching the country to find the next big comedy stars to join the likes of previous finalists Alan Carr, Peter Kay, Lee Mack, Sarah Millican, Marcus Brigstocke, Russell Howard and Rhod Gilbert.

Sixty acts competed in six regional heats held across the country to make it through to the semi-finals in Edinburgh, and now the live final from the Fringe.

Tonight, live on Radio 4, those final six acts go head to head to battle it out in the hope of being crowned winner of the BBC Radio New Comedy Award 2016 with a prize of £1,000 and a script commission with BBC Radio Comedy. Deciding upon the winner is an esteemed comedy panel of judges.

SUN 19:45 Reading Europe: Italian Snapshots (b07nnvgk)
Maternal Pride

Three snapshots of Italian life written in the past 15 years. In the second story - Maternal Pride by Matteo B. Bianchi - it's summer and a group of young Italian men are getting ready to attend a parade in Padua. An elderly lady is also making plans although her motivation is unclear.


Written by Matteo B. Bianchi
Translated by Liesl Schillinger and Jill Waters
Read by Mathew Baynton
Abridged and Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:00 More or Less (b07mz0hj)
Grammar Schools

Grammar Schools
It has been reported that Prime Minister Theresa May is planning on lifting the ban on creating new grammar schools. Chris Cook, Policy Editor for Newsnight, has been looking at the evidence for whether these selective schools improve exam performance or social mobility.

Swimming World Records
New world records are being set in swimming at a much faster rate than other sports - but why? Tim Harford speaks to swim coach and blogger, Rick Madge about the reason swimmers keep getting better results in the pool. Why do other sports, like athletics, not seem to have the same continual improvements in results?

Teenage girls aren't so bad after all
This week's Desk of Good News challenges the concept that teenage girls and young women are badly behaved. It features statistics on falling teenage pregnancy rates, drinking figures and improving educational success.

The rise of TV
Was the Queen's Coronation the event that sparked the biggest rise in TV sales ever? We take a look at the rise of television in the UK.

Lottery wins
Adam Kucharski, author of The Perfect Bet, looks at the maths behind playing the lottery or gambling.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Charlotte McDonald.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b07mz0hg)
Bishop Edward Daly, Ahmed Zewail, Suzanne Wright, Duke of Westminster, Ivo Pitanguy

Matthew Bannister on

the Bishop of Derry Edward Daly. He was famously photographed waving a bloodstained white handkerchief as he tended to a young man shot by the army on Bloody Sunday.

The Egyptian born chemist Ahmed Zewail who won the Nobel prize for his work on revealing the minute details of chemical reactions.

Suzanne Wright who raised millions of dollars for research into autism after her grandson was diagnosed with the condition.

The Duke of Westminster, one of the UK's wealthiest landowners and a close friend of the royal family.

And the Brazilian plastic surgeon Ivo Pitanguy. To his many celebrity patients he was known as the Michelangelo of the scalpel.

Producer: Paul Waters.

SUN 21:00 Your Money and Your Life (b07nmvmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b07nnbjz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 In Business (b07myxkw)
How Safe Are Your Secrets?

Companies don't often like to admit it, but we know the spies are out there, attempting to infiltrate almost every sector of industry, eager to winkle out the most valuable corporate secrets. And they sometimes succeed, passing on the information to rivals whether at home or abroad.
So what can be done to pursue the perpetrators and protect business from this growing threat?
In this episode of In Business Peter Day learns the lessons from businesses that have fallen victim to corporate espionage and he hears that most companies' Achilles' heels lie in the least expected places.

Producer Lucy Hooker.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b07nn83n)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b07myxkm)
Ingrid Bergman and Don Paterson

With Antonia Quirke.

Award-winning poet Don Paterson continues his series about great speeches in cinema history with the ever quotable Casablanca. Don't forget - we'll always have Paris.

Stig Bjorkman, the director of a new documentary about the star of Casablanca, Ingrid Bergman: In Her Own Words, talks about the controversy that dogged her career.

While literary salons are all the rage, the cinematic equivalent is relatively rare. Antonia visits a monthly meeting of the Moving Image Makers Collective in Selkirk on the Scottish Borders, where short films are shown and critiqued. Will it end in tears?

The Film Programme are looking for the unsung heroes of British cinema. Janet Rogers nominates her dad, the cinematographer Ted Lloyd, who worked with Hitchock on The 39 Steps. And Janet explains how she ended up starring a few adverts.

SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b07nnbjt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]


MONDAY 15 AUGUST 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b07nn869)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Self's Search for Meaning (b07ffkj3)
Philosophy

Will Self asks some of Britain's key opinion-makers to share, in simple terms, their conclusions about the nature - and meaning - of our existence.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b07nnbjr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07nn86d)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07nn86g)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07nn86j)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b07nn86l)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07ptdyb)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b07nn86n)
Chancellor's announcement about future farm subsidies, African farmers and a lady molecatcher.

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Felicity Evans and produced by Emily Hughes.

MON 05:56 Weather (b07nn86q)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tws57)
Cirl Bunting

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the cirl bunting.

Cirl buntings are related to yellowhammers and look rather like them, but the male cirl bunting has a black throat and a greenish chest-band.

Their rattling song may evoke memories of warm dry hillsides in France or Italy. Cirl buntings are Mediterranean birds more at home in olive groves than chilly English hedgerows. Here at the north-western edge of their range, most of our cirl buntings live near the coast in south Devon where they breed in hedgerows on farmland.

MON 06:00 Today (b07nn86s)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Playing the Skyline (b07nppkx)
Series 2, A Hillside in Oxfordshire

In 'Playing the Skyline' Tim Marlow joins two musicians as they look at how the land meets the air, and imagine it as music. They give their responses, then begin playing the skyline, before creating new pieces. Later, Tim hears how they are getting on and, finally, he and Radio 4's listeners hear the finished works and the musicians respond to each other's pieces.

There is in the south of England a dramatic skyline viewed by thousands daily. Sadly they can't stand and stare. This is where the M40 cuts through the Chilterns, opening to the expanse of rural Oxfordshire. For the second Playing the Skyline Tim, Robert Worby and Paul Sartin gather in a meadow of wild orchids, with red kites wheeling, beside the cutting.

Robert played keyboards in The Mekons, famous '70s punk band. These days he presents Radio 3's new music programme,' Hear and Now' , and composes music that draws on all available sounds - instrumental, mechanical, environmental and electronic.

Paul plays the oboe. He was, until they split up this year, one of Bellowhead, the folk big band that brought English traditional music to the main stage at Glastonbury, the London Palladium and even Radio 2. He now works with Faustus, Belshazzar's Feast and directs a community choir.

The scene is a Constable painting (plus motorway). Paul plays a folk tune collected in the 19th century just a couple of miles away, appropriately in such an English landscape, on the cor anglais. But both musicians are inspired by the dramatic intervention of modern man in this ancient landscape. Robert collects sounds of the motorway for his piece. Above this drone skylarks sing and Robert pulls a tiny synthesizer from his bag and, right there, creates a new electronic 'Lark Ascending'.

Producer: Julian May.

MON 09:30 Our Man in Greeneland (b07nppkz)
The Third Man

To complement BBC Radio 4's season of Graham Greene dramas, Vienna-based correspondent Bethany Bell explores Graham Greene's time in post-war Vienna, and the writing and making of the film, The Third Man, in the late 1940s.

Readings by James Lailey and Sam West
Produced by Emma Harding.

MON 09:45 Book of the Week (b07nrfb5)
Upbeat, Episode 1

'The great adventure of the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq deserves not only to be recorded for posterity but also to serve as an example of how the essential can survive catastrophe.' - Sir Peter Maxwell Davies.

Musician and conductor Paul MacAlindin was eating fish and chips in an Edinburgh cafe in 2008 when he first read the story in the Herald newspaper - "Iraqi teen seeks Maestro". That Iraqi teen was the astonishing Zuhal Sultan, a pianist who dreamed up the idea of a National Youth Orchestra of Iraq aged only 17.

Paul was intrigued.

Barely out of war, with no discernible orchestral tradition that he knew of, what could there be to work with? What instruments did they even have? How could it be that we in the West had heard so much about war and bloodshed in Iraq, but knew so little of who the Iraqis really were?

Fixated on the article, fish trembling at the end of his fork, Paul simply said to himself, "I know how to do this."

The following year, after auditions via Skype, a promise of a bespoke piece from the late Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, favours called in, massive logistical complexities and financial hiccups, they ran their first summer school. And so the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq was born.

In a few short years this group of young musicians came through the most difficult and dangerous times to produce fine music, not only in Iraq

Read by Kenny Blyth
Written by Paul MacAlindin
Directed and Abridged by Polly Coles

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07nn86v)
Phone-in: Screen time and children

Getting children away from their screens can be a daily battle, but how much more difficult is it in the school holidays? We'll be asking whether it matters that they're attached to their phones, tablets or computer games and whether it's useful to set boundaries about time spent online. Do you worry that your children are addicted to their screens or are you relaxed about it? Is it any different to time spent in front of the TV, and do you consider what example you might be setting? Jane will be joined by Dr Alicia Blum-Ross who is part of a team at the LSE looking at parenting in a digital age.

Phone lines open at 0800 on Monday: 03700 100 444.

You can also email the programme now through the website.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Anne Peacock.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07nppl3)
Graham Greene - Monsignor Quixote, Episode 6

Dramatised by Stephen Wyatt

Monsignor Quixote and Sancho help a robber - and pay an unexpected price.

Directed by Marc Beeby.

MON 11:00 The Untold (b07nppl5)
Ice Cream Wars in Newbiggin

In the Northumberland fishing village of Newbiggin by the Sea, local ice cream van owner Tommy Brash has lost the prime spot in the car park for selling ice creams. The council put it out to tender, and the tender was won by 'foreigners'. Variously described as Polish and then Iraqi, it seems no one actually knows who they are, and they've kept a low profile since winning the tender, even though the news made the headlines.

A local petition is launched to get Tommy's patch back, a march is held, but the newcomers are staying.

Tracking them down for this programme, we discover who the new ice cream sellers really are and follow them over the summer as they battle local hostility, rain, Brexit and health issues.

As they prepare for Newbiggin's big annual event, the Lifeboat fund-raiser - a sure-fire money-spinner, will they finally make their new business a success and will they get the welcome they're looking for?

Grace Dent presents.

Producer: Alice Lloyd.

MON 11:30 Way Out East (b07nppl7)
We'll Meet Again

New comedy by Guy Meredith about a group of expats sharing a flat in Hong Kong. Into the lives of unsuccessful architect James (Tony Gardner) and failed-everything Malcolm (John Gordon Sinclair) comes Zoe (Katherine Kingsley) on a one-way ticket from England to start a new life.

After an unpromising start, she moves in with James and Malcolm, convinced that she can get these two undomesticated alpha males to change their ways and become more organised at home and work. She also becomes part of the scene at the Shakes, the local expat pub run by Wanda (Samantha Bond) and visited by James's boss Mr Ampersand (Nicky Henson) who gives her a job as his PA.

The flatmates share many adventures including a very disorganised pub quiz, a series of domestic mishaps, attempts to fix the result of the Hong Kong Derby and a local marathon, and the annual Hong Kong New Year celebrations.

Katherine Kingsley was Olivier nominated for her role in Piaf and Singin' in the Rain, John Gordon Sinclair has performed in several musicals and is remembered for the title role in Gregory's Girl, Tony Gardner is currently one of the stars of the award-winning Last Tango in Halifax, and Samantha Bond has starred in many award-winning television and theatre productions including Downton Abbey. Guy Meredith has written several very successful dramas and comedies for radio, including the long-running series Daunt and Dervish.

Series Music Composer: David Chilton
Writer: Guy Meredith
Producer: Cherry Cookson

A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b07nn870)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 Home Front (b07kcgky)
15 August 1916 - Florrie Wilson

On this day in 1916, the King praised the 'spirit of cheerful confidence' he found amongst the troops in France, while in Folkestone, optimism eludes Florrie Wilson.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b07nn874)
BHS store future, Car recalls, Peat use

Winifred Robinson hears about motorists with potentially dangerous cars they should never have been sold.
In the final week of trading for the last remaining BHS stores, we look at what will become of the 163 buildings left empty.
And with continued efforts to cut the use of peat in our gardens, just how much peat is now being used by the green fingered?

MON 12:57 Weather (b07nn876)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b07nn879)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

MON 13:45 The River (b07nprbk)
Sabrina and the Fish of No Return

Writer, naturalist and broadcaster, Paul Evans watches a salmon struggle against the flowing waters to climb up a weir and return to the pool where she was born to lay her eggs. The struggle takes place on the River Severn, which was known to the Romans as Sabrina. Sabrina is also the name of the Severn Cruise boat in Shrewsbury, a woman from Greek mythology who was drowned in a river and a 1950s British glamour model and film star. In this essay, Paul weaves together the stories of these different Sabrinas as he watches the salmon driven by instinct to travel "against the flow, up the one way street" ....Like a film premiere with the star staggering up the red carpet, the crowd shouts encouragement, holds its collective breath, takes photographs, sighs as she stumbles back yet again...and again".

Written and presented by Paul Evans
Actor Adie Allen and Susan Jameson
Additional sound recordings by Chris Watson
Producer Sarah Blunt.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b07nng62)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b04fcb4l)
A Meeting with Dora

A Meeting With Dora
by Don Shaw

In 1979 the writer Don Shaw met Dora Russell, who was a campaigner for some of the great causes of the 20 century, including women's rights, progressive education, sexual reform and birth control. She was also the former wife of the philosopher Bertrand Russell. Shaw had been commissioned by the BBC to write a film about their life together. What resulted was a far more personal meeting for Shaw himself. Thirty five years later, using a mixture of fact and fiction, he has re-created that meeting.

Produced and directed by Pauline Harris.

MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b07npsmz)
Series 30, Heat 9, 2016

Competitors from Bradford, Nottinghamshire and Edinburgh join Paul Gambaccini to discover who'll take the last of the nine semi-final places in this 30th anniversary series of the eclectic music quiz.

To succeed, the competitors will have to remember two composers who've made operas of the story of Turandot, and recognise musical extracts by Rodgers & Hammerstein and Iggy Pop among others. That's even before they face their own set of individual questions on a musical topic of which they've had no prior warning.

At stake is a semi-final place and a chance to go forward to the 2016 Final in September.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b07nng5l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 Herland (b06yfhqr)
In 1915 women could neither vote, divorce nor work after marriage, yet in that same year the American writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman envisaged a revolutionary world populated entirely by women who were intelligent, resourceful and brave. Her great science fiction novel Herland tells the story of three men who crash land on an island where the men have died out; women reproduce by parthenogenesis. Until Gilman's book was published most visions of utopia, though turning the world on its head, struggled to envisage a place where gender had changed. Fantastical machines could be imagined alongside marvellous advances in medicine and technology, but the idea of woman functioning fully in the new utopias was too much for many to imagine. In this programme the award winning science fiction writer Geoff Ryman uses Herland as a starting point to ask why it's been so had to imagine a world where gender dissolves. In the course of the programme he will write his own short story, avoiding the pitfalls that have skewered many before him. The story called 'No Point Talking' will be broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra and be available as a podcast.

Presenter: Geoff Ryman
Producer: Nicola Swords
Contributors: Stephanie Saulter, author of the Evolution Trilogy; Laurie Penny, writer and journalist; Dr Sari Edelstein, The President of the Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society; Sarah Le Fanu, former Senior Editor at The Women's Press; Dr Caitríona Ní Dhúill, author of Sex and Imagined Spaces; Sarah Hall, author of The Carhullan Army and The Wolf Border.

Original music composed by Scanner.

MON 16:30 Beyond Belief (b07npss6)
Cultural Revolution

50 years ago, Mao Zedong launched the Cultural Revolution to rid the Communist Party of his rivals. He ended up destroying much of China's social fabric, calling on young, radical "Red Guards" to take party leaders to task for their embrace of bourgeois values and lack of revolutionary spirit. He ordered them to destroy the "four olds" - old ideas, customs, habits and culture. Religion was a prime target. Temples were ransacked and churches were destroyed. Religious leaders were sent to factories and farms for re-education through forced labour. Many of them died. Visibly, religion was all but wiped out. In recent years, however, there has been a strong religious revival. Some experts believe that by 2025 there will be more Christians in China than anywhere else in the world, despite the fact that religious freedom is still curtailed.

Ernie Rea explores the impact and legacy of the Cultural Revolution on religion in China with Martin Palmer, author and China expert; Isabel Hilton, Editor of the 'China Dialogue' website; and Laureen Leung, a Chinese Christian who was born in China in 1966 at the start of the Cultural Revolution and who now lives in the UK.

Producer: Dan Tierney
Series producer: Amanda Hancox.

MON 17:00 PM (b07nn87c)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07nn87f)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 Just a Minute (b07npvfc)
Series 76, Episode 2

Nicholas Parsons and guests return for the 76th series of the panel show where participants must try to speak for 60 seconds without hesitation, deviation or repetition. No repetition? That's no small order after nearly 50 years.

Paul Merton, now the second most prolific player of the game after Kenneth Williams, is joined by Julian Clary, Tony Hawks and Zoe Lyons and will be tackling topics such as 'Let them eat cake', 'A Brief Encounter', but get sidetracked by a debate on chips.

Hayley Sterling blows the whistle.

Produced by Matt Stronge.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b07npvff)
Caroline is feeling guilty, and Pip takes a call.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b07nn87h)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07nppl3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 Grunwick Changed Me (b07npvfh)
Maya Amin-Smith explores the impact of the Grunwick dispute, which began in August 1976, and finds out how members of her family became involved, and how they look back on it now.

The Grunwick dispute, at a film processing plant in north west London, is widely regarded as a landmark in British trade union history. For the first time, a high-profile strike involved women from South Asian immigrant communities, many of whom were fairly recent arrivals in the UK. Few if any had experience of industrial action - and the press at the time quickly noticed what they called 'strikers in saris', an image which challenged the perception that strikes were largely led by white men.

But aside from the public legacy of the Grunwick dispute, what was the personal impact on the people involved?

Maya Amin-Smith was born fifteen years after the strike was abandoned, into an Indian family of East-African immigrants. Her family had settled in the Chapter Road area of Dollis Hill where the Grunwick factory was situated. Indeed, two of her great aunts worked at the film processing plant themselves.

There's little sign now in the narrow streets of Dollis Hill that this was once the site of a long and bitter struggle, but now that the dust has settled, Maya explores the impact that this industrial action has had not only on her family, but on families like hers within the South Asian immigrant community, and how it's remembered now.

Producer Maya Amin-Smith.

MON 20:30 Crossing Continents (b07mythq)
Poland's Amateur Defenders

Playing war-games in the woods has become an ever-more popular pastime in Poland as thousands of young people join paramilitary groups to defend their country against possible invasion. Others - so-called "preppers" - are building bunkers and storing food supplies so their families can survive any disaster. Now the government plans to recruit such enthusiasts into a state-run volunteer defence force - to counter a possible Russian threat. But are the authorities stoking fear - and creating an amateur force that's no use in 21st Century warfare? Tim Whewell reports from the forests of north-eastern Poland, close to the Russian border.

Producer: Estelle Doyle.

MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b07mxgxd)
Rose

Brett Westwood looks into the heart of a rose. Its power lies in its infinite mutability - the rose symbolises everything from sex to socialism, romance to religious belief. It's not English, and it inspired the first punk single, as well as much of Persian poetry. David Austin Jr shows Brett around their rose garden, and cultural historian Jennifer Potter whizzes through roses from Sappho to Shakespeare.
Producer: Beth O'Dea

Contributors:
Narguess Farzad, Senior Fellow in Persian at SOAS, University of London
Jennifer Potter, author of The Rose: A True History
David Austin Jr, Managing Director, David Austin Roses

Readings
The Sick Rose by William Blake read by Lia Williams
Comical Roses in a Cubic Vase by George Szirtes, read by Iwan Rheon

Closing music:
Bright Blue Rose by Christy Moore.

MON 21:30 Playing the Skyline (b07nppkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b07nn87l)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b07nn87n)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07npwcs)
Eight Months on Ghazzah Street, Episode 1

Nearly 30 years on from its original publication, Hilary Mantel's third novel is still as disturbing, incisive and illuminating as ever. In an unusual collaboration, the author has revisited the book to create, with the abridger, this new ten-part serialisation.

Frances Shore is a cartographer by trade, but when her husband's work takes them to Saudi Arabia she finds herself unable to map either the ever changing landscape or the Kingdom's heavily veiled ways of working. The regime is corrupt and harsh, the expatriates are hard-drinking money-grubbers, and her Muslim neighbours are secretive and watchful.

She soon discovers that the streets are not a woman's territory. Confined in her flat, she finds her sense of self beginning to dissolve. She hears footsteps, sounds of distress from the supposedly empty flat above. She has only constantly changing rumours to hang on to, and no one with whom to share her creeping unease.

Reader: Anna Maxwell Martin
Author: Hilary Mantel
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 23:00 Word of Mouth (b07bbyj8)
Andrew Graham-Dixon on the naming of art movements

Michael Rosen and art critic Andrew Graham-Dixon take a tour through the naming of art movements. Surrealism, Impressionism, the Renaissance, the Pre-Raphaelites, Modern, Contemporary - how did they get their names and what does that tell us? Which terms have entered the language? With linguist Dr Laura Wright.
Producer Beth O'Dea.

MON 23:30 Short Cuts (b07gfhbq)
Series 9, Body Language

Reading Russian literature - without a book - in solitary confinement, speaking with someone else's voice and the need to be embraced. Josie Long delves into wordless communication.

From the melody of your speech to the brush of skin on skin, Josie explores body language. We hear about secret codes sent through walls, a sudden bodily change which left a woman feeling like a stranger to herself and the importance of touch.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall

A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


TUESDAY 16 AUGUST 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b07nn8bc)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Book of the Week (b07nrfb5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07nn8bf)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07nn8bh)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07nn8bk)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b07nn8bm)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07pthxj)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b07nn8bp)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Alun Beach.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b02tx0s5)
Spotted Flycatcher

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Steve Backshall presents the spotted flycatcher.

Spotted flycatchers may be rather plain-looking but they're full of character and they often nest in our gardens. The first sign that one's about may be a pale shape darting out from a tree to pluck a fly in mid-air with an audible snap of its bill.

TUE 06:00 Today (b07npx09)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (b07npx0c)
Series 4, Margaret Hodge

In this series, Peter Hennessy, the historian of modern Britain, asks senior politicians to reflect on their life and times. Each week, he invites his guest to explore their early, formative influences, their experiences of events and their impressions of people they've known.

In this programme, Peter Hennessy's guest is Dame Margaret Hodge, Labour MP for Barking since 1994. Their conversation covers her controversial time as Leader of Islington Council (1982-92), her role as a minister in the Blair and Brown governments, and her performance as chair of the powerful Commons Public Accounts Committee during 2010-15, when she earned a reputation as the scourge of top bosses and Whitehall mandarins.

Margaret Hodge reflects on the impact of her childhood experience as an immigrant and how this shaped her political views. She recalls how she first became involved in politics and became a councillor in Islington in the 1980s, where she was soon embroiled in tough battles with both the far left and the Conservative Government, and how she backed Neil Kinnock's fight to reform the Labour Party. Having been a close neighbour and friend of Tony Blair's in Islington, she backed him as Labour Leader in 1994. In the same year, she entered the Commons by winning the Barking by-election. She reveals how her experience in fighting the BNP's strong challenge in Barking changed her whole approach to politics and also influenced her work on the Commons Public Accounts Committee. Reflecting on her own career, she hopes people will come to appreciate that life is a marathon, not a short sprint, and that they can take on new challenges and contribute much throughout their lives.

Producer: Rob Shepherd.

TUE 09:45 Book of the Week (b07nppl1)
Upbeat, Episode 2

'The great adventure of the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq deserves not only to be recorded for posterity but also to serve as an example of how the essential can survive catastrophe.' - Sir Peter Maxwell Davies.

Musician and conductor Paul MacAlindin was eating fish and chips in an Edinburgh cafe in 2008 when he first read the story in the Herald newspaper - "Iraqi teen seeks Maestro". That Iraqi teen was the astonishing Zuhal Sultan, a pianist who dreamed up the idea of a National Youth Orchestra of Iraq aged only 17.

Paul was intrigued.

Barely out of war, with no discernible orchestral tradition that he knew of, what could there be to work with? What instruments did they even have? How could it be that we in the West had heard so much about war and bloodshed in Iraq, but knew so little of who the Iraqis really were?

Fixated on the article, fish trembling at the end of his fork, Paul simply said to himself, "I know how to do this."

The following year, after auditions via Skype, a promise of a bespoke piece from the late Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, favours called in, massive logistical complexities and financial hiccups, they ran their first summer school. And so the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq was born.

In a few short years this group of young musicians came through the most difficult and dangerous times to produce fine music, not only in Iraq

Read by Kenny Blyth
Written by Paul MacAlindin
Directed and Abridged by Polly Coles

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07nn8br)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07npx0f)
Graham Greene - Monsignor Quixote, Episode 7

Dramatised by Stephen Wyatt

Monsignor Quixote wakes from a drugged sleep to discover that he has been kidnapped and taken back to El Toboso

Directed by Marc Beeby.

TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b07npx0h)
Great Auk

In 1844, three men landed on the island of Eldey off the coast of Iceland and crept up on a pair of Great Auks which had an egg in a nest and killed the birds and trampled on the egg.These are believed to have been the last Great Auks which ever lived. Being flightless birds the men had little trouble catching and killing them. As one of the hunters recalled "I took him by the neck and he flapped his wings, he made no cry, I strangled him." The irony is that once they became extinct, Great Auks became even more sought after; this time by collectors of their skins and eggs. Today there are thought to be 75 specimens in museums or private collections. In this programme, Brett Westwood visits the Great North Museum to see two of these; an adult and a juvenile, before meeting writer and painter Errol Fuller; the proud owner of a Great Auk egg; a beautiful but tragic reminder of what once was. But that isn't the end of the story as Brett discovers because a group of scientists are hoping to bring the birds back from extinction in a process called De-extinction. All this Charles Kingsley, Ogden Nash, a Golden egg and a glass foot are in this extraordinary tale of an "extinct superstar". Readers: Pippa Haywood, Brian Protheroe. Producer: Sarah Blunt.

TUE 11:30 Songs for the Dead (b07npx1f)
Keeners were the women of rural Ireland who were traditionally paid to cry, wail and sing over the bodies of the dead at funerals and wakes. Their role was to help channel the grief of the bereaved and they had an elevated, almost mythical status among their communities. The custom of keening had all but vanished by the 1950's as people began to view it as primitive, old-fashioned and uncivilised.

Now - with emotions raw from her own recent experience of grief - broadcaster Marie-Louise Muir sets out to ask what's been lost with the passing of the keeners.

She travels to Inis Mor, a remote island off the west coast of Ireland, where one of Ireland's last professional keeners - Brigid Mullin - was recorded by the song collector and archivist Sidney Robertson Cowell in the 1950's. Brigid's crackling, eerie evocation of sorrow echoes down the years to capture a tradition in its dying days - a ghostly remnant of another world.

Dr Deirdre Ni Chonghaile is a native of Inis Mor and thinks modern funerals have taken on an almost Victorian dignity in a society that in general has become far less tolerant of extravagant displays of grief. Deirdre believes it was this very extravagance that helped lead to keening's demise. Its emphasis on the body and human mortality was in direct conflict with the notion of a Christian afterlife and the influential role of the keening women may even have been regarded as a threat to the patriarchy of the Church.

As the story of the keeners blends with the waves and winds of Ireland's west coast, Marie-Louise reflects on the passing of this once rich tradition.

Producer: Conor McKay.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b07nn8bv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 Home Front (b07kcgl3)
16 August 1916 - Hugh Cavendish

On this day in 1916, the French gained a mile of trenches at the Somme, and in Folkestone, Hugh Cavendish resists the incursions of Cecil Cameron.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b07nn8bz)
Call You and Yours

Consumer phone-in.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b07nn8c1)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b07nn8c3)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 The River (b07npx3c)
Soul Estuary: The Mouth of the River

"While we existed on dry land, and swam in the river, we lived for the sea", says Alan Read, Professor of Theatre at Kings College London as he explores Estuary Soul and recalls the time he spent growing up by the riverine estuary of Essex. "Those of us without boats, and that was all of us, swam through the summers and other colder months too, and when after hours of up and down, in and out, going nowhere, we rested, it was in the water still." The mouth of the estuary was their playground, and the history of this landscape fed into the estuary soul; the music, people, industry and culture "in the end, we knew we were all at the end, of the river, together, alone."

Written and presented by Alan Read
Actor Susan Jameson
Additional sound recordings by Chris Watson
Producer Sarah Blunt.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b07npvff)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Tracks (b07npxdz)
The Broca and Wernicke Areas

The second in a major new nine-part conspiracy thriller, starring Romola Garai. Written by Matthew Broughton.

Florian Chauvin was flying to Wales to tell his daughter Helen something important, but his plane fell out of the sky. Now Helen wants to know why. In the aftermath of the crash, Helen and Freddy investigate why one of the passengers doesn't seem to have a heart.

What was Florian coming to tell Helen? Who was in his party of five? And how is the shadowy medical corporation, Mayflower, implicated in the plane crash?

Tracks: A story in nine parts about life, death and the human brain.

Original music by Stu Barker

Directed in Wales by James Robinson.

TUE 15:00 Making History (b07npxwq)
Helen Castor is joined by the architectural writer and cultural commentator Travis Elborough and garden historian Deborah Trentham.

Tom Holland takes a ride on Brighton's new attraction, the British Airways i360, and is joined at 450 feet by Professor Fred Gray to gain new insight into the history of seaside attractions. Surprisingly, the new doughnut on a stick (as locals are describing it), offers similar experiences and challenges to those of the West Pier which opened 150 years ago.

In Norfolk, Radio 4's organic gardening legend Bob Flowerdew gets to grips with a character who, on the face of it, is his horticultural opposite. Lancelot 'Capability' Brown was born 300 years ago and Bob visits one of his masterpieces - Kimberley Hall - to ask landscape historian Professor Tom Williamson where the neatness and order of the English country house came from and what it was supposed to do for those who lived with it.

We continue our series of forgotten history heroes as food writer William Sitwell nominates the man who became famous for his pie but who also kept Britain fed during World War 2 - Lord Fred Woolton

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 15:30 Recycled Radio (b06grwnq)
Series 4, Evolution

Gerald Scarfe is back to guide you through the BBC archive - mutated into something completely different. Today's subject: Evolution.

This episode tackles the history of our evolution and searches the archive for answers to some of the biggest questions ever posed on Radio 4. Why are we like we are? Can things only get better? What's the full title of the Origin of Species? What can Darwin, Lemarck, Bernard Lovell, Tony Blair, Brian the Snail, D:Ream, Mary Berry, and the prawn cracker tell us about evolution? Recycled Radio might have the answer.

Producer: Polly Weston.

TUE 16:00 In the Criminologist's Chair (b07npxwx)
Criminologist David Wilson talks to former bank robber Noel "Razor" Smith about his life in crime. What made him go straight after spending much of his life in prison? And is Smith, who has been diagnosed as a psychopath, capable of true remorse?
Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.

TUE 16:30 Great Lives (b07npxx3)
Series 39, Sara Pascoe on Virginia Woolf

Sara Pascoe champions the life of Virginia Woolf, author of 'Mrs Dalloway' and 'A Room of One's Own', describing her as a sensible feminist. Sara explains why she thinks if she were alive today, Woolf would be a comedian, and how through her diaries and letters she's discovered the witty, manic and egotistical Virginia. Presenter Matthew Parris confesses to struggling with her work. Alexandra Harris is the expert.

Producer: Toby Field.

TUE 17:00 PM (b07nn8c5)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07nn8c7)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 Fresh from the Fringe (b07npz1f)
Fresh from the Fringe: 2016, Part 1

Fresh from the Fringe will once again bring highlights of the best in sketch, stand-up and musical comedy from the Edinburgh Fringe.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07npz1h)
Richard is in demand, and Rob is on a mission.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b07nn8c9)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07npx0f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 Personalised Medicine: Dose by Design (b07npz1m)
Personalised medicine means the right treatment for the right person at the right time. It's a revolution in healthcare that's apparently been heading to our local surgery ever since the first human genome sequence was announced in 2000. Our individual genetic barcodes, we've been told, will inform our personal medical care through our lifetimes. The one-size-fits-all medical model is dead, long live precision medicine.

But although genetic medicine and personalised care is happening in startling ways up and down the country (from cancer to HIV treatment to inherited diabetes) wholesale adoption of genomics to prevent, diagnose and treat disease, has some way to go.

Vivienne Parry, life long genetics enthusiast, now helping to deliver the 100,000 Genomes Project, investigates whether the NHS, at a time of huge financial uncertainty, can be nimble enough, decisive enough and forward-thinking enough, to overcome institutional inertia and adapt and deliver the benefits of genomic medicine for all.

Producer: Fiona Hill.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b07nn8cc)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted.

TUE 21:00 Why Become a Doctor? (b07npz23)
Why Be a Doctor?

Since the inception of the NHS Junior doctors have very much been on the front line, working long hours and often making decisions with far reaching consequences for patients. Medical outcomes are now greatly improved, and yet, as the long running junior doctors' dispute shows, morale has reached a historic low point.
In the first of a 3 part series Dr Kevin Fong looks at how the role of junior doctors has changed over the past 50 years. We hear from older generations of doctors who talk fondly of past eras of greater autonomy and camaraderie. Were those times really better - or did the lack of accountability put patients lives at risk?
We take a journey through advances in medical training and along the way look at the political and societal changes which have shaped our modern health service.

TUE 21:30 Reflections with Peter Hennessy (b07npx0c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 21:58 Weather (b07nn8cg)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b07nn8cj)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07npz2t)
Eight Months on Ghazzah Street, Episode 2

Nearly 30 years on from its original publication, Hilary Mantel's third novel is still as disturbing, incisive and illuminating as ever. In an unusual collaboration, the author has revisited the book to create, with the abridger, this new ten-part serialisation.

Frances Shore is a cartographer by trade, but when her husband's work takes them to Saudi Arabia she finds herself unable to map either the ever changing landscape or the Kingdom's heavily veiled ways of working. The regime is corrupt and harsh, the expatriates are hard-drinking money-grubbers, and her Muslim neighbours are secretive and watchful.

She soon discovers that the streets are not a woman's territory. Confined in her flat, she finds her sense of self beginning to dissolve. She hears footsteps, sounds of distress from the supposedly empty flat above. She has only constantly changing rumours to hang on to, and no one with whom to share her creeping unease.

Reader: Anna Maxwell Martin
Author: Hilary Mantel
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 23:00 Fresh from the Fringe (b07npz2w)
Fresh from the Fringe: 2016, Part 2

Fresh from the Fringe will once again bring highlights of the best in sketch, stand-up and musical comedy from the Edinburgh Fringe.

TUE 23:30 Short Cuts (b07hfwrf)
Series 9, The Stranger

An innocent encounter tips from flirtation to danger, the professional stranger you never want to see on your door step and a partner whose revelation turns him in an instant into a stranger. Josie Long delves into stories of brushes with the unknown - flirtations, deceptions and the kindness of strangers.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall

A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


WEDNESDAY 17 AUGUST 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b07nn8fz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Book of the Week (b07nppl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07nn8g1)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07nn8g3)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07nn8g6)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b07nn8g8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07q706k)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b07nn8gb)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Alun Beach.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020trjh)
Wryneck

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Wryneck. These strange birds - with feathers intricately barred and blotched in browns, blacks, fawns and creams - are so-called because of their habit of writhing their heads round at seemingly impossible angles.

WED 06:00 Today (b07p156z)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 What's the Point of...? (b07nrlql)
Series 8, The Commonwealth

Hangover from the Empire or brand new post-Brexit opportunity? It began as a consolation prize to the British for the loss of its Empire. Now the Commonwealth (no longer "British") covers a third of the world's population, a quarter of the world's land mass and 53 countries - with still more in the queue to join. (how very British).
Imperial relic? Post Brexit Trade network? Fomenter of western ideas? What is the point of the Commonwealth?
Quentin Letts' guests include Ambassador Abdul Minty - former chair of the anti-apartheid movement - on the Commonwealth's role in ending apartheid, and new Secretary General Patricia Scotland on the challenges facing her as she begins her term of office.

Producer: Rosie Dawson.

WED 09:30 Prime Ministers' Props (b07nrlqn)
Stanley Baldwin's Iron Gates

Professor Sir David Cannadine explores political fame and image by looking at how an object or prop, whether chosen deliberately or otherwise, can come to define a political leader - from Winston Churchill's cigar and siren suit to Margaret Thatcher's handbag.

Sir David looks at the significance of these props of power - what they mean and what they become, and what happens when, almost inevitably, Prime Ministers lose control of their image and their props take on a hostile meaning, very different from their original intentions.

In 1937, Stanley Baldwin retired in what was considered a blaze of glory, and he expected to live out his remaining days as a revered elder statesman behind his wrought-iron gates at his country estate, Astley Hall. But the Second World War changed everything and Baldwin's reputation collapsed when he became the scapegoat for Britain being ill-equipped to fight Hitler.

The problem became centred on his iron gates when, in September 1941, Stanley Baldwin's old enemy, Lord Beaverbrook, asked all local authorities to survey their area's iron and steel gates for requisitioning as scrap metal. Baldwin duly applied for exemption for the Astley Hall gates on the grounds of artistic merit. However Beaverbrook bit back and Baldwin's gates became something of a cause celebre and the focus for a national campaign hounding an old appeaser who was now seen to be hampering the war effort.

Stanley Baldwin's iron gates at Astley Hall were eventually removed, all except the pair of presentation gates given to him by the Worcestershire Association on his retirement. Sir David Cannadine goes in search of Baldwin's remaining gates to find out what happened to them.

A Blakeway production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 09:45 Book of the Week (b07nrlqq)
Upbeat, Episode 3

'The great adventure of the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq deserves not only to be recorded for posterity but also to serve as an example of how the essential can survive catastrophe.' - Sir Peter Maxwell Davies.

Musician and conductor Paul MacAlindin was eating fish and chips in an Edinburgh cafe in 2008 when he first read the story in the Herald newspaper - "Iraqi teen seeks Maestro". That Iraqi teen was the astonishing Zuhal Sultan, a pianist who dreamed up the idea of a National Youth Orchestra of Iraq aged only 17.

Paul was intrigued.

Barely out of war, with no discernible orchestral tradition that he knew of, what could there be to work with? What instruments did they even have? How could it be that we in the West had heard so much about war and bloodshed in Iraq, but knew so little of who the Iraqis really were?

Fixated on the article, fish trembling at the end of his fork, Paul simply said to himself, "I know how to do this."

The following year, after auditions via Skype, a promise of a bespoke piece from the late Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, favours called in, massive logistical complexities and financial hiccups, they ran their first summer school. And so the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq was born.

In a few short years this group of young musicians came through the most difficult and dangerous times to produce fine music, not only in Iraq

Read by Kenny Blyth
Written by Paul MacAlindin
Directed and Abridged by Polly Coles

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07nn8gj)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b07nrlqs)
Graham Greene - Monsignor Quixote, Episode 8

Dramatised by Stephen Wyatt

Imprisoned in his own house, Father Quixote is at the mercy of his bishop - unless his friend Sancho can pull off a daring rescue.

Directed by Marc Beeby.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b07nrlqv)
Theresa and Lauren - Facing the Truth

Fi Glover with a conversation between a grandmother and the granddaughter she's cared for since the age of 4, about the secret they eventually faced together. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 Grunwick Changed Me (b07npvfh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Guilt Trip (b07nrlqx)
Episode 4

Felicity Montagu and her daughter play mother and daughter doing a two week sponsored walk along The Thames Path.

Comedy drama in which Felicity Montagu (Lynn in Alan Partridge and Mrs Mainwaring in the new Dad's Army film) and her daughter (Olivia Nixon) play a mother and daughter doing a two week sponsored walk along The Thames Path to raise money for the dead father's charity. But the mother and father had been divorced for nine years and he had re-married, so relationships between them all have been strained. Things come to a head at any mention of the French Oak gable table Ros and her now dead ex bought together in Camden. This has ended up in the step-mother's house, much to Ros's annoyance: "I mean she sits at it! It's my table and she sits at it." The series is co-written by Katherine Jakeways who also plays the step-mother.

It's the last day of the walk and they still have 10 miles to go, but when they oversleep at the hotel they were not supposed to be staying in in the first place, it's not looking good. They are hung over and Ruth is organizing a big reception for them at Tower Bridge - but will they get there in time?

The producer was Jane Berthoud, it was a BBC Radio Comedy production.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b07nn8gl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 Home Front (b07kcgl8)
17 August 1916 - Esme Macknade

On this day in 1916, Romania pledged to join the allies at war, and in Folkestone, Esme Macknade steels herself to face her father.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b07nn8gq)
Consumer affairs programme.

WED 12:57 Weather (b07nn8gs)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b07nn8gv)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 The River (b07nrlqz)
Rivers of Faith

In the third of five illustrated essays by different writers on the theme of The River, Martin Palmer, Secretary General of The Alliance of Religions and Conservation reflects on the significance of rivers in religious stories and traditions. Drawing on examples he considers how rivers are a metaphor for life. They are also about being a part of something greater. They flow into the sea and the sea flows into the ocean. "As such the river is a natural symbol of the soul returning to the Source - God, the Divine whatever name you give it."

Written and narrated by Martin Palmer,
Actors: Adie Allen and Susan Jameson
Additional sound recordings by Chris Watson
Producer Sarah Blunt.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b07npz1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Drama (b07nrlr1)
Wounded Light

When James is invited to become an honorary citizen of his mother's native Italian town in recognition of his achievements as a writer, he embarks on a journey of self-discovery forcing him to confront his demons and uncover the truth.

John Lynch's lyrical drama about love and loss explores the fracturing of memory and identity.

Directed by Nadia Molinari

John Lynch is an actor (Cal, In The Name of the Father, Sliding Doors, The Fall) and a writer. He has written two novels 'Torn Water' and 'Falling out of Heaven' and he co-wrote the screenplay 'Best' about George Best. He is currently writing his third novel. This is his second drama for radio.

WED 15:00 Your Money and Your Life (b07nmvmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

WED 15:30 Science Stories (b06tvc2f)
Series 2, Submarine for a Stuart King

Philip Ball dives into the magical world of Cornelis Drebbel , inventor of the world's first submarine in 1621.

How did the crew of this remarkable vessel manage to breathe underwater, completely cut off from the surface, 150 years before oxygen was officially discovered?

King James I of England and thousands of his subjects lined the banks of the River Thames in London to watch the first demonstration. The strangest boat they had ever seen sank beneath the waves and stayed there for three hours.

Did Drebbel know how to make oxygen? Historian Andrew Szydlow reveals that Drebbel did have secret knowledge of how to keep the air fresh.

In his day, Drebbel was a pioneer of exploring uninhabitable places. Today's equivalent is to make oxygen on the Moon and as scientists grapple with this ultimate challenge, Monica Grady explains their work is being used under the waves where Drebbel began.

Producer: Erika Wright.

WED 16:00 Self's Search for Meaning (b07gf9lc)
Faith

Will Self asks some of Britain's key opinion-makers to share, in simple terms, their conclusions about the nature - and meaning - of our existence.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b07nn8gy)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b07nn8h0)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07nn8h2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 To Hull and Back (b07nrlr3)
Series 2, Is There Anyone Out There?

Lucy Beaumont stars as the daughter trying to escape her overbearing mother played by Maureen Lipman in the second series of this warm hearted sitcom set in Hull.

"It's like a cross between a Victoria Wood Sketch and a Mike Leigh film". Radio Times

Episode 2 - Is There Anyone Out There?

Sophie takes a shine to the new lodger; but the last thing Sheila wants is her daughter getting romantically involved with a UFO fanatic, or anyone else for that matter. She does her best to get rid of this interloper.

Writer ..... Lucy Beaumont
Producer ..... Carl Cooper
Production Co-ordinator ..... Sophie Richardson

This is a BBC Studios Production.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b07nrrg1)
Lilian is conflicted, and Alice gives Pip food for thought.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b07nn8h4)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07nrlqs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Two Rooms (b07nrrg3)
Brexit Britain

Fi Glover oversees as two groups of people share their contrasting views about Brexit.

WED 20:45 Four Thought (b07nrrg5)
Being Turkish

After the coup attempt in Turkey, writer Elif Shafak describes how being Turkish means worrying about your country all the time, "as though she were an eccentric relative one could neither fully trust on her own, nor stop loving."

"Neither military dictatorship nor authoritarian civilian rule, what this lonely country really needs is a true, pluralistic democracy."

Four Thought was recorded in front of a live audience at Somerset House in London.

Presenter: Mike Williams
Producer: Sheila Cook

Image credit: Muammer Yanmaz.

WED 21:00 Mind Reading (b07nrrg7)
We have always thought that we'd like to be able to read others' minds. Humans are, of course, excellent at disguising our real opinions. We've wanted to be able to know what people are thinking but not saying, whether it's trivially about how we look or whether it's seriously about what really happened when a suspect is being interrogated in a court of law.
In science fiction, writers have often used mind reading as a device for one alien species to be able to communicate with and influencing another life form.

But now researchers have devised ways to transfer thoughts from one person to another. The aim of this research is to help people with severe brain injury and other disabilities to communicate better. Neuroscientists have used technology to connect the brains of people and then read the signals they pick up. Others are concentrating on eye-gaze technology, speeding it up so that by staring at words on a screen the user can make a machine speak a sentence. But once the technology works it will be impossible to keep it away from people who see other uses for it.

Gaia Vince explores the ethical problems that follow from technology that captures thoughts. She looks at the controversial privacy issues raised by the technology. Could a machine speak your private thoughts and carry out the internal editing process that we all rely on?

WED 21:30 What's the Point of...? (b07nrlql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b07nn8h6)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b07nn8h8)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07nrrg9)
Eight Months on Ghazzah Street, Episode 3

Nearly 30 years on from its original publication, Hilary Mantel's third novel is still as disturbing, incisive and illuminating as ever. In an unusual collaboration, the author has revisited the book to create, with the abridger, this new ten-part serialisation.

Frances Shore is a cartographer by trade, but when her husband's work takes them to Saudi Arabia she finds herself unable to map either the ever changing landscape or the Kingdom's heavily veiled ways of working. The regime is corrupt and harsh, the expatriates are hard-drinking money-grubbers, and her Muslim neighbours are secretive and watchful.

She soon discovers that the streets are not a woman's territory. Confined in her flat, she finds her sense of self beginning to dissolve. She hears footsteps, sounds of distress from the supposedly empty flat above. She has only constantly changing rumours to hang on to, and no one with whom to share her creeping unease.

Reader: Anna Maxwell Martin
Author: Hilary Mantel
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:00 Angela Barnes: You Can't Take It with You (b07nrrgc)
Episode 2

Straight talking, stand-up comic Angela Barnes shares the big stuff she's thinking about - life, love, family, work and death.

In part tribute to her late father, who was a gregarious character - a sex shop manager, naturist, and a big fan of caravans and pranks - and a heavy influence on Angela. He taught her a 'carpe diem' approach to life.

His motto - You Can't Take It With You.

When her father died very suddenly in 2008, Angela and her family proved him wrong and stuffed his coffin with sentimental keepsakes for his final journey.

In this series, Angela does the very same thing and asks her loved ones to nominate objects that they would choose to send on with her as mementoes of their time together, which she keeps in a suitcase full of memories, acting as prompts for contemplative, heart-warming and captivating comedy.

Angela Barnes is a vivacious, critically acclaimed stand-up comic from Maidstone, Kent. After a career in health and social care, at aged 33 she decided to pursue a long held ambition and give comedy a go. Within a couple of years, Angela and her witty worldview had won the 2011 BBC New Comedy Award by a public vote, secured a weekly star slot in Channel 4's Stand Up For The Week and appeared on numerous radio and television shows including Loose Ends, The Now Show and writing credits on her beloved The News Quiz (BBC Radio 4), Russell Kane's Whistle Stop Tour (BBC Radio 2), Mock The Week (BBC 2) and Russell Howard's Good News (BBC 3).

An Impatient production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:15 Tez Talks (b07nrrgf)
Integration

Breakthrough comedian Tez Ilyas presents a show for everyone interested in - or interested in becoming - a British Muslim. Everything you need to know is here - the do's, don'ts, and avoid-or-you'll-be-arresteds. Simultaneously a hilarious, joyous celebration of British-Muslim life - and a subversive, thoughtful satire on society's attitudes to Islam.

In this episode, Tez looks at 'Integration', a word that's often used in the context of Muslims in the UK. How can Muslims integrate better? And who says they don't at the moment? And more importantly, what's Marks & Spencer or hipster beards got to do with it? Tez explains all...

About Tez
Blackburn-born Tez Ilyas started performing comedy in 2010 and has appeared in eight competition finals including the BBC New Comedy Award and Leicester Mercury New Comedian of the Year. He has recently appeared on the Now Show on Radio 4, as well as having performances on BBC1, BBC 3, E4, and BBC iPlayer, following his hugely critically-acclaimed debut Edinburgh show.

Producer: Sam Bryant
A BBC Studios Production.

WED 23:30 Short Cuts (b07j4pg4)
Series 9, Vanishing Point

From the man who'll help you disappear to coping with a sudden, shocking loss - Josie Long looks at vanishing points.

We hear stories of private investigators, the search for solitude in the dust bowl and a woman's life changing in one devastating second.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall

A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4.


THURSDAY 18 AUGUST 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b07nn8kb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Book of the Week (b07nrlqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07nn8kd)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07nn8kg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07nn8kj)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b07nn8kl)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07qh4v5)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b07nn8kq)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Felicity Evans and produced by Alun Beach.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020xv0f)
Savi's Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Savi's Warbler. Count yourself very lucky if you hear the buzzing song of a Savi's Warbler, these are very rare birds indeed, especially breeding pairs and the nests are almost impossible to find, so their song is the best clue that they're about.

THU 06:00 Today (b07p152r)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 Inside the Ethics Committee (b07nrxd4)
Series 12, Sharing Genetic Information

Andrew is just 33 when he develops bowel cancer. Genetic tests reveal he has a genetic condition called Lynch Syndrome.

Lynch Syndrome has previously been diagnosed in a relative, but Andrew was never told that put him at risk. If he'd known, his cancer might have been spotted sooner and treated.

In a separate case, Lucy discovers that her father has Huntington's disease. She wonders whether to get tested for the gene herself. Unlike Lynch Syndrome the disease can't be treated or prevented so she is unsure whether there is any benefit to knowing.

Lucy's also concerned about what this means for her young son. If she had known about Huntington's sooner she could have chosen not to pass on the gene. But now it's too late - could he carry the Huntington's gene too? How and when should she break that news to him?

Joan Bakewell and her panel of experts discuss the ethics of sharing genetic information. Do doctors have a duty of care only to their patient or also to the wider family? How do they balance their patient's right to privacy with the wider family's right to information that could save their lives?

Producer: Lorna Stewart
Photo Credit: Serge Noel / Getty Images.

THU 09:45 Book of the Week (b07nrxd6)
Upbeat, Episode 4

'The great adventure of the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq deserves not only to be recorded for posterity but also to serve as an example of how the essential can survive catastrophe.' - Sir Peter Maxwell Davies.

Musician and conductor Paul MacAlindin was eating fish and chips in an Edinburgh cafe in 2008 when he first read the story in the Herald newspaper - "Iraqi teen seeks Maestro". That Iraqi teen was the astonishing Zuhal Sultan, a pianist who dreamed up the idea of a National Youth Orchestra of Iraq aged only 17.

Paul was intrigued.

Barely out of war, with no discernible orchestral tradition that he knew of, what could there be to work with? What instruments did they even have? How could it be that we in the West had heard so much about war and bloodshed in Iraq, but knew so little of who the Iraqis really were?

Fixated on the article, fish trembling at the end of his fork, Paul simply said to himself, "I know how to do this."

The following year, after auditions via Skype, a promise of a bespoke piece from the late Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, favours called in, massive logistical complexities and financial hiccups, they ran their first summer school. And so the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq was born.

In a few short years this group of young musicians came through the most difficult and dangerous times to produce fine music, not only in Iraq

Read by Kenny Blyth
Written by Paul MacAlindin
Directed and Abridged by Polly Coles

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07nn8ks)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07nrxd8)
Graham Greene - Monsignor Quixote, Episode 9

Dramatised by Stephen Wyatt

Having escaped El Toboso, Monsignor Quixote and Sancho go in search of wine but find themselves in a battle to save the honour of the church.

Directed by Marc Beeby.

THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b07pfchg)
Colombia's Forgotten Exodus

In the Colombian capital of Bogota, Lucy Ash meets two people who fear they will never be able to return to their homes. They both come from Choco, which is one of the poorest provinces and most violent parts of the country. Maria, an Afro-Colombian mother of four, fled her town after she was abducted and brutally attacked by paramilitaries. Plinio was trying to help members of his indigenous community go back to their farms when he received death threats from a splinter group of left wing guerrilla (the ELN) and his friend was assassinated.

Their stories illustrate a nationwide trauma - the government may be on the brink of a historic peace deal with the FARC rebels, but Colombia has even more internally displaced people than Syria. More than 200,000 have been killed and seven million driven off their land during half a century of war. Lucy travels down the River Baudo to meet people uprooted from their jungle villages in violent clashes earlier this year and finds that Latin America's longest insurgency is far from over.

Reported and produced by Lucy Ash.

THU 11:30 Looping Swans (b07nrxdb)
When tanks rolled into Moscow on 19 August 1991 during a dramatic anti-Perestroika coup by Soviet hardliners, the USSR's state-controlled airwaves offered a curious response - a continuous loop of Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake. Ballet, of all things, served as balm for the revolution underway.

Yet most Soviets weren't fooled. A series of deaths by recent Soviet premiers - all greeted by broadcasts of the regime's beloved Swans on television - had taught Russians to view Tchaikovsky's classic as far more than art. It was a harbinger for political wrangling deep inside the Kremlin. Amid the dancing and pirouettes on a grainy screen, Russians saw hidden choreography affecting their lives and country. Tchaikovsky's swans had become canaries in the coalmine, sparking mass protests that brought an end to the Soviet empire.

A quarter of a century on, this programme traces the strange and elaborate pas de deux between Tchaikovsky's ballet classic and the Russian psyche - revealing how a work considered a flop upon its premiere emerged as a powerful instrument of Soviet propaganda, and - later - a soundtrack that failed to disguise impending political turmoil.

A mosaic of Russian voices recall their impressions of the swans through a richly layered tale of 'looped reporting' and encounters, rare archival audio, contemporary interviews and digital mash-ups to chronicle how Swan Lake has shaped the history of modern Russia and - even now - emerged as a powerful political meme in the Putin era.

Produced by Charles Maynes and Cicely Fell
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b07nn8kv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 Home Front (b07kcglf)
18 August 1916 - Johnnie Marshall

On this day in 1916, a clergyman's daughter was fined for sending photographs of German POW's to a newspaper, and in Folkestone, rival British intelligence agencies compete for position.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b07nn8kz)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b07nn8l1)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b07nn8l3)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 The River (b07nrxdd)
The Tay

For many years writer and essayist Kathleen Jamie climbed the steep hill near her home and looked out across the view "You have a hawk's eye view of the Tay as it makes its entrance, curving round the hills upstream, to accept the waters of the river Earn and at once becomes estuarial" For many years this was her relationship with the River, her relationship changes when when some Bronze Age swords and a wooden boat are dredged out of the River and she decides to venture out onto the river in a kayak "Suddenly, it wasn't enough to look from the sidelines. I wanted to participate, to get a sense for this majestic river as pre-historic people would."

Additional sound recordings by Chris Watson
Producer Sarah Blunt.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b07nrrg1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b047bzld)
Hatch, Match and Dispatch, Uncle Harry

Hatch, Match and Dispatch: Uncle Harry by Gary Brown.

The first of a series of six quirky plays that start in a Register Office and end in a birth, marriage or death. Mark's life is nicely well-ordered...despite his dysfunctional family, terrifying future father-in-law/boss, and on-going blackout problem. But that's until Uncle Harry gets in the way. Things get increasingly messy as Mark goes on a quest to discover his true identity. A comedy about grief and the true meaning of family

Written by Gary Brown
Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru Wales Production

Isn't it strange that the registering of life's important moments happen in a sterile municipal office? Everyone's got a story as to how they got there.

THU 15:00 Open Country (b07nrxdg)
Spurn Point Lifeboat Station

Helen Mark spends the day with the only full-time lifeboat crew in the UK, based on Spurn Point. This unique landscape is a strip of land, 3.5 miles long and only 50m wide in places. Until recently the station was occupied by the station staff and their families, but the fragility of the Spurn Point sandbank that links it to the mainland means it is no longer fit for so many people. And if you want to visit, you have to park up and walk 3 miles, since the storms of 2013 washed parts of the road away.

The lifeboat stations covers the treacherous inshore waters of the Humber and 100 miles out to sea, as far north as Bridlington and south to Skegness. There's an average call out rate of once a week, but the crew have to be ready 24/7. Helen meets Ben Mitchell, the 29 year old 2nd Coxwain who is in charge this week, plus crew members Ed Kilsby, Liam Dunnett, Glen Peterson and Kim Platford. She also visits the manager of the Spurn Poin National Nature Reserve, who explains why this tiny strip of land is of national importance to wildlife.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b07nnbjz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (b07nng5w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b07nrxdj)
Swallows and Amazons

With Antonia Quirke.

Antonia is joined by 18 year old vlogger and Into Film journalist, Ceyda Uzun, on her first press junket: an interview with the writer of Swallows And Amazons, Andrea Gibb.

Poet Don Paterson continues his series on great speeches in movie history with Rutger Hauer's philosophical monologue in Blade Runner. "Like tears in the rain".

Do you have an unsung hero of British cinema in your family ? The Film Programme is putting the spotlight on the unrecognised stars of the film industry, both behind and in front of the cameras. This week, David Cuff nominates his dad Bob, one of the great exponents of the lost art of matte painting.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b07nn8l5)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b07nn8l7)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07nn8l9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 Simon Evans Goes to Market (b07nrxdl)
Series 3, Episode 4

Simon Evans' comedy lecture on four of the big life stages that mark our journey through life and how economics is part of every one of those stages, whether we like it or not.

As always, he is joined by Financial Times columnist and presenter of Radio 4's 'More or Less', economist Tim Harford, and by financial guru and editor of Money Week, Merryn Somerset Webb.

This week in the final programme of the series, Simon looks at (probably) the most final of life stages: Death.

From paying for funerals to the cost of cryonics, and the cheery subject of getting your final finances in order, this inevitably morbid programme will also make you laugh.

Special guest is Louise de Winter, funeral planner and the editor of the Good Funeral Guide.

Presenter: Simon Evans, with Tim Harford and Merryn Somerset Webb
Special guest: Louise de Winter
Written by Simon Evans, Benjamin Partridge and Andy Wolton.
Producer: Claire Jones.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b07nrxdn)
It is the day of reckoning for Phoebe and Josh, and Carol has cause for reflection.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b07nn8lc)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07nrxd8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b07nrxdq)
David Aaronovitch looks at important issues in the news.

THU 20:30 In Business (b07nrxds)
A Virtual World

A new technology is emerging which could change the world as significantly as mobile phones or the Internet. That technology is Virtual Reality. Up to now it's mainly been used for fun - but things are changing. Adam Shaw investigates how VR could change our lives and revolutionise the world of business. Enabling us to be in two places at once and, for example, replacing the need for many painkillers and helping cure psychological problems.

Producer Smita Patel.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b07nn8l5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 Lives in a Landscape (b06pxysw)
Series 21, RIP

Alan Dein travels to Nottingham to meet with the 4th & 5th generations of a family firm of Funeral Directors (with a 6th generation already on the horizon). When furniture maker and dealer Arthur William Lymn started 'undertaking' funerals with his son Harold Percy in 1907, their first premises were on Goosegate - next door to a man selling potions and lotions. Although Arthur and Harold could not match the subsequent success of their next-door-neighbours, the Boots Pure Drug Company Ltd, AW Lymn did have to move to larger premises in 1915. And in the hundred years since they have continued to grow, now operating out of 25 offices, employing 110 staff and conducting 3,500 funeral every year.

Last year a brain tumour forced Harold's grandson, Nigel Lymn Rose to hand over the reins of the company to his son Matthew while he underwent brain surgery and recuperated. This summer, fully recovered and back at work, this temporary arrangement was made permanent. As Matthew and Nigel work out the parameters of their new roles within the company (alongside Matthew's aunt, Jackie, and sister Chloe - all also involved in the family firm), Alan Dein goes behind the scenes with them to discover what goes on beyond the formal funeral attire of top hats and tails and Roll Royce hearses. With them he visits the hospital morgue to pick up recently deceased 'patients', enters the world of the firm's embalmers and observes them in the chapels of rest - to find out what it's like to deal with death on a daily basis.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

THU 21:58 Weather (b07nn8lf)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b07nn8lh)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07nrxdv)
Eight Months on Ghazzah Street, Episode 4

Nearly 30 years on from its original publication, Hilary Mantel's third novel is still as disturbing, incisive and illuminating as ever. In an unusual collaboration, the author has revisited the book to create, with the abridger, this new ten-part serialisation.

Frances Shore is a cartographer by trade, but when her husband's work takes them to Saudi Arabia she finds herself unable to map either the ever changing landscape or the Kingdom's heavily veiled ways of working. The regime is corrupt and harsh, the expatriates are hard-drinking money-grubbers, and her Muslim neighbours are secretive and watchful.

She soon discovers that the streets are not a woman's territory. Confined in her flat, she finds her sense of self beginning to dissolve. She hears footsteps, sounds of distress from the supposedly empty flat above. She has only constantly changing rumours to hang on to, and no one with whom to share her creeping unease.

Reader: Anna Maxwell Martin
Author: Hilary Mantel
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 23:00 Fred MacAulay's Wet Hot Political Summer (b07pn82g)
Fred MacAulay looks again at the momentous summer of 2016 and convenes experts and comedians to find out what happened.

THU 23:30 Short Cuts (b07jysdq)
Series 9, Illuminations

A mysterious character offering to illuminate a course of action, an activist thrust into a glaring spotlight and the dull glow of car tail lights- Josie Long looks for illuminations in the darkness.

Featuring the actress and activist Sacheen Littlefeather walking onstage to collect Marlon Brando's Oscar, a singing medium and Laura Barton on driving at night.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.


FRIDAY 19 AUGUST 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b07nn8p8)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Book of the Week (b07nrxd6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07nn8pb)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07nn8pg)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07nn8pl)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b07nn8pn)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07qrgk4)
A reading and a reflection to start the day with Canon Patrick Thomas, Vicar of Christ Church in Carmarthen.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b07nn8pr)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Alun Beach.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b038qkfw)
Serin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Brett Westwood presents the serin. Serins breed just across the English Channel but they are small finches that continue to tantalize ornithologists here in the UK. Hopes were raised that this Continental finch would settle here to breed, especially if our climate became warmer. However, something about our islands doesn't suit them. They do like large parks and gardens, so keep an ear out for the song of this visitor....a cross between a goldfinch and a goldcrest, and you may be rewarded.

FRI 06:00 Today (b07p13h8)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b07nng5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Book of the Week (b07nrzj4)
Upbeat, Episode 5

'The great adventure of the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq deserves not only to be recorded for posterity but also to serve as an example of how the essential can survive catastrophe.' - Sir Peter Maxwell Davies.

Musician and conductor Paul MacAlindin was eating fish and chips in an Edinburgh cafe in 2008 when he first read the story in the Herald newspaper - "Iraqi teen seeks Maestro". That Iraqi teen was the astonishing Zuhal Sultan, a pianist who dreamed up the idea of a National Youth Orchestra of Iraq aged only 17.

Paul was intrigued.

Barely out of war, with no discernible orchestral tradition that he knew of, what could there be to work with? What instruments did they even have? How could it be that we in the West had heard so much about war and bloodshed in Iraq, but knew so little of who the Iraqis really were?

Fixated on the article, fish trembling at the end of his fork, Paul simply said to himself, "I know how to do this."

The following year, after auditions via Skype, a promise of a bespoke piece from the late Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, favours called in, massive logistical complexities and financial hiccups, they ran their first summer school. And so the National Youth Orchestra of Iraq was born.

In a few short years this group of young musicians came through the most difficult and dangerous times to produce fine music, not only in Iraq

Read by Kenny Blyth
Written by Paul MacAlindin
Directed and Abridged by Polly Coles

Produced by Clive Brill
A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07nn8q7)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07nrzj8)
Graham Greene - Monsignor Quixote, Episode 10

Dramatised by Stephen Wyatt

Monsignor Quixote and Sancho are taken in by the monks at the monastery of Oseira and their journey comes to an end.

Directed by Marc Beeby.

FRI 11:00 Jarvis and Matthew (b07nrzjb)
Setting Out

Close friends and closet raconteurs, Christopher Matthew and Martin Jarvis take to the streets to share their memories of what life in the 1960s as they first entered the world of work in the Sixties - Martin in the theatre, Christopher in advertising.

As a distinguished past member of the National Youth Theatre and a prize winning graduate from RADA, Martin's career began at the Library Theatre, Manchester, where, among other triumphs, he and Patrick Stewart starred in a play called The Princess and the Swineherd. Martin got the biggest laugh of the evening by entering with a large cucumber in one hand and crying, 'Look, father, twelve inches long and not a kink in it!'

Meanwhile Christopher was making a smaller, but no less determined, name for himself as a junior copywriter in various London advertising agencies where he achieved distinction with his slogan for the Cheese Bureau - "Cheese Tastes Quite Nice Sometimes".

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

FRI 11:30 Start/Stop (b07nrzjd)
Series 3, Cathy's Dad

Start/Stop is a sitcom by Jack Docherty about three marriages in various states of disrepair.

Barney and Cathy have been married for ages and it shows, Evan and Fiona's marriage is one big, noisy argument and David is old enough to be Alice's father.

Start/Stop follows the story of these three couples as they try to make the best of their marriages and friendships, and the characters are able to stop the action, explain themselves to the audience and start it all up again.

This week: 'Cathy's Dad'.

Cathy's Dad is in a nursing home but Cathy wants him to come and live with them, especially since he's just developed a condition where the wrong words come out all the time. Barney is not keen but then realises he can use looking after Cathy's Dad to make him seem more caring and, as it turns out, more attractive to Alice.
Meanwhile David gives his daughter a big role in the school play. And Evan finds there are some plusses to Fiona losing her voice after a throat operation.

But will Cathy's Dad ever be able to tell Barney what he thinks of him?

Written by: Jack Docherty
Producer: Claire Jones

A BBC Studio Production.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b07nn8qd)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 Home Front (b07kcgls)
19 August 1916 - Norman Harris

On this day in 1916, the papers reported a "Great British Day on the Somme", and in Folkestone, Norman Harris's life changes direction.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b07nn8qj)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b07nn8ql)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b07nn8qn)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 The River (b07nrzjg)
Flow

"I look down at my feet, not quite sure how I'm going to follow the course of the river North Tyne from its source to the sea when I'm having trouble putting one foot in front of the other" says wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson as he recalls a journey he made, capturing the sounds of the river and the landscape through which it flows from its source to the sea,. This is an immersive journey in sound through moorland, bogs, rushy flats and steep valleys, past scrapyards and rowing clubs, under bridges and past ferry landings and through the city of Newcastle upon Tyne, before heading out to the Black Middens and the sea at Tynemouth where eider ducks bow and coo in the swell.

Narrated and recorded by Chris Watson
Producer Sarah Blunt.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b07nrxdn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Drama (b07ns0qq)
The Virtues of Oblivion

James Purefoy stars in James Meek's metaphysical thriller. University professor Carl has devoted his life to the work of a philosopher in self-exile on a remote island in Estonia. The great man has never responded to Carl's weekly correspondence. And now he has died. Carl, devastated, is consoled to learn he has been appointed executor to the literary estate. Until he finds who his co-executor is...

Director..... Peter Kavanagh

The first radio play by the novelist and journalist James Meek is a tale of intrigue and betrayal as a lonely academic finds his life suddenly without meaning. Can he fill the void, in spite of the best efforts of a Russian table-dancer?

THE AUTHOR:
James Meek is the author of two short story collections and five novels, including the The People's Act of Love, which has been translated into more than twenty languages. His first work of non-fiction, Private Island, won the 2015 Orwell Prize. He grew up in Scotland, lived and Ukraine and Russia in the 1990s, and now lives in England.

THE CAST:
James Purefoy is an English actor, producer and director. Among any roles he is known for portraying Mark Antony in the HBO series Rome, and former college professor-turned-serial-killer Joe Carroll in the series The Following.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07ns0qs)
The Olympic Park

Eric Robson hosts the horticultural panel programme in Essex, four years on from the London Olympics. Matthew Wilson, Christine Walkden and Pippa Greenwood answer the audience questions.

Matthew Wilson also takes a tour of the Olympic Park to see how things have grown over the past four years.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 Keep an Open Mind (b07p0hbp)
Journalist and author Wendell Steavenson's first short story is a specially commissioned piece for Radio 4.

A former member of parliament is still coming to terms with her changed and reduced circumstances. Her neighbours gather outside her flat on a momentous night in June.

Wendell Steavenson lives in Paris and West London. Her journalism has included books on Egypt and Iraq. She writes for many international news publications.

Reader: Susan Brown

Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b07ns0qv)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 More or Less (b07ns0qy)
Series that investigates the numbers in the news.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b07ns0r0)
Luke and Dream - Meeting of Minds

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who met at a conference on Autism, and discovered that they have a lot in common in how they assess relationships. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b07nn8qs)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07nn8qw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 The Museum of Curiosity (b07ns0r2)
Series 9, Reeves, Wyatt, Williams

This week, the Professor of Ignorance John Lloyd and his curator Noel Fielding welcome:

Vic Reeves, the comedian, artist and game show host whose credits include Vic Reeves Big Night Out; The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer; Bang, Bang, It's Reeves and Mortimer, Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased); Catterick; House of Fools; and Shooting Stars. Vic also is the author of Vic Reeve's Vast Book of World Knowledge and presented Vic Reeves' Pirates - a six-part documentary on West Country pirates.

Dr Tristram Wyatt, Senior Research Associate and Emeritus Fellow at Kellogg College, Oxford whose main areas of interest are the evolution of pheromones and animal behaviour.
His TEDx talk on the 'Smelly Mystery of Human Pheromones' has had over a million views and the transcripts have been translated into 24 languages.

Professor Kate Williams, who co-presented BBC Two's Restoration Home, presented Young Victoria for BBC Two commentated for the State Opening of Parliament, the Diamond Jubilee and the Royal Wedding as well as covering the Olympic Opening Ceremony for BBC News. She was the resident historian on Radio 4's The Rest is History with Frank Skinner and is a regular guest panellist on BBC Two's Insert Name Here.

This week, the Museum's Guest Committee appreciate a pale bird that fakes injury to protect its young; a childishly photoshopped picture that fooled Conan Doyle; and a faint smell that may or may not exist, but (if it did) might drive you wild.

The show was researched by Mike Turner and Anne Miller of QI.

The producers were Richard Turner and James Harkin.

It was a BBC Studios Production.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b07ns0r4)
Anna is feeling challenged, and Rob receives good news.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b07nn8qz)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07nrzj8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b07ns0r6)
Iain Dale, Chuka Umunna MP

Shaun Ley presents political debate and discussion from the Radio Theatre at BBC Broadcasting House in London with a panel including the political commentator Iain Dale and the Labour MP Chuka Umunna.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b07ns0r9)
A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 Home Front - Omnibus (b07kcglv)
15-19 August 1916

In the week, in 1916, when the king praised the "cheerful confidence" of the troops in France, courage and hope are hard-won in Folkestone.

Written by Katie Hims
Directed by Allegra McIlroy
Editor: Jessica Dromgoole

Story-led by Katie Hims
Sound: Martha Littlehailes
Composer: Matthew Strachan
Consultant Historian: Maggie Andrews.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b07nn8r5)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b07nn8r7)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07ns0rf)
Eight Months on Ghazzah Street, Episode 5

Nearly 30 years on from its original publication, Hilary Mantel's third novel is still as disturbing, incisive and illuminating as ever. In an unusual collaboration, the author has revisited the book to create, with the abridger, this new ten-part serialisation.

Frances Shore is a cartographer by trade, but when her husband's work takes them to Saudi Arabia she finds herself unable to map either the ever changing landscape or the Kingdom's heavily veiled ways of working. The regime is corrupt and harsh, the expatriates are hard-drinking money-grubbers, and her Muslim neighbours are secretive and watchful.

She soon discovers that the streets are not a woman's territory. Confined in her flat, she finds her sense of self beginning to dissolve. She hears footsteps, sounds of distress from the supposedly empty flat above. She has only constantly changing rumours to hang on to, and no one with whom to share her creeping unease.

Reader: Anna Maxwell Martin
Author: Hilary Mantel
Abridger: Sara Davies
Producer: Alexa Moore
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 23:00 Great Lives (b07npxx3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:27 Short Cuts (b07kpy42)
Series 9, Rivals

Fights for territory, standing your ground and petty feuds - Josie Long hears stories of rivalry. From a bitter battle conducted in a laundrette to an ongoing argument between academics on either side of the world.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b07ns284)
Stacey and Elle - Walking with My Head High

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between friends who connected on DK Target's Noticeboard and discovered they share a belief that education can squash creativity. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.