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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 16 JULY 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b07jqrfw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 A Point of View (b07lpfdj)
After the Vote, Brexit and our cultural identity

The historian Mary Beard presents the last in the series in which some of Britain's leading thinkers give their own very personal view of "Brexit".

Mary Beard asks whether the referendum result will change our cultural identity.

And as she sits at a David Gilmour concert in the ancient amphitheatre at Pompeii, Mary reflects on the "New Europe that we British seem to be about to lose".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07jqrg0)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07jqrg2)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07jqrg4)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b07jqrg6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07k0n8k)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Anna Drew.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b07k0n8m)
An iPM listener talks about his experiences as a volunteer for the Samaritans over the past twenty years. He describes how he got into the Samaritans by accident, after discovering the power of emotion following a traumatic incident at sea. His time with the charity has taught him that active listening can often give people all the support they need.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b07jqrg8)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b07jqrgb)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Open Country (b07k01by)
The Dolphins of Cardigan Bay

Patrick Aryee travels to West Wales to meet the dolphin-watchers of New Quay, and to encounter some members of the largest group of bottlenose dolphins off the coast of the UK.

New Quay is home to the Cardigan Bay Marine Wildlife Centre, which was set up in 1996 by Steve Hartley, a former fisherman, because he wanted people to know about the amazing array of marine wildlife he saw from his fishing boat. Fishing trips turned into dolphin-watching trips, and now Steve takes researchers out regularly to monitor the marine wildlife. The Centre has become a hub of scientific research and is now part of the Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales. It's manned by volunteers and just a couple of paid scientific officers. Dolphins are a key part of the economy of the area, bringing tourists and visitors who hope to catch a glimpse of these charismatic animals from the harbour wall.

Patrick, a guest presenter on Open Country, has had a fascination for marine mammals since his childhood, when his parents took him to a safari park. But he's hoping to see dolphins in the wild for the first time. Another first is a chance for Patrick to try coasteering with Jethro Moore, who describes the activity as 'everything your mum told you never to do beside the sea'.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b07jqrgd)
Farming Today This Week: Agricultural Shows

From cattle to pigs, from tractors to showjumping, the agricultural show season is well under way across Britain. One of the biggest is the Great Yorkshire Show in the town of Harrogate which is celebrating its 158th year. Charlotte Smith travels to Yorkshire to see for herself why these shows are relevant in the modern age. Are Shows like this still a place where farmers can come together and do business or have they become an event for an increasingly urbanised public to meet farm animals once a year? To find out more, Charlotte talks to Charles Mills the Shows director, while along the way she meets Young Farmers to talk about the future, visits a robotic milking parlour, discusses why farmers show cattle these days with Frank Milnes of the Shorthorn Society, and catches up with Mike Smith and his Gloucester Old Spot pigs.

Producer Andrew Dawes.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b07jqrgg)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b07kl5fr)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b07jqrgj)
Wayne Hemingway

This week the Saturday Live road trip continues to Morecambe in Lancashire, where the Catch The Wind Kite Festival is taking place this weekend, with beautiful views across Morecambe Bay and plenty of fresh sea air. The programme comes live from The Platform, where Aasmah Mir and the Reverend Richard Coles celebrate the great day out, nostalgia, kites and space.

Morecambe-born designer Wayne Hemingway recalls his childhood in the resort, and tells us why Morecambe's seafront provides the perfect backdrop to his Vintage by the Sea Festival, attracting crowds of up to 40,000.

With a spectacular display of kites across the bay, Dave Holt describes his life-long passion for making and flying soft kites, purely inflated by the wind.

Cedric Robinson MBE has been on the notoriously dangerous sands all his life. As Queen's Guide for more than 50 years, he walks up to 500 people across at a time, walking the equivalent of twice round the world in the process!

The writer and comedian, Helen Keen's first stand up show It Is Rocket Science has won awards and been picked up by Radio 4 for three critically acclaimed series. She describes why her subject matter tends towards the unusual and esoteric, when her fascination for rockets began and why she's so enthusiastic about space.

The world's fastest one man band, Peter Moser, provides the music. He demonstrates his kit with bells and whistles on, and explains its appeal and relevance today.

JP meets the actress Margaret James, for a Brief Encounter. Hunter Davies shares his Inheritance Tracks - Georgy Girl by The Seekers and And I Love Her, by the Beatles; and there are live Thank Yous from the audience.

Helen Keen will be appearing at the bluedot Festival at Jodrell Bank, from 22-24 July.
The Co-op's Got Bananas, by Hunter Davies, is out now.

Producer: Louise Corley
Editor: Karen Dalziel.

SAT 10:30 A Brief History of TIM (b07kl685)
Lynne Truss celebrates the 80th anniversary of the Speaking Clock, which was launched amid great anticipation on 24th July, 1936. TIM, "the wonder instrument of the Post Office", used state of the art technology, with the voice reproduced from rotating glass discs. In the first year the service was only available in London, but still received around 12 million calls. Since then, the clock's four successive "Golden Voices" have told the time through a world war, huge cultural and technological changes, and radical developments in our understanding of time itself.

Two celebrated cosmologists comment on aspects of time and timekeeping: Professor Stephen Hawking, and Professor Martin Rees, the Astronomer Royal - it was an earlier holder of this title, Harold Spencer Jones, who made the first call to TIM, at the inaugural ceremony in 1936.

Lynne visits the grand original speaking clock, now housed at the British Horological Institute; and she meets the current Golden Voice, Sara Mendes da Costa, who describes what it is like to be part of this very British institution. Through music and archive, the programme travels back in time to the competitions to appoint Sara and her predecessors - Jane Cain, Pat Simmons, and Brian Cobby - and to discover how much times have changed.

Sound design by Dave Dodd
Produced by Susan Kenyon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b07kl687)
Tom Newton Dunn political editor of the Sun looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
A week of upheaval and drama-one prime minister bows out another comes in making big changes in government and Whitehall departments. And what is the lesser unknown Teresa May really like? Plus the Labour party in turmoil over its leadership challenge.
The editor is Marie Jessel.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b07jqrgl)
Heartlands

Kate Adie introduces stories of the land and its people - and how they affect each other - around the world.

Jon Sopel reflects on how Donald Trump is likely to deal with his party at the coming week's Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio. Grace Livingstone unearths some worrying aspects of the vast soya farms which are replacing cattle ranches on Argentina's pampas grasslands.

In Australia, the debate over Aboriginal land rights is still going on: while some groups have been given back their title on paper, Mark Stratton finds there are doubts over how meaningful the reforms will really be. Ed Lewis joins the young Palestinians having their horizons widened at a rock-climbing club in Ramallah.

And Sarah Wheeler hears one woman's quintessentially Russian life story - in the classic Russian setting of a banya, or steam bath, in Karelia.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b07jqrgn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b07kl689)
The Water Margin: A Tale of Two Drinking Troughs

A tale of two water troughs. Money Box listener, farmer Ian Potter, is puzzled over very differing bills for his cow's drinking water from two utility companies. He pays 44% more for his supply with one provider than the other. The programme asks whether the higher water bills paid in some geographical areas will decrease when competition is introduced from April 2017 for business customers. It also looks at the implications for domestic customers and what they might save from increased competition in the sector. Deryck Hall from the Consumer Council for Water joins the programme.

Pensions Minister Baroness Altmann has been dismissed. In a brief conversation Prime Minister Theresa May told Lady Altmann that she wanted the job done by a member of the House of Commons. That person is expected to be the new DWP Minister Penny Mordaunt, a leave campaigner who supported Andrea Leadsom in her brief leadership bid. She is the Member of Parliament for Portsmouth North. Independent pensions expert John Ralfe gives his assessment of Ros Altmann's achievements and the challenges facing her successor.

Despite much media speculation, the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee decided not to change interest rates or press the button on Quantitative Easing money printing. But it's expected that the committee may make changes at its next meeting in early August. So what does this say about the state of the UK economy? And the implications for savers, who've seen poor returns on their money since the credit crunch? Tony Yates, Professor of Economics, University of Birmingham and Anna Bowes, Savings Champion, discuss the issues.

Serena Williams won a record £2million for her eighth singles tennis title at Wimbledon last weekend. Plus another £175,000 as her share of the ladies doubles with her sister Venus. But much of that money could go to HMRC. How are international sports stars taxed when they visit the UK? Sports tax expert Julian Hedley, at Saffery Champness talks to the programme.

SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (b07k0k56)
Series 16, Episode 5

It's a momentous week for Theresa May as she makes her first appearance on Dead Ringers as Prime Minister.

Ministers sacked, the Labour party in meltdown, Brexit fears remain unabated this is a fabulous time for Laura Kuenssberg, Andrew Neil, Robert Peston, Jon Snow, Andrew Marr, Kirsty Wark , Hugh Edwards, all feeding off the trough of political failure.

Starring: Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens and Lewis Macleod.

Written by: Nev Fountain & Tom Jamieson, Laurence Howarth, Ed Amsden & Tom Coles, James Bugg, Laura Major, Sarah Campbell, Max Davies, Jack Bernhardt, Liam Beirne, Alex Harvey and Sara Gibbs.

Produced and created by Bill Dare.
BBC Studios Production.

SAT 12:57 Weather (b07jqrgq)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b07jqrgs)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b07k0m7y)
Charles Clarke, Paul Goodman, Lord Maude, Barbara Ntumy

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Brentwood School in Essex, with a panel including the former Home Secretary Charles Clarke, the Executive Editor of the political website ConservativeHome Paul Goodman, former Trade Minister and Minister to the Cabinet Office Lord Maude of Horsham, and the Momentum activist Barbara Ntumy.

Topics discussed include: French truck attack, the election of Theresa May as Prime Minister, Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary, the Labour Party leadership election.

Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b07jqrgv)
Age of Terror, Jeremy Corbyn, Boris Johnson

Topics covered Age of Terror, Jeremy Corbyn & Boris Johnson

Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230
Call 03700 100 444. Email is any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Or tweet, the hashtag is BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.

SAT 14:30 Defoe (b07kl7m5)
Moll Flanders, Episode 2

By Daniel Defoe, adapted by Nick Perry.

After meeting Elizabeth Atkins in Newgate gaol, Daniel Defoe has begun to turn her stranger-than-fiction life story into the narrative of Moll Flanders. He's convinced it will make a best seller and so placate his many creditors. But he has only managed to pen half a manuscript when Elizabeth is arrested and sent back to Newgate, charged with numerous capital offences. Defoe tracks her down so that she can conclude her story, but can she be saved from a certain fate at the Old Bailey? Will Defoe find a happy ending for his Moll Flanders?

Dramatist Nick Perry plays fast and loose with this 18th century classic, melding fiction and reality in a manner inspired by Daniel Defoe.

Director: Sasha Yevtushenko.

SAT 15:30 The House of the Windy City - Dance Music's Forgotten Heroes (b07jys1t)
Presenter and DJ Dave Pearce travel to Chicago to hear how a country traditionally resistant to dance music finally got it. The US invented it and then ignored it. Today with electronic dance music estimated to be a $20 billion industry, what do those who started Chicago House in the early 1980s think of this new scene?

House music grew out of black gay clubs in Chicago in the early 1980s. We hear from Robert Williams who started the legendary Warehouse club where the scene got its name. He brought in Frankie Knuckles to DJ and Dave Pearce hears how he would create his own edits to keep the crowd dancing all night.

In Chicago we track down Rocky Jones, founder of DJ International, who put out some of the very first records. What was his reaction when he found out the few thousand records he put out were driving a cult scene in the UK? With contributions from The Pet Shop Boys, DJ Marshall Jefferson and DJ Pierre we hear how the sound of Chicago topped the charts in the UK.

But in America a lot of house music wasn't played on the radio because it was viewed as gay music. As Hip Hop became the dominant musical form, Chicago House was pushed out to the suburbs. DJ Black Madonna takes us on a tour of one of the few remaining house music clubs. While here in the UK a new generation of house music artists like Disclosure have found an audience and a following. They tour the world playing their own interpretation of Chicago House.

A Tonic Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b07jqrgx)
Listener Week

At the suggestion of listener, Maylin Scott we talk to Kate Davies in the first of a Listener Week chain of interviews. After an unexpected stroke in her 30s Kate changed career to become a knitter and wool maker. She tells us about her recovery and her love of knitting.

What is it like to want a sex life with your partner but find that you have a low libido? We hear from one listener, while sexual health consultant Jane Ashby and Katherine White a Clinical Pyschologist have some advice.

We hear about the first black nurse in the NHS, Kofoworola Abeni Pratt. Janet Davies from the Royal College of Nurses explains her legacy.

Listener Lucy Humphries and her sister Sarah discuss becoming adult orphans and the impact on them of losing both their parents after a car crash. Julia Samuel a Psychotherapist offers her insight.

In the late 1990s, Claudia Rizzo's dad found the 1929 diary of May Stewart a teenage girl from Letchworth, at a small railway station in Southern Italy. Claudia tells us about the diary and why she wants to find May Stewart's family.

Osteoarthritis of the hands usually runs in families. Linda Muller got in touch to say her and her friends all in their 50s have the condition and find life very difficult. Professor Tonia Vincent a Professor of Musculoskeletal Biology at Oxford University explains why it occurs, how it can be treated and whether it can be prevented.

School holidays are a time of greater stress for some families who struggle with finding childcare, cannot afford to feed their children well or keep them occupied. The issue was discussed by Listener Val Barron who works as a development worker for Communities Together Durham and Sara Bryson is a policy advisor at Children North East who has researched the subject.

Why when we talk about successful women and their careers do we often refer to male dominated professions like banking or the law? Listener Chris Gent tells us why he believes his wife, a teacher, and his sister, a nurse are just as successful and need to be recognised.

Presented by Jane Garvey
Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
Editor: Jane Thurlow

Interviewed guest: Kate Davies
Interviewed guest: Jane Ashby
Interviewed guest: Katherine White
Interviewed guest: Janet Davies
Interviewed guest: Julia Samuel
Interviewed guest: Claudia Rizzo
Interviewed guest: Tonia Vincent
Interviewed guest: Val Baron
Interviewed guest: Sara Bryson.

SAT 17:00 PM (b07jqrgz)
Saturday PM

News with Shaun Ley including Turkey coup latest and advice for travellers.

SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b07k08xg)
Brave or Naive?

Is escaping the rat race always a good idea? Many people dream of giving up the day job to start their own business - and we often hear about the success stories. But does everyone have what it takes? Evan Davis and guests compare the dream and the reality.

GUESTS:

Luke Johnson, Entrepreneur and Founder of Risk Capital Partners

Paula Fry, former Director, Fashion Seeker UK

Sarah Meredith, Sole Trader, Rock Cakes

Deirdre Critchley, former Director, Jammy Cow

Producer: Elizabeth Cassin.

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07jqrh1)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b07jqrh3)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07jqrh5)
More than 260 killed in attempted takeover, IS group says Nice attacker was its soldier.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b07kl9gf)
Clive Anderson, Christopher Eccleston, Chris Difford, Colin Mochrie, Asad Mecci, Phoebe Eclair-Powell, Simon Mayo, Steve Mason

Clive Anderson and Christopher Eccleston are joined by Chris Difford, Colin Mochrie, Asad Mecci, Simon Mayo and Phoebe Éclair Powell for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Steve Mason and The Breath.

Producer: Sukey Firth.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b07kl9gh)
Theresa May

With no leadership campaign - during which the public might have got to know her better - Theresa May has entered Downing Street with a remarkably low profile. Mark Coles has been talking to people who know her well - including new Cabinet appointees Justine Greening and Chris Grayling - to try to find out who she really is, and what she believes in.

Producer: Smita Patel.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b07jqrh7)
Ghostbusters, Unreachable, Kei Miller, Liverpool Biennial, Secret Agent

The remaking of Ghostbusters in 2016 has 4 women taking the leading roles and it has caused consternation among devotees of the original film. What on earth is all the fuss about? Is it just a bunch of sexist fanboys determined not to enjoy it because girls are involved?

Matt Smith plays a perfectionist film director in Unreachable, a new play at London's Royal Court Theatre.
Kei Miller's novel Augustown is set in a lightly-fictionalised version of the real Jamaican town of the same name, involving flying prophets and civil unrest

This year's Liverpool Biennial has a typically eclectic selection of artists and venues; what caught the eye of our reviewers?

BBC TV has a new adaptation of Joseph Conrad's The Secret Agent, starring Toby Jones and Vicky McClure.

Sarah Crompton's guests are Naomi Alderman, Kathryn Hughes and Giles Fraser. The producer is Oliver Jones.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b07kl9gk)
The League of Extraordinary Housewives

In 1945 thousands of angry housewives formed a group to fight austerity and a Welfare State that they believed was "not in the interests of a free and happy home life". This militant battle is the starting point for an analysis of the housewife; her politics, economics and shifting power down the decades. How did the focus on feminism and the working mother, change the way society viewed her? And, has the housewife now embarked on a fight back? "Having it all" in practice seems to mean being exhausted, on the wrong side of the gender pay gap, and spending most of your income paying someone else to look after your children. Jo Fidgen delves into the archive, from the post-war period right through to today's knicker-twisting discussions over how to talk to, and about, women in the home.
Producer: Rosamund Jones

Image: Copyright of the Royal Albert Hall Archive.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b07jwt5x)
Roald Dahl: Going Solo, Episode 2

To celebrate the centenary year of his birth, a full dramatization of Roald Dahl's gripping autobiographical overseas adventure.

As World War II rages, Pilot Officer Dahl takes to the air in a series of daring deeds. An inspirational account of survival when things seem hopeless, in which the extraordinary is made human.

"The second part is about the time I spent flying for the RAF in the Second World War. There was no need to discard anything from this period because every moment was, to me at least, completely enthralling."

Having joined the RAF Dahl discovers a love of flying. But a crash in the Western desert almost ends his war before he's started. Eventually he rejoins his heavily depleted squadron during the hopeless last days in Greece. Dogged air fights, secret missions and many narrow misses with death ensue before he eventually returns home to his loving mother.

Patrick Malahide provides the voice of Dahl in a colourful adaptation by Lucy Catherine.

Dramatised by Lucy Catherine

Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b07jqrh9)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b07jyw9f)
Policing Offence

When is a personal opinion so offensive that it becomes morally unacceptable? This weekend former Tory leadership candidate Andrea Leadsom discovered her comments on motherhood had transgressed an unwritten social convention. The outraged legions of leader writers, columnists and Twitterati descended and by Monday she was gone. As the politics of offence, identity and rights become ever more toxic, they become equally hard to navigate and the price of transgression is ever higher. The whole Brexit debate and its aftermath have been characterised by claim and counter claim of racism, ageism and classism. We've had laws against "hate speech" for many years now, but are we too keen to create whole new categories of "-isms" to which we can take offence? If morality rests on the ability to distinguish between groups and make judgements about their lifestyles, how do you distinguish between a legitimate verdict and an unjustifiable prejudice? Why is it acceptable to say 'It's good that the President is black' but not to say 'It's good that the next President will be white'? Why is the insult "stale, male and pale" OK, but it wouldn't be if you changed gender and race? Is this about defending the powerless against the powerful, or limiting people's rights to say what they think? Where do we draw the line between policing the basic principles of equal rights and mutual respect with a capacity to judge people by what lies in their heart?
Chaired by Michael Buerk with Anne McElvoy, Claire Fox, Giles Fraser and Matthew Taylor. Witnesses are Maya Goodfellow, Josh Howie, Peter Tatchell and Dr Joanna Williams.

SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b07jyrdb)
Series 30, Heat 4, 2016

(4/13)
In the fourth heat of the 2016 series Paul Gambaccini welcomes competitors from Hampshire and London to face questions on every genre of music, with plenty of surprises and intriguing musical extracts. The programme comes from the BBC's historic Maida Vale studios.

Which American group wrote and originally performed the song which gave Lulu her first (and still best-known) hit? With which orchestra was Eugene Ormandy associated for more than forty years? Which composer is the subject of Julian Barnes's recent novel The Noise of Time?

In addition to general musical questions such as these, the competitors have to choose a special musical topic on which to answer their own individual questions, with no prior warning of the categories and no chance to prepare.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

SAT 23:30 The Echo Chamber (b07jwt61)
Series 7, Craig Raine

Paul Farley meets Craig Raine at his home to hear new and old poems from a famous Martian. 'A Martian Sends A Postcard Home' (1979) was Craig Raine's second collection and its poems defined and encapsulated a way of looking afresh at the familiar world. Since then Raine has taught English literature, written novels, edited Fabers' poetry list and started and run magazines of criticism and new writing. He has written poetry throughout. 'How Snow Falls' appeared in 2010 and this year he has published a book on the writing and reading of poetry called 'My Grandmother's Glass Eye'. He talks about arguing about poetry and reads a suite of new poems as well as some old ones. Producer: Tim Dee.


SUNDAY 17 JULY 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b07klcvx)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Introductions (b045y0t4)
We Are All Made of Stars

A fresh exploration of what an introduction means for British South Asian culture in contemporary society where the internet, cultural diversity, and freedoms previously unavailable to members of that society bounce off established traditions of arranged matches or family marriages.

Written by three authors from The Whole Kahani, a British South Asian writers group, the stories in 'Introductions' explore what it means to be mixed race, the tensions between modern independence and family traditions, and the impact of really going it alone in the face of family expectations.

In this third programme, We Are Made of Stars by Rohan Kar, single, thirtysomething Rupinder finally succumbs to her mother's belief that astrological charts can find her the perfect match. But, as Rupinder discovers, life on Earth is a lot more complicated than that in the heavens.

Reader: Vayu Naidu

Produced by David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07klcw5)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07klcw9)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07klcwc)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b07klcwf)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b07klg59)
Church of St Peter, Drayton in Oxfordshire

The bells of the Church of St Peter, Drayton in Oxfordshire.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b07kl9gh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b07klcwh)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b07klg5c)
Not Good Enough

The phrase "Not Good Enough" can devastate, or it can motivate. Mark Tully interprets the doom-laden words that have crushed some ambitions, and led to the fulfillment of others.

Paradoxically, in conversation with Carol Dweck, Professor of Psychology at Stanford University, Mark also hears about the damage that can be done by too much praise, even if we are good enough. She identifies the fixed mindset that can occur when our self-esteem is based on the fragile notion that we are cleverer than most, preventing us from taking risks that might prove otherwise and challenge our sense of worth.

For her, and for Mark Tully, the best advice seems to be that we should compete against ourselves to reach our full potential, instead of comparing ourselves to others, or listening to those who tell us we are "Not Good Enough."

A Unique production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b07klg5f)
Salads of New York

On a rooftop overlooking the world's most famous skyline a group of young farmers is growing a huge variety of tiny salad vegetables for the city's hungry diners. Tom Heap takes the elevator to Brooklyn Grange to chew on tiny carrots, fruity lime basil and peppery nasturtium.

Producer: Martin Poyntz-Roberts.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b07klcwk)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b07klcwm)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b07klcwp)
Sunday in Nice; Canada's disputed sacred islands; The Jewish vinyl Jewkbox

Services will be held in churches across France to remember those killed after a lorry ploughed into crowds celebrating Bastille Day. William Crawley talks to Fr Peter Jackson is from Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Nice and lives close to the terrorist attack.

This week a new Prime Minister entered Number 10. The daughter of an Anglican priest, Theresa May joins the list of world leaders with a strong religious upbringing. Dr Eliza Filby, author of 'God and Thatcher' and Wendy Alexander, former leader of the Scottish Labour Party and a daughter of the manse, discuss how faith has influenced politic leaders.

Kendall House in Gravesend was once a Church of England care home for young girls. It was shut in the mid 80's. One former resident tells William how she was drugged and abused over a two year period there. The Bishop of Rochester, James Langstaff, responds to the findings of the review he commissioned which said the Church's response to allegations about abuse at Kendall House was, "woeful and inadequate".

Trevor Barnes explores the history of Jewish musicians, composers and religious singers through a celebration of their vinyl recordings at the Jewish Museum in London.

Up to 40 Catholic churches in the Diocese of Salford could be closed and 150 parishes merged under a proposed restructuring plan. Bishop John Allen tells William why he may be forced to take these radical actions.

Despite the Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's saying he wants to improve the poor relationship between the government and the country's First Nations, it's claimed he has done nothing to stop a housing development on islands sacred to the indigenous population. Sian Griffiths reports.

Producers:
David Cook
Peter Everett

Series Producer:
Amanda Hancox.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b07klg5h)
Action for Kids

Actor Lisa Hammond who uses a wheelchair makes The Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Action for Kids
Registered Charity No 1068841
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'Action for Kids'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'Action for Kids'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b07klcwr)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b07klcwt)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b07klg5k)
A lament for Nice

Live from St Martin-in-the-Fields with the Revd Dr Sam Wells, and the Revd Katherine Hedderley, responding to the profound sense of shock felt across the world as a result of the apparent terrorist attack in Nice. With the choir of St Martin-in-the-Fields directed by Jeremy Cole.

Producer: Andrew Earis.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b07k0m80)
Facts Not Opinions

AL Kennedy ponders the importance of facts... in a world dominated by opinion.

"The Chilcot report highlights how a war can conjure the demons it promised to suppress", she writes "because facts were dodged or massaged and fantasy outcomes were taken as certainties".

While facts may be grim, "avoiding them puts us all at increased risk".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcgb)
Capercaillie

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the capercaillie. The bizarre knife-grinding, cork-popping display of the male capercaillie is one of the strangest sounds produced by any bird. The name 'Capercaillie' is derived from the Gaelic for 'horse of the woods', owing to the cantering sound, which is the start of their extraordinary mating display. These are the largest grouse in the world and in the UK they live only in ancient Caledonian pine forests.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b07klcww)
Sunday morning magazine programme with news and conversation about the big stories of the week. Presented by Paddy O'Connell.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b07klcwy)
Toby finds himself in a tight spot, and Ursula strikes a deal.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b07klh89)
Levi Roots

Kirsty Young's castaway is the entrepreneur, Levi Roots.

His business success began following an appearance on BBC Two's Dragon's Den in 2007. With guitar in hand, he sang about his 'Reggae reggae sauce' which he had been selling for years at London's Notting Hill Carnival. Both Peter Jones and Richard Farleigh invested in the business and within six weeks, his sauce was bottled and on supermarket shelves. Recipe books, TV shows and a restaurant, or 'rastaurant' followed.

He is the youngest of five children born in Jamaica. When he was four, his parents went to build a new life in the UK. Each year one of his siblings came to join the family in Britain. When Levi was 10, he left his much loved grandmother behind, never to see her again. Unable to read or write when he started school, he caught up quickly. He became a Rastafarian as a teenager. Following school, he became an apprentice engineer but left that to pursue a career in music.

In his late twenties, he went to prison for five years. His time inside would prove to be a turning point for him. Music continued to play an important part in his life and he was nominated for a Best Reggae Act MOBO award in 1998.

A father of eight, he lives in Brixton, London.

Producer: Cathy Drysdale.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b07klcx0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b07jyrdj)
Series 65, Episode 3

The nation's favourite wireless entertainment pays a visit to Glasgow's Pavilion Theatre. Old-timers Barry Cryer and Tony Hawks are joined on the panel by locals Susan Calman and Fred Macaulay with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell provides piano accompaniment.

Producer - Jon Naismith.

It is a BBC Studios production.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b07klh8c)
Albania and the Cheese Road

Dan Saladino travels on a new road in Albania that leads to an undiscovered cheese world.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b07klcx2)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b07klcx4)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 From Our Home Correspondent (b07h60lx)
In the latest programme of this new monthly series, Mishal Husain introduces dispatches from writers and journalists around the United Kingdom that reflect the range of contemporary life in the country.

Among the contributions this month: Peter Taylor on why Britain has so far not suffered an attack like the recent ones in Paris, Brussels - and now Nice; Ian McMillan asks why we talk to things that can't answer back; Sarah Oliver muses on life as the wife of an infantry officer still being posted to Afghanistan; Stephen Smith meets the creator of a great pageant in Bishop Auckland which charts British history from the Romans to the Second World War and Mark Cooper-Jones tells us about life as a supply teacher.

Producer Simon Coates.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07k0k4w)
Summer Garden Party, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh 1

Eric Robson presents the show from the GQT Summer Garden Party at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. Joining him on the panel are Bob Flowerdew, Pippa Greenwood and Bunny Guinness.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant producer Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b07knzdd)
Sunday Omnibus

Fi Glover with conversations that highlight the support of friends through tough times, the difficulties of adapting to change, and how a happy outcome can right past wrongs. All in the Omnibus of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Defoe (b07knzdg)
A Journal of the Plague Year

As part of BBC Radio 4's Defoe season, Ben Miles stars as the chameleon writer, businessman, debtor and hack, Daniel Defoe. In 1722, hoping to keep his creditors at bay, Defoe begins his fictional 'journal' of the Great Plague of 1665. But he soon comes to be haunted by the people he is conjuring.

Dramatised by Michael Butt

Directed by Emma Harding.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (b07knzdj)
Awesome Authors: Children's Literature with Frank Cottrell Boyce and Bali Rai

As part the children's reading celebration across the BBC, Awesome Authors, Mariella Frostrup explores contemporary children's fiction with writers Frank Cottrell Boyce, Bali Rai and Children's Editor of the Bookseller, Charlotte Eyre.

We also hear from John Wray on why writers should be cautious about re-visiting their childhood favourites for inspiration, and after working in publishing for over thirty years, Sarah Odedina gives her expert advice to aspiring novelists.

And finally we have some special literary recommendations from young readers.

SUN 16:30 The Echo Chamber (b07kp1d2)
Series 7, Tracy K Smith and Patricia Lockwood

Paul Farley hears new work from two young American poets: Tracy K. Smith and Patricia Lockwood. Outside of a few famous names recent British poetry has made little impact on American life and letters. The same might be said in reverse: though we speak the same language our poetries are oddly discrete. The Echo Chamber has opened its doors in the USA to seek some commonality by listening to some younger female American voices. Tracy K. Smith's book 'Life on Mars' won a Pulitzer Prize for her poems about space and race and David Bowie. Patricia Lockwood's writing-life on Twitter is watched from around the world and her 'sexts' and her 'Rape Joke' poem brought her a celebrity very rare in poetry. Both poets read from their ground-breaking books and share some new poems too. Producer: Tim Dee.

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b07jysvj)
Trade and Torture

Is the UK putting trade above concerns about human rights in the United Arab Emirates?

Britons who claim they were tortured in the Gulf state's prison cells say the UK government failed to fight for them.

The foreign office has received 43 cases of alleged abuse of UK citizens in the UAE since 2010.

In exclusive interviews, File on 4 hears from those who've got out of detention in Dubai who say they were arrested without charge and subjected to violent treatment and torture.

The UK government says it regularly raises Britons' cases - and allegations of mistreatment - with the UAE authorities. But those who've been stuck there tell File on 4 they didn't get the support they needed and expected when they were suffering, despite the authorities here knowing the risks they faced.

The government's also promoting deals with its largest trading partner in the Middle East.

Jane Deith counts up the billions of UAE investment in the UK, from container ports to housing developments.

And the programme hears the arguments for joint ventures with Emirati companies - for example by NHS hospitals - as a lucrative way to generate income as budgets are squeezed, ultimately providing better services for patients here.

The United Arab Emirates is seen as a stable ally in an unstable Middle East, not least in the fight against Islamic State - does that make the UK less willing to raise issues like human rights abuses and judicial process?

Reporter: Jane Deith
Producer: Sally Chesworth.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b07kl9gh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07klcx8)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b07klcxd)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07klcxj)
Three police officers have been shot dead in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b07klcxn)
Jolyon Jenkins

Pick Of The Week,
Chosen and Presented by Jolyon Jenkins
Highlights this week include a man who lives in a yurt so he can fish full time, and uses a tube of toothpaste every three years. Peter Curran and Patrick Marber's ideas for a male bra. And Frank Cottrell Boyce's musings on why Roald Dahl wasn't entirely truthful in his autobiography.

Production Pauline Harris and Rachel Gill.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b07knkhp)
Toby has pulled out of the first cricket match Harrison is captaining and he's down to ten men. Fallon tries to cheer him up but Harrison doesn't know how he's supposed to inspire the team.

Emma and Fallon chat as they prepare the cricket teas: Fallon remarks at the cars she saw queuing for Elfworld yesterday. Emma's heading off later to look at a flat - she and Ed are still looking for somewhere to rent, and they discuss the Brazilian theme for the fete and what recipes they can do.

At tea break, the cricket isn't going well. Rex reckons Toby's absent because of a woman rather than an injury, and he advises Harrison on how to approach future team talks. Harrison asks after Rex's love life, Rex explains that the person he likes isn't interested. Harrison tells him not to give up - look at him and Fallon.

After tea, the team redeem themselves with good fielding. A couple of brilliant catches by Harrison help win the match.

Adam tells Brian combining is going well. Brian mentions an open farm event that might be good for Tom and even Adam. Adam looks into it, and suggests Tom takes a look at the website. Tom's not sure but takes a look at the website and decides he'd like to go with Adam.

SUN 19:15 Dave Podmore's Big Bake Off Bash (b07kp5gj)
England's sleaziest cricketer Dave Podmore says there's more to cricket than stuffing yourself with cakes and sandwiches half-way through the game, but he can't remember what. Pod's at rock bottom, crying into his cold beans, until he thinks there could be "some light at the end of the doldrum" when he hits on a plan to create the best cricket tea that ever graced a Cath Kidston tablecloth or clogged an English artery, and to do it on the biggest stage of all: The Great British Bake Off.

Logging every glorious calorie along the way is Andy Hamer of Radio One County's ever popular "Triglyceride Watch". It's oven gloves off as Pod battles through the rounds, but will his unorthodox kebab cake rise to the occasion? Let's see how the public votes.

SUN 19:45 The Crime Writer at the Festival (b07kp5gl)
The Getaway

It's often said that there is something different about crime writers - they flock together, they enjoy each other's company and freely interact with their fans. Next week, thousands of fiction fans will head to Yorkshire for the Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Writing Festival in Harrogate, and this new story series celebrates the very particular atmosphere of such festivals.

In this story, Sarah Hilary (who won last year's Crime Novel of the Year Award at Harrogate for her debut SOMEONE ELSE'S SKIN), takes us to an imaginary festival and a character desperate to break free of the mainstream.

SUN 20:00 Feedback (b07k0k52)
Is it right to refer to a politician using just their first name? It's a question posed by some Feedback listeners after reporters referred to the new Foreign Secretary as simply "Boris". They are asking why he appears to be an exception to the rule and, more pertinently, if this note of familiarity softens the tone of interviews.

And are this year's Proms getting a shake-up? Having celebrated its 120th anniversary last year, the Proms have been given a new Director - David Pickard. As the 2016 season gets underway this weekend, what is his vision for the Proms? The Director speaks to Roger Bolton from the Royal Albert Hall, discussing the use of unexpected locations, whether this year will be less London-centric and how much is on offer for younger listeners.

Last week Feedback considered how the continued turmoil of Brexit was affecting comedy output - this week it's a look at the business unit. As the markets and the pound have been rocked by the out vote, listener Ian Callaghan goes behind-the-scenes of the BBC's Business and Economics unit to discover how they're responding.

Did you keep a diary during your teenage years? If so, would you be willing to share your adolescent highs and lows with a listening audience? That's exactly what Radio 4 comedy My Teenage Diary asks of its celebrity guests. But some listeners question the authenticity of the diaries, asking how likely it was that they were both preserved and contain fitting punchlines for a radio comedy. The producer, Harriet Jaine, and one of the guest on the latest series, Samira Ahmed, discuss how the programme is put together.

Produced by Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b07k0k50)
Sydney Schanberg, Beatrice de Cardi, Lord Evans of Temple Guiting, Alvin Toffler, Jimmy Gilbert

Matthew Bannister on

The American journalist Sydney Schanberg who won the Pulitzer prize for his reporting on Cambodia. His story was turned into the film "The Killing Fields".

The archaeologist Beatrice de Cardi, once described as "a cross between Miss Marple and Indiana Jones".

The publisher Lord Evans of Temple Guiting, who, as Matthew Evans, led Faber and Faber to great success. His friend Melvyn Bragg pays tribute.

The futurist Alvin Toffler best known for his 1970 book "Future Shock".

And the comedy producer Jimmy Gilbert who brought us "The Frost Report", "Last of the Summer Wine" and "Fawlty Towers".

Producer: Dianne McGregor.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b07kl689)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b07klg5h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 Analysis (b07jyrdq)
Money for Nothing

Should the state pay everyone a Universal Basic Income? Sonia Sodha finds out why the idea is winning support from an unlikely alliance of leftists and libertarians.
Producer: Helen Grady.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b07klcy1)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (b07k063f)
Ghostbusters Revisited

With Francine Stock.

The Comedians Cinema Club present their unique take on Ghostbusters.

Joshua Oppenheimer, the director of the award-winning and controversial documentary about Indonesian death squads , The Act Of Killing, reveals why he refuses to demonise mass murderers, and why he went undercover as an alien abductee for an expose of American militia.

Tim Robey and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh go head to head in the referendum that really matters - Watership Down or The Lion King: which is the better animated classic ?

SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b07klg5c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]


MONDAY 18 JULY 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b07klczz)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b07jyw97)
The English Defence League; 'Real' immigrants

The English Defence League: A study of the individuals who comprise this far right movement. Hilary Pilkington, Professor of Sociology at the University of Manchester, provides fresh and timely insights into a politics built on English identity and opposition to 'Islamism'. They're joined by Nasar Meer, Professor of Comparative Citizenship and Social Policy at Strathclyde University,

Who's a 'real' immigrant and who's 'not really' an immigrant? Martina Byrne, Lecturer in the School of Social Policy, Social Policy and Social Justice at University College, Dublin, discusses her study into middle class attitudes to immigration. Why do white Irish professionals consider that white Eastern Europeans are immigrants but white French and Australians are not?
Producer: Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b07klg59)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07kld01)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07kld03)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07kld05)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b07kld07)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07l67mm)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Anna Drew.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b07kld09)
Scottish and Welsh reactions to the new Defra secretary of state, Farm robots, Water management on frms

We'll be looking at water all this week - from flooding to water management to irrigating crops. Agriculture remains one of the main polluters of rivers and streams in the UK. We hear from Professor Joseph Holden of the University of Leeds who specialises in farming's impact on water quality.

Farm Robots could, one day, be planting, weeding and picking crops. The government's agri tech fund is awarding grants towards developing this technology and £300,000 of the money has gone to a Linclolnshire firm and Lincoln University who are developing robots to work in fields. We hear about the impact this could have on agriculture.

Andrea Ledsom was appointed the new DEFRA Secretary of State last Thursday. We hear from a hill farmer in Wales, and a BBC correspondent in Scotland, about what they think her priorities in Wales and Scotland should be.

Last week we reported on a new video about the dangers of livestock worrying - made by the LEAD campaign (Livestock, Education and Dogs). It will be on loop at the Royal Welsh Show all week - and here's a link to the film: http://www.skyweb.media/leadfilm/

Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Emily Hughes.

MON 05:56 Weather (b07kld0c)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03x45s5)
Black Redstart

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Bill Oddie presents the black redstart. It was the German Luftwaffe which enabled black redstarts to gain a real foothold here. The air-raids of the Blitz created bombsites which mimicked their rocky homes and the weeds that grew there attracted insects. In 1942 there over twenty singing males in London alone and now they're being encouraged by the creation of 'green roof' habitats, rich in flowers and insects.

MON 06:00 Today (b07kld0f)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 The Long View (b07knmp7)
Celebrity Football Managers

As pre-season training gets underway and transfer business goes on a-pace Jonathan Freedland takes the Long View of celebrity Football management. The new season will see the clash of several of the world's greatest managers lead by Jose Mourinho of Manchester United and Pep Guardiola of Manchester City.

It was a similar story in Manchester back in the mid 1960s. Matt Busby had been at United since the war building championship winning teams and a formidable reputation. City were languishing in the second division. But with the arrival of Joe Mercer and Malcolm Allison, City found a combination to challenge their Manchester rivals. And it really was a case of the Managers being the all important figures. When England won the world cup in 1966 it was Joe Mercer who'd just lead City to the old 2nd Division championship who was part of the BBC Television World Cup panel, endearing himself to the nation by referring to Pele as Peely.

Jonathan is joined by a former City player Paul Hince, Dr Colin Shindler, a screenwriter, academic and fanatic City fan, Sarah Collins who covers the city's sport for BBC local radio and Paul Gilroy of the League Managers Association. They discuss the then and now and the curious way in which - in these two eras - it was the Managers who were in the limelight. Much has changed, not least in terms of global reach, money and the international flavour of the Premiership, but at heart it's the same - the men on the pitch will be playing, and did play, in the shadow of the Celebrity Managers.

Producer: Tom Alban.

MON 09:30 In Therapy (b070nvxf)
Jo

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. Each day we are given privileged access to Susie's consulting room, where she meets a variety of clients.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed 'Jerusalem') and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learnt about their characters lives, backgrounds, and individual reason for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on hidden microphones at Susie's surgery.

Today, Susie has her first meeting with Jo, a new patient and an out of work actress.

Elsewhere in the series, we meet Helen, a high achieving corporate lawyer who is struggling to identify what is wrong - but knows that something is. John is older - in his 60s, and a retired railway trade unionist. His wide and children are gone, but his therapy is helping him to turn his life around. Then there's Louise and Richard - a couple expecting their first baby in a few days.

We hear the therapist at work, eavesdropping on the most intimate of exchanges. To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Presenter: Susie Orbach
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 09:45 Primo Levi's The Periodic Table (b07kngky)
An Introduction

Janet Suzman introduces a major new dramatization of Primo Levi's stories about our human relationship with the chemical elements that make up our universe - a book the Royal Institution of Great Britain named 'the best science book ever'. She begins with a short feature about Levi's life and writing, featuring archive interviews with Levi himself.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07kld0h)
Argentina and the disappeared, Dirty Dancing, Women politicians cleaning up the mess?

Are female politicians cleaning up the mess left behind by male leaders? Theresa May has been called a 'safe pair of hands'. How much is this rhetoric, how much reality?

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the military coup in Argentina. A new novel by Caroline Brothers, The Memory Stones, captures the violence and fear experienced by one family during this period and reveals how, with the help of The Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo, one family is eventually reunited with the
child of their disappeared daughter. The novel is based on real events that took place 40 years ago in Argentina.

The film, Dirty Dancing, first released in 1987, still has legions of fans. This summer Secret Cinema brings back one of its most popular experiences, creating a fully immersive world of Dirty Dancing in a secret London location. We discuss Dirty Dancing's appeal.

Felicia Brown was a British artist who was killed in 1936 while fighting Franco's fascist forces in Spain. She was the only British woman to have engaged in combat in the Spanish Civil War. She was also a very good artist. On the 80th anniversary of the Spanish Civil War we reflect on her life and work.

Presenter: Emma Barnett
Interviewed guest: Niamh Ni Mhaoileoin
Interviewed guest: Julie Gottlieb
Interviewed guest: Caroline Brothers
Interviewed guest: Karen Krizanovich
Interviewed guest: Rhianna Dhillon
Interviewed guest: Sonia Boue
Interviewed guest: Pauline Fraser
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07kngl0)
Lunch, The Big Thing

by Marcy Kahan

A platonic romantic comedy about two old flatmates.
Bella has just got back from Barcelona where she followed her new love, Guy, but is she ready to move in with him in London?
Bill helps her role play the dilemma.

Bill ..... Stephen Mangan
Bella ..... Claire Skinner

Directed by Sally Avens.

MON 11:00 The Untold (b07kngl2)
The School Inspection

A headteacher's fate hangs in the balance as she awaits a visit from a school inspector.

When Sue Vermes became headteacher of struggling Rose Hill Primary School less than two years ago, she hoped to reverse its fortunes. Instead, an Ofsted inspector labelled the Oxford school 'inadequate' and placed it into so-called 'Special Measures'. Now Sue's future is in question as she awaits the verdict of a follow-up visit by Ofsted. Have Sue and her team done enough to arrest the school's decline?

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

MON 11:30 Way Out East (b07knh41)
Get Well Soon Bobby McGee

New comedy by Guy Meredith about a group of expats sharing a flat in Hong Kong. Into the lives of unsuccessful architect James (Tony Gardner) and failed-everything Malcolm (John Gordon Sinclair) comes Zoe (Katherine Kingsley) on a one-way ticket from England to start a new life.

After an unpromising start, she moves in with James and Malcolm, convinced that she can get these two undomesticated alpha males to change their ways and become more organised at home and work. She also becomes part of the scene at the Shakes, the local expat pub run by Wanda (Samantha Bond) and visited by James's boss Mr Ampersand (Nicky Henson) who gives her a job as his PA.

The flatmates share many adventures including a very disorganised pub quiz, a series of domestic mishaps, attempts to fix the result of the Hong Kong Derby and a local marathon, and the annual Hong Kong New Year celebrations.

Katherine Kingsley was Olivier nominated for her role in Piaf and Singin' in the Rain, John Gordon Sinclair has performed in several musicals and is remembered for the title role in Gregory's Girl, Tony Gardner is currently one of the stars of the award-winning Last Tango in Halifax, and Samantha Bond has starred in many award-winning television and theatre productions including Downton Abbey. Guy Meredith has written several very successful dramas and comedies for radio, including the long-running series Daunt and Dervish.

Series Music Composer: David Chilton
Writer: Guy Meredith
Producer: Cherry Cookson

A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b07kld0k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 The Why Factor (b07knkhk)
Series 3, Time Perception

Mike Williams asks why some weeks just fly by but sometimes minutes can seem like hours? Why do we perceive time differently in different circumstances? Mike talks to Pakistani writer and broadcaster Raza Rumi, Claudia Hammond, author of "Time Warped" and John McCarthy, a British journalist taken hostage in Lebanon in 1986.

Presenter:Mike Williams
Producer:Bob Howard
Editor; Andrew Smith

First broadcast on the BBC World Service.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b07kld0m)
Extra Energy & Irish Housing Crisis

Extra Energy is the most complained about energy company in Britain. It's being investigated by Ofgem following a record number of complaints in the first quarter of this year. The latest figures from the Energy Ombudsman show it had complaints from customers at a rate of 192 per 100,000 customers between January and March this year. That's up 42% on the previous quarter. In contrast, SSE was the least complained about supplier, attracting only three complaints per 100,000 customers. Ben Jones is Extra Energy's Operations Manager is back to explain.

The Republic of Ireland's economic success in the late 90s and early noughties was largely built on the construction sector, until the economy went bust. Ireland is slowly recovering, with 8% growth last year. But a housing crisis is putting the brakes on a recovery, with homelessness on the rise and many housing estates still half-built. We sent our reporter Louise Williams to Adamstown, Ireland's first planned town, where only a fraction of houses and services have been completed.

Natural oils are now widely available under various forms of labelling and packaging. The success and popularity of these oils has encouraged thousands of new suppliers of essential oils and aromatherapy products to start up in the retail business to take advantage of the current consumer demand. Following the early success of specialist aromatherapy companies, supermarkets, cosmetic companies, high street retailers and home start-ups everywhere have all jumped on the bandwagon offering their own ranges of aromatherapy products. But they are not regulated and its hard for the consumer to know what is good - or even safe about the oils they buy.

MON 12:57 Weather (b07kld0p)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b07kld0r)
Labour's deputy leader Tom Watson says it's unacceptable for MPs to abstain on the Trident vote. The Labour MP Naz Shah who was suspended for anti-semitism gives her first interview.

MON 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07knkhm)
Khrushchev's Thaw

In a series exploring decisive moments in the early years of the Cold War, Bridget Kendall brings to life the personal recollections of those who were there when the death of Stalin in 1953 dramatically changed life in Soviet Russia and ushered in a brief political thaw in the decades long dictatorship of Soviet Communism.

Featuring Vladimir Ashkenazy, Tatiana Baeva, Sergei Khrushchev, Vladlen Loginov and Alexei Shipovalnikov.

Producer: Martin Williams.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b07knkhp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Drama (b07knkhr)
Brief Lives, Episode 2

Brief Lives by Tom Fry and Sharon Kelly
Episode 2
A man is arrested for suspected arson at a primary school. The school is mainly Muslim, is there a racially motivated element? Frank and Sarah unravel the underlying cat's cradle of complex community and relationship tensions.

Director/Producer Gary Brown

Series nine of the popular afternoon drama series starring David Schofield. Frank Twist's and Sarah Gold's legal advisers operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week to set free burglars, muggers, murderers and even some innocent people who find themselves on the wrong side of a cell door. Sarah and Frank have a child but their relationship is purely business as they clean up the mean streets of Manchester. The combination of complex crime stories and witty humour make this a popular returning series.

MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b07knlh7)
Series 30, Heat 5, 2016

(5/13)
What was the name of the record label set up by Prince in 1985? Which British composer created the Poldark TV theme music? One of the earliest successes of the late Sir Peter Maxwell Davies was a musical portrayal of which British King?

Paul Gambaccini welcomes another three amateur music lovers to the fifth heat of the 2016 Counterpoint contest, at London's Maida Vale studios. He'll be testing the breadth of their musical knowledge across the usual wide range of styles and eras. They'll also have to choose a topic on which to answer individual specialist questions, with no prior warning of the subject categories. At stake is a place in the semi-finals and a chance to go forward to the 30th anniversary Final at the BBC Proms.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b07klh8c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b07knlh9)
Daljit Nagra

Radio 4's first Poet in Residence, Daljit Nagra, introduces his favourite music, poetry and prose.
Kicking things off with childhood memories of The Jam's That's Entertainment and a classic track from the Bollywood musical Sholay, Daljit continues with works by Shelley, Shakespeare, Salman Rushdie and Liz Berry. Writer Sunjeev Sahota reads from his own novel The Year of the Runaways and Daljit explains why an eccentric Anglo-Indian dictionary holds so much fascination for him.
Recorded before an audience at the Radio Theatre, with readings performed by actress Siobhan Redmond and novelist Sunjeev Sahota.

Producer: Alice Lloyd.

MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b07knqxy)
Series 14, Science of Sleep

Brian Cox and Robin Ince are joined on stage by Professor Russell Foster, Professor Richard Wiseman and comedian Katy Brand as they attempt to get to grips with the science behind Robin's insomnia. They'll be asking why we sleep, is 8 hours really enough, and why has every creature on the planet evolved with some period of inactivity? They'll also be investigating the purpose of dreams and whether analysing them has any useful purpose? Was Freud right with his symbolic interpretation of dreams, or if we dream about aggressive courgettes, does this reveal our inner most anxieties about.... aggressive courgettes?
Producer: Alexandra Feachem.

MON 17:00 PM (b07kld0t)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07kld0w)
Independent report says Russian government behind widespread doping in at least 30 sports

MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b07knqy0)
Series 65, Episode 4

The antidote to panel games pays a return visit to the Pavilion Theatre in Glasgow. Old-timers Barry Cryer and Tony Hawks are joined on the panel by locals Susan Calman and Fred Macaulay with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell attempts piano accompaniment.

Producer - Jon Naismith.

It is a BBC Studios production.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b07knqy3)
Pat tells Jennifer that they took Henry to Elfworld and he insisted on wearing the elf costume Ursula made him. Pat looks forward to taking a holiday with Henry. Jennifer pushes Pat to ring Rob to negotiate the dates. Later, Pat returns Henry's elf costume. She floats the idea of having Henry more often in the school break. Rob denies that he needs that sort of help. Pat then gets on to the idea of a holiday, but Rob thinks this is a ruse to abduct Henry. He decides that she may holiday with Henry in this country only.

Emma talks to Clarrie about looking for a place to live. Ed isn't keen on Ambridge View, while Clarrie worries about Joe coping with leaving Grange Farm. Emma says the surveyor has concluded that the damp under the sofa was caused by the tree felling and that the subsidence should be fine now. Emma has cooked Brazilian treats for the family to taste test.

Jennifer helps Kate prepare the yurt for guests and is surprised at how much she has borrowed from Home Farm. Kate shows gratitude for Jennifer's help. Pat arrives and reports back to Jennifer on her conversation with Rob. Pat is furious at his game-playing.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b07kld0y)
Simon Pegg on Star Trek, Beatrix Potter at 150, Stalking the Bogeyman

Samira Ahmed talks to Simon Pegg, writer and star of the film Star Trek: Beyond.

Front Row marks the 150th birthday of Beatrix Potter, discussing the darker side of her children's stories with Kathryn Hughes and Sally Gardner.

Stalking the Bogeyman is a new play created by David Holthouse and Markus Potter, based on David's own experience of rape as a child and the revenge he plans to reap on his attacker.

And should we follow Steven Spielberg's example and bribe our children to watch black and white films? Samira talks to BFI Family Film Programmer Justin Johnson.

Presenter: Samira Ahmed
Producer: Timothy Prosser.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07kngl0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 The Corbyn Story (b07knmp9)
Episode 2

In this series, Steve Richards examines the dramatic story of Jeremy Corbyn over the past year, and what it tells us about the bitter battle for the soul of the Labour party.

Producer: Peter Mulligan.

MON 20:30 Analysis (b07knmpc)
A Subversive History of School Reform

Change, change, change - conventional wisdom is that the classroom is the site of an endless set of reforms, a constant stream of White Papers and directives that promise 'revolution' and sudden changes in direction. Yet is the real story of school reform really one of continuity?
Professor Alison Wolf of King's College London explores the post-war history of school reform in England. Speaking to former secretaries of state, historians, and teachers, she explores the forces and events that have shaped schools. She argues that real changes have been surprisingly few and that despite a great deal of fiery rhetoric, they have generally continued across party lines. And she asks if that means that governments have perhaps been listening to what parents genuinely want?
Producer: Gemma Newby.

MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b07jys1r)
Carp

Brett Westwood goes fishing. Why is the carp king? Dexter Petley author of 'Love, Madness, Fishing' knows some answers. He went to live in a yurt in Normandy in order to spend his life carp fishing. From there and a nearby water he brings us his tales of the river bank. Carp fishing is now a very high-tech pastime. Electronic bite detectors and gourmet bait balls are part of the business but an older intimacy with the carp is still crucial to land a fish; the angler must know how to read the water and track its hidden denizens. Meanwhile the Natural History Museum's Oliver Crimmen, Japanese art expert Timon Screech, Steve Varcoe from Aron's Jewish Delicatessen and anthropologist Desmond Morris discuss why various cultures continue to value the fish with a face that only a mother could love. Readings by Anton Lesser. Producer: Tim Dee.

MON 21:30 The Long View (b07knmp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b07kld10)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b07kld12)
Russia accused of state-sponsored doping

President of the World Anti-Doping Agency tells us they're calling for Russia's athletes to be banned from the Rio Olympics. MPs back renewal of Trident nuclear weapons programme. And the head of the Council of Europe tells us Turkey would not continue to be a member of the organisation if it decided to re-introduce the death penalty.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07knqy5)
Dirt Road, Episode 1

Booker prize-winner James Kelman's new novel is a potent exploration of love, grief and the power of music.

Reeling from a family bereavement, young musician Murdo and his father prepare to leave Scotland for a road trip to the Southern States of America.

Reader Finn den Hertog
Abridged by David Jackson Young
Produced Eilidh McCreadie.

MON 23:00 Don't Log Off (b07knqy7)
Series 7, Episode 4

Alan Dein continues his nocturnal excursions via Facebook and Skype, hearing the real life dramas of random strangers.

Tonight he connects with a Nepalese civil engineering student one year on from the earthquake that devastated Kathmandu, a Jamaican living in Panama City who is waiting to fulfil his childhood dream of joining the US army and a man in Tanzania, expecting the birth of his first child.

Producer: Clare Walker.

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07knrhl)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster as MPs debate the renewal of the UK's Trident nuclear missile system and MPs are told a security review is underway after the Nice attack.
Peers question whether the Government can trigger the UK's withdrawal from the EU without parliament's approval and MPs question the amount of interest students pay on their loans.


TUESDAY 19 JULY 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b07kld2s)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 Voices of the First World War (b04mhd5d)
By Night

There are now no living veterans of WW1, but it is still possible to go back to the First World War through the memories of those who actually took part. In a unique partnership between the Imperial War Museums and the BBC, two sound archive collections featuring survivors of the war are brought together for the first time. The Imperial War Museums' holdings include a major oral history resource of remarkable recordings made in the 1980s and early 1990s with the remaining survivors of the conflict. The interviews were done not for immediate use or broadcast, but because it was felt that this diminishing resource that could never be replenished, would be of unique value in the future. Speakers recall in great detail as though it were yesterday the conditions of the trenches, the brutality of the battlefield, the experience of seeing their first casualty and hearing their first shell, their daily and nightly routines as soldiers, pilots or navy members of all ranks, and their psychological state in the face of so much trauma. This series will broadcast many of these recordings for the first time. Among the BBC's extensive collection of archive featuring first hand recollections of the conflict a century ago, are the interviews recorded for the 1964 TV series 'The Great War', which vividly bring to life the human experience of those fighting and living through the war.

Dan Snow narrates this new oral history, which will be broadcast in short seasons throughout the commemorative period.

Programme 5 - By Night
Dan Snow looks at soldiers' experiences at night on the battlefields of the Western Front during the early stages war, when they had to be more alert than during the day.

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07kld2v)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07kld2x)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07kld2z)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b07kld31)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07l5dnz)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Anna Drew.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b07kld33)
Northern Ireland's priorities for farming post-Brexit, Increased risk of skin cancer for farmers, Potato irrigation technology

Farmers in Northern Ireland are hoping to maintain their farm subsidies post Brexit.
If you're are out in the fields in the blazing sunshine - the NHS says "Cover Up, Mate".
The Elveden Estate near Thetford on the Norfolk border is working with Cambridge University Farm to develop precision moisture monitoring, to 'hear' what each potato plant needs.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b01slvgp)
Spotted Crake

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. David Attenborough presents the Spotted Crake. If it weren't for its whiplash song, the spotted crake could win a prize as our least visible bird. Unlike its showy relatives the coot and the moorhen, this polka-dotted skulker is notoriously hard to find and only rarely betrays itself by singing.

TUE 06:00 Today (b07kpfgv)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b07kpfgx)
Trevor Cox

Inside a Victorian sewer, with fat deposits sliding off the ceiling and disappearing down the back of his shirt, Trevor Cox had an epiphany. Listening to the strange sound of his voice reverberating inside the sewer, he wondered where else in the world he could experience unusual and surprising noises.

As an acoustic engineer, Trevor started his career tackling unwanted noises, from clamour in the classroom to poor acoustics in concert halls. But his jaunt inside a sewer sparked a new quest to find and celebrate the 'sonic wonders of the world'.

In this episode he shares these sounds with Jim Al-Khalili and discusses the science behind them.

Producer: Michelle Martin.

TUE 09:30 One to One (b07kpfh2)
Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to Helen Pike

Unexpected educational journeys: the journalist Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the first female head teacher in the 500 year history of Magdalen College School in Oxford.

The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam had a challenging childhood punctuated by periods of homelessness but she was always expected to achieve academically. She won a bursary to a private school which led her onto Cambridge University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role education can have. For One to One she's speaking to three people who have been on unexpected educational journeys.

Today she meets Helen Pike. Born in Preston and educated entirely in the state sector, Helen Pike has almost exclusively worked in private schools and has just been appointed as the first female head teacher in the 500 year history of the independent Magdalen College School. At one stage she was the head teacher of the school that Datshiane attended (although not while Datshiane was there). They speak about background, confidence and breaking boundaries.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

TUE 09:45 Primo Levi's The Periodic Table (b07kp709)
Vanadium, Part 1

Janet Suzman introduces a major new dramatization of Primo Levi's short stories about our human relationship with the chemical elements that make up our universe - a book the Royal Institution of Great Britain named 'the best science book ever'. Starring Henry Goodman, Akbar Kurtha, Erich Redman and Juliet Aubrey. Dramatized by Graham White from the translation by Raymond Rosenthal.

Vanadium Part 1: In the course of his work as a chemist in a paint factory in the 1960s, Primo Levi receives a letter from one of the factory's German clients, signed by a Doktor Muller. Could this be the Doktor Muller who had overseen Levi's work as a prisoner in the lab at Auschwitz?

Produced and directed by Marc Beeby and Emma Harding.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07kld35)
Young Women and Social Media

Louise Pentland, also known as Sprinkles of Glitter, is one of the most popular YouTube bloggers in the UK. She speaks to Emma about her career and following. What is it like to be a celebrity online?

How much of ourselves should we present on social media? Amalia Ulman is a performance artist and the creator of "Excellences & Perfections," a project which aimed to demonstrate how femininity is constructed online. Ruby Elliot, known as Rubyetc, is a British illustrator who takes a far more open approach. She uses social media to express her own struggles with mental health.

With the rise of live streaming websites and apps like Facebook Live and Periscope, how should harassment and crime shared online be tracked? And what responsibility do we have as viewers? Rossalyn Warren is a Senior News Reporter for Buzzfeed UK. Steve Shepherd is an Operations and Media Consultant for the UK Safer Internet Centre.

And, we discuss social media's impact on social justice and politics. Patrisse Cullors is one the founders of the Black Lives Matter Movement, which started online and has resulted in an international outcry against police brutality and institutional racism. Emma Dabiri is a cultural commentator and teaching fellow in the Africa Department at the School of Oriental and African Studies. Mollie Goodfellow is the Editorial Assistant for the Sky News Political Team.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07kpfh7)
Lunch, The Unlived Life

by Marcy Kahan

A platonic romantic comedy.
Old flatmates Bill and Bella meet every month for lunch and swap news.
After a stint of jury duty Bill believes he should have been a barrister.

Bill ..... Stephen Mangan
Bella ..... Claire Skinner

Directed by Sally Avens.

TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b07kpfh9)
Fox

Brett Westwood investigates the biology and culture of the Fox - a creature long believed to be the devil in disguise. With poetry by Ted Hughes and Simon Armitage, the rollocking medieval bestseller Reynard the Fox, a fox seduction in an abandoned ruin, and a stakeout in a Bristol back garden with urban fox expert Professor Stephen Harris.

Producer: Melvin Rickarby.

TUE 11:30 John's Songs - A Day with a Music Hall Master (b07kpy3v)
Born near Euston Station in 1931, John Foreman is a singer of Music Hall songs, folk songs and more. He has been singing at clubs across Britain since the great folk revival of the 1950s.

Recovering well from a recent stroke, John has decided to clear out his North London home. We join him as he picks through a lifetime of memorabilia and his own beautiful self-printed songsheets, hearing him burst into song.

The golden era of the Music Hall had long gone by the time John was born, but he learned a vast number of songs from his parents, from neighbours and from friends. He went on to sing at folk clubs throughout the country and became one of the founding members of the British Music Hall Society.

John's forebears include clowns, circus ringmasters and dancers. After a childhood in the blitz, he worked as a teacher, busker and Punch and Judy man. As The Broadsheet King, he has printed and bound countless pamphlets, songsheets and books. We eavesdrop as John looks back on his life and the songs that he has loved.

Producer: Tom Woolfenden
A Loftus production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b07kld37)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 The Why Factor (b07kpy3x)
Series 3, Conspiracy Theories

Throughout history people have held conspiracy theories which cast doubt on the official narratives of some very serious events - from the Holocaust to 9/11, Diana to JFK, Lockerbie to Sandy Hook.
What prompts people to think in this way? How should Governments react to the people who doubt them? Or are they in fact critical in our attempts to hold Governments to account?
Mike Williams talks to a psychologist, a Professor of Political Science and a conspiracy theorist as he attempts to separate fact from fiction.

Presenter:Mike Williams
Producer: Ben Carter
Editor:Andrew Smith

(Photo: Conspiracy word cloud concept, with abstract background. Credit to Shutterstock).

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b07kld39)
Call You and Yours: Are You One Of The New Poor?

A new study examines incomes and living standards in the UK and suggests that though record numbers of people are in work, their standards of living are not rising. The new poor, the report says, have jobs but struggle to make ends meet.

Are you among them? Would you say you are one of the "new poor" and what is that like?

Or maybe your children are in work, but less well off than you were at their age?

We want to hear your stories. E-mail us - YouandYours@BBC.co.uk and leave a phone number so we can call you back.

Or you can call us from 11am on Tuesday on 03700 100 444

And join Winifred Robinson for Call You and Yours at a quarter past 12.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b07kld3c)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b07kld3f)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07kpy3z)
The Hungarian Revolution

In October 1956, Hungarians marched peacefully in support of reform. Within hours, the protests had become a revolution. Soviet tanks were sent in, but when they withdrew Hungarians appeared to have triumphed - until the tanks came back.

Bridget hears the stories of two students and a young journalist. All three were in the street outside the national radio station when the conflict with the secret police turned the protests into a revolution. And she hears what happened when one of them took up a gun.

With Peter Pallai, Matyas Sarkozi, Sandor Vaci

Producer: Phil Tinline.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b07knqy3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b01p0bms)
McLevy - Series 9, A Dangerous Remedy

New series of Victorian detective dramas, starring Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond.

Written by David Ashton.

Episode one: A Dangerous Remedy.

McLevy investigates a series of street attacks on clients of the Just Land - while Mulholland's Aunt Katie turns up unexpectedly from Ireland pursued by an angry neighbour.

Other parts are played by the cast.
Producer/Director: Bruce Young.

TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b07kpy42)
Series 9, Rivals

Fights for territory, standing your ground and petty feuds - Josie Long hears stories of rivalry. From a bitter battle conducted in a laundrette to an ongoing argument between academics on either side of the world.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b07kpy44)
Series 8, Disruption

The series that looks at current events through the lens of psychology - Michael Blastland explores the quirky ways in which we humans think, behave and make decisions.

In this episode - disruption and how it affects us. Cancelled trains or political and economic turmoil - when things happen beyond our control, how do we react psychologically? Not well, usually.

We don't like uncertainty. We tend to avoid a change to the status quo, almost at all cost. But are there cases when a bit of disruption has benefits? The Human Zoo team explores everything from displaced German towns and lateral problem-solving to comedy improvisation and music composition.

Michael Blastland is joined by resident Zoo psychologist Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School, and roving reporter Timandra Harkness.

Contributors this week include behavioural scientist Dr Stian Reimers, City University London; broadcaster Nicholas Parsons; psychologist Prof Thomas Ormerod; members of Spontaneity Shop, comedy improvisation company; and broadcaster and journalist, Tim Harford.

Producer: Dom Byrne
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 16:00 Document (b07kpy46)
Fu Bingchang's Diaries

Fu Bingchang was the Chinese ambassador to Moscow as the Second World War became the Cold War. During his time in Moscow, as the two great communist powers felt their way towards their own kind of post-war settlement, Fu Bingchang kept a personal diary in which he recorded not just the details of his meetings and engagements, but also about his personal life and private hopes and fears for the future.

There are very few records of the birth of post-war Chinese diplomacy, and the diaries are an important piece in the jigsaw of national alignments during the 1940s. In this Cold War edition of Document, his granddaughter Yee Wah Foo of the University of Lincoln opens up the diaries to the public for the first time and shares the inner thoughts of China's man in Moscow.

TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b07kpy48)
Francesca Simon and Lloyd Langford

Horrid Henry creator Francesca Simon and Welsh comedian Lloyd Langford talk favourite books with Harriett Gilbert.
They are: A Wrinkle In Time by Madeleine L'Engle, So The Wind Won't Blow it All Away by Richard Brautigan and The Train by Georges Simenon.
But who chose which book?
Producer Beth O'Dea.

TUE 17:00 PM (b07kld3h)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07kld3k)
Owen Smith now the only challenger to Jeremy Corbyn's Labour leadership; Turkish government widens its purge; and Melania vs Michelle, spot the difference

TUE 18:30 The Missing Hancocks (b04n67xl)
The Newspaper

Between 1954 and 1959, BBC Radio recorded 102 episodes of Ray Galton and Alan Simpson's comedy classic Hancock's Half Hour. The first modern sitcom, it made stars of Tony Hancock, Sid James and Kenneth Williams, and launched Galton and Simpson on one of the most successful comedy-writing partnerships in history. But 20 episodes of the show are missing from the BBC archives, and have not been heard since their original transmission nearly sixty years ago. Now, five of those episodes have been lovingly re-recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC Radio Theatre, featuring a stellar cast led by Kevin McNally as The Lad Himself.

Tonight's episode: The Newspaper. Tony inherits a newspaper, and sets about changing the world.

Written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, and with the classic score newly recorded by the BBC Concert Orchestra, the show stars Kevin McNally, Kevin Eldon, Simon Greenall, Robin Sebastian and Susy Kane. The Newspaper was last broadcast in February 1956.

Produced by Ed Morrish and Neil Pearson.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07kpydl)
David is in trouble, and is Pip avoiding Rex?

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b07kld3m)
John Wilson meets the former member of pop band Destiny's Child, Michelle Williams, as she prepares to host and perform at the Late Night Gospel Prom at the Royal Albert Hall.

Brexageddon?! is a one-off, 30-minute sitcom satirising the EU referendum and its effect on the nation. Its writers and stars, Jolyon Rubinstein and Heydon Prowse, reveal the pressures of delivering time sensitive laughs.

Can bricks and mortar inspire great music? The architect David Adjaye and his brother Peter, the composer aka AJ Kwame, discuss their new project, Dialogues, an album inspired by David's buildings which include the Stephen Lawrence Centre in Deptford, London, and the Genesis Pavilion in Miami.

And is the Pokemon Go craze a boon or a curse for art galleries and museums? Curator of Videogames at the V&A museum, Marie Foulston considers the popular game's impact.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07kpfh7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b07kpydn)
What Happened at Aston Hall Hospital?

Police are investigating allegations of abuse made by people who, as children, were sent for psychiatric treatment at Aston Hall Hospital in Derbyshire. Some patients say they were only sent there because they were difficult to manage or had behavioural problems.

The Medical Superintendent is accused of 'experimenting' on his child patients, giving them an anaesthetic called sodium amytal in therapy sessions throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Phil Kemp investigates the history of this treatment, which was used on shell shocked soldiers during World War Two, employed as a 'truth serum' by police and intelligence agencies, and by the 80's had become implicated in false memory cases. The hospital closed in 2004 and the Medical Superintendent died in 1976, leaving his patients struggling to make sense of what happened to them at Aston Hall.

Although treatment records reveal the sodium amytal was used on some children, former patients question what really went on while they were drugged. File on 4 opens the medical archives and hears from former staff to piece together a troubled chapter in the history of psychiatric care, and in the lives of former patients.

Reporter - Phil Kemp
Producer - Ruth Evans.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b07kld3p)
Signing of the Marrakesh Treaty, Suggested summer reads

The Marrakesh Treaty was designed to make the sharing of books more seamless between countries, and therefore make more literature available to people with visual impairments.

It needed 20 countries to ratify it, and this was achieved at the end of June.

Dan Pescod from the Royal National Institute of Blind People tells Peter White what happens next, and what it could mean for readers in the UK.

Meanwhile. three guests give their suggestions for absorbing summer reads, and talk about the devices they use to read their books. They are: BBC Washington Correspondent Gary O'Donoghue, author Tanvir Bush and avid reader, Adrienne Chalmers.

Adrienne Chalmers's choices:
Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke published by Bloomsbury
The Stone Diaries by Carol Shields published by Fourth Estate

Gary O'Donoghue's choices:
The Lonely City by Olivia Laing published by Canongate Books
Hotels of North America by Rick Moody published by Little Brown and Company

Tanvir Bush's choices:
Good Kings, Bad Kings by Susan Nussbaum published by Oneworld Publications
Sight Unseen by Georgina Kleege published by Yale University Press

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Lee Kumutat.

TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b07kpydq)
Papilloedema; Cardiac death in sport; Diagnosing early miscarriage; Warfarin

What is Papilloedema? The condition has been in the headlines as an optometrist was found guilty of manslaughter after missing abnormalities in the eyes of an eight year old child. Plus, Margaret McCartney debates the accuracy of screening young people for Sudden Cardiac Death in Sport. How to diagnose early eiscarriage in women who are bleeding in early pregnancy? And the serendipitous story of how the anti-clotting agent warfarin was first discovered.

TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b07kpfgx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 21:58 Weather (b07kld3r)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b07kld3t)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07kpyds)
Dirt Road, Episode 2

Booker prize-winner James Kelman's new novel is a potent exploration of love, grief and the power of music.

Murdo's American road trip gets off to the worst possible start as he and his dad find themselves stranded in Allentown, Mississippi.

Read by Finn den Hertog
Abridged by David Jackson Young
Producer Eilidh McCreadie.

TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b07knqxy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]

TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07kpyks)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster on the new Chancellor Stephen Hammond's first Commons outing. Also in the programme: an update on the attempted coup in Turkey, and on the Committee corridor, MPs question the Defence Secretary Michael Fallon, and take evidence on Vauxhall Zafira B fires. Editor: Rachel Byrne.


WEDNESDAY 20 JULY 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b07kld5y)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 Voices of the First World War (b04n307t)
Morale

There are now no living veterans of WW1, but it is still possible to go back to the First World War through the memories of those who actually took part. In a unique partnership between the Imperial War Museums and the BBC, two sound archive collections featuring survivors of the war are brought together for the first time. The Imperial War Museums' holdings include a major oral history resource of remarkable recordings made in the 1980s and early 1990s with the remaining survivors of the conflict. The interviews were done not for immediate use or broadcast, but because it was felt that this diminishing resource that could never be replenished, would be of unique value in the future. Speakers recall in great detail as though it were yesterday the conditions of the trenches, the brutality of the battlefield, the experience of seeing their first casualty and hearing their first shell, their daily and nightly routines as soldiers, pilots or navy members of all ranks, and their psychological state in the face of so much trauma. This series will broadcast many of these recordings for the first time. Among the BBC's extensive collection of archive featuring first hand recollections of the conflict a century ago, are the interviews recorded for the 1964 TV series 'The Great War', which vividly bring to life the human experience of those fighting and living through the war.
Dan Snow narrates this new oral history, which will be broadcast in short seasons throughout the commemorative period.

Programme 6 - Morale
Dan Snow looks at the morale of men serving in the First World War in 1914, from the relationship between officers and their troops, to their activities during rest periods, and steeling themselves for combat.

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07kld62)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07kld66)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07kld6d)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b07kld6j)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07lvwh4)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Anna Drew.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b07kld6l)
Coronation meadows, Natural flood relief, Game fairs

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Mark Smalley.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zr0ly)
Grasshopper Warbler

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the grasshopper warbler. The reeling song of the grasshopper warbler sounds more like an insect than a bird. Like the paying out of an angler's line from a reel, the grasshopper warbler's song spills out from the bush or bramble clump in which he sits. You'll hear it most often at dawn or dusk in overgrown scrubby or marshy areas.

WED 06:00 Today (b07kq5ss)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 Bringing Up Britain (b07kq5sv)
Series 9, Children and Gender

Mariella Frostrup and guests discuss parenting through questions of gender identity.

Mariella Frostrup and a panel of experts discuss how parents can best help youngsters through the complicated subject of gender identity. What does gender identity actually mean and how soon do youngsters acquire their own sense of their gender? What should the role of parents be in cases where children want to explore different gender identities or demonstrate gender dysphoria?

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

WED 09:45 Primo Levi's The Periodic Table (b07kq5sx)
Argon

Henry Goodman stars as Primo Levi in a major new dramatization of Levi's short stories about our human relationship with the chemical elements that make up our universe. Introduced by Janet Suzman and dramatised by Graham White from the translation by Raymond Rosenthal.

Argon: Primo imagines a fantasy meeting with his Piedmontese ancestors, who share a number of characteristics with the noble, rare and inert gases, such as Argon.

Produced and directed by Emma Harding and Marc Beeby.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07kld6n)
The new prime minister faces her first PMQs. Plus the campaign to protect women's rights post-Brexit.

The new Prime Minister Theresa May faces her first PMQ's - how will she fare? Twelve women's organisations - led by the Fawcett Society - have come together to launch a campaign to fight for women's rights to be protected post-Brexit. Should step-parents be allowed to stay in a stepchild's life even after a breakup or divorce? Plus Jane Rodgers talks about her latest novel, Eleanor and Conrad. And Phoebe Waller-Bridge who writes and stars in a new comedy Fleabag, for BBC 3 - available online from Thursday - reveals all about her sex-obsessed, cash-strapped and constantly inappropriate comedy creation.

Presented by Emma Barnett
Producer Beverley Purcell.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b07kq62w)
Lunch, Lose the Scarf

by Marcy Kahan

A platonic romantic comedy.
Old flatmates Bill and Bella meet every month for lunch and swap news.
Bill needs Bella's advice on a new wardrobe; but why does Bill want a new look?

Bill ..... Stephen Mangan
Bella ..... Claire Skinner

Directed by Sally Avens.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b07kq6s2)
Josephine and Sarah - The Smell of Death

Fi Glover introduces a conversation about mutual support through tough times, and how a community can pull together. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 The Corbyn Story (b07knmp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Plum House (b07krdvm)
Series 1, Lights, Camera, Pudding

Comedy about the inept staff at a historic house, starring Simon Callow, Miles Jupp and Jane Horrocks.

Every year thousands of tourists flock to the Lake District. But one place they never go to is Plum House - the former country home of terrible poet George Pudding (1779-1848). Now a crumbling museum, losing money hand over fist, it struggles to stay open under it's eccentric curator Peter Knight (Simon Callow).

Can anyone save Plum House from irreversible decline?

In this episode, the team at the museum are startled to hear that Peter has agreed to Plum House being used as a location in a period drama. And not just any period drama, but Buttermere Hall - the Cumbrian Poldark, the Lake District Downton Abbey - which just happens to be Maureen and Emma's favourite Sunday night series. It could be a massive publicity coup for Plum House, but with Peter dreaming of a starring role, Maureen insisting on catering for the crew, Alan fretting about his broken spade and Emma desperate to meet leading man Christopher Tennyson, will the team end up blowing it?

Written by Ben Cottam and Paul McKenna
Script Edited by Sarah Cartwright
Directed and Produced by Paul Schlesinger
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b07kld6q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 The Why Factor (b07krdvp)
Series 3, Magicians

Tricksters, conjurers, the world of magicians. Who are they and why do they do what they do? We began by asking ourselves why we enjoy magic shows and why we allow them to deceive us. But the psychology of the magicians themselves is as interesting as the psychology of the audience. So what is in the mind of a magician?

Presenter:Mike Williams
Producer: Ben Carter
Editor:Andrew Smith

First broadcast on the BBC World Service.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b07kld6s)
Paying for the Olympics, NHS continuing care, Sat-nav failure

You & Yours has heard from families who have been abandoned by some "no-win, no-fee" claims firms who told them they might be able to get back money they have paid in care fees. They are among thousands of families who paid for care, when they might have been entitled to NHS funding. Some sold homes to pay for the care.

This summer's Olympics in Brazil will cost an estimated fifteen billion pounds. The 2012 games in London cost nine billion, with questions remaining over the long-term benefits. It has led to calls from some for a rethink. We examine if it is time to find a new way to pay for and stage the Olympic Games.

A good guarantee can make it much easier to part with your money when you're buying something expensive. But what rights does a guarantee really give you when your goods go wrong? If a company goes back on its word, what can you do to hold them to terms of the guarantee?

Satellite navigation systems have led many people to abandon road maps altogether. They are a particular boon to the army of couriers who deliver the things we buy online. But there are some addresses where satnavs really struggle, where consistently the driver is sent to the wrong place. We speak to a You & Yours listener who's fed up that her shopping rarely turns up, and we investigate why it happens.

Producer: Jonathan Hallewell
Presenter: Winifred Robinson.

WED 12:57 Weather (b07kld6x)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b07kld6z)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

WED 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07krdvr)
The Congo Coup

In a series tracing decisive moments in the early years of the Cold War, Bridget Kendall hears the story of the independence struggle in the Congo in the words of people who were there.

Featuring Jacques Brassinne, Onadikondo Wung'a Lomami and Georges Nzongola-Ntaalaja

Producer: Martin Williams.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b07kpydl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b01p40h1)
McLevy - Series 9, No Looking Back

Victorian detective drama series, starring Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond.

Written by David Ashton.

Episode two: No Looking Back.

When a corpse turns up in a fisherman's net, McLevy discovers the murdered man had last been seen at the Just Land.

Other parts are played by the cast.
Producer/Director: Bruce Young.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b07kld71)
Money Box Live: The Summer Childcare Conundrum

School may be out for the summer but now the headache for working parents really begins. The Family and Childcare Trust's latest report into holiday childcare shows that formal out of school care is in short supply and costs are high.

Lesley Curwen and an expert panel also discuss forthcoming changes to free child care provision for children aged 2-4, how this could affect your family finances and the obligations on the Government to help out.

Whatever you want to know call us on 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday, standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply. Or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

Presenter: Lesley Curwen
Producer: Lesley McAlpine
Editor: Andrew Smith.

WED 15:30 Inside Health (b07kpydq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b07krdvv)
Sociological discussion programme, presented by Laurie Taylor.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b07kld73)
Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

WED 17:00 PM (b07kld75)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07kld77)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 I've Never Seen Star Wars (b04yk55d)
Series 6, Gyles Brandreth

Marcus Brigstocke persuades his reluctant guest to try new experiences: things they really ought to have done by now. Some experiences are loved, some are loathed, in this show all about embracing the new.

This week, Gyles Brandreth is persuaded to spend a day doing absolutely nothing, and writes his first ever pop song.

WED 19:00 The Archers (b07krdvx)
Lynda and Fallon go head to head, and Tom feels torn.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b07kld79)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07kq62w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b07krdvz)
Nuclear Weapons

MP's have voted overwhelmingly to renew our Trident nuclear weapons system and the first job of any new prime minister is to write the "letters of last resort" which contain prime ministers' instructions for what to do in the event of a nuclear attack. The handwritten notes are taken to the UK's four Vanguard-class submarines, the ships which carry the ballistic missiles the Royal Navy calls "the nation's ultimate weapon" and contain instructions of what to do in the worst-case nuclear scenario: the obliteration of the UK state. The value of nuclear weapons is in their deterrence - the promise of mutually assured destruction. Theresa May has told the Commons that she wouldn't hesitate, but she could do no other. It is rumoured previous prime ministers may not have been so certain. By their nature the letters have to make broad moral judgments rather than situationally-dependent ones. They're about morality and ethics, not tactics. In the event that deterrence fails and we are attacked, would it be moral to use our nuclear weapons against civilians in retaliation? What would you do in the event of nuclear war? Under the 1949 Geneva Conventions, collective punishment is a war crime. If you think the moral principles of collective punishment are clear when it comes to nuclear weapons what about in other stories in the news? Is it always wrong to punish the innocent in pursuit of a wider justice? Should we ban all Russian athletes from the Rio Olympics to punish the drug cheats? Is protecting American citizens against terrorist attacks a greater good than the right of Muslims to travel to the USA? The morality of retaliation and collective punishment on the Moral Maze.

WED 20:45 David Baddiel Tries to Understand (b07krdw1)
Series 2, Pi

David is asked by a member of the public to try and understand Pi, and what it means for its digits to continue infinitely. He starts out with a mathematician and the biggest circle he can find, and then tracks down a philosopher. But can he understand it well enough to explain it himself - to one particularly demanding member of the public?

Producer: Giles Edwards.

WED 21:00 From the Cockpit to the Operating Theatre (b05y16mv)
The human brain is fallible. In emergency situations it can be easily overloaded with information or be unable to override social rules of hierarchy and deference. This can have disastrous consequences, particularly in scenarios like aeroplane failures or surgical emergencies. On March 27, 1977 one of the deadliest ever air crashes happened in Tenerife, killing 583 people. There was nothing technically wrong with either plane involved in the collision. The overriding factor was found to be the authority gradient in the cockpit of 1 plane with the high status captain overruling the co pilot who thought they weren't cleared for take off. This was a game changing event for the airline industry. Claudia Hammond investigates how years of research in aviation psychology have made events like that a rarity and have given rise to huge improvements in understanding human behaviour and how mistakes are made so deathly disasters can be prevented. The world of aviation has embraced a so called 'just culture' where reporting errors and near misses are encouraged to prevent a similar mistake turning into a disaster in the future. But what has medicine learned from aviation psychology and how close is it to a similar just culture? Surgical check lists have been introduced to try and prevent errors like operating on the wrong limb and making sure teams communicate with one another. But how effective are they and could surgery learn more from aviation about the psychology of safety and being open about errors to prevent them in the future?

WED 21:30 Bringing Up Britain (b07kq5sv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b07kld7c)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b07kld7f)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07krkgw)
Dirt Road, Episode 3

Booker prize-winner James Kelman's new novel is a potent exploration of love, grief and the power of music.

Stranded overnight in Allentown, Mississippi, Murdo stumbles across a rehearsal by a group of Zydeco musicians.
Read by Finn den Hertog

Abridged by David Jackson Young
Producer Eilidh McCreadie.

WED 23:00 Expenses Only (b07krkgy)
Graphics

Put away your P45, you're not going to need it - it's Expenses Only. Our two young interns Tim and Miranda face facetious directors, frustrating commutes and flirtatious trumpets as they begin the first week of their internship in London within the fickle world of art and graphic design.

Expenses Only is a narrative sketch show by new writer Alex Lynch, centred around internships and the world of work experience.

In each episode, the show's two leading twenty-something protagonists, Tim (enthusiastic worker) and Miranda (jaded graduate), attempt to break into a different industry through a series of increasingly challenging placements.

The series is made up of an ensemble cast and is also tied together using linking sketches, signature ad-breaks and the Narrator who, with his deadpan delivery and wry commentary, guides us through the schadenfreude and chaos that unravels across an episode.

Recorded live at Bush Hall, London.

Creator / Writer: Alex Lynch
Additional material by Charlotte Michael
Director: Celia De Wolff
Executive Producer: Peter Hoare
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:15 Domestic Science (b07krkh0)
Episode 1

A heady combination of maths, science and comedy with Festival of The Spoken Nerd trio who are stand up Mathematician Matt Parker, Physicist Steve Mould and Physicist and musician Helen Arney. It's science that you can play along with at home as the team look at domestic phenomena that we relate to on a day to day basis.
In this episode the Shepard tone is explored along with the radioactivity of bananas and the conductivity of bones.

Producer... Julia McKenzie

A BBC Studios Production.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07krmby)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster.


THURSDAY 21 JULY 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b07kld97)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 Voices of the First World War (b04n62k9)
Prisoners of War

There are now no living veterans of WW1, but it is still possible to go back to the First World War through the memories of those who actually took part. In a unique partnership between the Imperial War Museums and the BBC, two sound archive collections featuring survivors of the war are brought together for the first time. The Imperial War Museums' holdings include a major oral history resource of remarkable recordings made in the 1980s and early 1990s with the remaining survivors of the conflict. The interviews were done not for immediate use or broadcast, but because it was felt that this diminishing resource that could never be replenished, would be of unique value in the future. Speakers recall in great detail as though it were yesterday the conditions of the trenches, the brutality of the battlefield, the experience of seeing their first casualty and hearing their first shell, their daily and nightly routines as soldiers, pilots or navy members of all ranks, and their psychological state in the face of so much trauma. This series will broadcast many of these recordings for the first time. Among the BBC's extensive collection of archive featuring first hand recollections of the conflict a century ago, are the interviews recorded for the 1964 TV series 'The Great War', which vividly bring to life the human experience of those fighting and living through the war.
Dan Snow narrates this new oral history, which will be broadcast in short seasons throughout the commemorative period.

Programme 9 - Prisoners of War
Using the voices of soldiers who were among the first to be taken prisoner, Dan Snow explores the conditions they endured in German camps during the early stages of the war.

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07kld99)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07kld9c)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07kld9f)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b07kld9h)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07ly2j0)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Anna Drew.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b07kld9k)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Mark Smalley.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcfq)
Stock Dove

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the stock dove. Perhaps 'stock pigeon' would be a better name, because they're like slightly smaller versions of the woodpigeon. Unlike their bigger relatives they have no white marks on their wings or neck and are more blue-grey in colour. When they fly, they look dumpier ...stockier you might say. Unlike woodpigeons, stock doves haven't taken to a life in town and they're mainly birds of wooded farmland.

THU 06:00 Today (b07krycd)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 How Low Can Rates Go? (b07krycg)
Martin Wolf, Chief Economic Commentator of the Financial Times, examines how policymakers are testing the norms of economic life as they seek solutions to slow growth. The payment of interest goes back to the Babylonians. Today, the business of banking is based on paying savers and charging borrowers for money. Negative interest rates, paying banks for holding our funds, violates this established norm. Yet, five central banks, which together oversee a quarter of the world's economy, have opted to impose negative rates on the commercial banks that must use their services. The aim of this unconventional policy is to convince people to spend and invest rather save. The results so far have been mixed. So might central banks be running out of options to boost economic growth, nearly ten years after the start of the last financial crisis? Martin Wolf talks with economists and central bankers, past and present, about why ideas once thought utterly shocking, such as "helicopter money" and a the abolition of cash, are being openly considered. How might such policies affect the way people spend and save in the future? And how low can interest rates go?

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

THU 09:45 Primo Levi's The Periodic Table (b07krycj)
Sulphur and Titanium

Janet Suzman introduces a major new dramatization of Primo Levi's short stories about our human relationship with the chemical elements - a book the Royal Institution of Great Britain named 'the best science book ever'. Dramatised by Graham White from the translation by Raymond Rosenthal.

1) Sulphur - Ben Crowe plays a boilerman who saves Primo's factory from disaster.
2) Titanium - Evie Killip reads this short story about a little girl who is fascinated by a man painting with white paint

Produced and directed by Marc Beeby and Emma Harding.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07kld9m)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07krycl)
Lunch, Truth Games

by Marcy Kahan

A platonic romantic comedy.
Old flatmates Bill and Bella meet every month for lunch and swap news.
Bella believes her mother has sabotaged her relationship with Guy and Bill has been to see Suki's stand up and he's not laughing.

Bill ..... Stephen Mangan
Bella ..... Claire Skinner

Directed by Sally Avens.

THU 11:00 Crossing Continents (b07krycn)
Stealing Innocence in Malawi

Ed Butler explores the secretive and shocking world of Malawi's "hyenas". These are the men hired to sexually initiate or cleanse adolescent and pre-adolescent girls - some said to be 12 years old, or even younger. It's a traditional custom that is endorsed and funded by the communities themselves, even the children's families. We meet some of the victims, the regional chief campaigning to stop the practice, and the hyenas themselves, and ask if enough is being done to stamp out a custom that's not just damaging on a human scale, but is also undermining the country's economic development.

Reported and produced by Ed Butler.

THU 11:30 Breaking Bard (b07krycq)
Episode 2

Fiona Lindsay and a panel of play-makers join in the table talk with the actors and director as they begin work bringing the York Mystery Plays from page to stage.

Fiona has spent much of her career working at the RSC with actors, writers and directors as they gather round the table to begin work getting a classic text to its feet and looking for new insights and connections in classic texts for contemporary audiences.

Though they have been performed regularly since the 1300s, it's only the second time in their near-700 year history that the York Mystery Plays have been staged in the Minster itself. It's an epic production, with many hundreds involved, including a large community cast of non-professional actors, joining the professional lead actor, Phillip McGinley playing Jesus Christ.

Joining Fiona Lindsay as they focus their work on the staging of The Crucifixion are the writer and adaptor Mike Poulton, who recently wrote the acclaimed stage version of Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies for the RSC, actor Philip McGinley whose credits include Game of Thrones and seasons at the National Theatre, and Director Phillip Breen. They read the text out loud for each other and try out exercises to try and find surprising new insights into the greatest story ever told.

In what new ways can this play compel a modern audience?


A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b07kld9r)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 The Why Factor (b07krycs)
Series 3, Addiction

Mike Williams investigates the biochemistry of the brain's reward system in an effort to detect the cause of addiction. How can things which initially bring such pleasure become such a destructive force? something that's start off being pleasurable end up making us feel so low? Mike Williams talks to scientists and former addicts who speak frankly as he searches for some answers.

Presenter: Mike Williams
Producer:Ben Carter
Editor:Andrew Smith

First broadcast on the BBC World Service.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b07kld9t)
Consumer affairs programme.

THU 12:57 Weather (b07kld9w)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b07kld9y)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07krycv)
The Berlin Wall Crisis

As part of her series tracing the crucial turning-points of the early Cold War, Bridget Kendall tells the story of the crisis that led up to the building of the Berlin Wall.

By 1961, so many were fleeing communist East Germany that the country was in crisis. So the government built the Berlin Wall to stop them. Would-be escapees were regularly gunned down.

Bridget hears the stories of three people who successfully fled East Berlin - one before the Wall went up, two who pulled it off even with the Wall in place.

And she finds out why they wanted to leave East Germany in the first place.
With: Leslie Colitt, Gisela Nicholaisen, Joachim Rudolph

Producers: Phil Tinline and Sabine Schereck.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b07krdvx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b01p704f)
McLevy - Series 9, A Pearl in the Oyster

Victorian detective drama series, starring Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond.

Written by David Ashton.

Episode three: A Pearl In The Oyster.

A young prostitute falls in love and decides to leave Jean's employment - but she later returns to die on the doorstep of the Just Land.

Other parts are played by the cast.
Producer/Director: Bruce Young.

THU 15:00 Open Country (b07ks070)
Biodiversity at Heathrow

Helen Mark visits Heathrow Airport to discover what steps they take to encourage biodiversity and assesses the impact the proposed third runway will have should the decision be made for it to go ahead.

Heathrow has thirteen sites of Conversation, and Helen speaks to to the Airport's Biodiversity Manager Adam Cheeseman about the species he finds there including the Black Bee. Environmental Operations Manager Russell Knight explains how they've encouraged fish species to return to their rivers, and how they plan to create a green fringe around the proposed new runway. Helen also asks how much difference biodiversity can make to a project of this scale.

She visits Colne Valley Park, part of which will be taken up by the new runway, and asks Stewart Pomeroy about the challenges of balancing the needs of the Park with the need for development, and to Mathew Frith from the London Wildlife Trust about the potential impact on the Park's bird and fish species. She also speaks to Colin Rayner who farms land around Heathrow about what life's like for him now and what he thinks the future will be should permission for a third runway be granted.

Producer: Toby Field.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b07klg5h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (b07knzdj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b07ks072)
Finding Dory

With Francine Stock.

Director Andrew Stanton and producer Lindsey Collins reveal why they took the plunge with the sequel to the 2003 hit Finding Nemo. They reveal how to cast fish for a movie, what they look for in a sub-aquatic species and how to make an octopus more aesthetically pleasing.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b07kldb0)
Adam Rutherford explores the science that is changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (b07kldb2)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07kldb4)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 The Tim Vine Chat Show (b07ks074)
Episode 4

A new show from the internationally acclaimed master of the one-liner Tim Vine sees Tim interview members of his live audience as he embarks on a quest to hear the life stories of the Great British public while simultaneously showcasing his trademark gleeful wordplay and preposterous songs.

The last show in the current series features a mysterious job in a reservoir and a quiz about trifle.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b07ks076)
Brian pulls some strings, and Toby changes his tune.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b07kldb6)
Arts news, interviews and reviews.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07krycl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b07ks078)
The Remainers

David Aaronovitch looks at important issues in the news.

THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b07ks07b)
How to Build an Olympics

The Olympics Games is the biggest sporting event on earth. But the road to a successful Olympics can be more grueling than a marathon. With less than two weeks to go until the opening ceremony in Rio, Evan Davis and guests discuss the difficulties of managing the money, the politics and the people.

GUESTS:

Neil Wood MBE, Partner, Deloitte and former CFO of London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games (LOCOG)

Gerhard Heiberg, International Olympic Committee (IOC) member and President and CEO of Lillehammer Winter Olympic,s 1994

Professor Andrew Zimbalist, Sports Economist, Smith College Massachusetts, Consultant and Author

Producer: Julie Ball

Editor: Innes Bowen.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b07kldb0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 How Low Can Rates Go? (b07krycg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b07kldb8)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b07kldbb)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07ks18x)
Dirt Road, Episode 4

Booker prize-winner James Kelman's new novel is a potent exploration of love, grief and the power of music.

After more uncomfortable bus journeys and an unplanned overnight stay in Allentown, Murdo and his dad finally meet up with Uncle John in Alabama.
Read by Finn den Hertog

Abridged by David Jackson Young
Producer Eilidh McCreadie.

THU 23:00 Daphne Sounds Expensive (b07ks18z)
Pirates

The gang set sail for New York but are waylaid by George's mathematical ineptitude.

Join critically-acclaimed sketch trio, Daphne, as they pull out all the stops in a dazzling array of peculiar characters, whacky scenarios, dodgy remarks, curious observations, minor altercations and major peacemaking - served on a bed of catchy little numbers with a live nine-piece band.

Written by and starring: Jason Forbes, Phil Wang & George Fouracres

Featuring Sir Willard White, Emma Sidi & David Elms

Original music composed by Jeff Carpenter

Musical Director: Freddie Tapner

Piano: Freddie Tapner
Drums: Ben Hartley
Bass: Rob Grist
Percussion: Ben Burton
Trumpet: Michael Maddocks
Tenor Sax: Greg Sterland
Trombone: Elliot Pooley
Violin: Hannah Bell
Cello: Nick Squires

The Production Coordinator was Hayley Sterling

It was produced by Matt Stronge

It was a BBC Studios production.

THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07ks191)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


FRIDAY 22 JULY 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b07kldd0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 Voices of the First World War (b06kndm1)
Home

Before the last survivors of the First World War passed away, the memories of many of those who fought it were captured in sound recordings. Speakers recall in great detail as though it were yesterday the conditions of the trenches, the brutality of the battlefield, the experience of seeing their first casualty and hearing their first shell, their daily and nightly routines, and their psychological state in the face of so much trauma. The Imperial War Museum's holdings include a major oral history resource of remarkable recordings made in the 1980s and early 1990s with the remaining survivors of the conflict. The interviews were done not for immediate use or broadcast, but because it was felt that this diminishing resource, that could never be replenished, would be of unique value in the future. Among the BBC's extensive collection of archive featuring first hand recollections of the conflict a century ago are the interviews recorded for the 1964 TV series 'The Great War', which vividly bring to life the human experience of those fighting and living through the war. In a unique partnership between the Imperial War Museums and the BBC, the two sound archive collections are brought together for the first time in this Radio 4 series. 'Voices of the First World War', a fifty-part series which began in Autumn 2014, broadcasts many of these recordings for the first time, and will run in short seasons throughout the commemorative period, tracking the course of the war.

Presented by Dan Snow, this second series of programmes to be broadcast this year looks at the events of 1915, including veterans' memories of their first trips home on leave, the rise of U-Boat attacks, the disastrous Battle of Loos, and the experiences of those fighting on the Eastern Front as the war expanded, in Salonika and Mesopotamia.

The first programme looks at the experiences of soldiers who travelled home from the Western Front on leave for an all-too-brief few days in 1915. They returned to baths and clean bed linen, loved ones unable to comprehend their experiences on the battlefield, and communities longing for news of their sons. For Kitty Eckersley, whose young husband returned home for a few days in early 1915, this would be the last time she saw him.

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07kldd2)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07kldd4)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07kldd6)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b07kldd8)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07mb08y)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with Anna Drew.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b07klddb)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside. Presented by Charlotte Smith and produced by Sally Challoner.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcqw)
Stone Curlew

Series of stories about British birds, inspired by their calls and songs. Kate Humble presents the stone curlew.

FRI 06:00 Today (b07ks3k7)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b07klh89)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Primo Levi's The Periodic Table (b07ks3k9)
Lead

Janet Suzman introduces a major new dramatization of Primo Levi's short stories about our human relationship with the chemical elements - a book the Royal Institution of Great Britain named 'the best science book ever'. Dramatised by Graham White from the translation by Raymond Rosenthal.

In 'Lead', set in the ancient world, a prospector travels from northern to southern Europe in search of the valuable, but toxic, lead rock. Read by Paul Copley.

Produced and directed by Marc Beeby and Emma Harding.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07klddd)
Programme that offers a female perspective on the world.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07ks3kc)
Lunch, Huge News

by Marcy Kahan

A platonic romantic comedy.
Old flatmates Bill and Bella meet every month for lunch and swap news.
Bella has some happy news but it's not so happy for Bill. Are their lunches in danger of being ditched?

Bill ..... Stephen Mangan
Bella ..... Claire Skinner

Directed by Sally Avens.

FRI 11:00 We Need to Talk about Stillbirth (b07ks3kf)
In 2010, Emma Beck's second child Mary was stillborn at 36 weeks. There were no warning signs. Her pregnancy had been low-risk. She is not alone, the majority of stillbirths occur in women whose pregnancies are assessed as low-risk.

Stillbirth is ten times more common than cot death, yet it's often not talked about. It remains something of a taboo.

Every day in the UK, nine babies are stillborn. For almost a third, no cause of death is found.

There are known risk factors for stillbirth - extremes of maternal age, smoking, obesity, social deprivation and certain ethnic groups - but there are huge gaps in our understanding of why babies die before or during birth. Doctors and scientists researching it believe raising awareness and talking about stillbirth is the first step to preventing it.

Emma learns the largest single group of stillbirths is due to placental failure. This under-researched organ that exists only for the 9 months of pregnancy is the baby's life support system. If the placenta stops working it's like multiple organ failure.

She meets Professor Gordon Smith at Cambridge University who's searching for clues to prevent stillbirth in his biobank of tissue and blood samples. In Manchester, she visits Dr Alex Heazell at St Mary's Hospital, whose team is trialling drugs to improve placental function. She also talks to Professor Jane Norman, Director of the Edinburgh Tommy's Centre, who suggests that empowering and listening to women may hold the key to reducing the rate of stillbirth.

Emma also speaks to other bereaved parents whose lives have been changed in ways they could never have imagined.

A Sparklab production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 11:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b04pc2zs)
Series 4, Episode 6

John Finnemore, the writer and star of Cabin Pressure, regular guest on The Now Show and popper-upper in things like Miranda, records a fourth series of his hit sketch show.

6/6: This final episode of the fourth series contains a pure moment of happiness, a song for a season that doesn't usually get sung about, and a curious tale about an invention that is probably not evil.

The first series of John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described as "sparklingly clever" by The Daily Telegraph and "one of the most consistently funny sketch shows for quite some time" by The Guardian. The second series won Best Radio Comedy at both the Chortle and Comedy.co.uk awards, and was nominated for a Radio Academy award. The third series actually won a Radio Academy award.

In this fourth series, John has written more sketches, like the sketches from the other series. Not so much like them that they feel stale and repetitious; but on the other hand not so different that it feels like a misguided attempt to completely change the show. Quite like the old sketches, in other words, but about different things and with different jokes. (Although it's a pretty safe bet some of them will involve talking animals.)

Written by and starring ... John Finnemore
Also featuring ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.
Original music by ... Susannah Pearse.
Producer ... Ed Morrish.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b07klddg)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 The Why Factor (b07ks3kh)
Series 3, The Circus

From clowns to tight-rope walkers, fire-eaters to elephant trainers, the modern circus has been around for centuries. But why does it still appeal in the modern age? Mike Williams explores the origins of the circus and asks why, in a world of screens, video streaming and TV-on-demand, the circus continues to delight adults and children around the globe. Mike visits the Moscow State Circus, hears from a clown with Cirque Du Soleil and talks to a lion trainer with the biggest animal act in the world. There's thrills, spills, fun and fear.

Presenter: Mike Williams
Producer: Sally Abrahams
Editor: Andrew Smith

First broadcast on the BBC World Service.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b07klddj)
Consumer news and issues.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b07klddl)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b07klddn)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

FRI 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07ks3kk)
The Cuban Missile Crisis

Bridget Kendall presents a series tracing the crucial turning points of the early Cold War.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b07ks076)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b01pbk7z)
McLevy - Series 9, The Cross-Roads

Victorian detective drama series, starring Brian Cox and Siobhan Redmond.

Written by David Ashton.

Episode four: The Cross-Roads.

McLevy is kidnapped by a grieving father who seeks vengeance for the death of his son. Jean, Roach and Mulholland join forces in a desperate bid to find the Inspector before kidnap turns into murder.

Producer/Director: Bruce Young.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07ks3kn)
Summer Garden Party, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh 2

Peter Gibbs presents the show from the GQT Summer Garden Party at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. Joining him on the panel are Matthew Wilson, Matt Biggs, Anne Swithinbank and Jim McColl.

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 The Limekiln Road (b07ks4lw)
Against a landscape of desolation and neglect, Victor befriends his elderly neighbour Lily who is increasingly living among the fragmented memories of her life. But is there one memory in particular that Lily has been holding on to above all others?

Stephen Rea reads this new story from novelist and dramatist Eoin McNamee.

Eoin McNamee's novels include Resurrection Man, later made into a film, The Blue Tango, which was longlisted for the Booker Prize, and Orchid Blue. He has written several dramas for Radio 4, including the Imision award-winning 'The Road Wife', 'North of Riga' and most recently, 'The Haunted Road'.

Producer ..... Heather Larmour
Writer ..... Eoin McNamee
Reader ..... Stephen Rea.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b07ks4ly)
Obituary series, analysing and celebrating the life stories of people who have recently died.

FRI 16:30 Feedback (b07ks4m0)
Radio 4's forum for audience comment.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b07ks5dy)
Lynn and Johnnie - The Good Guys v the Bad Guys

Fi Glover with a conversation where a three year old debates the concept of good and evil with his mother - and Darth Vader makes an appearance! Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b07klddq)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07kldds)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (b07ks4m2)
Series 16, Episode 6

The topical satirical show that mixes political vituperation with media savaging is back. With a referendum on Europe, a presidential election in America and the BBC in crisis, the team will focus on the things that matter, and quite a few things that don't, like Top Gear and most things on BBC Three.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b07ks4m4)
Ursula packs, worried about leaving Rob while he's still not yet back to full health. Ursula has found the 'Little Prince' sleepsuit and Rob's baby blanket that she brought when Helen was pregnant. Both are upset about not being able to see Rob's son and they hug awkwardly.

Pip calls Toby to say her family are going to the Stables for tea to welcome home Dan. She's planning to get out of it by saying she'll grease the trailers. Later, Pip tells Toby it's time for him to get going before her family returns. Toby tries to stay longer but Pip insists. They discuss when they can next spend time together.

Emma joins Joe and Eddie who are preparing ElfWorld. She tells them the surveyor assessing the kitchen wall crack at Grange Farm has been cancelling the rest of his appointments for that afternoon. Meanwhile, she and Ed can't find anywhere to rent that they can afford. Emma hears one of the stories Joe plans to tell to ElfWorld visitors and she thinks it's terrifying. Added to that, Joe and Eddie's costumes look creepy, they'd be better off wearing a couple of the merchandise t-shirts.

Henry and Rob say goodbye to Ursula. She gets into a taxi and they wave her off. It starts to rain and Henry complains he's getting wet. He asks to go inside but Rob insists they keep waving until Ursula's taxi is out of sight.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b07klddv)
News, reviews and interviews from the worlds of art, literature, film and music.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07ks3kc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b07ks4m6)
Ritula Shah presents political debate and discussion from the Central United Reformed Church in Derby.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b07ks4m8)
Being English

A reflection on a topical issue.

FRI 21:00 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07ks4mb)
Omnibus 3

Bridget Kendall presents an oral history series tracing decisive moments of the early Cold War.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b07klddx)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b07klddz)
In-depth reporting and analysis from a global perspective.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07ks4md)
Dirt Road, Episode 5

Booker prize-winner James Kelman's new novel is a potent exploration of love, grief and the power of music.

As the days settle into a routine in Alabama, Murdo is beginning to feel trapped at Uncle John and Aunt Maureen's house.
Read by Finn den Hertog

Abridged by David Jackson Young
Producer Eilidh McCreadie.

FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b07kpy48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07ks4mg)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b07ks5f0)
Lloyd and Yvonne - Old-School Ways

Fi Glover hears a retired primary school head and a long-serving district nurse lament the bureaucracy and e-correspondence that has replaced the personal touch. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.