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RADIO-LISTS: BBC RADIO 4
Weekly Listings for BBC Radio 4 — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 09 JULY 2016

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (b07hwmnq)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SAT 00:30 Book of the Week (b07k1jnw)
Evelyn Waugh: A Life Revisited, Episode 5

Hailed by Graham Greene as 'the greatest novelist of my generation', yet reckoned by Hilaire Belloc to have been possessed by the devil, Waugh's literary reputation has risen steadily since Greene's assessment in 1966. Philip Eade revisits the life of Evelyn Waugh for a new and revealing biography.

Waugh's Estate has released previously unseen letters and there is new personal testimony from those who knew and worked with him. The book spans the whole of Waugh's life, presenting new details of his difficult relationship with his embarrassingly sentimental father, his love affair with Alastair Graham at Oxford, his disastrous marriage to Evelyn Gardner and its complicated annulment, his dramatic conversion to Roman Catholicism and his chequered wartime career.

Read by Nickolas Grace
Abridged by Libby Spurrier
Directed by Celia de Wolff

A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07hwmns)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07hwmnv)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07hwmnx)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 05:30 News Briefing (b07hwmnz)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07j7q7q)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church.

SAT 05:45 iPM (b07j7q7s)
The programme that starts with its listeners.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (b07hwmp1)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SAT 06:04 Weather (b07hwmp3)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 06:07 Open Country (b07j7j67)
Bishop Auckland, History in Production

'Kynren' is set across a landscaped stage which is the size of 5 football pitches and involves over 1000 local volunteers. Organizers hope that it will transform Bishop Auckland and bring many visitors to the area for years to come. The story will explore 2000 years of British history from Roman times through the Saxons and Vikings to Industrial times and beyond. Helen Mark hears from the local volunteers about what it means to them and discovers the real history behind Bishop Auckland. She visits Binchester Roman Fort, Escomb Saxon Church and the shut down collieries to see how history remains clearly written in the landscape as well as in this ambitious new production.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (b07hwmp5)
Farming Today This Week: Soft Fruit

From strawberries to raspberries and gooseberries, Charlotte Smith finds out about how soft fruits are faring this season. Visiting Hayle's Fruit Farm near Winchcombe in the Cotswolds, she asks Martin Harrell how the Brexit vote might affect the availability of East European migrant workers who the industry relies upon to pick the crops. Charlotte also hears about the delayed growing season after a long, wet spring, and why Martin's had to diversify in order to survive.

Produced by Mark Smalley.

SAT 06:57 Weather (b07hwmp7)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 07:00 Today (b07jqlvp)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Yesterday in Parliament, Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (b07hwmp9)
Tim Vincent

The next stop on the Saturday Live summer road trip is the beautiful seaside town of Tenby in Pembrokeshire.

It's the Long Course Weekend and Aasmah Mir and Richard Coles will be celebrating extreme sports, adrenaline and music, live from Wales.

Wrexham lad Tim Vincent first hit our screens as the youngest ever male Blue Peter presenter, which saw him flying a fighter jet, running the New York Marathon and carrying a large tree around with 3 other paras. He's spent the last 11 years as the roving reporter on NBC's flagship entertainment programme, Access Hollywood.

American country singer Stella Parton will be with us to talk about her new album 'Mountain Songbird: A Sister's Tribute' - a collection of re-recorded songs previously made famous by her sister, Dolly Parton.

A mix of orienteering, mountaineering and swimming with tombstoning thrown in, the extreme sport of coasteering is said to originate in Pembrokeshire. Local guide Ollie Davies talks about his passion for this exhilarating pastime.

As a scientist, adventurer and educator, Huw James is well versed in adrenaline. He uses his enthusiasm for extreme sports to teach science, in between keeping the night sky dark in the Brecon Beacons.

O DUO are that rare thing - a duo of percussionists. After training at the Royal College of Music an Edinburgh festival novelty act has led to 15 years of percussive duets. Owen Gunnel and Oliver Cox join us on Saturday Live before their gig at the Gower festival.

JP meets local hero and "Mr Tenby", Laurie Dale, and we'll have thank yous live from our studio audience.

And the Inheritance Tracks of TV Weather presenter Sian Lloyd who chooses Can Walter by Meic Stevens and Something Inside So Strong by Labi Siffre.

Producer: Corinna Jones
Editor: Karen Dalziel.

SAT 10:30 Viz: An Unfeasibly Large Success (b07g8psz)
Viz was born in a Newcastle bedroom during the Thatcher years. The profanity-laced and flatulence-filled comic took Britain by storm with its taboo-shattering humour. While its blatant disregard for political correctness turned many away in disgust, its gasp-inducing gags made it one of Britain's best-selling magazines. Nick Baker traces the comic back to its Geordie genesis to ask how something so shockingly vulgar ended up under the mattresses of countless teens and under the eyes of business men pretending to read the Financial Times.

Nick's journey begins in Tyneside with the creators of Viz. Brothers Chris and Simon Donald and best friend Jim Brownlow.

With the equally loved and hated Fat Slags, Sid the Sexist and Johnny Fartpants by his side, Nick tours the Newcastle underground that served as an incubator for Viz. The naughty and risqué content spread like wildfire in the punk scene. Soon each issue of the DIY magazine was consistently selling over a million copies.

As Nick tries to understand this rollercoaster success, he secures exclusive interviews with Viz legends Roger Mellie the Man on the Tellie and Billy the Fish, voiced by Harry Enfield.

Viz's outrageous satire got them in trouble with everyone from the United Nations to Scotland Yard. Accusations of racism, sexism, and insensitivity were part of the daily routine at the office. Comedians Richard Herring, Alex Lowe, Lucy Porter and Frank Skinner debate whether these boundaries should exist in the first place.

Today, sales of Viz have declined dramatically. Nick discusses its place in the pantheon of British comedy with current editors Graham Dury and Simon Thorp.

Produced by Anishka Sharma
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4

Image (c) Colin Davison.

SAT 11:00 Week in Westminster (b07jqm79)
Paul Waugh of The Huffington Post looks behind the scenes at Westminster.
The verdict of the Chilcot Report, the battle for the leadership of the Conservative party and the next prime minster, what next for UKIP, and how parliament will have to be involved when it comes to settling the UK's exit from the European Union.
The Editor is Marie Jessel.

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (b07hwmpc)
The man who inspired a killer

Kate Adie introduces stories from correspondents around the world.
Frank Gardner assesses the reaction to the bombing close to one of Islam's holiest sites.
Shaimaa Khalil tells how a Pakistani assassin and the country's strict blasphemy laws influenced a killer in the UK.
We go to Colombia to hear from Natalio Cosoy and the story of legislators who are struggling with a problem: how do you pass laws to force senators to turn up for work when the senators needed to pass the laws don't turn up for work.
Olivia Acland travels to meet residents of a small island off the coast of Sierra Leone who learn that rich foreigners bearing gifts don't always keep their promises.
And Diarmaid Fleming tells how the appearance of mayflies causes the residents of one Irish town to drop everything and take to the water in search of trout.

SAT 12:00 News Summary (b07hwmpf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 12:04 Money Box (b07jqm7c)
What is the future for investing in commercial property

Seven commercial property funds, accounting for more than half this investment sector, have stopped investors taking their money out. They say too many investors wanted to cash in their investments on concerns that the value would fall after the vote to leave the EU. Is it right to blame Brexit? And what is the future of commercial property investment? David Hatcher, Estates Gazette and Adrian Lowcock, head of investing, AXA Wealth, join the programme.

More than a million people living abroad on UK pensions have seen their value plummet as the pound has tumbled since the vote to leave the European Union. Pensioners living in Europe have seen more than £40 wiped off their four weekly state pension payment and in other parts of the world such as America or Australia the loss has been even greater. What, if anything, can they do? Mark Bodega, from the currency firm HI FX talks to the programme.

A third of your pension fund can be taken by other people over a lifetime of investing. New research by the Transparency Taskforce - a campaign group of finance professionals - has identified a total of three hundred separate costs, fees, and charges which can drain away our money, often without being properly set out and usually without us noticing. The taskforce chairman, Andy Agathangelou, tells us why he wants more openness and control for investors.

SAT 12:30 Dead Ringers (b07j7nvf)
Series 16, Episode 4

It's out with Farage, Gove, Boris, Hodgson, Chris Evans and David Cameron. And in with the new: Andrea Leadsom?

SAT 12:57 Weather (b07hwmph)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 13:00 News (b07hwmpk)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SAT 13:10 Any Questions? (b07j7nvk)
Tim Farron MP, Dominic Grieve MP, Liam Halligan, Gisela Stuart MP

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate from Sandbach Town Hall in Cheshire with the Leader of the Liberal Democrats Tim Farron MP, Chair of the Intelligence and Security Committee Dominic Grieve MP, Sunday Telegraph columnist Liam Halligan and the Labour MP and former chair of Vote Leave which campaigned for Brexit, Gisela Stuart.

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (b07hwmpm)
Andrea Leadsom's Leadership bid, The Chilcot Report

You have your say on the Question's raised in last night's programme. Andrea Leadsom's Leadership bid and the publication of The Chilcot Report.
Any Answers after the Saturday broadcast of Any Questions? Lines open at 1230
Call 03700 100 444. Email is any.answers@bbc.co.uk. Or tweet, the hastag is BBCAQ. Follow us @bbcanyquestions.

Presented by Anita Anand
Producer Beverley Purcell
Editor Karen Dalziel.

SAT 14:30 Defoe (b07jwj17)
Moll Flanders, Episode 1

By Daniel Defoe, adapted by Nick Perry.

Daniel Defoe, once more in need of ready money, finds inspiration for a new book when he meets Elizabeth Atkins in Newgate gaol. She tells him her stranger-than-fiction story; of how she was born in prison to a petty thief and of how she loved and bargained her way from rags to riches, from prostitution in the streets of London to prosperity on a Virginia plantation, and then lost it all again. Defoe interprets it all in his characteristic manner, blending fact with fiction, and re-inventing his interlocutor as the lusty and resourceful Moll Flanders.

The Harpsichord was played by Peter Ringrose.

Director: Sasha Yevtushenko.

SAT 15:30 India's Classical Music Marathon (b07j4kfy)
Aditya Chakrabortty journeys to Kolkata and into the mythology of one of India's most precious musical traditions.

Over the course of an all-night classical music concert - or 'conference' - hear some of the best Indian classical musicians on the planet describe the intricacies of their art, and explain why it might not last much longer in a culture short of attention and keen for quick satisfaction.

"The whole day is so much full of noise, of work, of distraction ... Indian classical music is more about meditation. Nights give us that tranquillity. The listener needs to be free of his worldly worries, as musicians paint on the canvas of silence."

At the Uttarpara Sangeet Chakra Conference, on the bank of the river Ganges just north of Kolkata, sitarists, tabla-players, vocalists and other instrumentalists start at 8pm and try to outplay each other until 7 o'clock in the morning, to an audience of nearly 3,000. In doing so, they re-enact a tradition central to Indian classical music, which was based on such a competitive tradition with artists battling each other in front of a royal court.

It's magical, hypnotic, mesmerising - but do modern audiences have the stamina or the will to keep awake for arguably the world's most famous sitar player, Shahid Parvez, at 5 o'clock in the morning?

Aditya meets some of the audience members and musicians trying to keep the all-night conference alive, including some of Indian classical music's biggest names - Shahid Parvez, Tanmoy Bose and Ajoy Chakrabarty, as well as the Kolkata-based writer and classically trained singer Amit Chaudhuri.

Produced by Eve Streeter
A Greenpoint production for BBC Radio 4.

SAT 16:00 Woman's Hour (b07hwmpp)
Weekend Woman's Hour

Jacqueline Gold the CEO of Ann Summers discusses the changing landscape of the adult entertainment industry and why she's a fan of the new ITV drama Brief Encounters based on her party reps in the 80s.

The Multi award winning poet Helen Mort talks about her new collection of poems, No Map Could Show Them, about the lives of pioneering female mountaineers, campaigners and runners.

Iceland reached the quarter finals of the Euros this year but the women's national team will very likely be going to their third euros in 2017, outplaying the men on the international stage. We're joined by women's team captain Margret Lara Vioarsdottir.

Is crying at work still a taboo? How can we best support a colleague who become tearful? Science broadcastaer Dr Emily Grossman and journalist, Nell Frizzell discuss.

Millie Smith started a campaign to put a purple butterfly sticker onto cots in hospital to indicate to visitors when there has been a loss of a sibling in a multiple pregnancy. Millie tells us about the death of one of her twins and Cheryl Titherley from Bereavement Care at Sands UK talks about how best to help families.

Sabine Durrant and Ruth Ware on the appeal of psychological thrillers. And What is it really like to be a step parent? Four listeners Jane, Alison, Louise and Jo share their own experiences.

SAT 17:00 PM (b07hwmpr)
Saturday PM

Full coverage of the day's news.

SAT 17:30 The Bottom Line (b07j7j6m)
The Price of Life

It's hard to put a value on a human life. When you're well, perhaps you don't think about it. But if you're ill, getting access to the right drugs, whatever the cost, is a priority. But the NHS does not have a bottomless pit of money. And some medicines are judged too expensive to be freely available, so patients miss out on treatments that could save or extend their lives. There are usually two villains of the piece: The drugs companies for charging too much; the NHS for not stumping up the cash. In this edition, Evan Davis and guests explore how pharmaceutical companies price their drugs, the role of the NHS in deciding how much the medicines are worth and, in the case of generic or non-branded drugs, they'll ask whether competition is working properly to keep down the NHS medicines bill.

Guests:
Erik Nordkamp, Managing Director, Pfizer UK

Carole Longson, Director of the Centre for Health Technology Evaluation at NICE, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence

Warwick Smith, Director-General, British Generic Manufacturers Association

Producer: Sally Abrahams.

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07hwmpt)
The latest shipping forecast.

SAT 17:57 Weather (b07hwmpw)
The latest weather forecast.

SAT 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07hwmpy)
Angela Eagle to challenge Jeremy Corbyn for the Labour leadership

Jeremy Corbyn is to face a challenge for the Labour leadership from Angela Eagle.

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (b07jwj19)
Clive Anderson, Scottee, Howard Jacobson, Anohni, Tess Berry-Hart, Nish Kumar

Clive Anderson and Scottee are joined by Howard Jacobson, Anohni, Tess Berry-Hart and Nish Kumar for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from Anohni.

Producer: Sukey Firth.

SAT 19:00 Profile (b07jqmrd)
Andrea Leadsom

Andrea Leadsom and Theresa May are vying to be the next Conservative leader and Britain's second ever female prime minister. Mark Coles explores how a little-known junior energy minister was propelled into the limelight by the televised referendum debates and now stands a chance of leading not only her party but also her country. She is a relative newcomer to politics, having been elected to Parliament in 2010 when she won her seat in South Northamptonshire. She cooks an excellent roast dinner and has strong family values. Before becoming an MP she had a long career in the city but this has come under scrutiny this week with some claiming she has exaggerated past roles. We take a closer look at her CV and ask - does it stack up?

Presenter: Mark Coles
Producers: Laura Gray and Sarah Shebbeare.

SAT 19:15 Saturday Review (b07hwmq0)
Georgia O'Keeffe, Maggie's Plan, Robert lePage, The Association of Small Bombs, Brexit metaphors

A major retrospective exhibition of the work of Georgia O'Keeffe at Tate Modern brings together a wide range of her work from the floral paintings to her landscapes and urban paintings
A complicated web of marital intrigue unfolds in Rebecca Miller's film Maggie's Plan - is it more than Woody Allen lite?
Needles and Opium is Canadian performer Robert lePage's latest work to reach the UK - a revival of a work debuted in 1991 and based on the New York experiences of Jean Cocteau and Miles Davis
Karan Mahajan's novel The Association of Small Bombs is set in Delhi, which follows the consequences and web of influences of a terrorist attack
When politics seems wobbly, commentators in the press reach for the solid base of a good metaphor; Shakespeare, Game of Thrones and The Thick of It and Game of Cards have all been invoked to try and describe the consequences of the Brexit vote and Tory and Labour parties disarray.
Tom Sutcliffe's guests are Alex Preston, Rosie Boycott and Simon Evans. The producer is Oliver Jones.

SAT 20:00 Archive on 4 (b07jwj1c)
The Heath Enigma

The conventional wisdom is that Sir Edward Heath was a one-shot prime minister. For good or ill, he transformed the United Kingdom by taking the country into the European Community in 1973. But otherwise his premiership is commonly remembered for its economic 'U-turn', its prices and incomes policy, the miners' strike and the three-day week, culminating in an early election and humiliating defeat. After Heath was ousted as Conservative leader by Margaret Thatcher, he famously devoted himself to the 'incredible sulk' while she became an election-winner and long-serving prime minister.

Yet does this view present the full truth of the man and his career - a man who was an accomplished musician, and who also taught himself to sail before becoming a world class yachtsman? Was he also a more successful politician who made a greater impact than is often appreciated?

On the centenary of his birth (9 July 1916), Shaun Ley presents a reappraisal of Heath, the man and the leader, drawing on archive recordings and interviews with those who knew him. This portrait explores the enigma of an intensely private man who reached the top in politics and inspired affection among those closest to him, despite his extraordinary social awkwardness and brusque dealings with many others. His contemporaries discuss the personal qualities and flaws that shaped him, and the drive and talent that enabled him to transform the Conservatives into a party of change. The programme also reveals the inside story of the eventual rapprochement between Sir Edward Heath and Baroness Thatcher in their later years. For the first time, a wider audience can hear Margaret Thatcher praising Edward Heath as one of Britain's greatest Prime Ministers.

Producer: Rob Shepherd.

SAT 21:00 Drama (b07hwwjv)
Roald Dahl: Going Solo, Episode 1

To celebrate the centenary year of his birth, a full dramatization of Roald Dahl's gripping autobiographical overseas adventure.

Beginning aboard the SS Mantola, Dahl sets sail for Africa at the tender age of 22. He experiences the remnants of colonial British life, filled with eccentric characters, and is thrown into a world as bizarre and surprising as any you will find in his fiction.

"Life is made up of a great number of small incidents and a small number of great ones."

Stationed in Tanzania, Dahl is faced with the excitement of the wild; lions carrying off women in their mouths; fatal green mambas captured by snake men. But his savannah-sun-drenched life is interrupted when World War II erupts. Dahl is ordered to round up the German inhabitants of Dar es Salaam and experiences first-hand the horror of war.

Patrick Malahide provides the voice of Dahl in a colourful adaptation by Lucy Catherine.

Dramatised by Lucy Catherine

Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production.

SAT 22:00 News and Weather (b07hwmq2)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4, followed by weather.

SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (b07j68nh)
The Chilcot Inquiry

130 sessions of oral evidence,150 witnesses, 150,000 documents, more than 2.5 million words - the Chilcot Report on the Iraq War was finally published on the day of this programme. The inquiry was set up to examine our reasons for taking part in the US-led invasion of Iraq, how the war was prosecuted and its aftermath. But was the decision to go to war morally justified? Chilcot confirms that there was a massive failing in intelligence in the lead-up to the decision to go to war, especially around WMD; it accepts that Tony Blair was acting in good faith and did not deliberately mislead Parliament and the public about that intelligence. The relationship between morality and consequences is complex and sometimes contradictory. If Tony Blair and his government were acting in good faith but the consequences of that war were so catastrophic, can we still describe the decision to go to war as a moral one? If the government were a limited company, isn't this the kind of gross negligence that would lead to directors being prosecuted for corporate manslaughter? On the other hand, if - being wise after the event - we were to hound all politicians for making decisions that went wrong, wouldn't that produce sclerosis and the replacement of democratic judgement with technocracy? Is this a counsel of moral perfection that produces only paralysis of the will? When does ignorance become a moral failing? Is that contingent on outcomes? What if the war had been a success and Iraq transformed into a flourishing democracy? Would we still be worrying about whether it was moral? Would we have spent £10m on an inquiry about it? Chaired by Michael Buerk with Michael Portillo, Matthew Taylor, Giles Fraser and Melanie Phillips. Witnesses are Prof Michael Clarke, John Rentoul, Haider Al Safi and Dr Dan Bulley.

SAT 23:00 Counterpoint (b07j4384)
Series 30, Heat 3, 2016

(3/13)
Competitors from Gloucestershire, Worcestershire and West Yorkshire join Paul Gambaccini for the latest heat of the wide-ranging music quiz. From Beethoven and Korngold to Elton John and Led Zeppelin, the questions and extracts test their knowledge of music in all its variety and provide something for all tastes.

Today's contest comes from the headquarters of the BBC Philharmonic in Salford, and the winner will automatically take a place in the semi-finals with a real chance of competing in the 30th Counterpoint Final at the Proms in September.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

SAT 23:30 The Echo Chamber (b07hwwl9)
Series 7, Sharon Olds

In New York City Paul Farley hears some new odes from Sharon Olds addressed to bodies and body parts, both shoddy and enduring. Sharon Olds' poetry is almost always personal and is renowned for its frank directness. She has written unflinchingly about abuse in her family and her broken marriage. Much imitated and highly influential no one compares to her. She reads her new poems about her hymen, and her wattles, a composting toilet, and the tampon. Producer: Tim Dee.


SUNDAY 10 JULY 2016

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (b07jqqgk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

SUN 00:30 Introductions (b0457fqm)
Three Singers

'Introductions' is a fresh exploration of what an introduction means for British South Asian culture in contemporary society, where the internet, cultural diversity, and freedoms previously unavailable to members of that society bounce off established traditions of arranged matches or family marriages.

Written by three authors from The Whole Kahani, a British South Asian writers group, the stories in 'Introductions' explore what it means to be mixed race, the tensions between modern independence and family traditions, and the impact of really going it alone in the face of family expectations.

In Kavita A Jindal's Three Singers mixed race twins Himani and Sonali escape the tensions of setting up their own fashion business by joining a classical Indian singing class, but what they get from the class is not what they expected.

Reader: Deni Francis

Producer: David Roper
A Heavy Entertainment production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07jqqgm)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07jqqgp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service. BBC Radio 4 resumes at 5.20am.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07jqqgr)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (b07jqqgt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (b07jwl7k)
St Bartholomew's Church, Sutton-cum-Lound

This week's Bells on Sunday comes from St Batholomew's, Sutton-cum-Lound in Nottinghamshire who are marking a special time in the life of the church. A service of celebration is being held to celebrate a record 50 years of service by Mr Bryan Birkett as Tower captain. Guest preacher to recognise this achievement will be The Right Reverend Tony Porter, Bishop of Sherwood. We hear now the 8 Bells of Sutton ringing Superlative Surprise Major.

SUN 05:45 Profile (b07jqmrd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Headlines (b07jqqgw)
The latest national and international news.

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b07jwlcy)
Brilliant Mistakes, Blessed Failures

Artist Grayson Perry has said that 'creativity is mistakes'. Journalist Abdul-Rehman Malik agrees, and explores through poetry and prose how mistakes, although a reminder of human imperfection, nevertheless have the ability to reveal something new and hidden.

The programme features the music of Ella Fitzgerald, Elvis Costello and Puccini, and readings from theologian Paula Gooder, the Qu'ran, and the Old and New Testaments.

Presenter: Abdul-Rehman Malik
Producer: Jonathan Mayo
A TBI Media production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 06:35 On Your Farm (b07jwld0)
Wild Farming in South Devon

Sarah Swadling meets sheep farmers Rebecca Hosking and Tim Green and discovers how they are using mob grazing to regenerate exhausted arable land. They are tenants on a coastal farm exposed to the elements with challenging topography. When they inherited it the soils were thin and stony - now they're using agro-ecological practices to boost its fertility and bring more wildlife back onto the farm.

They've adopted a bold way of managing the land and the livestock; the method of Holistic Planned Grazing, also nicknamed mob grazing, which mimics how wild herds feed and move. Their flock of 600 sheep graze a paddock for a day before being moved on to fresh pasture. The sheep then won't come back to that patch of land for another 4 months, giving the pasture time to recover, simultaneously creating new topsoil and organic matter. It's a method first developed by Allan Savory inspired by herds on the African savannah, and Rebecca has adapted it to work specifically for Village Farm. Sarah joins Rebecca for the daily move of sheep and hears why she gave up filming BBC wildlife documentaries with David Attenborough to return to her farming roots.

Producer: Sophie Anton.

SUN 06:57 Weather (b07jqqgy)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (b07jqqh0)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (b07jqqh2)
St Olav's Way, C of E vision for education, Jewish intermarriage

Ed Stourton talks to Dallas Morning News reporter Naomi Martin about the mood in the city. Later in the programme, he interviews black pastors from the areas where police killed two black men.

The United Reform Church has become the first major Christian denomination to allow same sex marriage in its churches. We talk to Lee Battle who has had her own wedding on hold waiting for this moment.

Bob Walker follows St. Olav's Way - a 400 mile pilgrimage route which ends at Nidaros Cathedral in Tronheim where Norway's patron saint St Olav is buried.

A new report by the Institute for Jewish Policy Research has shown that marriage between Jews and non-Jews is at a record high prompting fears about the effect that 'marrying out' is having on the Jewish population in Britain. Rabbi Aaron Goldstein and Rabbi Dovid Lewis discuss the new research.

On Wednesday, students from schools across the country travel to the Houses of Parliament to take part in a debate on what they want from their religious education classes. Two of these students give us a preview of some of their thoughts.

Nigel Genders, the Chief Education Officer for the Church of England, talks about the Church's 'Vision for Education' (a document discussed at this week's Synod). The C of E wants to run a quarter of the free schools planned by the government (i.e. 125 out of 500).

More than 200 women's rights campaigners have sent a letter to the Home Secretary raising serious concerns about the government-appointed independent review into Sharia councils in Britain. Maryam Namazie (who helped to draft the letter) and Mona Siddiqui (chair of the review) discuss.

Producers: Helen Lee
Catherine Earlam
Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (b07jwt5j)
FRANK Water

Anita Rani presents The Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of FRANK Water
Registered Charity No 1121273
To Give:
- Freephone 0800 404 8144
- Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal, mark the back of the envelope 'FRANK Water'
- Cheques should be made payable to 'FRANK Water Projects'.

SUN 07:57 Weather (b07jqqh4)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (b07jqqh6)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (b07jwt5l)
Deliver Us from Evil

The next in an occasional series on the Lord's Prayer, Sunday Worship comes live from Emmanuel Church, Didsbury, in Manchester, with preacher Natalie Collins, who won this year's "Sermon of the Year" competition. The programme explores the complex life of Dorothy Lawrence, the English reporter who secretly posed as a man to become a soldier in the Battle of the Somme one hundred years ago.

Born in London in 1896, Lawrence was abandoned by her mother and adopted by a guardian of the Church of England. When she returned after the war, she confided to a doctor that she had been raped in her teenage years by her church guardian. She was not believed and was sent to a lunatic asylum in Barnet. She died in 1964, and was buried in a pauper's grave.

Natalie Collins works to prevent and respond to violence against women and enable others to do the same. In telling the story of Dorothy Lawrence, she reflects on the ways in which, one hundred years on, individuals and communities can still be ignored and diminished.

The service is led by the Rev Dr Kirsty Thorpe and music is provided by the Manchester Singers, directed by Aimee Presswood. The producer is Andrew Earis.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (b07j7nvm)
Belongings

"Transitions shake us" writes AL Kennedy. "and you don't need me to tell you that as a nation we're sharing one".

Alison reflects on how disturbing transitional times can be ...and writes of her own personal experience and that happening in post-Brexit Britain.

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b03thwxg)
Black-Throated Diver

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

John Aitchison presents the black-throated diver. Black-throated divers are strong contenders for our most beautiful bird. Their breeding plumage with a neck barcoded in white, an ebony bib and a plush grey head, is dramatic. The black dagger-like bill and broad lobed feet are perfect for catching and pursuing fish which the divers bring to their chicks in nests on the shoreline of the Scottish Lochs on which they breed.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (b07jqqh8)
News with Paddy O'Connell. Including Conservative leadership latest, sounds to relax to and wither the bungalow? Reviewing the papers: Labour's Dame Margaret Hodge, commentator Barry Davies and financial journalist Heather McGregor.

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (b07k7qnb)
Anna needs to make herself scarce, and Kenton gets some shocking news.

SUN 11:15 Desert Island Discs (b07jwt5n)
Nicole Farhi

Kirsty Young's castaway is the designer and sculptor Nicole Farhi.

Born into a Turkish family in France, Nicole's interest in fashion was present from an early age. As a child, she used to design clothes for her paper dolls; as a teenager, she was taken to couture shows in Paris by her stylish aunts.

Aged eighteen, she enrolled in fashion school in Paris and began selling her design sketches to earn a little pocket money, thus setting out on a career as a freelance designer. In the early 1970s, she met the British entrepreneur Stephen Marks who was just starting the retail chain French Connection where she became chief designer, and it was he who encouraged her to set up her eponymous label in 1982. Her fashion empire would eventually extend to New York, London and Tokyo before being sold in 2010, and Nicole herself left the business in 2012.

Since retiring from fashion, Nicole Farhi has dedicated herself to her other passion - sculpture. She sculpts predominantly in clay and then casts her works in different materials including glass, bronze and concrete.

She has been married to the playwright Sir David Hare since 1992.

Producer: Christine Pawlowsky.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (b07jqqhb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 12:04 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b07j438b)
Series 65, Episode 2

The 65th series of Radio 4's multi award-winning antidote to panel games promises more homespun wireless entertainment for the young at heart. This week the programme pays a return visit to the Royal Court Theatre in Liverpool. Regulars Barry Cryer, Jeremy Hardy and Tim Brooke-Taylor are once again joined on the panel by Rory Bremner with Jack Dee in the chair. At the piano - Colin Sell.

Producer - Jon Naismith.

It is a BBC Studios production.

SUN 12:32 Food Programme (b07jwt5q)
School food: An uncertain future

In 2013, The School Food Plan was published aiming to revolutionise food in schools across England, and to show countries around the world what providing good food in schools could look like. Out of the policy came 'universal infant free school meals', dubbed by the Government as "good news" for any family with small children at infant school. A £600 million commitment to giving children a hot meal at lunchtime.

But in this programme, one of the authors of the School Food Plan says the Government failed to listen to the advice it asked for. Now thousands of primary schools across England face funding cuts which could see them struggling to provide school lunches to tens of thousands of pupils.

Sheila Dillon hears how a Government report on funding food in small schools was never published and asks what the future holds for school food across the UK in an uncertain political climate.

Presented by Sheila Dillon
Produced in Bristol by Clare Salisbury.

SUN 12:57 Weather (b07jqqhd)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (b07jqqhg)
Global news and analysis.

SUN 13:30 Black Flight and the New Suburbia (b07jwt5s)
In Britain, multiculturalism is no longer confined to urban areas. Black, Asian and minority ethnic people are leaving inner cities in large numbers and heading for the suburbs.

As new research forecasts high levels of internal migration over the next forty years, Hugh Muir examines why this is happening and what it will mean for our traditional view of quintessential suburbia.

In his 1973 documentary Metro-land, Sir John Betjeman romanticised the suburbs of Middlesex created by the Metropolitan railway. Betjeman celebrated the mundane streets where all the people and houses looked the same; the interchangeable parks and churches, the slow pace of life. The suburbs enticed workers out of cramped homes in the city to suburban semis built on the principle of defensible space and home-as-castle. 'White flight' was born.

Fast forward to 2016. The suburbs have a very different look and are anything but mundane. Large numbers of Black and Asian people have moved out of Britain's city centres to leafy suburbia.

Hugh examines this drift away from the inner-cities by meeting those who have made the leap, and those that plan to. He asks what has changed, in both mindset and infrastructure, to enable this movement to happen.

With so many people leaving the city, he asks if we need to stop using 'urban' as a byword for ethnic minority.

Presented by Hugh Muir
Produced by Peter Sale

A PPM production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07j7nv5)
Galleries of Justice, Nottingham

Eric Robson and the panel answer horticultural questions from the Galleries of Justice, Nottingham. Dealing with the queries this week are Bob Flowerdew, Anne Swithinbank and Pippa Greenwood

Produced by Dan Cocker
Assistant producer: Laurence Bassett

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 14:45 The Listening Project (b07jwt5v)
Sunday Omnibus - Thespian Edition

Fi Glover with conversations about how long one can usefully pursue amateur dramatics, cabaret and choosing a career as a performer, in the Omnibus of the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

SUN 15:00 Drama (b07jwt5x)
Roald Dahl: Going Solo, Episode 2

To celebrate the centenary year of his birth, a full dramatization of Roald Dahl's gripping autobiographical overseas adventure.

As World War II rages, Pilot Officer Dahl takes to the air in a series of daring deeds. An inspirational account of survival when things seem hopeless, in which the extraordinary is made human.

"The second part is about the time I spent flying for the RAF in the Second World War. There was no need to discard anything from this period because every moment was, to me at least, completely enthralling."

Having joined the RAF Dahl discovers a love of flying. But a crash in the Western desert almost ends his war before he's started. Eventually he rejoins his heavily depleted squadron during the hopeless last days in Greece. Dogged air fights, secret missions and many narrow misses with death ensue before he eventually returns home to his loving mother.

Patrick Malahide provides the voice of Dahl in a colourful adaptation by Lucy Catherine.

Dramatised by Lucy Catherine

Directed by Helen Perry
A BBC Cymru/Wales Production.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (b07jwt5z)
Writing From Wales, a special programme recorded at Cardiff Library.

In a special edition, recorded at Cardiff Central Libray, Mariella Frostrup explores contemporary literature from Wales - written in both Welsh and English. She talks to authors Tom Bullough and Jon Gower about their approach, and hears about some of the country's fresh voices and new writing from Gwen Davies, editor of the New Welsh Review and LLeucu Siencyn, Chief Executive of Literature Wales.

SUN 16:30 The Echo Chamber (b07jwt61)
Series 7, Craig Raine

Paul Farley meets Craig Raine at his home to hear new and old poems from a famous Martian. 'A Martian Sends A Postcard Home' (1979) was Craig Raine's second collection and its poems defined and encapsulated a way of looking afresh at the familiar world. Since then Raine has taught English literature, written novels, edited Fabers' poetry list and started and run magazines of criticism and new writing. He has written poetry throughout. 'How Snow Falls' appeared in 2010 and this year he has published a book on the writing and reading of poetry called 'My Grandmother's Glass Eye'. He talks about arguing about poetry and reads a suite of new poems as well as some old ones. Producer: Tim Dee.

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (b07j537j)
The Price of PFI

Successive government procurement strategies have repeatedly promised high quality public buildings made possible through Private Finance Initiatives, but is that what's been delivered? What went wrong in Edinburgh where 17 schools remained closed after the Easter break because of fears walls might collapse on children and staff? Allan Urry reveals new concerns about the extent of fire safety problems in some schools and hospitals because contractors failed to ensure they were built to specification. How safe are they, and who's footing the bill to put them right?

Producer: Ian Muir Cochrane
Reporter: Allan Urry.

SUN 17:40 Profile (b07jqmrd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (b07jqqhj)
The latest shipping forecast.

SUN 17:57 Weather (b07jqqhl)
The latest weather forecast.

SUN 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07jqqhn)
Murray wins Wimbledon again. Corbyn urges leadership challenger Eagle to 'think'. Supporters of Tory leadership contender, Andrea Leadsom claim she's facing 'black ops' campaign.

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (b07jqqhq)
Sarfraz Manzoor

The best of BBC Radio this week,chosen and presented by Sarfraz Manzoor,which looks back at Ted Heath's premiership , Barack Obama's legacy, the history of female spies, and the sublime sounds of the Appalachian mountains.

Production crew: Pauline Harris, Kay Bishton, Rachel Gill.

SUN 19:00 The Archers (b07jwt63)
Tony returns Henry to Blossom Hill Cottage. While Henry is washing his hands, Ursula and Rob are scathing of the Archer family. Ursula suggests they take Henry to a safari park one day which Rob thinks is a good idea. Back at Bridge Farm, Tony recounts to Pat about going back to Blossom Hill Cottage for the first time after the stabbing. Pat wonders if they could offer to have Henry for an extra day a week during the school holidays. Tony's not sure if it's worth rocking the boat.

Pip arrives at Hollowtree and asks Toby what he's up to later. Toby tries to let Pip down gently after their fling. Pip finds the fact that Toby thought he was about to break her heart hilarious. She says their night together was fun. She adds, her heart really was broken by her break-up with Matthew and right now what she needs is some fun.

Rob broods over a remark of Henry's about Helen and Ursula tries to buoy him. Her mobile rings, it's her husband Bruce. Rob answers and after a brief hello hands the phone to a suddenly meek Ursula. When she comes off the phone she announces to Rob and Henry that Grandpa Bruce is visiting tomorrow.

SUN 19:15 Rumblings from the Rafters (b07jwt65)
Edible Dormouse and Peacock Butterfly

An Edible Dormouse played by Hugh Dennis and a Peacock Butterfly played by Amanda Abbington reveal the truth about life in an old attic in a house in Amersham in the last of three very funny tales, written and introduced by Lynne Truss, with additional sound recordings by Chris Watson.

The Edible Dormouse is no Common Dormouse. He is Russian and extremely serious-minded. He is obsessed with answering the question, "Why are we here?" both the philosophical question and the literal one. No answer satisfies him. So he has reached his own conclusion, which involves secret agents and a submarine. "I may be rare, cute-looking, and of indisputable foreign origin, but I am not stupid." He is planning a meeting with his fellow Edible Dormice to discuss their next move. He knows this won't be easy. The others think he is mad. Top of the agenda is what they should call themselves. "Imagine how it feels to be one of the only zoological species in existence whose very name says, "Have you ever thought of eating me?"

The Peacock Butterfly is youthful, intelligent, and ever so concerned with being brave and sensible about mortality. Having been born the previous year, she is re-visiting the attic before dying. "I remember when I first came in, I thought hello, this wouldn't be a bad place to pop off, when the time comes." But trying to be brave about her inevitable end is much harder than she expects, "Well, I'm sorry to say that for some completely inexplicable reason I totally lost it at the sycamore! I mean what's wrong with me? " But as she settles down to die, a sudden thought changes everything ...

Edible Dormouse: Hugh Dennis
Peacock Butterfly: Amanda Abbington
Written and introduced by Lynne Truss
Wildlife sound recordings Chris Watson
Producer Sarah Blunt.

SUN 19:45 The Crime Writer at the Festival (b07jwt67)
The Queen of Mystery

In the month that thousands of fiction fans head to Yorkshire for the Harrogate Crime Festival, this new short story series celebrates the very particular atmosphere of such festivals. It's often said that there is something different about crime writers - they flock together, they enjoy each other's company and freely interact with their fans. Over the next four Sunday evenings, festival stalwarts Ann Cleeves, Sarah Hilary, Val McDermid and David Mark, will take us to events real and imagined in four original stories that will charm and intrigue.

In this first story, Ann Cleeves (bestselling author of the Vera and Shetland crime novel series) takes us to Malice Domestic in Bethesda, Maryland - an annual crime convention for lovers of the traditional mystery novel. Her character, Stella Monkhouse, known to her fans as the "Queen of Mystery", is an award-winning crime writer who is struggling to come to terms with the fact that her literary star is beginning to wane...

Read by Joanna Tope.

Written by Ann Cleeves.

Produced by Kirsteen Cameron.

SUN 20:00 Feedback (b07jx1db)
The unpredictable and fast-moving political landscape post-Brexit continues to dominate the headlines and listeners remain divided over whether the BBC's coverage has been as "duly impartial" as its Charter requires.

The "political earthquake" caused by last month's vote has presented special challenges to BBC Radio News - not just in terms of balance but also because of the sheer speed with which the tectonic plates have shifted. And when Boris Johnson announced he wasn't running for the tory leadership it wasn't just the lunchtime bulletins which had to be re-written - it presented a considerable headache to the writers and performers of Radio 4's Deadringers, who were recording their programme just a few hours later.

We went along to see how they would cope.

Series producer Bill Dare talks us through some of the hairier moments of the last two weeks and Jon Culshaw and Jan Ravens explain how they've speedily perfected their impersonations of Michael Gove and Theresa May.

And is visualisation the future of radio? Roger Bolton chairs a panel with Joe Harland, the BBC's Head of Visual Radio; Rhian Roberts, the editor of digital for Radios 4, 3 and 4 Extra; and three listeners with very different views on the need to be able to watch radio.

Producer: Will Yates
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

SUN 20:30 Last Word (b07j7nv9)
Caroline Aherne, Elie Wiesel, Sir Geoffrey Hill, Lord Mayhew, Michael Cimino

Matthew Bannister on

The comedian Caroline Aherne who created Mrs Merton and the Royle family and struggled with the pressures of fame.

Holocaust survivor and author Elie Wiesel. Described by President Obama as "one of the great moral voices of our time", he won the Nobel Peace Prize.

The poet Sir Geoffrey Hill whose work focused on English history, landscape and religion.

The Conservative politician Lord Mayhew. As Northern Ireland Secretary under John Major, he laid the foundations for the peace process.

And the film director Michael Cimino - best known for the Deer Hunter which won five Oscars.

Producer: Dianne McGregor.

SUN 21:00 Money Box (b07jqm7c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:26 Radio 4 Appeal (b07jwt5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 Analysis (b07j47q0)
Obama's World

Politico foreign correspondent Nahal Toosi examines the international record of President Obama's eight years in office and tries to discern the governing principles behind his foreign policy. The president sought to avoid costly overseas interventions - yet his critics allege that he has allowed rival powers like Russia and China to flex their muscles and threaten American interests. And he has been condemned for his signature foreign policy achievements, like rapprochements with Iran and Cuba. With interviews gathered in Europe, the Middle East and in Washington DC, Nahal examines the president's decisions to ask if there is such a thing as an "Obama Doctrine".
Producer: Lucy Proctor.

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (b07jqqhs)
Weekly political discussion and analysis with MPs, experts and commentators.

SUN 23:00 The Moth Radio Hour (b07jl8vp)
Series 3, Science Hour

True stories told live in the USA: Meg Bowles introduces stories about heroic research, prizes and survival against great odds.

The Moth is an acclaimed not-for-profit organisation dedicated to the art and craft of storytelling based in the USA. Since 1997, it has celebrated both the raconteur and the storytelling novice, who has lived through something extraordinary and yearns to share it. Originally formed by the writer George Dawes Green as an intimate gathering of friends on a porch in Georgia (where moths would flutter in through a hole in the screen), and then recreated in a New York City living room, The Moth quickly grew to produce immensely popular events at theatres and clubs around New York City and later around the USA, the UK and other parts of the world.

The Moth has presented more than 15,000 stories, told live and without notes, to standing-room-only crowds worldwide. The Moth podcast is downloaded over 27 million times a year.

Featuring true stories told live on stage without scripts, from the humorous to the heart-breaking.

The Moth Radio Hour is produced by Jay Allison and Atlantic Public Media in Woods Hole, Massachusetts and is distributed by the Public Radio Exchange.

SUN 23:50 A Point of View (b07j7nvm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:48 today]


MONDAY 11 JULY 2016

MON 00:00 Midnight News (b07jqqkp)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

MON 00:15 Thinking Allowed (b07j68nc)
Political women and language, The morality of sleep medication

Political women, gender and speech: Laurie Taylor talks to Deborah Cameron, Rupert Murdoch Professor of Language and Communication at the University of Oxford, about her analysis of the performances of the three female party leaders who took part in televised debates during the 2015 UK General Election campaign. What were the similarities and differences between the women and their male colleagues, as well as between the women themselves and how was it taken up as an issue in media coverage of the campaign?
Also, the morality of sleep medications. Jonathan Gabe, Professor of Sociology at Royal Holloway, University of London, talks about his study into attitudes towards the prescribing and taking of sleeping pills.
Producer: Jayne Egerton.

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (b07jwl7k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07jqqkr)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07jqqkt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07jqqkw)
The latest shipping forecast.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (b07jqqky)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07l170r)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church.

MON 05:45 Farming Today (b07jqql0)
Flashing fishing nets, Discard ban, Agricultural shows

Today fishery experts from around the world will descend on Aberdeen for a global fisheries economics conference. The International Institute of Fisheries Economics & Trade (IIFET) conference attracts leading economists, scientists and fisherman in their hundreds.

The discard ban will be top of the agenda - that's the new rule which is being gradually introduced and aims to stop fishermen throwing away fish they've caught, but can't take back to market as they have no quota for them. We hear from a fisherman who is taking part in a pilot scheme to avoid discarding any fish at all.

We'll be focussing all week on Agricultural Shows - all week we'll be looking at the highs and lows of the agricultural show, from small to large.. For some its all about the shopping and socialising, for others it's the horses and for some farmers its part of the business as they show their best livestock.

MON 05:56 Weather (b07jqql2)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcgb)
Capercaillie

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the capercaillie. The bizarre knife-grinding, cork-popping display of the male capercaillie is one of the strangest sounds produced by any bird. The name 'Capercaillie' is derived from the Gaelic for 'horse of the woods', owing to the cantering sound, which is the start of their extraordinary mating display. These are the largest grouse in the world and in the UK they live only in ancient Caledonian pine forests.

MON 06:00 Today (b07jqql4)
News and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 The Long View (b07jxsy1)
Military Drones and the 'Robo-planes' of the 1940s

Jonathan Freedland and guests compare the development of drone warfare today with the arrival of Nazi V1 and V2 weapons in the skies above southern England in the final year of the Second World War.

The philosopher A C Grayling and Professor Michael Clarke, former Director of the Royal United Services Institute, are among the contributors exploring connections between contemporary drones and the 'pilotless aircraft' or 'robo-planes' of the 1940s.

From the technology of unmanned flight to the ethics of increasingly autonomous weaponry, Jonathan and his guests consider the dilemmas of the present through the prism of the past.

With:
Christy Campbell, author of Target London: Under Attack from the V-weapons during WWII
Professor A C Grayling of the New College of the Humanities, author of Among The Dead Cities: Is the Targeting of Civilians in War Ever Justified ?
Professor Michael Clarke, former Director of RUSI
Ulrike Franke of the University of Oxford

With readings by Anna Wilson Jones

Producer Julia Johnson.

MON 09:30 In Therapy (b070v8bn)
John

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. Each day we are given privileged access to Susie's consulting room, where she meets a variety of clients.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed 'Jerusalem') and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learnt about their characters lives, backgrounds, and individual reason for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on hidden microphones at Susie's surgery.

Today, Susie meets John, a retired railway trade unionist in his 60s. His wife and children are gone, but his therapy is helping him to turn his life around.

Elsewhere in the series, we meet Helen, a high achieving corporate lawyer who is struggling to identify what is wrong - but knows that something is. We also hear Susie's first meeting with Jo - a new patient and an out of work actress. Then there is Louise and Richard who are expecting their first child in a few days.

We hear the therapist at work, eavesdropping on the most intimate of exchanges. To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Presenter: Susie Orbach
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 09:45 A Point of View (b07l24cr)
After the Vote, Onora O'Neill

The philosopher Onora O'Neill criticises the standard of public debate on both sides of the European Union decision and asks how this democratic deficit can be repaired.
"The disarray that we now witness, and the retractions, revelations and recriminations that spill out on a daily basis, show that large parts of each campaign failed to communicate with the public, did not offer adequate or honest accounts of the alternatives, and did not provide the basic means for voters to judge the real options, the real opportunities or the real risks."
This is the first of a series of special editions of Radio 4's long-running essay programme, A Point of View, in which five of Britain's leading thinkers give their own very personal view of "Brexit" - what the vote tells us about the country we are, and are likely to become.
Producer: Sheila Cook.

MON 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07jqql8)
Listener Week

One listener kick-starts a chain of interviews, starting with knitwear designer Kate Davies. Maylin Scott is a knitting enthusiast who's been inspired by Kate's impact on modern knitting as well as her candid writing about her life on her blog.

What's it like when you'd like to have a sex life with your partner, but you find you have a low libido? What could be the reasons and can you do anything about it? One listener shares her experiences, and we discuss what options are available to bring about change.

Woman's Hour's podcast reaches thousands of listeners around the world. Today, how it kept one teacher in touch with the UK when she was working in Russia.

A discussion about a statue to Crimean nurse Mary Seacole prompted a tweet asking us to champion another great female role model, Kofoworola Abeni Pratt, probably the first black nurse in the NHS and the first Nigerian to be chief nurse in her own country. Janet Davies from the Royal College of Nurses talks about her legacy.

Another listener noted we spoke to a lawyer as an example of a 'successful' woman. What about people like his wife, a teacher, or his sister, a nurse? Just as successful to him. Is it time to re-evaluate what's meant by success and give more credit to women who work in traditionally less glamorous or female-dominated roles?

MON 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07jxsy5)
Life Lines, Episode 1

By Al Smith

Carrie is an ambulance call handler. She never knows what the next emergency will be or the effect it might have on her.
And sometimes you have to listen hard to find out exactly what's going on.

Directed by Sally Avens

Al Smith's tense drama goes behind the scenes of an ambulance control room where we hear from Carrie about the job and hear how she deals with the vast disparity of calls that come in - some are literally a matter of life or death and in some of the others well the emergency may be more in the mind of the caller.
Al has written extensively for radio including Life In The Freezer and Everyday Time Machines. He is a graduate of the BBC Writers Academy, has been a broadcast Hot Shot and in 2012 won the BFI Wellcome Trust Screenwriting Prize. His play Harrogate will be at The Royal Court later in the year and also stars Sarah Ridgeway.

Sarah Ridgeway has appeared in Holby City, The Suspicions of Mr Whicher and The Crimson Petal and The White,.

MON 11:00 The Untold (b07jxsy7)
Our Own Marigold Hotel

The idea for a guest house came after Phillida and Christopher Purvis spent time travelling with charities working in the Nilgiri Hills. They had heard Indian community leader, Stan Thekaekara when he gave a guest presentation at Oxford University's Said Business School and were impressed by the work he was doing. He and his wife Mari have been alongside the Adivasi community in the Nilgiri Hills for more than three decades, working with those living in more than 300 villages and settlements stretching over a 40 mile radius. They set up a charity to help tribal villagers reclaim land and businesses to trade in tea and honey, for example. They have also overseen new community provisions, including a school and a well-regarded hospital.

As a former merchant banker Christopher already had experience of working abroad and being thrown in at the deep end. He had overseen the setting up of Warburg's Tokyo branch and it was in Japan that he and Phillida met. When he retired from banking he turned his hand to charity work, opening the Handel House Museum in London and working to help disadvantaged youngsters get into University and adjust to life there. He and Phillida decided to commit to sustained periods of volunteering in India with Stan and his community. They also thought that some of their retired friends might also like to help and the idea of the guest house was born.

The couple have put in a third of the money needed to buy the land and build the guest house and are lending a further third to the charity they've set up to oversee things. They want to raise the last £100,000 from friends and people they know, in part because it signifies a commitment and desire to join the venture. As Grace Dent hears, this will enable people with a range of skills can join together to help and it will also be fun sharing the guest house with like-minded people. There will be terraces, an area for yoga and even for Ayurveda medicine and meals will be specially prepared in the purpose built kitchens.

The unveiling of the idea to friends is met with a mixed response: on the one hand some are happy to commit to the kind of time share arrangement proposed, with £6,000 securing a month's stay every year for a decade. Others are more reluctant without visiting first and instead offer donations to help get things started. With the Monsoon fast approaching the work on clearing the land needs to start for things to be up and running on time. The rallying of the uncommitted begins in earnest and Grace Dent follows what happens
Produced by Susan Mitchell.

MON 11:30 Way Out East (b07jyrd2)
Domino Effect

New comedy by Guy Meredith about a group of expats sharing a flat in Hong Kong. Into the lives of unsuccessful architect James (Tony Gardner) and failed-everything Malcolm (John Gordon Sinclair) comes Zoe (Katherine Kingsley) on a one-way ticket from England to start a new life.

After an unpromising start, she moves in with James and Malcolm, convinced that she can get these two undomesticated alpha males to change their ways and become more organised at home and work. She also becomes part of the scene at the Shakes, the local expat pub run by Wanda (Samantha Bond) and visited by James's boss Mr Ampersand (Nicky Henson) who gives her a job as his PA.

The flatmates share many adventures including a very disorganised pub quiz, a series of domestic mishaps, attempts to fix the result of the Hong Kong Derby and a local marathon, and the annual Hong Kong New Year celebrations.

Katherine Kingsley was Olivier nominated for her role in Piaf and Singin' in the Rain, John Gordon Sinclair has performed in several musicals and is remembered for the title role in Gregory's Girl, Tony Gardner is currently one of the stars of the award-winning Last Tango in Halifax, and Samantha Bond has starred in many award-winning television and theatre productions including Downton Abbey. Guy Meredith has written several very successful dramas and comedies for radio, including the long-running series Daunt and Dervish.

Series Music Composer: David Chilton
Writer: Guy Meredith
Producer: Cherry Cookson

A Goldhawk Essential production for BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:00 News Summary (b07jqqlb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 12:04 The Why Factor (b07jyrd4)
Series 3, Groupthink

The Why Factor investigates the concept of "Groupthink." How the perceived wisdom of our allies and colleagues can influence our choices and persuade us to make disastrous military decisions, join cults or simply deny the evidence before our very eyes.

Presenter:Mike Williams
Producer:Sandra Kanthal
Editor:Andrew Smith

First broadcast on the BBC World Service.

MON 12:15 You and Yours (b07jqqld)
Electric cars, Wedding debt

The company behind the UK's 'electric highway' and sole provider of electric car chargers at motorway service stations has announced that it is going to start charging a fee for charging your electric car. Ecotricity has revealed that it plans to introduce a £6 fee for a 30 minute charge at its 300 fast-charging stations across the country. It has come as a surprise to the owners of electric and hybrid cars.

You don't need us to tell you that international travel has become more complicated over the years and that airlines have become strict about the documents you need to fly. But what is the poor traveller to do if the information provided is contradictory? We hear a strange case of tangled red tape, involving nothing more complicated than a flight from London to Dublin.

Brides and grooms break their wedding budget by £2 billion a year according to a new study by Barclays. A fifth of couples overspend while planning their big day, and on average have nine arguments. The average overspend is £7,971. We meet the couples getting into debt to tie the knot.

Presenter: Shari Vahl
Producer: Maire Devine.

MON 12:57 Weather (b07jqqlg)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 13:00 World at One (b07jqqlj)
As Andrea Leadsom pulls out of the Conservative Leadership contest, we examine the political implications of the decision, how the process of Theresa May becoming the next Prime Minister will unfold, and hear from supporters of both women on what a future cabinet should look like.
Angela Eagle formally announced her intention to become Labour Leader, following days of speculation, and amidst continuing uncertainty over whether Jeremy Corbyn would have to be nominated by 51 MPs or MEPs in order to secure a place on the ballot. Barry Gardiner, a member of Mr Corbyn's cabinet tells us that he should be on the ballot nominations or not, and that he supports Labour's Election Coordinator Jon Trickett's call for a General Election.
Former Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Seema Malhotra, who resigned last week tells us that Angela Eagle is right person to lead a united Labour party into an election.

MON 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07jyrd6)
The Korean War

As part of her series tracing the crucial turning-points of the early Cold War, Bridget Kendall revisits the Korean War. This was the moment the Cold War turned hot, and brought fears of a new global conflict.

But in this programme Bridget focuses on the fate of Koreans driven from their homes and divided from other family members, often permanently.

And she hears from two people who were rescued by a remarkable act of military compassion - the Heungnam Evacuation of December 1950. Tens of thousands of Korean refugees were allowed onto American, Japanese and South Korean ships and sailed to safety.

As she hears, conditions on board were grim. But as the ships landed in Busan, in the days immediately before Christmas, the evacuation came to be known as the 'Christmas Miracle'.

Nonetheless, the permanent division of families wrought by the war persists even today.

With: Lee Hoo-ja, Sohn Dong-hun, Kim Taesung, Norman Deptula

Producer: Phil Tinline.

MON 14:00 The Archers (b07jwt63)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Sunday]

MON 14:15 Drama (b07jyrd8)
Brief Lives, Episode 1

Brief Lives by Tom Fry and Sharon Kelly
Episode 1
Return of the popular drama series set in Manchester. Two young women are arrested for fighting in a hotel. Frank and Sarah reckon it's a fuss over nothing. Until one of the women is accused of theft.

Producer/Director Gary Brown

Series nine of the popular afternoon drama series starring David Schofield. Frank Twist's and Sarah Gold's legal advisers operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week to set free burglars, muggers, murderers and even some innocent people who find themselves on the wrong side of a cell door. Sarah and Frank have a child but their relationship is purely business as they clean up the mean streets of Manchester. The combination of complex crime stories and witty humour make this a popular returning series.

MON 15:00 Counterpoint (b07jyrdb)
Series 30, Heat 4, 2016

(4/13)
In the fourth heat of the 2016 series Paul Gambaccini welcomes competitors from Hampshire and London to face questions on every genre of music, with plenty of surprises and intriguing musical extracts. The programme comes from the BBC's historic Maida Vale studios.

Which American group wrote and originally performed the song which gave Lulu her first (and still best-known) hit? With which orchestra was Eugene Ormandy associated for more than forty years? Which composer is the subject of Julian Barnes's recent novel The Noise of Time?

In addition to general musical questions such as these, the competitors have to choose a special musical topic on which to answer their own individual questions, with no prior warning of the categories and no chance to prepare.

Producer: Paul Bajoria.

MON 15:30 Food Programme (b07jwt5q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 With Great Pleasure (b07jyrdd)
Maxine Peake

Actress Maxine Peake, star of Shameless, Silk and Dinnerladies, shares the pieces of writing that have meant the most to her in life. Including inspiration from Joan Littlewood and Marti Caine, Hovis Presley and Beryl Bainbridge. Recorded before an audience at the BBC Radio Theatre, with readers Diane Morgan (aka TV's Philomena Cunk) and John Shrapnel.
Producer Beth O'Dea

Pieces:
Joan's Book: the Autobiography of Joan Littlewood
Nico, Songs They Never Play on the Radio by James Young
The Bottle Factory Outing by Beryl Bainbridge
Lucy in The Sky with Hummus by Hovis Presley
A Coward's Chronicles by Marti Caine
Music: Puff the Magic Dragon by Peter, Paul and Mary.

MON 16:30 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b07jyrdg)
Series 14, The Recipe to Build a Universe

The Recipe to Build A Universe

Brian Cox and Robin Ince ask what ingredients you need to build a universe? They are joined on stage by comedian and former Science Museum explainer, Rufus Hound, chemist Andrea Sella and solar scientist Lucie Green, as they discuss the basis of all school chemistry lessons, the periodic table. They discover how the elements we learnt about at school are the building blocks that make up everything from humans to planet earth to the universe itself. They were formed in stars and during the big bang. The history of the discovery of the periodic table and the elements is a wonderful tale of genuine scientific exploration that has changed our understanding of where we come from and how life and the universe that we know came to be. The panel also ponder which element they might choose if they were building a universe from scratch and the audience suggest which elements they would remove from the periodic table if given the chance?

Producer: Alexandra Feachem.

MON 17:00 PM (b07jqqll)
PM at 5pm- Eddie Mair with news, interviews, context and analysis. Including Conservative Party leadership latest, Labour Party leadership latest and further analysis of the Chilcot Report.

MON 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07jqqln)
Theresa May is the UK's new Prime Minister.
Angela Eagle launches Labour leadership bid

MON 18:30 I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue (b07jyrdj)
Series 65, Episode 3

The nation's favourite wireless entertainment pays a visit to Glasgow's Pavilion Theatre. Old-timers Barry Cryer and Tony Hawks are joined on the panel by locals Susan Calman and Fred Macaulay with Jack Dee in the chair. Colin Sell provides piano accompaniment.

Producer - Jon Naismith.

It is a BBC Studios production.

MON 19:00 The Archers (b07jyrdl)
Ursula gets a second treacle tart out of the oven. She wasn't happy with the lattice of the first one she made. She'll make proper custard to go with it, of course. The doorbell goes, Rob says he'll answer it but Ursula insists she goes.

Bert cooks Rex breakfast on his birthday. Rex is feeling glum about being 29 an only having a part-share in a business that's barely breaking even. Bert reads the poem he's written for him. Later in The Bull, Pip gives Rex a cuddly toy chicken. Bert has added a few more verses to his poem for Rex, which he reads to Rex, Pip and Toby. While Pip is at the bar, Toby asks Rex for change. He needs it for the machine in the gents' toilets. Rex digs in his pocket for coins.

Bruce and Ursula walk while Rob rests. Bruce says it's time Ursula came home in fact he's taking her home with him today. Ursula pleads to stay with Rob a little longer and Bruce agrees she can stay until the end of the week. Ursula wants to help Rob during the summer holidays but Bruce doesn't care for Henry and says he should spend more time with his grandparents. Rob tells them he's going to show Henry the best summer of his young life. Ursula says both her and Bruce will support Rob through the trial.

MON 19:15 Front Row (b07jqqlq)
Alan Ayckbourn, Men and Chicken, Peter Robinson

Samira Ahmed talks to Alan Ayckbourn about his experimental new work for the Stephen Joseph Theatre in Scarborough, The Karaoke Theatre Company, which involves audience participation.

Briony Hanson reviews Men and Chicken, a Danish comedy film starring Mads Mikkelsen.

Crime writer Peter Robinson discusses his 23rd DCI Banks novel When the Music's Over, which features a celebrity at the centre of a historical abuse investigation.

MON 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07jxsy5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

MON 20:00 The Corbyn Story (b07jyrdn)
Episode 1

In this series, Steve Richards examines the dramatic story of Jeremy Corbyn over the past year, and what it tells us about the bitter battle for the soul of the Labour party.

Producer: Peter Mulligan.

MON 20:30 Analysis (b07jyrdq)
Money for Nothing

Should the state pay everyone a Universal Basic Income? Sonia Sodha finds out why the idea is winning support from an unlikely alliance of leftists and libertarians.
Producer: Helen Grady.

MON 21:00 Natural Histories (b07j4kc9)
Lobster

Brett Westwood looks at how the lobster is a creature that when drawn up from the deep is made to shed its natural identity as an ancient predator of the sea floor and has become an improbable sex symbol, an epicure's delight, a muse for surrealist artists a fearsome little nipper thanks to those pincers. Not all lobsters have claws, but the ones in this programme do. They're the European and American species, which come equipped with enormous claws like oversized boxing gloves, and a tough armour evolved to withstand the rigours of life on the rocks. Producer: Tom Bonnett.

MON 21:30 The Long View (b07jxsy1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 21:58 Weather (b07jqqls)
The latest weather forecast.

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (b07jqqlv)
Theresa May promises to make Brexit a success

We discuss what we might expect from her premiership. After five policemen were gunned down in Dallas we report from a shooting range, where more people than ever are learning how to use a gun. And we talk to an addict to Pokemon Go, the latest virtual reality game gripping the world.

MON 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07jyrds)
The Muse, Episode 6

When on a summer's day in 1967, Odelle Bastien climbs the steps of the Skelton gallery in London to take up a position as typist, she little realises how significantly her life is about to change. For there she meets the glamorous and enigmatic Marjorie Quick, who soon takes Odelle into her confidence and encourages her to pursue her dream of writing. But Odelle senses there is something that Quick is holding back, and when 'Rufina and the Lion', a lost Spanish masterpiece is brought to the gallery, Odelle begins to suspect that the mystery behind the painting's origins and her mentor's secrecy may be somehow connected.

The truth about 'Rufina and the Lion' lies in 1936 and a large house in rural Spain, where Olive Schloss, the daughter of renowned art dealer Harold Schloss and his beautiful but fragile wife Sarah, is harbouring artistic ambitions of her own. When artist and revolutionary Isaac Robles and his half-sister Teresa come into their lives, passion, art, and politics collide, with explosive and devastating consequences for them all.

Weaving between events in 1967 and those of 1936, a powerful story of love, obsession, identity, authenticity and deception unfolds in this highly anticipated new novel from Jessie Burton, author of the best-selling The Miniaturist.

Written by Jessie Burton

Abridged by Doreen Estall

Read by Martina Laird

Read by Jessica Raine

Produced by Heather Larmour.

MON 23:00 Don't Log Off (b07jyrdv)
Series 7, A Message from Hank and Norma

Alan Dein presents the moving story of three years in the life of Hank & Norma, a couple in their 60s from Arkansas, USA - told entirely by the messages left by Hank for Alan on Skype.

Alan first spoke to harp-playing Hank three years ago for Don't Log Off. Shortly afterwards, Hank started to leave Alan occasional messages and audio recordings. As the months went by, the recordings became more intimate and revealing, charting Hank's major heart surgery and Norma's experiences with cancer. Entirely on his own initiative, Hank started to record every detail of the couple's lives - including the final hours of Norma's life.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07jyrdx)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster.


TUESDAY 12 JULY 2016

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (b07jqqnk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

TUE 00:30 A Point of View (b07l24cr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07jqqnm)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07jqqnp)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07jqqnr)
The latest shipping forecast.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (b07jqqnt)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07l5y3b)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church.

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (b07jqqnw)
ARLA asks shoppers to pay more for their branded Farmers' Milk

ARLA asks shoppers to pay more for their milk which they say will go back to their farmers. But is this the best way to give UK dairy farmers a fair price for their milk?
This week is show week and Farming Today will be bringing you the sounds if not the sights of the traditional agricultural show. Today, more than 130,000 people are expected to visit one of the biggest events - the Great Yorkshire Show, in Harrogate.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mztnb)
Crossbill

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

David Attenborough presents the story of the Crossbill. Crossbills are large finches that specialise in eating conifer seeds. To break into the pine or larch cones, they've evolved powerful bills with crossed tips which help the birds prise off the woody scales of each cone. Crossbills breed very early in the year and incubating birds sometimes have snow on their backs.

TUE 06:00 Today (b07jys1f)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Life Scientific (b07jys1h)
Georgina Mace

Despite decades of conservation work, in zoos and in the field, the rate at which species are going extinct is speeding up. Georgina Mace has devoted her Life Scientific to trying to limit the damage to our planet's bio-diversity from this alarming loss. For ten years she worked on the Red List of Threatened Species, developing a robust set of scientific criteria for assessing the threat of extinction facing every species on the planet. When the list was first published, she expected resistance from big business; but not the vicious negative reaction she received from many wildlife NGOS. Her careful quantitative analysis revealed that charismatic animals, like the panda and the polar bear, are not necessarily the most at risk.

Producer: Anna Buckley.

TUE 09:30 One to One (b07jys1k)
Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to Val McDermid

Unexpected stories of education: The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the crime writer, Val McDermid, about an unusual educational experiment she was part of in the 1960s.

Datshiane Navanayagam had a difficult childhood punctuated by periods of homelessness, but she was always expected to achieve educationally and won a bursary to a private school which led her onto Cambridge University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role of education and for three editions of One to One is speaking to people who went on an unexpected educational journey.

Today she meets the crime writer, Val McDermid, who was part of an educational experiment in the 1960s which separated her from her peers and pushed her forward by a year.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

TUE 09:45 A Point of View (b07l5y3d)
After the Vote, Britain, Europe and the World

In these special editions of Radio 4's long-running essay programme, A Point of View, five of Britain's leading thinkers, give their own very personal view of "Brexit" - what the vote tells us about the country we are, and are likely to become.

Today, the philosopher John Gray who has presented on Radio 4 for many years, argues that Britain should look to Brexit as a new beginning in which it "can throw off the dead weight of a failing European project".

He says we should now accept the new opportunities given to us and "make our home in a more spacious world".


Producer: Adele Armstrong.

TUE 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07jqqny)
Listener week: The mystery of the lost diary, Lyme disease, Child of a Catholic priest

It's been a turbulent few weeks in politics, not least for the women involved in leadership struggles - Theresa May, Andrea Leadsom and Angela Eagle. Two listeners share their thoughts.

In the late 1990s Claudia Rizzo's father found the 1929 diary of May Stewart, a teenage girl from Letchworth, at a small railway station in southern Italy. Claudia wants to trace May's family.

We continue our Listener Week chain of interviews. Knitwear designer and blogger Kate Davies recommends sonic artist and knitter, Felicity Ford.

Summer is a good time to be tick-aware as families spend more time in environments where Lyme-disease carrying ticks live. If detected early, Lyme disease can often be treated effectively with antibiotics. But if it's not treated or left too late there is a risk that you could develop severe and long-lasting symptoms. We speak to a listener , whose daughter was diagnosed with Lyme in January this year, and Dr Sandra Pearson, medical director of Lyme Disease Action.

We hear from Hannah Robinson, a listener who discovered her absent father was a Catholic priest.

Presenter: Jane Garvey
Producer: Lucinda Montefiore.

TUE 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07jys1p)
Life Lines, Episode 2

By Al Smith

Carrie is an ambulance call handler. She never knows what the next emergency will be or the effect it might have on her.
And today a man is intent on taking his own life.

Directed by Sally Avens.

TUE 11:00 Natural Histories (b07jys1r)
Carp

Brett Westwood goes fishing. Why is the carp king? Dexter Petley author of 'Love, Madness, Fishing' knows some answers. He went to live in a yurt in Normandy in order to spend his life carp fishing. From there and a nearby water he brings us his tales of the river bank. Carp fishing is now a very high-tech pastime. Electronic bite detectors and gourmet bait balls are part of the business but an older intimacy with the carp is still crucial to land a fish; the angler must know how to read the water and track its hidden denizens. Meanwhile the Natural History Museum's Oliver Crimmen, Japanese art expert Timon Screech, Steve Varcoe from Aron's Jewish Delicatessen and anthropologist Desmond Morris discuss why various cultures continue to value the fish with a face that only a mother could love. Readings by Anton Lesser. Producer: Tim Dee.

TUE 11:30 The House of the Windy City - Dance Music's Forgotten Heroes (b07jys1t)
Presenter and DJ Dave Pearce travel to Chicago to hear how a country traditionally resistant to dance music finally got it. The US invented it and then ignored it. Today with electronic dance music estimated to be a $20 billion industry, what do those who started Chicago House in the early 1980s think of this new scene?

House music grew out of black gay clubs in Chicago in the early 1980s. We hear from Robert Williams who started the legendary Warehouse club where the scene got its name. He brought in Frankie Knuckles to DJ and Dave Pearce hears how he would create his own edits to keep the crowd dancing all night.

In Chicago we track down Rocky Jones, founder of DJ International, who put out some of the very first records. What was his reaction when he found out the few thousand records he put out were driving a cult scene in the UK? With contributions from The Pet Shop Boys, DJ Marshall Jefferson and DJ Pierre we hear how the sound of Chicago topped the charts in the UK.

But in America a lot of house music wasn't played on the radio because it was viewed as gay music. As Hip Hop became the dominant musical form, Chicago House was pushed out to the suburbs. DJ Black Madonna takes us on a tour of one of the few remaining house music clubs. While here in the UK a new generation of house music artists like Disclosure have found an audience and a following. They tour the world playing their own interpretation of Chicago House.

A Tonic Media production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:00 News Summary (b07jqqp0)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 12:04 The Why Factor (b07jys1w)
Series 3, Age of Consent

Mike William investigates the Age of Consent. it used to be 12 in England, it''s currently 14 in italy - less for so-called "Romeo and Juliet" couples who have only three years age difference. The Why Factor explores the real reasons we draw a line on sexual relationships.

Presenter:Mike Williams
Producer:Ben Carter
Editor: Andrew Smith

The Why Factor broadcasts weekly on the BBC World Service.

TUE 12:15 You and Yours (b07jqqp2)
Call You and Yours: Have you borrowed from, or lent to, friends or family?

Lending within families or friendship groups is rising. According to recent figures from Legal and General, parents lending to their children to help them get on the UK property ladder will amount to £5bn in 2016. But there are also signs of families leaning more on other family members or friends for support in paying for everyday expenses. Could it be that what used to be a rare thing is becoming the norm in these days of rising house prices and student loans?

New research suggests that this informal borrowing and lending is straining relationships. If you have to lend to family or friends, how best can you do it? Have you done it successfully, what was the secret? Or how does it go wrong and why?

Have you borrowed from, or lent to, friends or family? How did it go for you? Email us with your experience - youandyours@bbc.co.uk and remember to leave your phone number so we can call you back. And join Shari Vahl for the programme at 12.15pm on Tuesday.

TUE 12:57 Weather (b07jqqp4)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 13:00 World at One (b07jqqp6)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

TUE 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07jys1y)
McCarthyism

As part of her series tracing the crucial turning-points of the early Cold War, Bridget Kendall explores the personal impact of the McCarthyite Red Scare in the America of the 1950s.

As she finds, the Cold War fear of 'Reds' was driven not just by the spectre of Stalin's Soviet Union but by the communist revolution to America's west, across the Pacific.

As angry voices asked 'Who Lost China?', people with strong associations with China became objects of suspicion - particularly if they were left-wing intellectuals. Investigation and long years of hearings followed.

All this had huge, lasting impact on these people - and on their children. And Bridget hears too from the daughter of a civil rights activist and communist, who went 'underground' for five years, when she was a young child, before the case against him finally fell away.

With Kathryn Jackson, David Lattimore, Sian Shaw.

Producer: Phil Tinline.

TUE 14:00 The Archers (b07jyrdl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Drama (b07jysdn)
Foreign Bodies: Keeping the Wolf Out, The Wolf

Philip Palmer's new detective drama is set in communist Hungary in 1963. A former member of the despised secret police has been found brutally murdered. Special Investigator Bertalan Lázár must find his killer but not all his colleagues share his zeal.

Directed by Toby Swift

Keeping the Wolf Out is part of Radio 4's 'Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze'.

TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (b07jysdq)
Series 9, Illuminations

A mysterious character offering to illuminate a course of action, an activist thrust into a glaring spotlight and the dull glow of car tail lights- Josie Long looks for illuminations in the darkness.

Featuring the actress and activist Sacheen Littlefeather walking onstage to collect Marlon Brando's Oscar, a singing medium and Laura Barton on driving at night.

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 15:30 The Human Zoo (b07jysds)
Series 8, Democracy and the Wisdom of Crowds

The series that looks at current events through the lens of psychology. Michael Blastland explores the quirky ways in which we humans think, behave and make decisions.

At a time when questions are being asked both of democracy, and of how Donald Trump continues to rise in the US, the Human Zoo team investigates the so-called wisdom of crowds - the idea that collective judgments lead to the right solution.

Sometimes, how we learn from one another results in human progress. Elsewhere, our tendency to copy each other's behaviour has irrational outcomes.

When does the herd get it right and wrong? How do we know when the crowd is leading us in the right direction?

Michael Blastland is joined by resident Human Zoo psychologist Nick Chater, Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School, and roving reporter Timandra Harkness.

Contributors this week include Yale economist Robert Shiller, science writer Philip Ball, Alex Mesoudi from the University of Exeter and author Steven Poole.

Producer: Eve Streeter
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

TUE 16:00 Document (b07jysdv)
Knowing Jurgen Kuczynski

When Anne McElvoy met and wrote about the East German Economist Jurgen Kuczynski back in the 1980s she was aware of his reputation as a fringe player in the collection of Soviet spies operating in Britain in the years leading up to the 2nd World War. Now, with the help of recently released documents from MI5 and the intelligence services in both the US and Germany, Anne pieces together a fuller story of Kuczynski, his family and their role in the Atomic bomb spy scandals that rocked the British in the years after the second World War. She talks to academics who have been exploring the way the Kuczynski family were able to operate in spite of a full and detailed operation by MI5 intended to keep them under surveillance and she talks to surviving members of the family about Jurgen and his sister Ruth, better known as the soviet spy Sonya, and why they never felt any need to excuse the work they did in allowing a Stalinist regime in Moscow to dramatically accelerate their development of Nuclear Weapons.

Producer: Tom Alban.

TUE 16:30 A Good Read (b07jysdx)
Joann Fletcher and Damian Barr

Writer Damian Barr and Egyptologist Joann Fletcher join Harriett Gilbert to talk about their favourite books. Under discussion are Alice Walker's Pulitzer Prize winner, The Color Purple, Isis in the Ancient World by RE Witt, an exploration of the Egyptian Goddess, and Leonora Carrington's surreal novel The Hearing Trumpet. But which book helped save Damien Barr's life? Which book is variously described as "a wonderful book" and "turgid and indigestible", and which book would Damien have rather eaten than read? Producer Sally Heaven.

TUE 17:00 PM (b07jqqp8)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

TUE 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07jqqpb)
12/07/16 Labour leadership chaos

Labour's NEC discusses whether Jeremy Corbyn should be on the leadership shortlist. David Cameron chairs his final cabinet meeting.

TUE 18:30 The Missing Hancocks (b04ly3xv)
The Matador

Between 1954 and 1959, BBC Radio recorded 102 episodes of Ray Galton and Alan Simpson's comedy classic Hancock's Half Hour. The first modern sitcom, it made stars of Tony Hancock, Sid James and Kenneth Williams, and launched Galton and Simpson on one of the most successful comedy-writing partnerships in history. But 20 episodes of the show are missing from the BBC archives, and have not been heard since their original transmission nearly sixty years ago. Now, five of those episodes have been lovingly re-recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC Radio Theatre, featuring a stellar cast led by Kevin McNally as The Lad Himself.

Tonight's episode: The Matador. Tony uses Sid's travel agency to book a holiday in Spain, little knowing that Sid also runs a bullfighting business....

Written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, and with the classic score newly recorded by the BBC Concert Orchestra, the show stars Kevin McNally, Kevin Eldon, Simon Greenall, Robin Sebastian and Susy Kane. The Matador was last broadcast in October 1955.

Produced by Ed Morrish and Neil Pearson.

TUE 19:00 The Archers (b07jysvg)
Adam and Brian admire the new drill which arrived yesterday. They discuss its capacities and try to persuade Jennifer to take a look but she doesn't have time. She's going shopping with Kate for upmarket furnishings for the yurts.

Josh finds Rex doing the early shift at Hollowtree when it should have been Toby. Rex says his brother has become even less reliable because he has a new woman on the go. Josh isn't pleased because if Toby doesn't do his share it will make the business less efficient which will impact their profit. When Toby eventually turns up at Hollowtree, he promises to never miss a shift again. Josh makes it clear that Toby needs to pull his weight.

When Jennifer returns from shopping with Kate she finds Adam and Brian still admiring the new drill. Brian explains how it works and Jennifer shows she knows a lot of it already. Josh calls round Home Farm, Adam shows him the new drill and Josh is genuinely interested. They talk about the technology advancements in farming. Josh asks if Adam can offer him any tractor work during harvest. Adam tells Brian he gets a sense Josh isn't too hopeful about his A-level results. Jennifer can't believe the two of them are still admiring the drill.

TUE 19:15 Front Row (b07jqqpd)
Matt Smith on Unreachable, Author Sean O'Brien, Summertime film review, Cultural Olympiad legacy

Matt Smith stars in a new play that was completely conceived in the rehearsal room. In 'Unreachable', written and directed by Anthony Neilson, Smith plays a film director consumed by his attempts to capture the perfect light. We speak to them both about the rehearsal process and the end result. Unreachable is on at the Royal Court in London until the 6th August.

Award-winning poet Sean O'Brien talks about his new novel, Once Again Assembled Here. Set in the claustrophobic world of a boys' boarding school in the late 60s, it's a murder story which explores the re-emergence of the far right after World War II. Once Again Assembled Here is published on 14 July.

Ruth Mackenzie was the director of the Cultural Olympiad for the London 2012 Olympics. In the run up to Rio 2016, we ask her to assess its legacy four years on.

Hannah McGill reviews French film La Belle Saison or Summertime.

Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe
Producer: Elaine Lester.

TUE 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07jys1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (b07jysvj)
Trade and Torture

Is the UK putting trade above concerns about human rights in the United Arab Emirates?

Britons who claim they were tortured in the Gulf state's prison cells say the UK government failed to fight for them.

The foreign office has received 43 cases of alleged abuse of UK citizens in the UAE since 2010.

In exclusive interviews, File on 4 hears from those who've got out of detention in Dubai who say they were arrested without charge and subjected to violent treatment and torture.

The UK government says it regularly raises Britons' cases - and allegations of mistreatment - with the UAE authorities. But those who've been stuck there tell File on 4 they didn't get the support they needed and expected when they were suffering, despite the authorities here knowing the risks they faced.

The government's also promoting deals with its largest trading partner in the Middle East.

Jane Deith counts up the billions of UAE investment in the UK, from container ports to housing developments.

And the programme hears the arguments for joint ventures with Emirati companies - for example by NHS hospitals - as a lucrative way to generate income as budgets are squeezed, ultimately providing better services for patients here.

The United Arab Emirates is seen as a stable ally in an unstable Middle East, not least in the fight against Islamic State - does that make the UK less willing to raise issues like human rights abuses and judicial process?

Reporter: Jane Deith
Producer: Sally Chesworth.

TUE 20:40 In Touch (b07jqqpg)
Blindness: for sighted beginners

In response to a recent programme discussion on how blind people should accept and then dispense with help, sighted listeners contacted In Touch asking for information on the best techniques and tips when giving help. Should you open doors or count steps? And how should you guide?
Amie Slavin, blind since the age of 23, and Julie Smethurst give their views on the best ways sighted people can offer help, and some practical do's and don'ts.

Presenter: Peter White
Producer: Lee Kumutat.

TUE 21:00 Inside Health (b07jysvn)
Care.data, Asthma, Acne rosacea, Pacemakers

Care.data, the scheme to build an enormous database containing the medical records of all English patients has been scrapped. Dr Mark Porter investigates the fall-out following the cancellation of this expensive programme, which foundered on concerns about confidentiality and public and professional trust. Chair of the national EMIS user group and Sheffield GP Dr Geoff Schrecker and GP Dr Margaret McCartney discuss the scale of the failure of the care.data programme and outline what needs to happen in the future if valuable patient data is to be used for the public good.

Twelve hundred adults and children die every year in the UK from asthma attacks, and these grim statistics have remained stubbornly consistent for decades. But there is light on the horizon as researchers in the field begin to stratify the disease; identifying patients with different types of asthma and treating them accordingly.
Mark visits the Churchill Hospital in Oxford where some pioneering work has taken place to develop new diagnostic tests and new treatments. Ian Pavord, Professor of Respiratory Medicine at the Nuffield Department of Medicine, shows Mark the new FENO breath test for nitric oxide to test inflammation - soon to be available for use in general practice.

Acne Rosacea is a debilitating and painful condition. It's characterised by redness, spots and inflammation on the face and affects both sexes but mainly women. Dr Bav Shergill of the British Association of Dermatologists discusses latest treatments.

And the first in a new series dedicated to happy accidents that have altered modern medicine. First off, the pacemaker. Dr Margaret McCartney and Carl Heneghan, Professor of Evidence Based Medicine at the University of Oxford, tell the remarkable story of the serendipitous discovery of this life-saving device.

TUE 21:30 The Life Scientific (b07jys1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 21:58 Weather (b07jqqpj)
The latest weather forecast.

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (b07jqqpl)
Corbyn 'can stand' against Labour challenger

Jeremy Corbyn is to stand in a Labour leadership contest after the party's ruling body decided he did not need nominations from MPs and MEPs to be included in the ballot. Also as a tribunal rules that China has no right to islands and reefs in the South China Sea, we speak to a senior US State Department official. And Paul Moss goes on patrol with Dallas police.

Photo: Jeremy Corbyn
Credit: AFP PHOTO / ODD ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images.

TUE 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07jyv0z)
The Muse, Episode 7

When on a summer's day in 1967, Odelle Bastien climbs the steps of the Skelton gallery in London to take up a position as typist, she little realises how significantly her life is about to change. For there she meets the glamorous and enigmatic Marjorie Quick, who soon takes Odelle into her confidence and encourages her to pursue her dream of writing. But Odelle senses there is something that Quick is holding back, and when 'Rufina and the Lion', a lost Spanish masterpiece is brought to the gallery, Odelle begins to suspect that the mystery behind the painting's origins and her mentor's secrecy may be somehow connected.

The truth about 'Rufina and the Lion' lies in 1936 and a large house in rural Spain, where Olive Schloss, the daughter of renowned art dealer Harold Schloss and his beautiful but fragile wife Sarah, is harbouring artistic ambitions of her own. When artist and revolutionary Isaac Robles and his half-sister Teresa come into their lives, passion, art, and politics collide, with explosive and devastating consequences for them all.

Weaving between events in 1967 and those of 1936, a powerful story of love, obsession, identity, authenticity and deception unfolds in this highly anticipated new novel from Jessie Burton, author of the best-selling The Miniaturist.

Written by Jessie Burton

Abridged by Doreen Estall

Read by Jessica Raine

Produced by Heather Larmour.

TUE 23:00 The Infinite Monkey Cage (b07jyrdg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Monday]

TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07jyv11)
TIP: The Foreign Secretary says Britain is willing to hire trade negotiators from "wherever" it can in the world. The Governor of the Bank of England has issued a robust defence of his economic warnings before the referendum. And peers react to the Chilcot Report. Alicia McCarthy has the latest from Westminster.


WEDNESDAY 13 JULY 2016

WED 00:00 Midnight News (b07jqqtm)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

WED 00:30 A Point of View (b07l5y3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07jqqtr)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07jqqtt)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07jqqty)
The latest shipping forecast.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (b07jqqv4)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07ldrbh)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church.

WED 05:45 Farming Today (b07jqqv6)
New bovine TB vaccine for cattle, Agricultural shows, Alcoholic fruit liqueurs

Scientists from the University of Bath have been awarded a £240,000 grant to work on developing an improved bovine TB vaccine for cattle, using superbug technology.
Every summer weekend in Scotland you can find at least one agricultural show. They're certainly not the glitzy events like the Royal Highland or the big commercial industry exhibitions. These are small-scale community shows run by farmers, and livestock are the main focus.
Sybil Ruscoe has been to Westwell, an organic farm near Burford in Oxfordshire where Miles Gibson is making alcoholic liqueurs from soft fruit.

Presented by Anna Hill and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03mzv6d)
Merlin

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Chris Packham presents the story of the merlin. These diminutive falcons nest in deep heather on moorland, mainly in the north and west. In winter they also hunt over open country, hillsides and coastal marshes. The male merlin or jack is our smallest falcon, about the size of a mistle thrush.

WED 06:00 Today (b07jyvzs)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 The Listening Project (b07jyvzv)
The Listening Project Live: From Bexhill-on-Sea

In the first of this summer's special live programmes from The Listening Project Mobile Booth, currently parked by the De La Warr Pavilion, Fi Glover enjoys local conversations and asks journalist Kathryn Flett and others how different Sussex seaside towns really are.

Fi welcomes former contributors to The Project to hear about the impact their conversation had on their lives, introduces new conversations, and hears about the role of the iconic modernist Pavilion through 80 years of local life.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 09:30 In Therapy (b070cxy4)
Helen

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach explores the private relationship between therapist and patient. Each day we are given privileged access to Susie's consulting room, where she meets a variety of clients.

All of the clients are played by actors, but these are not scripted scenes. Each client profile has been carefully constructed by therapist Susie, director Ian Rickson (former artistic director at the Royal Court, and director of the highly acclaimed 'Jerusalem') and radio producer Kevin Dawson. The client profiles have been given to the actors who have learnt about their characters lives, backgrounds, and individual reason for seeking therapy. The scenes have then been improvised and recorded on hidden microphones at Susie's surgery.

Today, Susie meets Helen, a high achieving corporate lawyer who is struggling to identify what is wrong - but knows that something is.

Elsewhere in the series, we meet John - in his 60s, and a retired railway trade unionist. His wife and children are gone, but his therapy is helping him to turn his life around. We also meet Louise and Richard - a couple expecting their first baby in a few days, and Jo, who is meeting Susie for the first time - she is an out of work actress.

We hear the therapist at work, eavesdropping on the most intimate of exchanges. To help us with our understanding of the process, Susie Orbach commentates on what is happening in the room, shining a light on the journey both she and her patient have embarked upon.

Presenter: Susie Orbach
Producer: Kevin Dawson
Director: Ian Rickson

A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 09:45 A Point of View (b07ldrbk)
After the Vote, Democracy After Brexit

In these special editions of A Point of View, five of Britain's leading thinkers give their own very personal view of "Brexit" - what the vote tells us about the country we are, and are likely to become.

Today, the philosopher Roger Scruton reflects on democracy after Brexit and explains why he feels it is the ordinary people of this country who care about democracy, not the urban elites.

"The referendum gave these people a voice", writes Scruton, "and what they have told us is that their country, its laws and its sovereignty are more important to them than the edicts of anonymous bureaucrats striving to rule from nowhere".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

WED 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07jqqvn)
Listener week: Rubbish friends, Adult orphans, 170 years of family recipes

The death of your parents is never easy, however old you are. Lucy Humphries wrote to us about the experience of becoming an adult orphan. She joins Jenni along with her sister Sarah and the psychotherapist Julia Samuel, a specialist in grief and a vice-chair of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy.

Our Listener Week chain of interviews continues. The sonic artist Felicity Ford suggested we speak to her friend and fellow knitter Lara Clements. Lara talks about the pressures on women in their thirties to marry and have children and reveals why she loves being an aunt.

We hear from a group of friends in Suffolk who meet every week to pick litter. Fiona Unwin, Julia Squier and Etta Lloyd-Jones are Rubbish Friends.

Listener Jenny Mallin on her family's 170 year old book of recipes, passed down and added to by five generations of Anglo-Indian women.

Presenter: Jenni Murray
Producer: Helen Fitzhenry.

WED 10:41 15 Minute Drama (b07jyvzz)
Life Lines, Episode 3

By Al Smith

Carrie is an ambulance call handler. She never knows what the next emergency will be or the effect it might have on her.
And now her own life is fast becoming as difficult as some of the calls she has to take.

Directed by Sally Avens.

WED 10:55 The Listening Project (b07jyw01)
David and John - Moving to the Country

Fi Glover with a conversation where a couple who moved from London to a small village in Pembrokeshire reveal that it's the one who was born in Wales who found it harder to settle. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

WED 11:00 The Corbyn Story (b07jyrdn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:00 on Monday]

WED 11:30 Plum House (b07jyw84)
Series 1, The Rather Risky Ramble

Every year thousands of tourists flock to the Lake District. But one place they never go to is Plum House - the former country home of terrible poet George Pudding (1779-1848). Now a crumbling museum, losing money hand over fist, it struggles to stay open under its eccentric curator Peter Knight (Simon Callow).

Can anyone save Plum House from irreversible decline?

In this episode, Tom returns from a team building course in London to find the Plum House team have been bickering in his absence. So he decides to put what he has learned into action. Peter has a better idea to restore team spirit and suggests the museum's staff go on a walk through the Cumbrian countryside, known as Pudding's Horseshoe. Hiking boots on, the group set off on their ramble on a beautiful sunny day, full of enthusiasm and Kendal Mint Cake. What can possibly go wrong?

Written by Ben Cottam and Paul McKenna
Directed and Produced by Paul Schlesinger
A Hat Trick production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:00 News Summary (b07jqqvv)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 12:04 The Why Factor (b07jyw86)
Series 3, Fear of Robots

Robots are in our homes, our factories, on battlefields and in hospitals. Some are smarter than us, some are faster. Some are here to help us, others not. Science fiction is filled with malign machines which rise against humanity. Mike Williams asks if we have reason to fear the machines we are creating.

Presenter:Mike Williams
Producer:Sandra Kanthal
Editor:Andrew Smith

First broadcast on the BBC World Service.

WED 12:15 You and Yours (b07jqqw1)
HRT mis-selling, Olympic legacy, Mastercard class action

Leading medical bodies say that an alternative form of Hormone Replacement Therapy is being mis-sold to women suffering with menopausal symptoms.

In an exclusive investigation for You & Yours, we've found a number of private clinics and a specialist pharmacy advertising Bioidentical HRT as a safer and more natural form of treatment. But expert medical bodies in the UK, including the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, say there is insufficient evidence from clinical trials to back that up.

The Olympic games in Brazil is fast approaching, making it four years since London hosted them. The city won the 2012 games on a promise of regenerating one of the most deprived areas of the UK. But a freedom of information request has found that fewer than a thousand permanent jobs have been created on the Olympic Park. We examine whether London 2012 has delivered its promised legacy.

If you used a Mastercard between 1992 and 2008, you could be in line for a payout of £450, if new legal action against the world's second biggest card company is successful. It's being brought in one of the first class actions in the UK under the Consumer Rights Act 2015. It is alleged that Mastercard charged retailers excessive fees for using their cards, which shops then passed on to consumers in higher prices. We hear from the former Chief Financial Ombudsman, Walter Merricks, who is leading the lawsuit and Mark Barnett, the President of Mastercard.

Producer: Rebecca Maxted
Presenter: Shari Vahl.

WED 12:57 Weather (b07jqqw3)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 13:00 World at One (b07jqqw5)
David Cameron is applauded by MPs after speaking at the dispatch box for the last time. We examine the challenges facing Theresa May and a member of Labour's NEC tells us a a number of her colleagues were "very upset" at last night's meeting after a "number of threats" were made.

WED 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07jyw88)
The H-Bomb

In a series tracing the decisive moments in the early years of the Cold War, Bridget Kendall tells the story of the development of the hydrogen bomb.

Featuring Kenneth Ford, Sergei Khrushchev and Matashichi Oishi.

Readings by Sadao Ueda.

Producer: Martin Williams.

WED 14:00 The Archers (b07jysvg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Drama (b07jyw8b)
Foreign Bodies: Keeping the Wolf Out, The Old Days

Hungary, 1963. Soviet investigators are determined to find the mole in the Ministry. Archivist Franciska Lázár finds herself in their sights as her detective husband investigates what becomes a brutal murder case. Scores are being settled in Philip Palmer's Cold War detective drama.

Directed by Toby Swift

Keeping the Wolf Out is part of Radio 4's 'Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze'.

WED 15:00 Money Box (b07jqqw9)
Money Box Live: University education - a good deal?

Does paying for your degree make you a more active consumer?

It's a huge purchase decision - made by people who are just starting to live their independent lives - so how do you get a good deal for the money paid for your university education?

What help is there to ensure you get want you want and need? What are your rights and how do you complain?

Whatever you want to know, call us on 03700 100 444 from 1pm to 3.30pm on Wednesday, standard geographic charges from landlines and mobiles will apply. Or e-mail moneybox@bbc.co.uk now.

Presenter: Ruth Alexander
Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Helen Shreeve.

WED 15:30 Inside Health (b07jysvn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Thinking Allowed (b07jyw97)
The English Defence League; 'Real' immigrants

The English Defence League: A study of the individuals who comprise this far right movement. Hilary Pilkington, Professor of Sociology at the University of Manchester, provides fresh and timely insights into a politics built on English identity and opposition to 'Islamism'. They're joined by Nasar Meer, Professor of Comparative Citizenship and Social Policy at Strathclyde University,

Who's a 'real' immigrant and who's 'not really' an immigrant? Martina Byrne, Lecturer in the School of Social Policy, Social Policy and Social Justice at University College, Dublin, discusses her study into middle class attitudes to immigration. Why do white Irish professionals consider that white Eastern Europeans are immigrants but white French and Australians are not?
Producer: Jayne Egerton.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (b07jqqwf)
BBC deputy director-general Anne Bulford, Should BBC have filmed the raid on Cliff Richard's home, Risks of true crime TV shows

One of the most senior women in media gives her first interview. The BBC's new Deputy Director General Anne Bulford talks Top Gear, top executives' pay and how the broadcaster plans to make hundreds of millions of pounds in savings.

Sir Cliff Richard says he will sue the BBC and South Yorkshire Police over TV coverage of the raid on his home in 2014 in connection with historical sex abuse allegations. After 22 months without being arrested or charged, Sir Cliff was told that the case had been dismissed. He says the behaviour of the police and BBC at the time his home was raided was unfair and caused him distress and financial loss. The House of Commons Home Affairs Select Committee criticised the police, but said the BBC did nothing wrong. However, should the law be changed to protect the anonymity of people who fall under suspicion but are never arrested or charged? Or should the media be free to report on police action against public figures, even if they emerge as completely innocent at the end of the process? We hear contrasting views from two legal experts.

Also - Since the success of the Serial podcast in the United States, UK broadcasters have been looking for a successful true crime formula here. This Thursday on ITV, award-winning investigator and former police detective Mark Williams-Thomas tackles a cold case in "The Investigator: A British Crime Story". It uses dramatic reconstruction to delve into a story of murder and disappearance. We hear from Mark Williams-Thomas and also the executive producer of the BAFTA-winning Channel Four series "The Murder Detectives", Neil Grant, on how they choose their cases and the production and ethical challenges involved when real tragedy becomes TV entertainment.

WED 17:00 PM (b07jqqwh)
News with Eddie Mair: context and analysis as Theresa May takes over as Prime Minister.

WED 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07jqqwk)
13/07/16 Theresa May has become Prime Minister

Speaking in Downing Street, Mrs May said she would lead a 'one nation' government.

WED 18:30 I've Never Seen Star Wars (b04xp4wx)
Series 6, Rebecca Front

Marcus Brigstocke persuades his guests to try new experiences: things they really ought to have done by now. Some experiences are loved, some are loathed, in this show all about embracing the new.

This week, Rebecca Front, a self-confessed scaredy cat, is persuaded to take her first ride on a motorbike and read her first book about science. But how much of it did she understand?

WED 19:00 The Archers (b07jyw99)
Pat learns from Susan that Ursula is leaving on Friday and resolves it's definitely worth asking her solicitor, Maggie, about increased access with Henry. She learns that the only way they can get more time with Henry is by asking Rob directly. They are entitled, however, to arrange a week-long holiday away with their grandson.

Tom asks Adam to do the Bridge Farm combining because he forgot to confirm his usual contractor who's now no longer available. Adam sees Tom is still under a lot of pressure and invites him for a drink. Adam tells Tom about the plan to persuade Harrison to become captain of the cricket team. Tom tells Adam he wants to grow Bridge Farm's business, recalling the conversations he used to have with Helen about how to extend their range, but he just doesn't have the time. Adam wishes there was more his family could do to help.

Kenton thinks this year's fete will be boring and wonders if he can liven it up. At the fete committee meeting they discuss the theme of this year's event. Lynda suggests Resurgam but she is outmanoeuvred and outnumbered by Kenton and Fallon who want a Rio Carnival theme.

WED 19:15 Front Row (b07jqqwm)
Winona Ryder in Stranger Things, Jan Ravens on impersonating Theresa May, Alice Oswald, James Kelman

Stranger Things is a Netflix series starring Winona Ryder which tells the story of a supernatural disappearance of a young boy in 1980s Indiana. Kim Newman reviews.

As satirists target a new Prime Minister, Jan Ravens of Radio 4's Dead Ringers discusses her approach to impersonating Theresa May.

Poet Alice Oswald discusses Falling Awake, her new poetry collection that explores mortality, and why gardening and the classics lead to poetic inspiration.

James Kelman who won the Booker Prize in 1994 for his novel How Late It Was, How Late, discusses his new book Dirt Road, which follows a Scottish teenager and his father on a trip to the American south where they grieve for the teenager's mother and sister who have died of cancer.

On his 82nd birthday the Nobel Prize-winning Nigerian playwright and poet reads from his poem, A Vision of Peace.

Presenter Samira Ahmed
Producer Jerome Weatherald.

WED 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07jyvzz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:41 today]

WED 20:00 Moral Maze (b07jyw9f)
Policing Offence

When is a personal opinion so offensive that it becomes morally unacceptable? This weekend former Tory leadership candidate Andrea Leadsom discovered her comments on motherhood had transgressed an unwritten social convention. The outraged legions of leader writers, columnists and Twitterati descended and by Monday she was gone. As the politics of offence, identity and rights become ever more toxic, they become equally hard to navigate and the price of transgression is ever higher. The whole Brexit debate and its aftermath have been characterised by claim and counter claim of racism, ageism and classism. We've had laws against "hate speech" for many years now, but are we too keen to create whole new categories of "-isms" to which we can take offence? If morality rests on the ability to distinguish between groups and make judgements about their lifestyles, how do you distinguish between a legitimate verdict and an unjustifiable prejudice? Why is it acceptable to say 'It's good that the President is black' but not to say 'It's good that the next President will be white'? Why is the insult "stale, male and pale" OK, but it wouldn't be if you changed gender and race? Is this about defending the powerless against the powerful, or limiting people's rights to say what they think? Where do we draw the line between policing the basic principles of equal rights and mutual respect with a capacity to judge people by what lies in their heart?
Chaired by Michael Buerk with Anne McElvoy, Claire Fox, Giles Fraser and Matthew Taylor. Witnesses are Maya Goodfellow, Josh Howie, Peter Tatchell and Dr Joanna Williams.

WED 20:45 David Baddiel Tries to Understand (b07jywbn)
Series 2, The Cloud

After receiving suggestions of topics that merit explanation through social media, David Baddiel sets out to make sense of The Cloud (as in computing, rather than meteorology). David speaks to the head of IT for the Chartered Institute of Information Technology, and visits an IBM data centre as he tries to grapple with what this term actually means, before returning to explain it to the man who originally suggested he try to understand it.

Producer: Giles Edwards.

WED 21:00 Nature (b07jywbq)
Series 9, The Fen Raft Spider

Fen Raft Spiders as their name implies are water-loving spiders. They are also large and distinctive looking spiders with white, cream or yellow stripes along the sides of both the carapace and abdomen which contrast with their dark body. They were first discovered in the mid-1950s in Redgrave and Lopham Fen in Suffolk which today is one of the sites where Helen Smith, President of the British Arachnological Society and leader of the Fen Raft Spider Recovery Programme has been introducing these spiders after their populations declined as a result of degradation and loss of lowland aquatic habitat. The spiders are also found at on the Pevensey Levels in East Sussex and Crymlyn Bog near Swansea in South Wales. For this programme, Helen, who has a license to handle these spiders, very kindly agreed to collect a male and female Fen Raft Spider and bring them indoors in a tank so that wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson could not only get a really close look at these spiders, but also try and record their courtship behaviour. This is a complex and elaborate affair, which includes the males vibrating his front legs in arcs on the water surface. After mating, the female lays her eggs in an egg sac and spins a nursery web in which to protect them. The webs are usually spun on vegetation above the water's surface, but Helen also had one in tank so Chris was able to examine the tiny spiderlings which had hatched from the egg case. Back out on the fens, Chris also lowered a couple of underwater microphones (hydrophones) into a ditch and captured the extraordinary world of sound in which these creatures live as diving beetles, backswimmers and water boatman communicated to one another below the water surface. Producer Sarah Blunt.

WED 21:30 The Listening Project (b07jyvzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

WED 21:58 Weather (b07jqqwp)
The latest weather forecast.

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (b07jqqwr)
Change of Power in Downing Street

David Cameron says goodbye after six years at Number 10

Theresa May becomes Prime Minister - only the 2nd woman in UK political history

Boris Johnson becomes new Foreign Secretary

And the people of Coventry tell us what they want Mrs May to do about Brexit.

WED 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07jywck)
The Muse, Episode 8

When on a summer's day in 1967, Odelle Bastien climbs the steps of the Skelton gallery in London to take up a position as typist, she little realises how significantly her life is about to change. For there she meets the glamorous and enigmatic Marjorie Quick, who soon takes Odelle into her confidence and encourages her to pursue her dream of writing. But Odelle senses there is something that Quick is holding back, and when 'Rufina and the Lion', a lost Spanish masterpiece is brought to the gallery, Odelle begins to suspect that the mystery behind the painting's origins and her mentor's secrecy may be somehow connected.

The truth about 'Rufina and the Lion' lies in 1936 and a large house in rural Spain, where Olive Schloss, the daughter of renowned art dealer Harold Schloss and his beautiful but fragile wife Sarah, is harbouring artistic ambitions of her own. When artist and revolutionary Isaac Robles and his half-sister Teresa come into their lives, passion, art, and politics collide, with explosive and devastating consequences for them all.

Weaving between events in 1967 and those of 1936, a powerful story of love, obsession, identity, authenticity and deception unfolds in this highly anticipated new novel from Jessie Burton, author of the best-selling The Miniaturist.

Written by Jessie Burton

Abridged by Doreen Estall

Read by Martina Laird

Produced by Heather Larmour.

WED 23:00 Expenses Only (b07jzxdj)
Advertising

Put away your P45, you're not going to need it - it's Expenses Only. Our two young interns Tim and Miranda face heated hot-seating, intense lunch runs and jingle-themed back-stabbing as they compete for the same internship in the acronym-obsessed world of advertising.

Expenses Only is a narrative sketch show by new writer Alex Lynch, centred around internships and the world of work experience.

In each episode, the show's two leading twenty-something protagonists, Tim (enthusiastic worker) and Miranda (jaded graduate), attempt to break into a different industry through a series of increasingly challenging placements.

The series is made up of an ensemble cast and is also tied together using linking sketches, signature ad-breaks and the Narrator who, with his deadpan delivery and wry commentary, guides us through the schadenfreude and chaos that unravels across an episode.

Recorded live at Bush Hall, London.

Creator / Writer: Alex Lynch
Additional material by Charlotte Michael
Director: Celia De Wolff
Executive Producer: Peter Hoare
A Pier production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:15 Bunk Bed (b07jzxdl)
Series 3, Episode 6

Everyone craves a place where their mind and body are not applied to a particular task. The nearest faraway place. Somewhere for drifting and lighting upon strange thoughts which don't have to be shooed into context, but which can be followed like balloons escaping onto the air. Late at night, in the dark and in a bunk bed, your tired mind can wander.

This is the nearest faraway place for Patrick Marber and Peter Curran. Here they try to get the heart of things in an entertainingly vague and indirect way. This is not the place for typical male banter. From under the bed clothes they play each other music, and archive of Angela Carter, ex-Prime Ministers, a Castrato singer, and an elephant playing the piano.

Work, family, literature, and their own badly-scuffed dreams are the funny, if warped conversational currency.

A Foghorn Company production for BBC Radio 4.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07jzxdn)
Susan Hulme reports from Westminster on David Cameron's last Prime Minister's Question Time. Also: MPs debate the Chilcot Report, Michael Gove makes perhaps his last appearance as Justice Secretary, and there's a warning that the decision to leave the EU is a body blow for the British steel industry. Editor: Rachel Byrne.


THURSDAY 14 JULY 2016

THU 00:00 Midnight News (b07jqr0n)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

THU 00:30 A Point of View (b07ldrbk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07jqr0q)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07jqr0s)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07jqr0v)
The latest shipping forecast.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (b07jqr0x)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07lg2w1)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church.

THU 05:45 Farming Today (b07jqr11)
Livestock worrying, Disease threat at agricultural shows

A new campaign to highlight the dangers of dogs to sheep and lambs is launched today. LEAD, Livestock Education and Dogs aims to explain to dog owners why their pets should be kept on a lead around livestock. We've had a chance to preview the video - it shows the reality of what dog attacks on sheep look like, and what effect an incident can have on both farmers and on dogs and their owners. We also speak to the North Wales Police's rural crime team to find out if current legislation is tough enough.

Viral haemorrhagic disease (VHD) is a highly infectious disease that affects wild and domestic rabbits. A recent outbreak means that the rabbit section of Agricultural shows across the country have been cancelled to prevent the spread of infection. We speak to chief vet at the Great Yorkshire Show, Andrew Schofield, about how they manage disease risk in Yorkshire.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03zrcnt)
Red-Throated Diver

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Kate Humble presents the red-throated diver. The eerie wails of a red-throated diver were supposed to foretell rain. In Shetland the red-throated diver is called the "rain goose" but anyone who knows the island knows that rain is never far away. Like all divers, red-throats are handsome birds with sharp bills, perfect for catching fish. In summer they have a rusty throat patch and zebra-stripes on the back of their neck but in winter they're mainly pearly grey and white.

THU 06:00 Today (b07k01bc)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 Defoe (b07k01bf)
Defoe: The Facts and the Fictions

Mark Lawson presents a documentary exploring the far-reaching influence of Daniel Defoe. Bookshops have separate sections for Fiction, Non-Fiction, Autobiography, Travel Writing, Journalism, Economics and Politics. But all of these different forms of writing were more or less created by one author - Daniel Defoe. Defoe also pioneered, three hundred years ago, what has become one of the most fashionable literary tactics of the 21st century: "faction", which blurs history and story.

Although now considered foundations of the realistic English novel, Defoe's Robinson Crusoe (1719) and Moll Flanders (1721) were initially published with only the names of their narrators on the cover, and were sold and bought as memoirs. Defoe's A Journal of the Plague Year (1722), an account of the bubonic epidemic, is still often read as reportage, but was "faction" based on extensive research. His book, A Tour Through the Whole Isles of Great Britain (1724), can be seen as one of the beginnings of travel writing and The Complete English Tradesman (1726) is one of the first business or economic texts. As the author of more than 500 pamphlets, Defoe is also a forefather of British journalism.

In the company of writers, biographers, critics, and cartoonists, Mark Lawson tells the story of the man who never stopped telling stories.

THU 09:45 A Point of View (b07lg2xj)
After the Vote, Strategic Shift

Peter Hennessy sees the UK's vote to leave the European Union as the biggest strategic shift in British history since the Second World War, rivalled only by the disposal of the British Empire. As a consequence, we need a serious national conversation using a new political vocabulary to tackle "multiple and overlapping anxieties".

"If we do hold that national conversation, rise to the level of events and draw on those wells of civility and tolerance, we may yet surprise ourselves - and the watching world - by the quality, the care and the foresight of what we do and what we say."

Producer: Sheila Cook.

THU 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07jqr17)
Listener Week: The Anchoress; Hand arthritis; Sheila Bownas; Sex offenders

The fourth link in the Listener Week "Chain" series is Catherine Davies, a Welsh singer-songwriter, nominated by the blogger and knitter Lara Clements who was inspired by Catherine's determination in the music industry. Her debut album Confessions Of A Romance Novelist includes epigraphs and a reading list.

A listener whose ex-husband was convicted for child sex offences wants to raise the issue of how little support there is when you're the parent trying to deal with the aftermath. Jenni speaks to Lisa Thornhill, a senior practitioner at the child protection charity Lucy Faithful and Zoe Fleetwood, a family lawyer.

Listener Chelsea tells how a little late-night online shopping led her to uncover the work of unknown designer Sheila Bownas, whose fabric and wallpaper designs brightened up post-war Britain. Seven years on, Rugby Art Gallery and Museum is exhibiting Sheila's work for the first time.

Osteoarthritis of the hands usually happens as part of nodal osteoarthritis (a form of osteoarthritis that runs in families) and mainly affects women after the menopause. Listener Linda Muller explains how the condition makes life difficult and Tonia Vincent, Professor of Musculoskeletal Biology at Oxford University talks about prevention and treatments.

Presenter: Jenni Murray.

THU 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07jyw9c)
Life Lines, Episode 4

By Al Smith

Carrie is an ambulance call handler. She never knows what the next emergency will be or the effect it might have on her.
And how can you help when precious resources can't be in two places at once.

Directed by Sally Avens.

THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (b07jqr1f)
Keep A Cool Head

Kate Adie introduces tales of true grit - and grace under pressure - from around the world. As the USA agonises over questions of policing, race and firearms, Barbara Plett Usher in Minnesota hears how little trust some protesters have in the future. As veteran reporter Jim Muir prepares to leave the BBC, he remembers first setting out for Lebanon in 1974. His beloved city of Beirut would soon be engulfed by war - a fate shared by much of the Middle East since then. Nicola Kelly talks to people in the so-called 'jihadi north' of Burkina Faso about the growing threats from militant groups which are affecting their lives and businesses. Tim Ecott is on the Faroe Islands, where there are more sheep than humans - but it's the birds which are the true owners of the landscape. And Heidi Fuller Love breaks out of the luxury-hotel bubble in the Maldives to attend a gathering in honour of a national hero: the sixteenth-century Sultan and sea captain who liberated these islands from the Portuguese empire.

THU 11:30 Breaking Bard (b07k01bn)
Episode 1

Fiona Lindsay listens in to the table talk of the actors and director as they begin work to bring Shakespeare's Othello from text to performance.

Fiona has spent years at the RSC working with actors and directors as they look afresh at the play texts to which we return again and again. What interests her is how new connections and insights are drawn from stories so well known that they have almost become national myths.

In the first in the series, Fiona takes her panel to The Brooksbank Schook in Elland, West Yorkshire, where students are hard at work bringing the play to life.

Her panel includes Carol Rutter, Professor of Drama and Shakespeare Studies at the University of Warwick, director and dramaturg Tom Cornford, and actors Jonjo O'Neill, fresh from a season at Shakespeare's Globe, and Karl Collins, a regular on Hollyoaks.

The panel is joined by a local audience as well as the students, and together they put the words from the page on their feet for the first time. They try out practical exercises to unearth new questions in order to see what surprising new connections they might be able to make about this tale of jealousy and masculinity.

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:00 News Summary (b07jqr1k)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 12:04 The Why Factor (b07k01bq)
Series 3, Drawing

Lucy Ash asks why we draw. Are some people simply more visual than others? And what do we reveal through our drawings?
Drawing is something we all do unselfconsciously as children before we learn to write. It is a form of expression that goes back 40,000 years and began on the walls of caves. But why do we draw? Is it to make our mark on the world, to decorate our surroundings, or is it a way of communicating with others when words fail us?
Lucy Ash talks to Stephen Wiltshire, world famous for his incredibly detailed pen and ink cityscapes; to David Hockney renowned for both his traditional draughtsmanship and his enthusiasm for new technology, and to Lizzie Ellis, who comes from a remote community in central Australia and draws with a stick, telling stories through her traditional form of Aboriginal women's art.

Presenter: Lucy Ash
Producer: Arlene Gregorius
Editor: Andrew Smith

First broadcast on the BBC World Service.

THU 12:15 You and Yours (b07jqr1m)
Ticket touts, Star Wars convention, Citroen

Today a new campaign group called Fan Fair Alliance is launched by big players in the music industry to tackle the problem of ticket touts. The manager of Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds and PJ Harvey tells You & Yours what the promoters and musicians are trying to do to stop so many tickets ending up on resale websites.

Sci-fi fans going to a Star Wars Convention this weekend are worried they've only bought a ticket which gives them the right to queue for a ticket to see the main events.

The boss of Citroen, Linda Jackson, talks about how she turned around the fortunes of the car manufacturer.

We continue our series looking at what legacy is left by the Olympics being hosted in your country. Today we report from Athens in Greece.

A Housing Association in Oldham is helping the NHS save money by speeding up the transfer of patients into accommodation to free up beds. The Housing Association hopes its idea will be adopted across the UK which it says will save the health service millions of pounds.

And a new law comes into force this month that stops companies selling replica furniture in the UK. One company is telling people who've already put in orders that they'll have to pick up their furniture from Ireland.

THU 12:57 Weather (b07jqr1p)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 13:00 World at One (b07jqr1t)
Analysis of news and current affairs.

THU 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07k01bv)
The East German Uprising

On June 17 1953, East German workers went on strike and demanded free elections. Within hours, Moscow ordered its tanks to crush the rebellion.

Bridget hears the story of that day, as experienced by a teenage boy, a young worker, a trainee lawyer, an English military driver - and a girl who was looking forward to her seventh birthday party.

With Hardy Firl, George Flint, Carla Ottmann, Joachim Rudolph, Alfred Wegewitz

Producers: Phil Tinline and Sabine Schereck.

THU 14:00 The Archers (b07jyw99)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Dangerous Visions (b046j8zp)
The Bee Maker

By Anita Sullivan

It's 2020 and the bees are nearly all gone. Human beings might be next.

Robotics expert, Deborah, builds artificial bees in order to help pollinate fruit trees across the world - real bees having been driven to the brink of extinction. But then a strange phenomenon strikes mankind - people start getting lost. It happens slowly, people lose their way, forget where they are. But before long society starts to crumble.

Deborah must fight her way across an apocalyptic Britain and find her way back home. But first she must remember where that is.

A dark and cautionary tale about our busy technology-filled lives.

Directed by James Robinson
A BBC Cymru Wales Production.

THU 15:00 Open Country (b07k01by)
The Dolphins of Cardigan Bay

Patrick Aryee travels to West Wales to meet the dolphin-watchers of New Quay, and to encounter some members of the largest group of bottlenose dolphins off the coast of the UK.

New Quay is home to the Cardigan Bay Marine Wildlife Centre, which was set up in 1996 by Steve Hartley, a former fisherman, because he wanted people to know about the amazing array of marine wildlife he saw from his fishing boat. Fishing trips turned into dolphin-watching trips, and now Steve takes researchers out regularly to monitor the marine wildlife. The Centre has become a hub of scientific research and is now part of the Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales. It's manned by volunteers and just a couple of paid scientific officers. Dolphins are a key part of the economy of the area, bringing tourists and visitors who hope to catch a glimpse of these charismatic animals from the harbour wall.

Patrick, a guest presenter on Open Country, has had a fascination for marine mammals since his childhood, when his parents took him to a safari park. But he's hoping to see dolphins in the wild for the first time. Another first is a chance for Patrick to try coasteering with Jethro Moore, who describes the activity as 'everything your mum told you never to do beside the sea'.

Producer...Mary Ward-Lowery.

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (b07jwt5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (b07jwt5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (b07k063f)
Ghostbusters Revisited

With Francine Stock.

The Comedians Cinema Club present their unique take on Ghostbusters.

Joshua Oppenheimer, the director of the award-winning and controversial documentary about Indonesian death squads , The Act Of Killing, reveals why he refuses to demonise mass murderers, and why he went undercover as an alien abductee for an expose of American militia.

Tim Robey and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh go head to head in the referendum that really matters - Watership Down or The Lion King: which is the better animated classic ?

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (b07jqr1y)
Dinosaur extinction, Neanderthals in Gibraltar, Music appreciation, A year of New Horizons

The dinosaurs met their end with a massive bang when, 66 million years ago, a 6 mile-wide rock crashed into the Gulf of Mexico. This was bad news for the dinosaurs, and consequently good news for the mammals left behind. Thomas Halliday is a palaeontologist, who specialises on the rise of the mammals, and his new work unpicks what happened to survivors after 75% of the species on earth died.

The Neanderthals were found in Gibraltar back in 1848. Ever since then, teams have been exploring the caves systems on that rocky outcrop of Europe. It's known as Neanderthal City and researchers think it was home to the very last of these people, some 30,000 years ago. BBC science reporter Melissa Hogenboom has just returned from Gibraltar and talks to Adam about the recent findings of abstract art, which suggest that Neanderthals are much more like us than previously thought.

We generally find the combination of notes in a consonant chord more pleasant to our ears than a dissonant one. The question is whether that reaction is learnt or simply part of our biology. It's a tricky thing to test because music is culturally ubiquitous. Neuroscientist Josh McDermott has found a way around this, by playing those tunes to members of a very remote Bolivian tribe - the Tsimane - and gauging their reactions.

One year on since the New Horizons probe zoomed past Pluto, Kathy Olkin, one of the chief scientists behind the mission talks to Adam about how the team have dealt with the new data. Noah Hammond from Brown University explains how he has used photographic data from New Horizons to examine the cracks in the surface of Pluto, and has suggested how they came to be.

Presenter: Adam Rutherford

Producer: Adrian Washbourne.

THU 17:00 PM (b07jqr20)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

THU 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07jqr22)
14/07/16 Theresa May is completing her first cabinet

The prime minister has radically overhauled the Conservative front-bench.

THU 18:30 The Tim Vine Chat Show (b07k08xb)
Episode 3

A new show from the internationally acclaimed master of the one-liner Tim Vine sees Tim interview members of his live audience as he embarks on a quest to hear the life stories of the Great British public while simultaneously showcasing his trademark gleeful wordplay and preposterous songs.

This week, a job interview for Tim and an encounter with an anaconda.

Producer: Richard Morris
A BBC Studios Production.

THU 19:00 The Archers (b07k01c6)
BBC Radio 4 FM

Update: 2016-28-153

Please note change(s) to the Week 28 schedule on the following date(s):

Ran on: 15/07/2016
Ran at: 10:16:20
Thursday 14:07:2016
Friday 15:07:2016
Proteus errata are dated using 06:00 to 05:59 broadcast days - changes for timeslots between 00:00 and 05:59 refer to the next calendar day.

Thursday 14:07:2016

Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Amend19:02:0019:02:00The ArchersThe Archers
Short Desc
Alistair needs Fallon's help.
Medium Desc
Alistair needs Fallon's help, and Carol shares her view of Rob.
Long Desc
At The Bull Alistair chats to Kenton who fills him in on Beverley Drains; Jolene and Wayne have gone to her funeral today. Fallon is covering for them both. Kenton mentions that Shula has seemed a bit subdued lately. Alistair says Dan coming home tomorrow should perk her up. Harrison arrives and Alistair asks him to take on the cricket captaincy but Harrison says he's not interested. Alistair asks Fallon if she can help persuade him.

Carol brings Anna a cup of coffee, Anna tells her off for carrying hot liquid upstairs with one arm in a cast and then apologises. Carol is glad Anna's continuing to represent Helen; she admires her for sticking with it. Later, when Anna takes a break, she talks guardedly about continuing with Helen's case. Carol promises not to breathe a word.

Fallon talks to Harrison about becoming cricket team's captain. She thinks he's the man to turn around Ambridge's current poor performance. Harrison says he'll only do it if Fallon puts on the teas, likening them to Alistair and Shula. Fallon complains that she has a tearoom to run but agrees to do it as long it doesn't clash with a paying job.
Repeated on15:07:2016 14:02:00
Friday 15:07:2016

Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Amend10:02:0010:02:00Woman's HourWoman's HourListener Week. The Hayes Sisters; Huntington's Disease. Coping with the school holidays on a low income.
Short Desc
Listener Week; The Hayes Sisters on making time for music alongside careers and family.
Medium Desc
Musicians The Hayes Sisters. Spotlight on Huntington's Disease. Coping with the school holidays if you're on a low income. And the final link in our listener week Chain.
Long Desc
On the final day of Listener Week; Jen, Cath and Angela, The Hayes Sisters - a musical trio from Manchester - talk about making time for music alongside their full time careers and families. Susan Fletcher highlights Huntington's disease and the impact it's had on her and her family's life alongside Consultant neurologist and Huntington's disease researcher Ed Wild. Val Barron tells us why school holidays can be stressful for some families on low incomes. She's a development worker for Communities Together Durham and joins Jenni alongside Sara Brysons a policy advisor at Children North East to look at what help's available. Plus the work of Emma Bannister and her award winning PMS Garden. And the last link in Listener Week's "Chain," Hannah Daisy, chosen by the musician Catherine Anne Davies, who was inspired by her work in mental health and her creativity in addressing anxiety. And we hear from some of the far flung places you're tuning in to listen to the programme.

Presenter Jenni Murray
Producer Beverley Purcell

Guest; Hannah Daisy
Guest; The Hayes Sisters - Jen, Cath and Angela.
Guest; Sara Bryson
Gueat; Val Barron.
PresenterJENNI MURRAY
Billed TimeOn-air TimeProg. TitleTX TitleEp. Title
Amend14:02:0014:02:00The ArchersThe Archers
Short Desc
Alistair needs Fallon's help.
Medium Desc
Alistair needs Fallon's help, and Carol shares her view of Rob.
Long Desc
At The Bull Alistair chats to Kenton who fills him in on Beverley Drains; Jolene and Wayne have gone to her funeral today. Fallon is covering for them both. Kenton mentions that Shula has seemed a bit subdued lately. Alistair says Dan coming home tomorrow should perk her up. Harrison arrives and Alistair asks him to take on the cricket captaincy but Harrison says he's not interested. Alistair asks Fallon if she can help persuade him.

Carol brings Anna a cup of coffee, Anna tells her off for carrying hot liquid upstairs with one arm in a cast and then apologises. Carol is glad Anna's continuing to represent Helen; she admires her for sticking with it. Later, when Anna takes a break, she talks guardedly about continuing with Helen's case. Carol promises not to breathe a word.

Fallon talks to Harrison about becoming cricket team's captain. She thinks he's the man to turn around Ambridge's current poor performance. Harrison says he'll only do it if Fallon puts on the teas, likening them to Alistair and Shula. Fallon complains that she has a tearoom to run but agrees to do it as long it doesn't clash with a paying job.

THU 19:15 Front Row (b07jqr24)
The Secret Agent; Sol Gabetta, Black Masculinity

The BAFTA-winning writer Tony Marchant has adapted Joseph Conrad's 1907 novel The Secret Agent into a three-part TV drama, starring Toby Jones and Vicky McClure. He talks adapting the novel's prescient story of homegrown terrorism, surveillance and betrayal.

Samira talks to Argentinian cellist Sol Gabetta, who opens the BBC Proms on Friday with the Elgar Cello Concerto.

And a new photography exhibition, Made You Look: Dandyism and Black Masculinity, explores the identity of the black dandy in studio and street photography around the world. The group exhibition's curator Ekow Eshun, discusses the photographers and images which capture the dress and flamboyance of black individuals from New York to Bamako.

THU 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07jyw9c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (b07k08xd)
Why Did People Vote Leave?

Why did so many people in the UK vote to Leave the EU? David Aaronovitch talks to residents in the pro-Leave city of Wakefield and finds out from experts why personal prosperity was a poor indicator of referendum voting intention.

Guests include:

Stian Westlake, Executive Director of Policy and Research, NEST, and author of 'The Intangible Economy' with Jonathan Haskel
Ben Shimshon, BritainThinks, market research and communications consultancy
Molly Crockett, Associate Professor of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford.

Producer: Joe Kent
Researchers: Alex Burton and Kirsteen Knight.

THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (b07k08xg)
Brave or Naive?

Is escaping the rat race always a good idea? Many people dream of giving up the day job to start their own business - and we often hear about the success stories. But does everyone have what it takes? Evan Davis and guests compare the dream and the reality.

GUESTS:

Luke Johnson, Entrepreneur and Founder of Risk Capital Partners

Paula Fry, former Director, Fashion Seeker UK

Sarah Meredith, Sole Trader, Rock Cakes

Deirdre Critchley, former Director, Jammy Cow

Producer: Elizabeth Cassin.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (b07jqr1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 Defoe (b07k01bf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 21:58 Weather (b07jqr26)
The latest weather forecast.

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (b07jqr28)
May Completes 'Day of the Long Knives'

We assess Theresa May's cabinet reshuffle - dubbed 'the day of the long knives' - with Jenni Russell & Andrew Gimson, and consider the legacy of sacked Justice Secretary Michael Gove with Nick Hardwick, former Chief Inspector of Prisons. Plus - Donald Trump's new running mate in the US Presidential Elections, and why pedal power alone wasn't enough for Tour De France leader, Chris Froome.
Photo: Theresa May arrives at No 10 Downing Street.
Credit: EPA/WILL OLIVER.

THU 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07k08xj)
The Muse, Episode 9

When on a summer's day in 1967, Odelle Bastien climbs the steps of the Skelton gallery in London to take up a position as typist, she little realises how significantly her life is about to change. For there she meets the glamorous and enigmatic Marjorie Quick, who soon takes Odelle into her confidence and encourages her to pursue her dream of writing. But Odelle senses there is something that Quick is holding back, and when 'Rufina and the Lion', a lost Spanish masterpiece is brought to the gallery, Odelle begins to suspect that the mystery behind the painting's origins and her mentor's secrecy may be somehow connected.

The truth about 'Rufina and the Lion' lies in 1936 and a large house in rural Spain, where Olive Schloss, the daughter of renowned art dealer Harold Schloss and his beautiful but fragile wife Sarah, is harbouring artistic ambitions of her own. When artist and revolutionary Isaac Robles and his half-sister Teresa come into their lives, passion, art, and politics collide, with explosive and devastating consequences for them all.

Weaving between events in 1967 and those of 1936, a powerful story of love, obsession, identity, authenticity and deception unfolds in this highly anticipated new novel from Jessie Burton, author of the best-selling The Miniaturist.

Written by Jessie Burton

Abridged by Doreen Estall

Read by Jessica Raine

Produced by Heather Larmour.

THU 23:00 Daphne Sounds Expensive (b07k0dfn)
Malaysia

This week the gang heads off to Malaysia to find Phil's legendary criminal uncle, Pak Belang.

Join critically-acclaimed sketch trio, Daphne, as they pull out all the stops in a dazzling array of peculiar characters, whacky scenarios, dodgy remarks, curious observations, minor altercations and major peacemaking - served on a bed of catchy little numbers with a live nine-piece band.

Written by and starring: Jason Forbes, Phil Wang & George Fouracres

Featuring Sir Willard White, Emma Sidi & David Elms

Original music composed by Jeff Carpenter

Musical Director: Freddie Tapner

Piano: Freddie Tapner
Drums: Ben Hartley
Bass: Rob Grist
Percussion: Ben Burton
Trumpet: Michael Maddocks
Tenor Sax: Greg Sterland
Trombone: Elliot Pooley
Violin: Hannah Bell
Cello: Nick Squires

The Production Coordinator was Hayley Sterling

It was produced by Matt Stronge

It was a BBC Studios production.

THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07k0dfq)
Sean Curran reports from Westminster as MPs react to Theresa May's cabinet reshuffle and raise concerns over recent threats of violence, while peers call for action on hate crimes.
The Commons continues its debate on the Chilcot report on the invasion of Iraq and the House of Lords hears renewed calls for EU nationals to be given the right to remain in the UK.


FRIDAY 15 JULY 2016

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (b07jqr44)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4. Followed by Weather.

FRI 00:30 A Point of View (b07lg2xj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (b07jqr46)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (b07jqr48)
BBC Radio 4 joins the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (b07jqr4b)
The latest shipping forecast.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (b07jqr4d)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (b07k77pc)
A spiritual comment and prayer to begin the day with His Grace Bishop Angaelos, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church.

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (b07jqr4g)
Reactions on Andrea Leadsom's appointment as Secretary of State for Defra, plus the Great Yorkshire Show

Andrea Leadsom is to become the new Secretary of State of DEFRA, the Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. She's a Brexiteer and has a background in the financial sector. She's already made a commitment to maintain farming subsidies in the near future, but what will her plan for the future of British farming hold? For the environmental and farming perspective we speak to Matt Shardlow from Buglife and Meurig Raymond, President of the NFU.

There's been an alleged incident of cheating at the Royal Yorkshire Show - allegedly a competitor inflated his prize Jersey cows' udders with gas and then glued up the teats to stop milk or gas leaking out. It's because judges award marks for large, symmetrical udders, as they are seen as an indication of the animal's milk-producing capacity. We speak to show director Charles Mills about the affair.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b0378xxk)
Golden Eagle

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Michaela Strachan presents the golden eagle. Golden Eagles are magisterial birds. With a wingspan of over two metres their displays are dramatic affairs involving spectacular aerobatics. They can dive upon their quarry at speeds of more than 240 kilometres per hour, using their sharp talons to snatch up their prey.

FRI 06:00 Today (b07k88qx)
Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (b07jwt5n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:15 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 A Point of View (b07lpfdj)
After the Vote, Brexit and our cultural identity

The historian Mary Beard presents the last in the series in which some of Britain's leading thinkers give their own very personal view of "Brexit".

Mary Beard asks whether the referendum result will change our cultural identity.

And as she sits at a David Gilmour concert in the ancient amphitheatre at Pompeii, Mary reflects on the "New Europe that we British seem to be about to lose".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

FRI 10:00 Woman's Hour (b07jqr4j)
Listener Week: How creative things like nail art can help overcome anxiety

The last link in our Listener Week "Chain," Hannah Daisy, chosen by the musician Catherine Anne Davies, who was inspired by her work in mental health and her creativity in addressing anxiety. Jen, Cath and Angela, The Hayes Sisters - a musical trio from Manchester - talk about making time for music alongside their full time careers and families. Susan Fletcher highlights Huntington's disease and the impact it's had on her and her family's life alongside Consultant neurologist and Huntington's disease researcher Ed Wild. Val Barron tells us why school holidays can be stressful for some families on low incomes. She's a development worker for Communities Together Durham and joins Jenni alongside Sara Brysons a policy advisor at Children North East to look at what help's available. Plus the work of Emma Bannister and her award winning PMS Garden.

Presenter Jenni Murray
Producer Beverley Purcell
Guest; Hannah Daisy
Guest; The Hayes Sisters - Jen, Cath and Angela.
Guest; Sara Bryson
Gueat; Val Barron.

FRI 10:45 15 Minute Drama (b07k0k4k)
Life Lines, Episode 5

By Al Smith

Carrie is an ambulance call handler. She never knows what the next emergency will be or the effect it might have on her and her relationships.

Directed by Sally Avens.

FRI 11:00 Farewell Doctor Finlay (b07k0k4m)
Episode 2

Dr Margaret McCartney, along with medical historians and GPs, tells the story of general practice from the troubled early years of the NHS to the still-troubled present day.

The NHS was a huge improvement for the general population, for hospitals and hospital doctors. But it was rather different for GPs as their private fees disappeared and their workload multiplied with all the chronic disease that had previously gone untreated. General practice was under-funded and under-loved. Scathing reports of dingy, ill-equipped surgeries, along with repeated bouts of GP unrest, finally brought about the Family Doctors Charter in 1966, leading to a much better period of subsidised health centres and staffing.

Modernisation came thick and fast from the late 1980s, with some GPs controversially given budgets to choose services for their patients. Relaxation of the "out of hours" obligation saw practices forming co-operatives to handle evening and weekend calls and, from 2004, the responsibility for providing 24 hour care was removed from GPs entirely.

But unrest has continued, with many training places unfilled, GP posts vacant, and some practices closing altogether. The programme explores how the profession evolved into its present state.

Presented by Dr Margaret McCartney
Produced by Mike Hally

A Square Dog Radio production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 11:30 John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme (b04l3clb)
Series 4, Episode 1

John Finnemore, the writer and star of Cabin Pressure, regular guest on The Now Show and popper-upper in things like Miranda, records a fourth series of his hit sketch show.

In this repeat this is the fifth episode of the brand-new series which sees John create an innovative teaching aid; eavesdrop on two guards who really should be paying more attention; and, well, since you ask him for a tale of honour satisfied, he does have one such sketch.

The first series of John Finnemore's Souvenir Programme was described as "sparklingly clever" by The Daily Telegraph and "one of the most consistently funny sketch shows for quite some time" by The Guardian. The second series won Best Radio Comedy at both the Chortle and Comedy.co.uk awards, and was nominated for a Radio Academy award. The third series actually won a Radio Academy award.

In this fourth series, John has written more sketches, like the sketches from the other series. Not so much like them that they feel stale and repetitious; but on the other hand not so different that it feels like a misguided attempt to completely change the show. Quite like the old sketches, in other words, but about different things and with different jokes. (Although it's a pretty safe bet some of them will involve talking animals.)

Written by and starring ... John Finnemore
Also featuring ... Margaret Cabourn-Smith, Simon Kane, Lawry Lewin and Carrie Quinlan.
Original music by ... Susannah Pearse & Sally Stares.
Producer ... Ed Morrish
A BBC Studios Production.

FRI 12:00 News Summary (b07jqr4q)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 12:04 The Why Factor (b07k0k4p)
Series 3, Cycling

The bicycle - and cycling - started out as somewhat of a faddish leisure pursuit, largely the preserve of middle-aged and wealthy men. Yet it quickly became the world's most popular means of transport and remains so to this day. So what lies behind its mass appeal?
Author and life-long cyclist Rob Penn, helps us chart the cultural and social impact of the bicycle. From helping to widen the human gene pool to blazing a trail for the women's movement.

Presenter:Mike Williams
Producer:Rose de Larrabeiti
Editor:Andrew Smith

The Why Factor is broadcast weekly on the BBC World Service.

FRI 12:15 You and Yours (b07jqr4v)
Cancer funding, VW emissions, Beer names

New research suggests the Cancer Drugs Fund, which decides who can have expensive treatment which is outside the normal NHS budget constraints in England, isn't working as well as it could. We ask if cancer treatment is being given too much attention - at the expense of other life-saving medications.

The Boss of Next, a prominent Brexiteer in the run-up to the EU referendum, tells us what he hopes will happen next now we have voted to leave.

MPs are calling on the Government to get tough with Volkswagen in the wake of the emissions scandal, claiming consumers are being let down by both the car maker and UK officials.

Is Cannicross, a new sport where you go out for a run harnessed to your dog, the answer for both fat pooches and their owners.

We find out why online deals for model boats aren't floating the boats of many model enthusiasts.

And craft beer makers in the US are coming to blows about names for their brews. Apparently they are struggling for clever titles using a pun on the word HOP - and have asked You and Yours listeners for help.

FRI 12:57 Weather (b07jqr51)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 13:00 World at One (b07jqr53)
Eight four people have been killed in Nice as a lorry ploughed through a crowd celebrating Bastille day - the French President Francois Hollande says it was an act of terrorism.
We have the latest from the scene, ask who the killer was and why France has become such a target for extremists.
We hear from a senior French politician who helped write a report calling French security a glaring incomprehensible failure.
Theresa May makes her first official visit as PM - to Edinburgh to tell Scotland's First Minister that there will be no second referendum on the country staying in the UK.
And that reshuffle - brutally cynical or common sense?

FRI 13:45 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07k0k4r)
The Iran Coup

In a series tracing the decisive moments in the early years of the Cold War, Bridget Kendall hears from three people who witnessed the fall of Mohammad Mossadegh in Iran in 1953.

Featuring Farhad Diba, Stephen Langlie and Homa Sarshar

Producer: Martin Williams.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (b07k01c6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Afternoon Drama (b047c9zz)
A Hospital Odyssey

Gwyneth Lewis's new drama is a contemporary version of The Odyssey set in an NHS Hospital. A woman sets off on a journey to save her husband's life. As she hears the dreaded diagnosis, cancer, the hospital lurches and her fear sets her on a quest to save him. As Maris confronts her deepest fears her world slides into science-fiction. She must face dark creatures and tests of her resolve - a dragon in the bowels of the hospital, a Microbes' Ball, and The Cancer Mother herself.

Starring Alexandra Roach (who played the young Margaret Thatcher to Meryl Streep's Iron Lady) as Maris, and Alex Beckett (Twenty Twelve's Jubilympic creative Barney) as Wilson the talking dog.

Gwyneth Lewis was the first Poet Laureate of Wales. She wrote her original poem A Hospital Odyssey drawing on very personal experience after her husband was diagnosed with cancer.

Written and dramatised by Gwyneth Lewis
Music and sound design by Gary C. Newman
Produced and directed by Allegra McIlroy.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners' Question Time (b07k0k4w)
Summer Garden Party, Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh 1

Eric Robson presents the show from the GQT Summer Garden Party at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. Joining him on the panel are Bob Flowerdew, Pippa Greenwood and Bunny Guinness.

Produced by Darby Dorras
Assistant producer Hannah Newton

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 15:45 An American Fridge (b07k0k4y)
by Mick Herron
A man is tempted by a luxury apartment complete with top-of-the-range kitchen. But there will be a heavy price to pay for entry to this glamorous new life.
Read by Alasdair Hankinson
Producer Eilidh McCreadie

Mick Herron is the author of the SLOUGH HOUSE series of spy novels. He won the CWA's Gold Dagger award for best crime novel of the year in 2013 and is on the longlist for this year's prize.

FRI 16:00 Last Word (b07k0k50)
Sydney Schanberg, Beatrice de Cardi, Lord Evans of Temple Guiting, Alvin Toffler, Jimmy Gilbert

Matthew Bannister on

The American journalist Sydney Schanberg who won the Pulitzer prize for his reporting on Cambodia. His story was turned into the film "The Killing Fields".

The archaeologist Beatrice de Cardi, once described as "a cross between Miss Marple and Indiana Jones".

The publisher Lord Evans of Temple Guiting, who, as Matthew Evans, led Faber and Faber to great success. His friend Melvyn Bragg pays tribute.

The futurist Alvin Toffler best known for his 1970 book "Future Shock".

And the comedy producer Jimmy Gilbert who brought us "The Frost Report", "Last of the Summer Wine" and "Fawlty Towers".

Producer: Dianne McGregor.

FRI 16:30 Feedback (b07k0k52)
Is it right to refer to a politician using just their first name? It's a question posed by some Feedback listeners after reporters referred to the new Foreign Secretary as simply "Boris". They are asking why he appears to be an exception to the rule and, more pertinently, if this note of familiarity softens the tone of interviews.

And are this year's Proms getting a shake-up? Having celebrated its 120th anniversary last year, the Proms have been given a new Director - David Pickard. As the 2016 season gets underway this weekend, what is his vision for the Proms? The Director speaks to Roger Bolton from the Royal Albert Hall, discussing the use of unexpected locations, whether this year will be less London-centric and how much is on offer for younger listeners.

Last week Feedback considered how the continued turmoil of Brexit was affecting comedy output - this week it's a look at the business unit. As the markets and the pound have been rocked by the out vote, listener Ian Callaghan goes behind-the-scenes of the BBC's Business and Economics unit to discover how they're responding.

Did you keep a diary during your teenage years? If so, would you be willing to share your adolescent highs and lows with a listening audience? That's exactly what Radio 4 comedy My Teenage Diary asks of its celebrity guests. But some listeners question the authenticity of the diaries, asking how likely it was that they were both preserved and contain fitting punchlines for a radio comedy. The producer, Harriet Jaine, and one of the guest on the latest series, Samira Ahmed, discuss how the programme is put together.

Produced by Kate Dixon
A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.

FRI 16:55 The Listening Project (b07k7cnn)
Dermot and Sinead - Access for All

Fi Glover with a pair who have been friends since primary school and celebrate the fact that Dermot has never let his disability get in the way, even in the face of bigotry. Another conversation in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.

FRI 17:00 PM (b07jqr5h)
Eddie Mair with interviews, context and analysis.

FRI 18:00 Six O'Clock News (b07jqr5m)
Three days of national mourning declared in France, after the deadly attacks in Nice.

FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (b07k0k56)
Series 16, Episode 5

It's a momentous week for Theresa May as she makes her first appearance on Dead Ringers as Prime Minister.

Ministers sacked, the Labour party in meltdown, Brexit fears remain unabated this is a fabulous time for Laura Kuenssberg, Andrew Neil, Robert Peston, Jon Snow, Andrew Marr, Kirsty Wark , Hugh Edwards, all feeding off the trough of political failure.

Starring: Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens and Lewis Macleod.

Written by: Nev Fountain & Tom Jamieson, Laurence Howarth, Ed Amsden & Tom Coles, James Bugg, Laura Major, Sarah Campbell, Max Davies, Jack Bernhardt, Liam Beirne, Alex Harvey and Sara Gibbs.

Produced and created by Bill Dare.
BBC Studios Production.

FRI 19:00 The Archers (b07k0k58)
Pip spots an opportunity, and Henry must do his duty.

FRI 19:15 Front Row (b07jqr60)
Alistair Beaton, Marcus Harvey, Facing the World, Someone Knows My Name

Fracked! Or: Please don't use the F-word is a comedy in Chichester about shale extraction. Playwright Alistair Beaton explains how he keeps the play topical in times of fast political change, and how he cast actor James Bolam when he met him demonstrating against a potential fracking site in Sussex.

The art of the self-portrait - why do artists portray themselves? From Rembrandt's unflinching treatment of his ageing reflection to Ai Weiwei's politically-charged use of social media, a new exhibition at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh sets out to answer that question. Moira Jeffrey reviews Facing the World.

Someone Knows My Name is a Canadian historical drama which tells the true story of a West African girl who campaigns for her freedom after she is abducted into slavery in South Carolina. Kevin Le Gendre reviews this TV adaptation.

Marcus Harvey first attracted public attention as a YBA with his portrait of the child killer Myra Hindley, created from a small child's handprints. Protestors picketed the Royal Academy when it went on show as part of Sensation in 1997. Harvey discusses new exhibition Inselaffe at Jerwood Gallery in Hastings, which explores what it means to be British.

Presenter: Tom Sutcliffe
Producer: Angie Nehring.

FRI 19:45 15 Minute Drama (b07k0k4k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:45 today]

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (b07k0m7y)
Charles Clarke, Paul Goodman, Lord Maude, Barbara Ntumy

Jonathan Dimbleby presents political debate and discussion from Brentwood School in Essex, with a panel including the former Home Secretary Charles Clarke, the Executive Editor of the political website ConservativeHome Paul Goodman, former Trade Minister and Minister to the Cabinet Office Lord Maude of Horsham, and the Momentum activist Barbara Ntumy.

Topics discussed include: French truck attack, the election of Theresa May as Prime Minister, Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary, the Labour Party leadership election.

Producer: Lisa Jenkinson.

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (b07k0m80)
Facts Not Opinions

AL Kennedy ponders the importance of facts... in a world dominated by opinion.

"The Chilcot report highlights how a war can conjure the demons it promised to suppress", she writes "because facts were dodged or massaged and fantasy outcomes were taken as certainties".

While facts may be grim, "avoiding them puts us all at increased risk".

Producer: Adele Armstrong.

FRI 21:00 Cold War: Stories from the Big Freeze (b07k0m82)
Omnibus 2

Bridget Kendall tells the stories of four crucial episodes from the early Cold War through the memories of those who were there, in an omnibus edition of episodes from this week's programmes in Radio 4's Cold War series.

The Korean War was when the Cold War turned hot - and tore thousands of families apart. Bridget hears three such stories: of separation, regret, and a remarkable rescue.

She hears from three people whose parents were targets of the 1950s Red Scare - with tales of persecution, hearsay evidence, FBI investigation and going underground.

Bridget tells the story of the development of the hydrogen bomb.

On June 17 1953, East German workers went on strike and demanded free elections. Bridget tells the forgotten story of the first anti-communist revolt of the Cold War.

Producers: Martin Williams, Phil Tinline, Sabine Schereck.

FRI 21:58 Weather (b07jqr6d)
The latest weather forecast.

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (b07jqr6l)
Army takes control of Turkey

The aftermath of Nice terror attacks and the military tries to seize power in Turkey.

FRI 22:45 Book at Bedtime (b07k0m84)
The Muse, Episode 10

When on a summer's day in 1967, Odelle Bastien climbs the steps of the Skelton gallery in London to take up a position as typist, she little realises how significantly her life is about to change. For there she meets the glamorous and enigmatic Marjorie Quick, who soon takes Odelle into her confidence and encourages her to pursue her dream of writing. But Odelle senses there is something that Quick is holding back, and when 'Rufina and the Lion', a lost Spanish masterpiece is brought to the gallery, Odelle begins to suspect that the mystery behind the painting's origins and her mentor's secrecy may be somehow connected.

The truth about 'Rufina and the Lion' lies in 1936 and a large house in rural Spain, where Olive Schloss, the daughter of renowned art dealer Harold Schloss and his beautiful but fragile wife Sarah, is harbouring artistic ambitions of her own. When artist and revolutionary Isaac Robles and his half-sister Teresa come into their lives, passion, art, and politics collide, with explosive and devastating consequences for them all.

Weaving between events in 1967 and those of 1936, a powerful story of love, obsession, identity, authenticity and deception unfolds in this highly anticipated new novel from Jessie Burton, author of the best-selling The Miniaturist.

Written by Jessie Burton

Abridged by Doreen Estall

Read by Martina Laird

Read by Jessica Raine

Produced by Heather Larmour.

FRI 23:00 A Good Read (b07jysdx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (b07k7861)
Mark D'Arcy reports from Westminster.

FRI 23:55 The Listening Project (b07k0k54)
Kay and Rachel - A Musical Friendship

Fi Glover introduces a conversation between professional string players who have supported each other through the most difficult family problems. Another in the series that proves it's surprising what you hear when you listen.

The Listening Project is a Radio 4 initiative that offers a snapshot of contemporary Britain in which people across the UK volunteer to have a conversation with someone close to them about a subject they've never discussed intimately before. The conversations are being gathered across the UK by teams of producers from local and national radio stations who facilitate each encounter. Every conversation - they're not BBC interviews, and that's an important difference - lasts up to an hour, and is then edited to extract the key moment of connection between the participants. Most of the unedited conversations are being archived by the British Library and used to build up a collection of voices capturing a unique portrait of the UK in the second decade of the millennium. You can learn more about The Listening Project by visiting bbc.co.uk/listeningproject

Producer: Marya Burgess.